History Literature / Bluebeard

9th Jan '18 12:52:09 PM GlitteringFlowers
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* Appears as episode 16 of the anime ''Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics''. Based on the Brothers Grimm's retelling, here the girl is named Josephine.

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* Appears as episode 16 of the anime ''Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics''. ''Anime/GrimmsFairyTaleClassics''. Based on the Brothers Grimm's retelling, here retelling. It also expands the story a little: Bluebeard is redesigned to look like the aforementioned Henry VIII, the girl is named Josephine.Josephine and her origins are shown (she's a humble peasant girl, implied to have been raised ''and'' very sheltered by [[PromotionToParent her three]][[BigBrotherInstinct big brothers]]), her first days at the manse is shown, etc. It's also infamous for its ''very'' creepy imaginery including the wives's corpses [[DeadGuyOnDisplay mounted as trophies]] in the forbidden room, white roses that turn red when Josephine gets inside, et.
14th Nov '17 10:21:49 AM DemonDuckofDoom
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Added DiffLines:

* BigBad: Bluebeard, serial wife murderer extraordinaire.
15th Apr '17 6:11:49 PM nombretomado
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* SoundHorizon's song "Aoki Hakushaku no Shiro" on their ''Marchen'' album is based around this story. In a small twist, the story is told from the perspective of the ghost of his first wife.

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* SoundHorizon's Music/SoundHorizon's song "Aoki Hakushaku no Shiro" on their ''Marchen'' album is based around this story. In a small twist, the story is told from the perspective of the ghost of his first wife.
16th Mar '17 4:11:26 AM Nakuyabi
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** Bluebeard may have been based on 15th century serial killer [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilles_de_Rais Gilles de Rais]] (or de Retz). When you can say that an adaptation in which someone has a roomful of dead wives and a basin full of blood in their [[TortureCellar locked-away torture room]] is LighterAndSofter...

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** Some believe that the fairy tale has its origins in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conomor Conomor the Cursed,]] known for murdering his wives as soon as they got pregnant.
** Bluebeard may also have been based on 15th century serial killer [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilles_de_Rais Gilles de Rais]] (or de Retz). When you can say that an adaptation in which someone has a roomful of dead wives and a basin full of blood in their [[TortureCellar locked-away torture room]] is LighterAndSofter...
16th Mar '17 3:55:48 AM Nakuyabi
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%%* FamilyUnfriendlyDeath

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%%* FamilyUnfriendlyDeath* FamilyUnfriendlyDeath: A lot of versions have some awfully graphic descriptions of the murdered women when the heroine finds them.


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* InterplayOfSexAndViolence: In some versions, instead of the wife's making increasingly feeble pleas for Bluebeard to hold off murdering her a little longer (and his inexplicably granting her a respite each time long enough for the DeusExMachina to occur), the tale has the more clever device of having her ask him to wait while she puts on various parts of her wedding dress. Due to an ancient version of this trope, this tricks Bluebeard into thinking that she's preparing for an imminent marriage to Death, i.e. that she's resigned to dying and just insists on doing it with ''[[FaceDeathWithDignity honor]]''; which he decides to allow because he's rather WickedCultured that way.
26th Feb '17 8:29:56 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* TheSociopath: Implied. Blue Beard is superficially charming in public (known for his generosity and courtly graces), but behind closed doors he rather coldly and casually murders his many wives over the smallest disobediences missteps, then stuffs their rotting corpses in a single room in the main manor in front of his next wife.

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* TheSociopath: Implied. Blue Beard is superficially charming in public (known for his generosity and courtly graces), but behind closed doors he rather coldly and casually murders his many wives over the smallest disobediences or missteps, then stuffs their rotting corpses in a single room in the main manor in front of his next wife.



* VictimBlaming: Charles Perrault tries to paint the wife as being in the wrong for

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* VictimBlaming: Charles Perrault tries to paint the wife as being in the wrong for looking into the room. Though it's possible he was being [[SarcasmMode sarcastic]].
26th Feb '17 8:22:02 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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** Of course, there is also Henry the VIII. ''Anime/GrimmsFairyTaleClassics'' lampshaded this.

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** Of course, there is also Henry the VIII.UsefulNotes/HenryVIII. ''Anime/GrimmsFairyTaleClassics'' lampshaded this.




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* YouGottaHaveBlueHair: Or at least a blue beard.
24th Feb '17 7:57:49 PM Give1Take2
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* BrokenAesop: Perrault tries to explain that the curiosity is a flaw... but in almost every version the lady ''survives'', finds out her husband is a serial murderer, escapes him and ends marrying a better guy.

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* BrokenAesop: Perrault tries to explain that the curiosity is a flaw... but in almost every version the lady ''survives'', finds out her husband is a serial murderer, escapes him and ends up marrying a better guy.guy.
** The text itself also makes it clear that the lady has a {{gut feeling}} that something is ''off'' about Blue Beard, but allows [[TheSociopath his courtly graces]] to convince her she should discard these instincts and marry him anyway. And when he first gives her the key, she has another {{gut feeling}} that something is ''wrong'', and she ''has ''to open the door to find out what it is. Doing so saves her life in the long run. The obvious moral seems to be, "Trust your instincts," yet the stated moral at the end seems to take the opposite view.



%%* PeekABooCorpse: Several of them.

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%%* * PeekABooCorpse: Several of them.them. This ''is'' the story of Blue Beard and the corpses of his many murdered wives in the closet.


Added DiffLines:

* TheSociopath: Implied. Blue Beard is superficially charming in public (known for his generosity and courtly graces), but behind closed doors he rather coldly and casually murders his many wives over the smallest disobediences missteps, then stuffs their rotting corpses in a single room in the main manor in front of his next wife.


Added DiffLines:

* VictimBlaming: Charles Perrault tries to paint the wife as being in the wrong for
11th Jan '17 10:21:43 AM eroock
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-->''"At first she saw nothing, for the windows were closed, but after a few moments she perceived dimly that the floor was entirely covered with clotted blood, and that in this there were reflected the dead bodies of several women that hung along the walls. These were all the wives of Blue Beard, whose throats he had cut, one after the other."''
-->--"Bluebeard"

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-->''"At ->''"At first she saw nothing, for the windows were closed, but after a few moments she perceived dimly that the floor was entirely covered with clotted blood, and that in this there were reflected the dead bodies of several women that hung along the walls. These were all the wives of Blue Beard, whose throats he had cut, one after the other."''
-->--"Bluebeard"
-->-- "Bluebeard"
20th Oct '16 5:59:38 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* The musical being staged on the night of the 1903 Iroquois theater fire in Chicago was a very loose adaptation of the folk tale which turned it into a musical comedy. Entitled ''Mr Bluebeard'', it moved the action to a heavily exoticized version of [[ArabianNightsDays Baghdad]], not that this stopped the show including Irish charmers, a number about ''Hamlet'' and a platoon of singing Hussars, or paying a whistle-stop tour of [[InterchangeableAsianCultures India and Japan]]. The characters had [[StockForeignName stock foreign names]] like Fatima, Abulim, Beco, Zoli and, most bafflingly of all, ''[[TheyJustDidntCare Anne]]''. Even by the standards of the time it wasn't considered a very good show, and the fire is probably the only reason anyone remembers ''Mr Bluebeard'' at all.

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* The musical being staged on the night of the 1903 Iroquois theater fire in Chicago was a very loose adaptation of the folk tale which turned it into a musical comedy. Entitled ''Mr Bluebeard'', it moved the action to a heavily exoticized version of [[ArabianNightsDays Baghdad]], not that this stopped the show including Irish charmers, a number about ''Hamlet'' and a platoon of singing Hussars, or paying a whistle-stop tour of [[InterchangeableAsianCultures India and Japan]]. The characters had [[StockForeignName stock foreign names]] like Fatima, Abulim, Beco, Zoli and, most bafflingly of all, ''[[TheyJustDidntCare Anne]]''.''Anne''. Even by the standards of the time it wasn't considered a very good show, and the fire is probably the only reason anyone remembers ''Mr Bluebeard'' at all.
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