History Literature / BookOfEsther

11th Jun '18 3:30:15 PM RedScharlach
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One of the fun and more exciting stories in the Bible, the events are commemorated by the uproarious festival of [[UsefulNotes/JewishHolidays Purim]], and the (surprisingly short) book is read in the synagogue that day at an atypically-noisy session.

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One of the fun and more exciting stories in the Bible, the events are commemorated by the uproarious festival of [[UsefulNotes/JewishHolidays Purim]], and the (surprisingly short) book is read in the synagogue that day at an atypically-noisy atypically noisy session.



* ForgotICouldChangeTheRules: Averted. The king is maneuvered into creating a law that would allow all the Jews to be massacred by Haman. When Queen Esther reveals to the king that she's Jewish herself and exposes Haman's plot, the law authorizing pogrom cannot be annulled by even the king. However, there is nothing that prevents him from passing a new law [[LoopholeAbuse enabling the Jewish population to defend themselves]] with state support.

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* ForgotICouldChangeTheRules: Averted. The king is maneuvered into creating a law that would allow all the Jews to be massacred by Haman. When Queen Esther reveals to the king that she's Jewish herself and exposes Haman's plot, the law authorizing pogrom cannot be annulled by annulled, even by the king. However, there is nothing that prevents him from passing a new law [[LoopholeAbuse enabling the Jewish population to defend themselves]] with state support.



* InformedJudaism: Esther's Jewishness is a major plot point, but she apparently passed for a non-Jew well enough that her own husband was surprised to find out her ethnicity/religion. However, hiding her Jewishness from Xerxes before they get married is also part of Mordecai's plan. Possibly a more acurate example of this trope in the story would be the scholarly suggestion that Esther and Mordecai are secular Jews, rather than religious ones. See YMMV.

to:

* InformedJudaism: Esther's Jewishness is a major plot point, but she apparently passed for a non-Jew well enough that her own husband was surprised to find out her ethnicity/religion. However, hiding her Jewishness from Xerxes before they get married is also part of Mordecai's plan. Possibly a more acurate accurate example of this trope in the story would be the scholarly suggestion that Esther and Mordecai are secular Jews, rather than religious ones. See YMMV.



* JustSoStory: There is no evidence Persia ever had a Jewish queen, and its possible ''Esther'' was invented to explain the festival of Purim which already existed. No doubt, though, Xerxes was an actual Persian King, possibly the same one who is in ''Film/ThreeHundred'' as a matter of fact.

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* JustSoStory: There is no evidence Persia ever had a Jewish queen, and its it's possible ''Esther'' was invented to explain the festival of Purim which already existed. No doubt, though, Xerxes was an actual Persian King, possibly the same one who is in ''Film/ThreeHundred'' as a matter of fact.



* NotWhatItLooksLike: Haman throws himself at Queen Esther to beg for his life, ''another'' thing that backfires -- The king comes in at the wrong moment and assumes that Haman is trying to assault/rape her. This does not end well for Haman.

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* NotWhatItLooksLike: Haman throws himself at Queen Esther to beg for his life, ''another'' thing that backfires -- backfires. The king comes in at the wrong moment and assumes that Haman is trying to assault/rape her. This does not end well for Haman.



* ReplacementGoldfish: Xerxes holds a competition to find a beautiful wife for him to replace his divorced one Vashti.

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* ReplacementGoldfish: Xerxes holds a competition to find himself a beautiful wife for him to replace his divorced one Vashti.



* WorldsMostBeautifulWoman: Esther is determined to be by Xerxes.
* YouCanLeaveYourHatOn: A literal case, at least implied. The previous queen, Vashti, is asked to parade before Xerxes' drunken party guests wearing her royal crown-- the insinuation being, ''[[MsFanservice only]]'' her crown. Her refusal sets the story in motion.

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* WorldsMostBeautifulWoman: Esther is determined declared to be this by Xerxes.
* YouCanLeaveYourHatOn: A literal case, at least implied. The previous queen, Vashti, is asked to parade before Xerxes' drunken party guests wearing her royal crown-- crown -- the insinuation being, ''[[MsFanservice only]]'' her crown. Her refusal sets the story in motion.
15th May '18 8:26:10 AM Jeduthun
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* ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice: The gallows that Haman builds (and [[HoistByHisOwnPetard gets hanged on at the end]]) was most likely an impaling stake, per the usual Persian practice of the time. It was fifty cubits high-- abut 75 feet. Ouch.

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* ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice: The gallows that Haman builds (and [[HoistByHisOwnPetard gets hanged on at the end]]) was most likely an impaling stake, per which was the usual Persian practice of the time. It was fifty cubits high-- abut about 75 feet. Ouch.
15th May '18 8:24:55 AM Jeduthun
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Added DiffLines:

* ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice: The gallows that Haman builds (and [[HoistByHisOwnPetard gets hanged on at the end]]) was most likely an impaling stake, per the usual Persian practice of the time. It was fifty cubits high-- abut 75 feet. Ouch.
1st Feb '18 10:05:49 AM luiginumber1
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* JustSoStory: There is no evidence Persia ever had a Jewish queen, and its possible ''Esther'' was invented to explain the festival of Purim which already existed. No doubt, though, Xerxes was an actual Persian King, the same one who is in ''Film/ThreeHundred'' as a matter of fact.

to:

* JustSoStory: There is no evidence Persia ever had a Jewish queen, and its possible ''Esther'' was invented to explain the festival of Purim which already existed. No doubt, though, Xerxes was an actual Persian King, possibly the same one who is in ''Film/ThreeHundred'' as a matter of fact.
10th Jan '18 11:15:34 AM VicGeorge2011
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* VillainsWantMercy: Haman begs Esther to save his life. It backfires when Xerxes catches him throwing himself at her bed.

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* VillainsWantMercy: Haman begs Esther to save his life. It backfires when Xerxes catches him throwing himself at her while on her bed.
24th Nov '17 3:37:16 PM VicGeorge2011
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* ThroughHisStomach: Esther prepares two banquets for King Xerxes in order to gain his favor and listen to her petition to spare her people.

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* ThroughHisStomach: Esther prepares two banquets for King Xerxes in order to gain his favor and listen to her petition to spare her people. It is at the second banquet that Esther exposes Haman as the adversary responsible for the plot.
6th Nov '17 4:08:25 AM VicGeorge2011
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* InformedJudaism: Esther's Jewishness is a major plot point, but she apparently passed for a non-Jew well enough that her own husband was surprised to find out her ethnicity/religion. However, hiding her Jewishness from Xerxes before they get married is also part of Mordecai's plan. Possibly a more acurate example of this trope in the story would be the scholarly suggestion that Esther and Mordecai are secular Jews, rather than religious ones. See YMMV.



* InformedJudaism: Esther's Jewishness is a major plot point, but she apparently passed for a non-Jew well enough that her own husband was surprised to find out her ethnicity/religion. However, hiding her Jewishness from Xerxes before they get married is also part of Mordecai's plan. Possibly a more acurate example of this trope in the story would be the scholarly suggestion that Esther and Mordecai are secular Jews, rather than religious ones. See YMMV.
5th Nov '17 11:25:20 AM VicGeorge2011
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Added DiffLines:

* ThroughHisStomach: Esther prepares two banquets for King Xerxes in order to gain his favor and listen to her petition to spare her people.
5th Nov '17 11:11:55 AM VicGeorge2011
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Added DiffLines:

* DreamIntro: The Greek additions to the original story start with one for Mordecai. The last chapter ends with Mordecai's interpretation of the dream he had at the beginning.
5th Nov '17 11:05:42 AM VicGeorge2011
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* InSpiteOfANail: Mordechai tells Esther outright that the Jews will be saved regardless of her actions, because God won't allow otherwise... ''Esther'' is the one who will suffer if she refuses to help.

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* InSpiteOfANail: Mordechai Mordecai tells Esther outright that the Jews will be saved regardless of her actions, because God won't allow otherwise...otherwise to happen. ''Esther'' is the one who will suffer if she refuses to help.
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