History Literature / Beowulf

5th Oct '17 5:33:16 PM Augusto
Is there an issue? Send a Message


And did we mention that it's a [[NarrativePoem poem]]?

to:

And Oh, and did we mention that it's a [[NarrativePoem poem]]?
5th Oct '17 11:12:12 AM Augusto
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Beowulf'' is the oldest surviving work of fiction in the English language -- so old, in fact, that [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfEnglish the language it's written in is barely recognizable as English]] (no, really, [[http://web.archive.org/web/20130216193224/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y13cES7MMd8 listen to it]]). It recounts two stories from the life of its eponymous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geats Geatish]] hero: how, as a young man, he visited Denmark and slew the monster Grendel, then faced the wrath of Grendel's even more monstrous mother; and how, toward the end of his life back in Geatland, he was the only man who dared fight a rampaging dragon.

to:

''Beowulf'' is the oldest surviving work of fiction in the English language -- so old, in fact, that [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfEnglish the language it's written in is barely recognizable as English]] (no, really, [[http://web.archive.org/web/20130216193224/http://www.org/web/20130919103818/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y13cES7MMd8 listen to it]]). It recounts two stories from the life of its eponymous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geats Geatish]] hero: how, as a young man, he visited Denmark and slew the monster Grendel, then faced the wrath of Grendel's even more monstrous mother; and how, toward the end of his life back in Geatland, he was the only man who dared fight a rampaging dragon.
5th Oct '17 11:04:27 AM Augusto
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Beowulf'' is the oldest surviving work of fiction in the English language -- so old, in fact, that [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfEnglish the language it's written in is barely recognizable as English.]] It recounts two stories from the life of its eponymous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geats Geatish]] hero: how, as a young man, he visited Denmark and slew the monster Grendel, then faced the wrath of Grendel's even more monstrous mother; and how, toward the end of his life back in Geatland, he was the only man who dared fight a rampaging dragon.

to:

''Beowulf'' is the oldest surviving work of fiction in the English language -- so old, in fact, that [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfEnglish the language it's written in is barely recognizable as English.]] English]] (no, really, [[http://web.archive.org/web/20130216193224/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y13cES7MMd8 listen to it]]). It recounts two stories from the life of its eponymous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geats Geatish]] hero: how, as a young man, he visited Denmark and slew the monster Grendel, then faced the wrath of Grendel's even more monstrous mother; and how, toward the end of his life back in Geatland, he was the only man who dared fight a rampaging dragon.
27th Sep '17 6:57:30 AM Theriocephalus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FranchiseZombie: Some scholars have read into the various tales of Beowulf's past achievements to conclude that there were more episodes to this saga, lost to history or having only existed in oral tradition. It's suggested that Beowulf was killed by the dragon as a way to finish off the series.



* TheLowMiddleAges
* MadeASlave: is just hinted at in the queen's BackStory, because her name means "foreign slave".

to:

* %%* TheLowMiddleAges
* MadeASlave: is just hinted Hinted at in the queen's BackStory, because her name means "foreign slave".



* MutualKill: The dragon and Beowulf.
* NarrativePoem

to:

* MutualKill: The dragon and Beowulf.
*
Beowulf, who die killing each other.
%%*
NarrativePoem



* ProudWarriorRaceGuy: ''Everyone''.
* RagsToRoyalty: see MadeASlave.

to:

* %%* ProudWarriorRaceGuy: ''Everyone''.
* RagsToRoyalty: see MadeASlave.As the queen's name mean "foreign slave", it's implied she was a free woman overseas before being captured and married to the king.



* YouthIsWastedOnTheDumb: A key part of Beowulf's CharacterDevelopment is discovering how rash he was as a younger man and how he makes a much better king now that he's older. When he goes out to fight the dragon, it is to save his people from [[InSeriesNickname "the sky-plague"]] as much as it is to have one last glorious adventure.

to:

* YouthIsWastedOnTheDumb: A key part of Beowulf's CharacterDevelopment is discovering how rash he was as a younger man and how he makes a much better king now that he's older. When he goes out to fight the dragon, it is to save his people from [[InSeriesNickname "the sky-plague"]] "[[InSeriesNickname the sky-plague]]" as much as it is to have one last glorious adventure.
27th Sep '17 4:38:34 AM ScroogeMacDuck
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* LazyDragon: The dragon is described as having been sleeping on its hoard within its lair, only awakening when a thief snuck inside and stole a goblet from its treasure.
27th Jul '17 7:32:17 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The story has been adapted many times. Some of the adaptations have been quite offbeat: they include John Gardner's novel ''Literature/{{Grendel}}'', from the [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation point of view of the monster]]; Creator/MichaelCrichton's novel ''Eaters of the Dead'' (filmed as ''Film/The13thWarrior''), which [[{{Demythtification}} purported to tell the historical events that inspired]] the Grendel plot; and [[Film/Beowulf1999 the 1999 sci-fi film]] starring Christopher Lambert. The 2005 film ''Beowulf & Grendel'' was comparatively faithful. The [=YouTube=] video, ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKp5kTUFl1k Beowulf, The Storybook Version]]'', is relatively faithful, but very silly. DC Comics adapted the tale in the 1970s/1980s. A more recent offbeat version was a stage play "Brother Wolf" which transposed the story to the early 20th Century appalachian mountains. Beowulf is the itinerant preacher Brother Wolf, and Grendel is a demon haunting a small mountain town.

to:

The story has been adapted many times. Some of the adaptations have been quite offbeat: they include John Gardner's novel ''Literature/{{Grendel}}'', from the [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation point of view of the monster]]; Creator/MichaelCrichton's novel ''Eaters of the Dead'' (filmed as ''Film/The13thWarrior''), which [[{{Demythtification}} purported to tell the historical events that inspired]] the Grendel plot; and [[Film/Beowulf1999 the 1999 sci-fi film]] starring Christopher Lambert.Creator/ChristopherLambert. The 2005 film ''Beowulf & Grendel'' was comparatively faithful. The [=YouTube=] video, ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKp5kTUFl1k Beowulf, The Storybook Version]]'', is relatively faithful, but very silly. DC Comics adapted the tale in the 1970s/1980s. A more recent offbeat version was a stage play "Brother Wolf" which transposed the story to the early 20th Century appalachian mountains. Beowulf is the itinerant preacher Brother Wolf, and Grendel is a demon haunting a small mountain town.
28th May '17 4:08:12 PM rmctagg09
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* NiceDayDeadlyNight: The titular hero's first enemy is Grendel, a monster that attacks each night before slinking away come morning.
18th Nov '16 7:53:08 AM capthanos
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DownerEnding: Beowulf dies in the fight against the dragon, and it's implied that, without their leader, the Geats will be conquered by their Swedish neighbors. Of course, Saxons love reminding their readers of [[UsefullNotes/AngloSaxons THEIR fate]] after this story.
26th Oct '16 4:03:01 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Most (but not all) of the ''Beowulf'' references on this wiki are to the 2007 film ''Film/{{Beowulf|2007}}'', written by Creator/RogerAvary and Creator/NeilGaiman, directed by Creator/RobertZemeckis, and starring RayWinstone. The screenplay for this has [[ExternalRetcon similarly unusual]] diversions from the original story, to say the least. It seems ''Beowulf'' has a knack for inspiring artists to put their own spin on the material. This could perhaps be owing to the somewhat [[BlueAndOrangeMorality alien]] [[ValuesDissonance worldview]] in which the piece was written.

to:

Most (but not all) of the ''Beowulf'' references on this wiki are to the 2007 film ''Film/{{Beowulf|2007}}'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Beowulf|2007}}'', written by Creator/RogerAvary and Creator/NeilGaiman, directed by Creator/RobertZemeckis, and starring RayWinstone.Creator/RayWinstone. The screenplay for this has [[ExternalRetcon similarly unusual]] diversions from the original story, to say the least. It seems ''Beowulf'' has a knack for inspiring artists to put their own spin on the material. This could perhaps be owing to the somewhat [[BlueAndOrangeMorality alien]] [[ValuesDissonance worldview]] in which the piece was written.
10th Oct '16 2:42:00 PM CJCroen1393
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AvengeTheVillain: Grendel's mother is (somewhat understandably) furious when she discovers that her son had been slain.

to:

* AvengeTheVillain: AvengingTheVillain: Grendel's mother is (somewhat understandably) furious when she discovers that her son had been slain.slain and seeks to avenge him by continuing where he left off and later trying to kill his killer.
This list shows the last 10 events of 108. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.Beowulf