History Literature / Beowulf

18th Dec '15 8:55:31 PM nombretomado
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The Seven Basic Plots, as a work, cannot be used as a trope.
* [[TenMoviePlots Monster in the House]] or [[TheSevenBasicPlots Overcoming the Monster]], depending on whose perspective you take. Beowulf the Geat (one of the baddest of the BigDamnHeroes) comes over to fight the monster Grendel that has been ravaging the Dane's house for 12 years, i.e. he comes over and they've got a monster in their house.
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* [[TenMoviePlots Monster in the House]] or [[TheSevenBasicPlots Overcoming the Monster]], House]], depending on whose perspective you take. Beowulf the Geat (one of the baddest of the BigDamnHeroes) comes over to fight the monster Grendel that has been ravaging the Dane's house for 12 years, i.e. he comes over and they've got a monster in their house.
2nd Dec '15 9:33:40 AM YoKab
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[[caption-width-right:250:[[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe Luckily his shield protects him.]]]] [[caption-width-right:250: [- Illustration by J. R. Skelton (1908) -] ]]
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[[caption-width-right:250:[[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe Luckily his shield protects him.]]]] [[caption-width-right:250: [- Illustration ]][[note]]Illustration by J. R. Skelton (1908) -] ]] (1908)[[/note]]]]
23rd Oct '15 3:05:05 PM Morgenthaler
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Misuse. It's Genre Savvy, not just "savvy".
* GenreSavvy: Beowulf is remarkably unfond of [[BoisterousBruiser unnecessary combat,]] [[AManIsNotAVirgin wenching,]] and [[AlcoholInducedIdiocy getting roaring drunk at wild parties]] for a Norse hero. It saves his life in combat against Grendel, since he's awake, alert, and completely energized for his brawl instead of as drunk as the man Grendel eats.
3rd Oct '15 9:12:06 AM DemonDuckofDoom
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* DiscOneFinalBoss: Grendel
29th Sep '15 12:30:04 PM lolahighwind
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The entry for Mid-Season Upgrade said "because Unferth's Hrunting got destroyed in his battle against Grendel's mother", but it doesn't get destroyed in the epic poem; Beowulf returns Hrunting to Unferth (see around line 1810)
* MidSeasonUpgrade: Beouwulf receives the Naegling after the TimeSkip, because Unferth's Hrunting got destroyed in his battle against Grendel's mother.
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* MidSeasonUpgrade: Beouwulf receives the Naegling after the TimeSkip, because Unferth's Hrunting got destroyed in his battle against Grendel's mother.TimeSkip.
21st Sep '15 2:03:26 PM nombretomado
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* ShoutOut: A minstrel in the poem compares Beowulf to [[NorseMythology the dragonslayer "Sigemund"]]. And it's [[{{Foreshadowing}} fitting]], as Beowulf will eventually face a dragon himself.
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* ShoutOut: A minstrel in the poem compares Beowulf to [[NorseMythology [[Myth/NorseMythology the dragonslayer "Sigemund"]]. And it's [[{{Foreshadowing}} fitting]], as Beowulf will eventually face a dragon himself.
19th May '15 1:22:25 PM LahmacunKebab
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The story has been adapted many times. Some of the adaptations have been quite offbeat: they include John Gardner's novel ''Literature/{{Grendel}}'', from the [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation point of view of the monster]]; Creator/MichaelCrichton's novel ''Eaters of the Dead'' (filmed as ''{{The 13th Warrior}}''), which [[{{Demythtification}} purported to tell the historical events that inspired]] the Grendel plot; and the 1999 sci-fi film starring Christopher Lambert. The 2005 film ''Beowulf & Grendel'' was comparatively faithful. The [=YouTube=] video, ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKp5kTUFl1k Beowulf, The Storybook Version]]'', is relatively faithful, but very silly. DC Comics adapted the tale in the 1970s/1980s. A more recent offbeat version was a stage play "Brother Wolf" which transposed the story to the early 20th Century appalachian mountains. Beowulf is the itenerent preacher Brother Wolf, and Grendel is a demon haunting a small mountain town.
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The story has been adapted many times. Some of the adaptations have been quite offbeat: they include John Gardner's novel ''Literature/{{Grendel}}'', from the [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation point of view of the monster]]; Creator/MichaelCrichton's novel ''Eaters of the Dead'' (filmed as ''{{The 13th Warrior}}''), which [[{{Demythtification}} purported to tell the historical events that inspired]] the Grendel plot; and the 1999 sci-fi film starring Christopher Lambert. The 2005 film ''Beowulf & Grendel'' was comparatively faithful. The [=YouTube=] video, ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKp5kTUFl1k Beowulf, The Storybook Version]]'', is relatively faithful, but very silly. DC Comics adapted the tale in the 1970s/1980s. A more recent offbeat version was a stage play "Brother Wolf" which transposed the story to the early 20th Century appalachian mountains. Beowulf is the itenerent itinerant preacher Brother Wolf, and Grendel is a demon haunting a small mountain town.
2nd Feb '15 1:10:43 PM LordGro
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Supplying the image source.
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[[caption-width-right:250: [- Illustration by J. R. Skelton (1908) -] ]]
30th Jan '15 1:18:08 PM LordGro
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Forgot to acctually delete the example. Reasons: see below.
* BearsAreBadNews: "Beowulf" is a kenning ([[PunnyName wordplay]]) for bear. "Wulf" basically just meant 'predator' in Old English, so the literal meaning is 'Predator of Bees' or 'Enemy of Bees'. [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Basically, Beowulf is like a wolf with bees in its mouth, and when it howls, it shoots bees at you.]] To give you an idea just how much they feared bears, we don't actually know the Old English word for bear -- they feared using it would attract them, and therefore stuck to kennings like Beowulf when referring to them.

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30th Jan '15 1:16:21 PM LordGro
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1) To give you an idea, consult an Anglo-Saxon dictionary and learn that the Anglo-Saxons totally had a word for "bear". 2) There are no actual bears in "Beowulf" and that Beowulf's name *possibly* means "bear" (ultimately it is just a hyopthesis) does not make him an example of Bears Are Bad News. 3) Ba"basically" as often as possible because it is basically just Word Cruft that basically just annoys the reader, because it means basically nothing.
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