History Literature / BrewstersMillions

13th Oct '17 4:53:45 PM jormis29
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** Zig-zagged: Louie, the avaricious parrot in the [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Warner Bros.]] cartoon "Dough Ray Me-Ow" (1948), is reading a book titled ''[[PunBasedTitle Rooster's Millions]]''.

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** Zig-zagged: Louie, the avaricious parrot in the [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Warner Bros.]] cartoon "Dough Ray Me-Ow" "WesternAnimation/DoughRayMeOw" (1948), is reading a book titled ''[[PunBasedTitle Rooster's Millions]]''.
18th Sep '17 3:55:56 AM Gouken20xx
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*** Effectively, the attorney knows full well the money is Monty's, no argument, so just lets the money be released to Brewster, THEN starts freezing assets. Monty likely left the money effectively in trust ANYWAY, but he still has proof, for the people he had to lie to, that he had a reason for his terrible attitude towards all the things they did for him.



* JustForTheHeliOfIt: In the 1985 film, Brewster flies his minor-league baseball team in on helicopters for a press event before an exhibition game between the team and the New York Yankees (which Brewster paid to make happen). The coach says the team will be tired after the trip--which was completely unnecessary because they're just over in New Jersey and could've gotten there faster on the bus--but Brewster says he did it to make an impression. He doesn't mention that he did it so he could spend more money to fulfill the challenge.

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* JustForTheHeliOfIt: In the 1985 film, Brewster flies his minor-league baseball team in on helicopters for a press event before an exhibition game between the team and the New York Yankees (which Brewster paid to make happen). The coach says the team will be tired after the trip--which was completely unnecessary because they're just over in New Jersey and could've gotten there faster on the bus--but Brewster says he did it to make an impression. He doesn't mention that he did it so he could spend more money to fulfill the challenge.[[note]]Mainly since he couldn't tell ANYONE why he was spending so callously...[[/note]]


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** It also never explains what happened to the law firm who were planning to effectively abuse the bet to steal the money.


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*** FridgeBrilliance kicks in there. Roundfield is likely planning some very expensive and very complex legal proceedings about irregularities in the challenge. But Monty was completely above the level. He walks away with 300 mil in the bank. The people still in the room... They'll not get ANY sleep.
15th Sep '17 9:19:00 PM Zeekay980
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** The problem is what would happen to the money. By allowing Brewster the chance to spend the $20,000 and fulfilling the will, Brewster gets the money immediately. If Roundfield had suspended the terms of the will to investigate charges of fraud, the money would continue to be held in trust until the ensuing criminal and civil investigations and trials are resolved which would likely last years. Even if Monty didn't beat the clock, Roundfield would have ordered an investigation into the fraud with the same result.
26th Aug '17 1:42:34 PM dieseldragons
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*** In the 1985 film, Brewster finds a loophole to purchasing assets: [[spoiler:he buys a rare stamp, then uses it to mail a letter]]. Since he used the stamp for its intended purpose, he technically didn't give it away or destroy it.

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*** In the 1985 film, Brewster finds a loophole to purchasing assets: [[spoiler:he buys a rare stamp, then uses it to mail a letter]]. Since he used the stamp for its intended purpose, he technically didn't give it away or destroy it. By this logic though, Brewster could have bought toys highly sought after, as they are mint-in-the-box, and un-boxed them. He can argue the fact that he's using the toy for its original purpose, [[ImmediateSelfContradiction doesn't negate the fact he's just wiped away its value as a collector's piece.]]
9th Aug '17 1:06:04 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* YouHave48Hours: The AnimatedAdaptation does this in the most literal sense. Punky Brewster and her friends must spend one million dollars in exactly 48 hours to win forty million dollars. The one limitation--besides not keeping anything--was that Punky and her friends couldn't buy anything for more than ten thousand dollars per unit. (Margaux's hopes of using the money to buy a villa? Ruined.)

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* YouHave48Hours: The AnimatedAdaptation does this in the most literal sense. Punky Brewster and her friends must spend one million dollars in exactly 48 hours to win forty million dollars. The one limitation--besides not keeping anything--was that Punky and her friends couldn't buy anything for more than ten thousand dollars per unit. (Margaux's hopes of using the money to buy a villa? Ruined.)
19th May '17 2:25:57 AM DoctorNemesis
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''Brewster's Millions'' is a novel written by George Barr [=McCutcheon=] in 1902, although it's arguably more well known for various adaptations that have been made since. The basic story revolves around Monty Brewster, an impoverished young man who inherits a substantial amount of money from a long-lost relative and also stands to further inherit a huge additional amount. (The total sum varies by time period; to fit the title, it's always in the millions. In the 1985 film, the original inheritance is $30 million and the full inheritance is $300 million.) But the inheritance [[OnOneCondition has a catch]]: Monty must ''waste'' the entire first amount in a limited period of time. He must end the challenge with no tangible assets whatsoever--and keep the arrangement a secret from everyone else. Monty wins the full inheritance if he pulls it off, but if he breaks any of the rules or fails to spend the first amount in full, he gets nothing.

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''Brewster's Millions'' is a novel written by George Barr [=McCutcheon=] in 1902, although it's arguably more well known for various adaptations that have been made since. The basic story revolves around Monty Brewster, an impoverished young man who inherits a substantial amount of money from a long-lost relative and also stands to further inherit a huge additional amount. (The total sum varies by time period; to fit the title, it's always in the millions.millions or more. In the 1985 film, the original inheritance is $30 million and the full inheritance is $300 million.) But the inheritance [[OnOneCondition has a catch]]: Monty must ''waste'' the entire first amount in a limited period of time. He must end the challenge with no tangible assets whatsoever--and keep the arrangement a secret from everyone else. Monty wins the full inheritance if he pulls it off, but if he breaks any of the rules or fails to spend the first amount in full, he gets nothing.
3rd Apr '17 6:21:08 PM nombretomado
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The novel has been adapted for the screen nine times: the most famous film version remains the 1985 film starring Creator/RichardPryor and Creator/JohnCandy; the story had been adapted before in 1921, 1926 (with the protagonist changed to a woman), 1935, 1945, and 1961; a Hindi version produced in 1988 is a shot-by-shot remake of the 1985 film; a Tamil version was produced in 1997; a play based on the story was created in 1906; and the novel's plot also formed the basis of an episode of ''[[PunkyBrewster It's Punky Brewster]]''.

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The novel has been adapted for the screen nine times: the most famous film version remains the 1985 film starring Creator/RichardPryor and Creator/JohnCandy; the story had been adapted before in 1921, 1926 (with the protagonist changed to a woman), 1935, 1945, and 1961; a Hindi version produced in 1988 is a shot-by-shot remake of the 1985 film; a Tamil version was produced in 1997; a play based on the story was created in 1906; and the novel's plot also formed the basis of an episode of ''[[PunkyBrewster ''[[Series/PunkyBrewster It's Punky Brewster]]''.



* AnimatedAdaptation: Although no direct adaptations of the story itself have been made, the ''[[PunkyBrewster It's Punky Brewster]]'' episode "Punky's Millions" essentially takes the basic plot of this story and runs with it (with a few alterations, such as the cash amount becoming a game-show prize rather than an inheritance).

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* AnimatedAdaptation: Although no direct adaptations of the story itself have been made, the ''[[PunkyBrewster ''[[Series/PunkyBrewster It's Punky Brewster]]'' episode "Punky's Millions" essentially takes the basic plot of this story and runs with it (with a few alterations, such as the cash amount becoming a game-show prize rather than an inheritance).
27th Jan '17 2:35:02 PM Taskmaster123
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**** One of the things that would have really screwed him over had he not caught on to it right away was revealed when he went to the bank to deposit the thirty million. The bank manager cheerfully tells him that the amount of the deposit means that Brewster qualifies for a "special interest rate" on his account. In other words, he would have been ''earning'' money just by depositing it in the bank. Brewster quickly turns down the interest and insists that ''he'' should be paying the bank for the privilege of depositing his money with them.
1st Oct '16 6:08:19 AM luiz4200
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* ThirteenIsUnlucky: In the 2016 film "[=Tô Ryca!=]", Brewster's counterpart tries to lose $ 100,000 on the roulette by placing that money on 13. [[GenderFlip She]] wins.
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