History Literature / BrotherCadfael

16th Apr '16 2:53:35 PM Sharlee
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Added DiffLines:

* LockedOutOfTheLoop: Everyone in ''The Potter's Field'' goes out of their way to conceal what's going on from Donata, not wanting to burden her when she's so ill. [[spoiler: This turns out to be the ''worst'' course of action they could take, as she's the only one alive who knew the truth about the buried woman's death and could exonerate all the suspects in one go.]]
15th Apr '16 10:39:05 PM Sharlee
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* GoodShepherd: Many characters in the books, but special mention goes to Brother Mark, who despite his youth and hard upbringing freely administers to lepers and criminals, and in Cadfael's opinion has the makings of a saint. Both Abbots Heribert and Radulfus, Brother Paul who takes care of the novices, and the late Father Adam all show strong shades of this, and of course Cadfael himself works hard to bring in lambs led astray, in his own slightly unorthodox way.

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* GoodShepherd: Many characters in the books, but special mention goes to Brother Mark, who despite his youth and hard upbringing freely administers to lepers and criminals, and in Cadfael's opinion has the makings of a saint. Both Abbots Heribert and Radulfus, Brother Paul who takes care of the novices, and the late Father Adam all show strong shades of this, and of course Cadfael himself works hard to bring in lambs led astray, in his own slightly unorthodox way. Even Oswin shows signs of becoming this once he matures out of his carelessness and switches from being Cadfael's helper to manning the hospital.
13th Apr '16 4:28:39 PM PaulA
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* AerithAndBob: Due to era-appropriate naming conventions, many names still in use like Stephen, Robert or Constance appear alongside archaic ones like Fulke, Godith, and Torold. Also applies for many Welsh or Norse names that stand out among English ones, and some (including Cadfael's own) that were obscure even in the 12th century.
13th Apr '16 6:18:28 AM Sharlee
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* AerithAndBob: Due to era-appropriate naming conventions, many still-commonplace names like Stephen, Robert or Constance appear alongside archaic ones like Fulke, Godith, and Torold. Also applies for many Welsh or Norse names that stand out among English ones, and some (including Cadfael's own) that were obscure even in the 12th century.

to:

* AerithAndBob: Due to era-appropriate naming conventions, many still-commonplace names still in use like Stephen, Robert or Constance appear alongside archaic ones like Fulke, Godith, and Torold. Also applies for many Welsh or Norse names that stand out among English ones, and some (including Cadfael's own) that were obscure even in the 12th century.
13th Apr '16 6:17:55 AM Sharlee
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* AerithAndBob: Due to era-appropriate naming conventions, as still-commonplace names like Stephen, Robert or Constance appear alongside archaic ones like Fulke, Godith, and Torold. Also applies for many Welsh or Norse names that stand out among English ones, and some (including Cadfael's own) that were obscure even in the 12th century.

to:

* AerithAndBob: Due to era-appropriate naming conventions, as many still-commonplace names like Stephen, Robert or Constance appear alongside archaic ones like Fulke, Godith, and Torold. Also applies for many Welsh or Norse names that stand out among English ones, and some (including Cadfael's own) that were obscure even in the 12th century.
13th Apr '16 6:17:34 AM Sharlee
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Added DiffLines:

* AerithAndBob: Due to era-appropriate naming conventions, as still-commonplace names like Stephen, Robert or Constance appear alongside archaic ones like Fulke, Godith, and Torold. Also applies for many Welsh or Norse names that stand out among English ones, and some (including Cadfael's own) that were obscure even in the 12th century.
13th Apr '16 6:06:12 AM Sharlee
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* TheExoticDetective: Cadfael, as a cloistered monk in a time period before the development of many of the key elements of modern law and order, is not the usual sort of character to be a ficitional detective.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The first novel is mostly set far from Shrewsbury and is less of a straight-up mystery than a political drama with a murder in it.
* TheExoticDetective: Cadfael, as a cloistered monk in a time period before the development of many of the key elements of modern law and order, is not the usual sort of character to be a ficitional fictional detective.
31st Jan '16 6:49:28 PM PaulA
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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: The many potential interventions of [[GodWasMyCopilot Saint Winifred]], whom Cadfael helped discover in the first novel.
** Did [[spoiler: ''God'' actually aim the [[LaserGuidedKarma Karmic Laser]] at Father Ailnoth for his hypocritical, self-righteous cruelty that ruined lives and drove a young girl to suicide?]] Cynric the verger certainly seems to think so...

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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: MaybeMagicMaybeMundane:
**
The many potential interventions of [[GodWasMyCopilot Saint Winifred]], whom Cadfael helped discover in the first novel.
** Did [[spoiler: ''God'' actually aim the [[LaserGuidedKarma Karmic Laser]] at Father Ailnoth for his hypocritical, self-righteous cruelty that ruined lives and drove a young girl to suicide?]] suicide]]? Cynric the verger certainly seems to think so...so.
31st Jan '16 6:46:12 PM PaulA
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* TheExoticDetective: Cadfael, who's not exotic due to his ethnicity (he's Welsh-born, but so are at least a couple of other Shrewsbury monks), but because of his highly-travelled background as an ex-soldier and former Crusader. As the GoodShepherd, he seems to look on people of all nations, including his own, with a sort of detached, fond exasperation that's the closest he gets to patriotism.

to:

* TheExoticDetective: Cadfael, who's as a cloistered monk in a time period before the development of many of the key elements of modern law and order, is not exotic due to his ethnicity (he's Welsh-born, but so are at least a couple of other Shrewsbury monks), but because of his highly-travelled background as an ex-soldier and former Crusader. As the GoodShepherd, he seems to look on people of all nations, including his own, with a usual sort of detached, fond exasperation that's the closest he gets character to patriotism.be a ficitional detective.
31st Jan '16 4:02:11 PM Wolfstix
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* TheExoticDetective: Cadfael

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* TheExoticDetective: CadfaelCadfael, who's not exotic due to his ethnicity (he's Welsh-born, but so are at least a couple of other Shrewsbury monks), but because of his highly-travelled background as an ex-soldier and former Crusader. As the GoodShepherd, he seems to look on people of all nations, including his own, with a sort of detached, fond exasperation that's the closest he gets to patriotism.



* GoodShepherd: Abbot Heribert, in particular.

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* GoodShepherd: Abbot Heribert, Many characters in particular.the books, but special mention goes to Brother Mark, who despite his youth and hard upbringing freely administers to lepers and criminals, and in Cadfael's opinion has the makings of a saint. Both Abbots Heribert and Radulfus, Brother Paul who takes care of the novices, and the late Father Adam all show strong shades of this, and of course Cadfael himself works hard to bring in lambs led astray, in his own slightly unorthodox way.



* KarmicDeath

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* KarmicDeathKarmicDeath: Often, and also subverted, but played especially straight with [[spoiler: Father Ailnoth of "Raven in the Foregate"]] and also with [[spoiler: Godfrid Picard]].



** Did [[spoiler: ''God'' actually aim the [[LaserGuidedKarma Karmic Laser]] at Father Ailnoth for his hypocritical, self-righteous cruelty that ruined lives and drove a young girl to suicide?]] Cynric the verger certainly seems to think so...



* MurderByInaction: In ''Raven In The Foregate'', it turns out that the victim wasn't murdered (by being hit on the head and thrown in the river) at all. The man who was the prime suspect simply didn't help him when he slipped on some ice, hit a tree stump and slid down the riverbank unconscious.

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* MurderByInaction: In ''Raven In The Foregate'', it turns out that the victim wasn't murdered (by being hit on the head and thrown in the river) at all. The man who was witnesses his death, never previously a suspect, when it looks like another will be punished for the prime suspect deed, comes forward and confesses that he [[spoiler: simply didn't help him the victim when he slipped on some ice, hit a tree stump and slid down the riverbank unconscious.unconscious. Specifically, the [[AssholeVictim victim]] slipped while he was was beating an elderly woman with his stave for begging for her nurseling's life when he overbalanced; she fled the scene as he fell and never saw what happened to him.]]
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