History Literature / AubreyMaturin

10th Jun '17 11:00:00 AM maxwellsilver
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* [[EveryoneHasStandards Even French Intelligence Services Have Standards]]: Wray and Ledward murdering their own agents to safeguard their own fortunes is the main reason behind Duhamel's defection.

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* [[EveryoneHasStandards Even French Intelligence Services Have Standards]]: EveryoneHasStandards: Wray and Ledward murdering their own agents to safeguard their own fortunes is the main reason behind Duhamel's defection.



* ForWantOfANail: In ''The Fortune of War'', Jack, who has just been rescued along with Stephen and a number of his followers from a shipwreck, is offered the opportunity to head to Brazil (and thence home to England) on a prize that the ship that picked him up, the HMS ''Java'', has recently taken. However, a suspicious ship has just been spotted, so Jack decides (both for himself and his followers) to stay aboard the ''Java'' in the hope of sharing in the rewards of another prize. There's only one problem; that other ship is USS ''Constitution'', the renowned "Old Ironsides", which proceeds to defeat and take the ''Java'' in a furious engagement. (The engagement is TruthInTelevision, and can be read about at [[http://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/u/uss-constitutions-battle-record0/uss-constitution-vs-hms-java-1812.html here]].) Jack, Stephen and their comrades end up being taken as prisoners of war.



-->Not quite played straight, as Padeen badly beats three men for mocking his bandaged jaw, throwing one into a horse pond and holding another in a fire. Padeen is clearly enormously strong, being able to lift a very large, very heavy door clear off of its hinges to get at opiates. He was also capable of restraining the deranged gunner (who was one of the strongest men in the ship, and had just beaten his wife and her liaison to death) threatening Stephen.

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-->Not ** Not quite played straight, as Padeen badly beats three men for mocking his bandaged jaw, throwing one into a horse pond and holding another in a fire. Padeen is clearly enormously strong, being able to lift a very large, very heavy door clear off of its hinges to get at opiates. He was also capable of restraining the deranged gunner (who was one of the strongest men in the ship, and had just beaten his wife and her liaison to death) threatening Stephen.



* GilliganCut: Patrick O'Brian occasionally uses them to jump over sections, not for comedy but as an interesting way to maintain pacing. For instance, O'Brian often describes a battle to the vital turning point, and then jumps forward to port and have Jack or Stephen narrate details from the aftermath.



* HookHand: after [[PluckyMiddie William Reade]] gets his hand blown off, he has it replaced with a hook.
* HeterosexualLifePartners
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: both the French captain Christy-Palliere and the British Heneage Dundas really existed. Interestingly, ''Master and Commander'' in particular was heavily based on the real-life exploits of Captain Cochrane (particularly the [[InUniverse Sophie-vs-Cacafuego]][=/=][[RealLife Speedy-vs-Gama]] duel, accurate down to the number of guns and the number of crew), who really was captured by Christy-Palliere in the same way that Jack Aubrey was captured--and the real-life Christy-Palliere was so impressed by Cochrane's exploits that he refused to accept his sword in surrender, the same as Aubrey.

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* HookHand: after [[PluckyMiddie PluckyMiddie William Reade]] Reade gets his hand blown off, he has it replaced with a hook.
* %%* HeterosexualLifePartners
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: both the French captain Christy-Palliere and the British Heneage Dundas really existed. Interestingly, ''Master and Commander'' in particular was heavily based on the real-life exploits of Captain Cochrane (particularly the [[InUniverse Sophie-vs-Cacafuego]][=/=][[RealLife Speedy-vs-Gama]] ''Sophie''-vs-''Cacafuego''/''Speedy''-vs-''Gama'' duel, accurate down to the number of guns and the number of crew), who really was captured by Christy-Palliere in the same way that Jack Aubrey was captured--and captured -- the real-life Christy-Palliere was so impressed by Cochrane's exploits that he refused to accept his sword in surrender, the same as Aubrey.



* NiceJobBreakingItHero: In ''The Fortune of War'', Jack, who has just been rescued along with Stephen and a number of his followers from a shipwreck, is offered the opportunity to head to Brazil (and thence home to England) on a prize that the ship that picked him up, the HMS ''Java'', has recently taken. However, a suspicious ship has just been spotted, so Jack decides (both for himself and his followers) to stay aboard the ''Java'' in the hope of sharing in the rewards of another prize. There's only one problem; that other ship is USS ''Constitution'', the renowned "Old Ironsides", which proceeds to defeat and take the ''Java'' in a furious engagement. (The engagement is TruthInTelevision, and can be read about at http://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/u/uss-constitutions-battle-record0/uss-constitution-vs-hms-java-1812.html .) Jack, Stephen and their comrades end up being taken as prisoners of war.



* NostalgiaFilter: A number of older captains and admirals (and, increasingly, Jack and Stephen) remember the past quite fondly. A number of references are made to the 80s and 90s. The ''seventeen''-eighties and -nineties. One spends a significant amount of time at dinner instructing a midshipman on proper behavior, specially pointing out with approval Jack's rather old-fashioned behavior and appearance.[[note]]Only with regard to his habit of wearing his hat 'athwartship' rather than 'fore-and-aft' in admiration of Admiral Nelson. Otherwise Jack was always cautiously modern, liking flintlocks, but keeping slowmatch on hand just in case, for example.[[/note]]

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* NostalgiaFilter: A number of older captains and admirals (and, increasingly, Jack and Stephen) remember the past quite fondly. A number of references are made to the 80s 1780s and 90s. The ''seventeen''-eighties and -nineties.90s. One spends a significant amount of time at dinner instructing a midshipman on proper behavior, specially pointing out with approval Jack's rather old-fashioned behavior and appearance.[[note]]Only with regard to his habit of wearing his hat 'athwartship' rather than 'fore-and-aft' in admiration of Admiral Nelson. Otherwise Jack was always cautiously modern, liking flintlocks, but keeping slowmatch on hand just in case, for example.[[/note]]



** Or period romance fit to compete with the likes of PrideAndPrejudice.

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** Or period romance fit to compete with the likes of PrideAndPrejudice.''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice''.



* {{Pirate}}: Encountered occasionally, always as Type 1. Mostly in the less developed parts of the world, and sailing smaller craft, though Aubrey does engage ''Alastor'', a French four-masted pirate ship, in ''The Wine-Dark Sea''.
** Mention also goes to the Chinese and Malay members of the ''Lively'''s crew, who were mostly "recruited" from empty junks and praus. They show up in ''HMS Surprise'', when Jack leads a boarding-party of them to take a gunboat. Instead of [[BoisterousBruiser charging in with cheers]], European-style, the former pirates take out their targets with garrotes and knives in total silence, leaving Jack and the European sailors stunned. [[spoiler:Then comes the Port Mahon raid to free Stephen, where the capability for stealth and silent killing becomes paramount, and Jack makes a specific point of asking for them.]]
* PluckyMiddie: lots and lots of them. Pullings, Babbington, and Mowett form the first generation of Jack's midshipmen, risen to commanders and post-captains themselves. Reade and Hanson belong to the "second generation"; by the end of the book series, Reade is a lieutenant in charge of the tender ''Ringle'', while Hanson is on track for promotion to Lieutenant.
* PottyEmergency: normally, arrival at a secret prison run by one of the dreaded intelligence agencies is an imposing affair, which makes things all the funnier in ''The Surgeon's Mate'' when--as a result of having eaten some rather dubious crayfish--Jack, Jagiello, and their captor, the ConsummateProfessional Duhamel, all make a mad dash through the prison in search of a restroom upon arrival. (Stephen had medicated himself, so he's the one whom the astonished prison officers turn to for an explanation.)

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* {{Pirate}}: {{Pirate}}:
**
Encountered occasionally, always as Type 1. Mostly in the less developed parts of the world, and sailing smaller craft, though Aubrey does engage ''Alastor'', a French four-masted pirate ship, in ''The Wine-Dark Sea''.
** Mention also goes to the Chinese and Malay members of the ''Lively'''s crew, who were mostly "recruited" from empty junks and praus. They show up in ''HMS Surprise'', when Jack leads a boarding-party of them to take a gunboat. Instead of [[BoisterousBruiser charging in with cheers]], cheers, European-style, the former pirates take out their targets with garrotes and knives in total silence, leaving Jack and the European sailors stunned. [[spoiler:Then comes the Port Mahon raid to free Stephen, where the capability for stealth and silent killing becomes paramount, and Jack makes a specific point of asking for them.]]
* PluckyMiddie: lots Lots and lots of them. Pullings, Babbington, and Mowett form the first generation of Jack's midshipmen, risen to commanders and post-captains themselves. Reade and Hanson belong to the "second generation"; by the end of the book series, Reade is a lieutenant in charge of the tender ''Ringle'', while Hanson is on track for promotion to Lieutenant.
* PottyEmergency: normally, Normally, arrival at a secret prison run by one of the dreaded intelligence agencies is an imposing affair, which makes things all the funnier in ''The Surgeon's Mate'' when--as a result of having eaten some rather dubious crayfish--Jack, Jagiello, and their captor, the ConsummateProfessional Duhamel, all make a mad dash through the prison in search of a restroom upon arrival. (Stephen had medicated himself, so he's the one whom the astonished prison officers turn to for an explanation.)



* [[PutOnABus Put on a Ship]]: Reverend Martin, Dr. Maturin's frequent companion on naturalist expeditions, is sent home to England for medical reasons.

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* [[PutOnABus Put on a Ship]]: PutOnABus: Reverend Martin, Dr. Maturin's frequent companion on naturalist expeditions, is sent home to England for medical reasons.



*** Perhaps more that he is [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} utterly uninterested in the subject]], but it's still pretty hilarious.

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*** Perhaps more that he is [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} utterly uninterested in the subject]], subject, but it's still pretty hilarious.



* RunningGag: Stephen Maturin's signature ability to fall out of any boat or ship. Eventually he gets better at this, but by that time it's too late: due to his reputation for such he is usually assisted aboard, much to his indignation. (On the other hand the officers have learned to cope; for a while it was standard practice to have a jar of oil ready--just in case Stephen's pocketwatch gets a dunking when he's trying to board, and needs to be cleaned of water.)

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* RunningGag: RunningGag:
**
Stephen Maturin's signature ability to fall out of any boat or ship. Eventually he gets better at this, but by that time it's too late: due to his reputation for such he is usually assisted aboard, much to his indignation. (On the other hand the officers have learned to cope; for a while it was standard practice to have a jar of oil ready--just in case Stephen's pocketwatch gets a dunking when he's trying to board, and needs to be cleaned of water.)



* SealedOrders: Make an appearance in ''The Commodore.'' O'Brian even [[ShownTheirWork goes into detail]] about how they come with lead and are to be thrown overboard if the ship is taken.

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* SealedOrders: Make an appearance in ''The Commodore.'' O'Brian even [[ShownTheirWork goes into detail]] detail about how they come with lead and are to be thrown overboard if the ship is taken.



** ''Polychrest'' was originally designed to carry one -- a large rocket delivery system. Unfortunately, once it killed its inventor, the Navy was left with a ship that wasn't going to be firing off giant rockets... and wasn't much good for anything else, unless you count [[AwesomeButImpractical sailing backwards.]]

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** ''Polychrest'' was originally designed to carry one -- a large rocket delivery system. Unfortunately, once it killed its inventor, the Navy was left with a ship that wasn't going to be firing off giant rockets... and wasn't much good for anything else, unless you count [[AwesomeButImpractical sailing backwards.]]



** Except for the one time O'Brian skimped on research - Book 6 (''The Fortune of War''), with the aforementioned Frenchies running around a Boston where they wouldn't be welcome (because, in the War of 1812, Boston, and New England in general, was the center of anti-war feeling and pro-British, or more accurately, pro-free-trade-with-Britain, sentiment). Another character makes a horse-driven round trip from Boston to Salem in a mere two hours.

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** Except for the one time O'Brian skimped on research - Book 6 (''The Fortune of War''), with the aforementioned Frenchies running around a Boston where they wouldn't be welcome (because, in the War of 1812, Boston, Boston -- and New England in general, general -- was the center of anti-war feeling and pro-British, or more accurately, pro-free-trade-with-Britain, sentiment). Another character makes a horse-driven round trip from Boston to Salem in a mere two hours.



* ShutUpHannibal: when Stephen ''finally'' has enough of Mrs. Williams' badgering of Jack Aubrey and his family, he coldly informs her that unless she stops he will inform the authorities about her illegal gambling racket.

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* ShutUpHannibal: when When Stephen ''finally'' has enough of Mrs. Williams' badgering of Jack Aubrey and his family, he coldly informs her that unless she stops he will inform the authorities about her illegal gambling racket.



* SpyDrama (very much Stale Beer-or should we say Stale Grog-Flavored)
** Interestingly, with a few exceptions such as his activities in Boston Maturin's spy work is [[RealityEnsues often basically paperwork]]. Deadly, deadly paperwork. We hear repeated references to his allowing particular pieces of information to be 'captured' which lead to the deaths of numerous enemy agents and, in one case, the collapse of a French intelligence department. Maturin with a prepared notebook is a dangerous thing.

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* SpyDrama (very SpyDrama: Very much Stale Beer-or should we say Stale Grog-Flavored)
Grog-Flavored.
** Interestingly, with a few exceptions such as his activities in Boston Maturin's spy work is [[RealityEnsues often basically paperwork]].paperwork. Deadly, deadly paperwork. We hear repeated references to his allowing particular pieces of information to be 'captured' which lead to the deaths of numerous enemy agents and, in one case, the collapse of a French intelligence department. Maturin with a prepared notebook is a dangerous thing.



** In ''The Ionian Mission'', Jack narrowly loses a race in the ship's rigging to a sixty-something admiral. (Actually, it's strongly implied Jack intentionally slows himself on the way down so that he loses by a hair.)
* StoryArc: though the first three books are largely standalone, later books are grouped into larger story arcs, with even larger story arcs weaving in and out in-between. A fair rule of thumb is that once Aubrey makes it back to Britain, an arc has ended and another will begin soon. For instance:

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** In ''The Ionian Mission'', Jack narrowly loses a race in the ship's rigging to a sixty-something admiral. (Actually, it's admiral (it's strongly implied Jack intentionally slows himself on the way down so that he loses by a hair.)
hair).
* StoryArc: though Though the first three four books are largely standalone, later books are grouped into larger story arcs, with even larger story arcs weaving in and out in-between. A fair rule of thumb is that once Aubrey makes it back to Britain, an arc has ended and another will begin soon. For instance:



* SugarAndIcePersonality: Stephen.

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* %%* SugarAndIcePersonality: Stephen.



* UglyGuyHotWife: Stephen is short (one source gives his height as 5'6"), dark, variously described as "scrawny" or "squat", pale, sloppily dressed (he has an unfortunate habit of smearing ink or grease on such nice items of clothing as he is able to obtain), his only remarkable feature being his pale eyes. Nonetheless, after many trials, he's able to win the hand of the dazzling beauty Diana Villiers.

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* UglyGuyHotWife: UglyGuyHotWife:
**
Stephen is short (one source gives his height as 5'6"), dark, variously described as "scrawny" or "squat", pale, sloppily dressed (he has an unfortunate habit of smearing ink or grease on such nice items of clothing as he is able to obtain), his only remarkable feature being his pale eyes. Nonetheless, after many trials, he's able to win the hand of the dazzling beauty Diana Villiers.
21st May '17 10:42:33 AM nombretomado
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** In ''The Truelove'', a red silk wedding dress is striking and symbolic of trouble to the reader, while being unremarkable to the characters, since white wedding dresses were uncommon at best at the time -- a wedding dress would just be the nicest dress the lady owned or could afford, regardless of color. White wedding dresses did not become standard issue for brides in the Western world until [[VictorianBritain The Victorian Era]].

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** In ''The Truelove'', a red silk wedding dress is striking and symbolic of trouble to the reader, while being unremarkable to the characters, since white wedding dresses were uncommon at best at the time -- a wedding dress would just be the nicest dress the lady owned or could afford, regardless of color. White wedding dresses did not become standard issue for brides in the Western world until [[VictorianBritain [[UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain The Victorian Era]].
15th Mar '17 9:02:48 AM isolato
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** Also discussed repeatedly in contexts such as when, early on in the series, Stephen quizzes one of the officers about the custom of showing "false flags" to trick a potential enemy. The officer explains that this practice is quite legal as tactical deception in pre-battle maneuvering, but that the ship's genuine national colors are ''always'' raised before battle is joined. This is quite important because if it's not done, the ship can legally be treated as a pirate vessel!

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** Also discussed repeatedly in contexts such as when, early on in the series, Stephen quizzes one of the officers about the custom of showing "false flags" "[[FalseFlagOperation false flags]]" to trick a potential enemy. The officer explains that this practice is quite legal as tactical deception in pre-battle maneuvering, but that the ship's genuine national colors are ''always'' raised before battle is joined. This is quite important because if it's not done, the ship can legally be treated as a pirate vessel!
13th Feb '17 9:59:26 AM Divra
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Added DiffLines:

* OverlyNarrowSuperlative: Jack defends his old ship, the aged, decrepit fifty-gun ''H.M.S. Leopard'', calling her "the finest fourth-rate in the fleet". The Royal Navy, at the time, had two fourth-rates in service, and the other one (''H.M.S. Grampus'', if anyone's curious) was ''even more'' overtly horrible.
8th Jan '17 2:03:11 PM Divra
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Added DiffLines:

** Not that Jack didn't have his moments, especially early in the series. He openly disdains the Irish, makes some ugly remarks about Catholics and comments on how Spaniards are innately cruel, sometimes right in half-Catalan, half-Irish Catholic Stephen's face (though he is usually quite quick to apologize, and gets better the more he interacts with Stephen). He is mildly leaning pro-slavery, albeit only because he considers abolition a threat to Britain's ability to fund the war (he has absolutely no hang-ups about race, and after he gets to see the conditions on a slaving ship first-hand he becomes a committed abolitionist). He makes several disparaging remarks about the American political system and considers "one man, one vote" to be the equivalent of anarchy, while defending the property-based and deeply corrupt British parliamentary system. He is less happy about flogging his men than many other captains, but completely ruthless in applying ATasteOfTheLash when he considers it to be necessary.
** Stephen was also remarkably progressive for the time, but he was also a 19th-century Catalan nobleman, and quite ready to protect his honor against any slights, real or imagined, by killing the offending party. He was also quite openly islamophobic and hated "the Moors".
7th Dec '16 5:42:54 AM Dawkeye
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Added DiffLines:

* CombatPragmatist: Played straight, played with and occasionally averted. Aubrey, while enjoying a fair fight with a ship of equal or similar force, is not adverse to trickery, deception and plain running away from a superior opponent. On one notable occasion he is sent to intercept a French ship which is due to sail from a port on a certain date. Rather that wait for her to come out and engage in honourable combat at sea he sneaks his men into the port the night before she is due to sail, assuming that most of the French will be ashore getting drunk, and takes the ship out himself.
4th Dec '16 4:25:19 PM Exxolon
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[[caption-width-right:342:Yes, in the first published edition, Jack Aubrey was played by a young Clint Eastwood.]]

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[[caption-width-right:342:Yes, [[caption-width-right:200:Yes, in the first published edition, Jack Aubrey was played by a young Clint Eastwood.]]
4th Dec '16 4:25:04 PM Exxolon
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[[quoteright:342:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/master_commander_r_8778.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:342:http://static.[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/master_commander_r_8778.jpg]]
27th Nov '16 3:25:53 AM MissIzzy2
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Added DiffLines:

* SealedOrders: Make an appearance in ''The Commodore.'' O'Brian even [[ShownTheirWork goes into detail]] about how they come with lead and are to be thrown overboard if the ship is taken.
16th Oct '16 4:46:41 PM Exxolon
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Compare with: HoratioHornblower.

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Compare with: HoratioHornblower.
with ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'', the final novel of which was published in 1967, two years before ''Master and Commander'' was published.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.AubreyMaturin