History Literature / BookOfEsther

1st Feb '18 10:05:49 AM luiginumber1
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* JustSoStory: There is no evidence Persia ever had a Jewish queen, and its possible ''Esther'' was invented to explain the festival of Purim which already existed. No doubt, though, Xerxes was an actual Persian King, the same one who is in ''Film/ThreeHundred'' as a matter of fact.

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* JustSoStory: There is no evidence Persia ever had a Jewish queen, and its possible ''Esther'' was invented to explain the festival of Purim which already existed. No doubt, though, Xerxes was an actual Persian King, possibly the same one who is in ''Film/ThreeHundred'' as a matter of fact.
10th Jan '18 11:15:34 AM VicGeorge2011
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* VillainsWantMercy: Haman begs Esther to save his life. It backfires when Xerxes catches him throwing himself at her bed.

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* VillainsWantMercy: Haman begs Esther to save his life. It backfires when Xerxes catches him throwing himself at her while on her bed.
24th Nov '17 3:37:16 PM VicGeorge2011
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* ThroughHisStomach: Esther prepares two banquets for King Xerxes in order to gain his favor and listen to her petition to spare her people.

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* ThroughHisStomach: Esther prepares two banquets for King Xerxes in order to gain his favor and listen to her petition to spare her people. It is at the second banquet that Esther exposes Haman as the adversary responsible for the plot.
6th Nov '17 4:08:25 AM VicGeorge2011
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* InformedJudaism: Esther's Jewishness is a major plot point, but she apparently passed for a non-Jew well enough that her own husband was surprised to find out her ethnicity/religion. However, hiding her Jewishness from Xerxes before they get married is also part of Mordecai's plan. Possibly a more acurate example of this trope in the story would be the scholarly suggestion that Esther and Mordecai are secular Jews, rather than religious ones. See YMMV.



* InformedJudaism: Esther's Jewishness is a major plot point, but she apparently passed for a non-Jew well enough that her own husband was surprised to find out her ethnicity/religion. However, hiding her Jewishness from Xerxes before they get married is also part of Mordecai's plan. Possibly a more acurate example of this trope in the story would be the scholarly suggestion that Esther and Mordecai are secular Jews, rather than religious ones. See YMMV.
5th Nov '17 11:25:20 AM VicGeorge2011
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Added DiffLines:

* ThroughHisStomach: Esther prepares two banquets for King Xerxes in order to gain his favor and listen to her petition to spare her people.
5th Nov '17 11:11:55 AM VicGeorge2011
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Added DiffLines:

* DreamIntro: The Greek additions to the original story start with one for Mordecai. The last chapter ends with Mordecai's interpretation of the dream he had at the beginning.
5th Nov '17 11:05:42 AM VicGeorge2011
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* InSpiteOfANail: Mordechai tells Esther outright that the Jews will be saved regardless of her actions, because God won't allow otherwise... ''Esther'' is the one who will suffer if she refuses to help.

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* InSpiteOfANail: Mordechai Mordecai tells Esther outright that the Jews will be saved regardless of her actions, because God won't allow otherwise...otherwise to happen. ''Esther'' is the one who will suffer if she refuses to help.
3rd Nov '17 9:23:04 AM Omeganian
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Added DiffLines:

* InSpiteOfANail: Mordechai tells Esther outright that the Jews will be saved regardless of her actions, because God won't allow otherwise... ''Esther'' is the one who will suffer if she refuses to help.
8th Oct '17 6:55:36 AM VicGeorge2011
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The Protestant canon version of Esther is ten chapters long, with the tenth chapter ending at verse 3. The Vulgate version extended the story to about sixteen chapters, though these additions are interspersed into the original story in Catholic editions, bringing the chapter count back down to ten.

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The Protestant canon version of Esther is ten chapters long, with the tenth chapter ending at verse 3. The Vulgate version (which is based on the Greek) extended the story to about sixteen chapters, though these additions are interspersed into the original story in Catholic editions, bringing the chapter count back down to ten.
8th Oct '17 6:54:11 AM VicGeorge2011
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* JesusTaboo: Rather surprisingly for a book of Literature/TheBible, the story never once mentions the name of {{God}}. It's generally accepted that the point is God can work behind the scenes InMysteriousWays even when he is TheUnseen.

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* JesusTaboo: Rather surprisingly for a book of Literature/TheBible, the story never once mentions the name of {{God}}. (At least not the Hebrew only version anyway; the Greek additions are another story.) It's generally accepted that the point is God can work behind the scenes InMysteriousWays even when he is TheUnseen.
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