History Literature / AubreyMaturin

24th Jul '16 1:57:51 PM Someoneman
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* {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Dr. Maturin, frequently. The whole world could be blowing up around his ears, and he'd be prancing about the ship with a rare snake or a pair of mating insects or somesuch. Of course, that assumes he didn't cause the explosion in question, in which case see CrowningMomentOfAwesome.

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* {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Dr. Maturin, frequently. The whole world could be blowing up around his ears, and he'd be prancing about the ship with a rare snake or a pair of mating insects or somesuch. Of course, that assumes he didn't cause the explosion in question, in which case see CrowningMomentOfAwesome.question.



* ComeToGawk: The pillory is shown in ''The Reverse of the Medal''. And then it turns into a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming as hundreds of sailors Jack has known over the years come and guard Jack while he's there, even dismissing the hired help Stephen has brought.

to:

* ComeToGawk: The pillory is shown in ''The Reverse of the Medal''. And then it turns into a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming as hundreds of sailors Jack has known over the years come and guard Jack while he's there, even dismissing the hired help Stephen has brought.



* PottyEmergency: normally, arrival at a secret prison run by one of the dreaded intelligence agencies is an imposing affair, which makes things [[FunnyMoments all the funnier]] in ''The Surgeon's Mate'' when--as a result of having eaten some rather dubious crayfish--Jack, Jagiello, and their captor, the ConsummateProfessional Duhamel, all make a mad dash through the prison in search of a restroom upon arrival. (Stephen had medicated himself, so he's the one whom the astonished prison officers turn to for an explanation.)

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* PottyEmergency: normally, arrival at a secret prison run by one of the dreaded intelligence agencies is an imposing affair, which makes things [[FunnyMoments all the funnier]] funnier in ''The Surgeon's Mate'' when--as a result of having eaten some rather dubious crayfish--Jack, Jagiello, and their captor, the ConsummateProfessional Duhamel, all make a mad dash through the prison in search of a restroom upon arrival. (Stephen had medicated himself, so he's the one whom the astonished prison officers turn to for an explanation.)



* RememberWhenYouBlewUpASun: despite the huge, huge list of [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome crowning moments of awesome]] that Aubrey pulls off as a captain, the one that comes up most often in-universe is his first: ''Sophie'' versus ''Cacafuego''. Stephen Maturin's own such moment also comes during his first adventure with Jack, when he successfully trepans a crew member to repair a brain injury; his naval friends, colleagues and crewmates cite this ever after as ''prima facie'' evidence of his sheer awesomeness in the field of medicine.

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* RememberWhenYouBlewUpASun: despite the huge, huge list of [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome crowning moments of awesome]] accomplishments that Aubrey pulls off as a captain, the one that comes up most often in-universe is his first: ''Sophie'' versus ''Cacafuego''. Stephen Maturin's own such moment also comes during his first adventure with Jack, when he successfully trepans a crew member to repair a brain injury; his naval friends, colleagues and crewmates cite this ever after as ''prima facie'' evidence of his sheer awesomeness in the field of medicine.



* ShutUpHannibal: when Stephen ''finally'' has enough of Mrs. Williams' badgering of Jack Aubrey and his family, he coldly informs her that unless she stops he will inform the authorities about her illegal gambling racket. It's just one of his many AwesomeMoments.

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* ShutUpHannibal: when Stephen ''finally'' has enough of Mrs. Williams' badgering of Jack Aubrey and his family, he coldly informs her that unless she stops he will inform the authorities about her illegal gambling racket. It's just one of his many AwesomeMoments.
22nd Jun '16 2:38:28 PM margdean56
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* TwentyOneGunSalute: This shows up frequently in the series; fitting, as the tradition originated with the navy in the 17th century and this is a naval series set in the 19th. A captain gets a certain number of guns, an admiral a certain number more. After a particularly well fought battle in the first book, a number of ships fire off their guns as a salute to the HMS Sophie and her crew.

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* TwentyOneGunSalute: This shows up frequently in the series; fitting, as the tradition originated with the navy in the 17th century and this is a naval series set in the 19th. A captain gets a certain number of guns, an admiral a certain number more. After a particularly well fought battle in the first book, a number of ships fire off their guns as a salute to the HMS Sophie ''HMS Sophie'' and her crew.



*** Once pointed out by a female prisoner, who happens to see him swimming naked. Maturin replies 'Perhaps he is a bit cut about. But you will notice that his scars are all received honorably from the front, except those that are from the rear."

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*** Once pointed out by a female prisoner, who happens to see him swimming naked. Maturin replies 'Perhaps "Perhaps he is a bit cut about. But you will notice that his scars are all received honorably from the front, except those that are from the rear."



** In ''The Truelove'', a red silk wedding dress is striking and symbolic of trouble to the reader, while being unremarkable to the characters, since white wedding dresses were uncommon at best at the time - a wedding dress would just be the nicest dress the lady owned or could afford, regardless of color. White wedding dresses did not become standard issue for brides in the Western world until [[VictorianBritain The Victorian Era]].
* WhatAPieceOfJunk: ''HMS Sophie'' in the first book. She's actually a brig (a two-masted coastal patrol vessel), but officially listed as a three-masted frigate due to social promotion - brigs were considered lieutenants' commands, so rather than demote the commander, the Navy promoted the ship. That becomes a problem when she's expected to handle the duties of a vessel her rating. She's old, leaky, slow before the wind, slower in turning, has a pittance of a broadside and even less chase armament, and her crew is both woefully understrength and composed of an equal mix of [[ArmyOfThievesAndWhores total lubbers, press-ganged felons and near-senile old salts.]] Through a mix of clever naval engineering and just-as-clever social engineering, Aubrey manages to turn her into an absolutely deadly commerce raider anyway.

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** In ''The Truelove'', a red silk wedding dress is striking and symbolic of trouble to the reader, while being unremarkable to the characters, since white wedding dresses were uncommon at best at the time - -- a wedding dress would just be the nicest dress the lady owned or could afford, regardless of color. White wedding dresses did not become standard issue for brides in the Western world until [[VictorianBritain The Victorian Era]].
* WhatAPieceOfJunk: ''HMS Sophie'' in the first book. She's actually a brig (a two-masted coastal patrol vessel), but officially listed as a three-masted frigate due to social promotion - -- brigs were considered lieutenants' commands, so rather than demote the commander, the Navy promoted the ship. That becomes a problem when she's expected to handle the duties of a vessel of her rating. She's old, leaky, slow before the wind, slower in turning, has a pittance of a broadside and even less chase armament, and her crew is both woefully understrength and composed of an equal mix of [[ArmyOfThievesAndWhores total lubbers, press-ganged felons and near-senile old salts.]] Through a mix of clever naval engineering and just-as-clever social engineering, Aubrey manages to turn her into an absolutely deadly commerce raider anyway.
22nd Jun '16 2:21:37 PM margdean56
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* LovingAShadow: Stephen himself is afraid that his own feelings toward Diana were false after he runs into her again in Boston, and discovers that he no longer loves her, leading to endless self-questioning if his earlier passion were based on reality. Even their marriage was acknowledged by both as an act of convenience, in order to regain Diana's lost British citizenship so that she couldn't be deported to America. Despite their close friendship, it isn't until ''The Letter of Marque'' when it is finally established, without a doubt, that Diana and Stephen truly love each other.
* MarriedAtSea: Stephen and Diana at the end of ''The Surgeon's Mate'', possibly also Jack and Sophie at the end of ''The Mauritius Command'' (though in-text it's implied that Sophie prefers a proper church wedding ashore.) Stephen had wanted to marry Diana aboard the H.M.S. ''Shannon'' in ''The Fortune of War'', and the captain was preparing to do it (he even had the proper passages marked in the Book of Common Prayer) when he was interrupted by the ship-to-ship duel with the U.S.S. ''Chesapeake''.

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* LovingAShadow: Stephen himself is afraid that his own feelings toward Diana were false after he runs into her again in Boston, and discovers that he no longer loves her, leading to endless self-questioning if his earlier passion were was based on reality. Even their marriage was acknowledged by both as an act of convenience, in order to regain Diana's lost British citizenship so that she couldn't be deported to America. Despite their close friendship, it isn't until ''The Letter of Marque'' when it is finally established, without a doubt, that Diana and Stephen truly love each other.
* MarriedAtSea: Stephen and Diana at the end of ''The Surgeon's Mate'', possibly also Jack and Sophie at the end of ''The Mauritius Command'' (though in-text it's implied that Sophie prefers a proper church wedding ashore.) ashore). Stephen had wanted to marry Diana aboard the H.M.S. ''Shannon'' in ''The Fortune of War'', and the captain was preparing to do it (he even had the proper passages marked in the Book of Common Prayer) when he was interrupted by the ship-to-ship duel with the U.S.S. ''Chesapeake''.



'''Aubrey:''' No, no, it is not quite that, neither. I mean? I wish you would not confuse my mind, Stephen.

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'''Aubrey:''' No, no, it is not quite that, neither. I mean? mean... I wish you would not confuse my mind, Stephen.



* TheMovie: "[[LongTitle Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World]]." Based mostly on the tenth book, but it includes elements and lines from much of the series.

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* TheMovie: "[[LongTitle ''[[LongTitle Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World]]." World]]''. Based mostly on the tenth book, but it includes elements and lines from much of the series.
22nd Jun '16 2:10:37 PM margdean56
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* LastNameBasis: Used [[TruthInTelevision accurately]], as during that period only the very most intimate friends or lovers would address one another by unadorned first name. Except for Jack, all of Stephen's old comrades/shipmates - and by the end of the series he has amassed a very wide circle of naval friends - address him by his professional title, and even Jack addresses him as "Doctor" during, so to speak, business hours. Diana Villiers, Stephen's great love throughout most of the series, most frequently calls him "Maturin" before their marriage (and even occasionally after), and Stephen reciprocates by calling her "Villiers". In fact, Jack, Jack's wife Sophie, Diana, [[spoiler:and later on in the series, Sir Joseph Blaine and Christine Wood]] are the only people who are entitled, by the intimacy of their relationship, to address Stephen by his first name. (It should be emphasized that LastNameBasis does ''not'' imply coldness or distance in the relationship; for instance, Tom Pullings, who has been a close friend of Stephen's ever since their first commission together in the ''Sophie'', invariably addresses him as "Doctor". Stephen, however, does customarily address Pullings as "Tom" in informal conversation. Stephen and Diana, during their long courtship, are another obvious example.)
** Jack's very old shipmates, especially those who follow him from commission to commission - his "followers" - invariably address him as "Captain" out of their deep respect for him, no matter how close their relationship is. Jack will customarily address old friends/subordinates such as Pullings, James Mowett, William Babbington (and later on in the series, William Reade) by their first name in informal conversation; when naval business is being done, he will call them "Mr. (insert surname here)" or address them by rank.
** LastNameBasis saves Stephen's fortune on at least one occasion: [[spoiler:Before leaving on his circumnavigation recounted in the arc beginning with ''The Thirteen Gun Salute'', Stephen writes a power-of-attorney letter authorizing Sir Joseph Blaine to move his money from his current bank, which is providing highly unsatisfactory service, to a different one recommended by Jack. However, Stephen is writing a note to Diana at the same time, and in true {{Cloudcuckoolander}} fashion, signs that note with the formal "S. Maturin" signature that he uses for business letters and signs the power-of-attorney as "Stephen". This turns out to be very fortunate, however, as the bank Stephen had intended to shift his fortune to unexpectedly goes bust during the voyage. and because Sir Joseph can't move the funds with the incorrectly signed power-of-attorney, the money is safe in the "highly unsatisfactory" bank. Another happy result is that, from that point on, Stephen and Sir Joseph, already close friends, enjoy the liberty to address each other by unadorned first names.]]

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* LastNameBasis: Used [[TruthInTelevision accurately]], as during that period only the very most intimate friends or lovers would address one another by unadorned first name. Except for Jack, all of Stephen's old comrades/shipmates - -- and by the end of the series he has amassed a very wide circle of naval friends - -- address him by his professional title, and even Jack addresses him as "Doctor" during, so to speak, business hours. Diana Villiers, Stephen's great love throughout most of the series, most frequently calls him "Maturin" before their marriage (and even occasionally after), and Stephen reciprocates by calling her "Villiers". In fact, Jack, Jack's wife Sophie, Diana, [[spoiler:and later on in the series, Sir Joseph Blaine and Christine Wood]] are the only people who are entitled, by the intimacy of their relationship, to address Stephen by his first name. (It should be emphasized that LastNameBasis does ''not'' imply coldness or distance in the relationship; for instance, Tom Pullings, who has been a close friend of Stephen's ever since their first commission together in the ''Sophie'', invariably addresses him as "Doctor". Stephen, however, does customarily address Pullings as "Tom" in informal conversation. Stephen and Diana, during their long courtship, are another obvious example.)
** Jack's very old shipmates, especially those who follow him from commission to commission - -- his "followers" - -- invariably address him as "Captain" out of their deep respect for him, no matter how close their relationship is. Jack will customarily address old friends/subordinates such as Pullings, James Mowett, William Babbington (and later on in the series, William Reade) by their first name in informal conversation; when naval business is being done, he will call them "Mr. (insert surname here)" or address them by rank.
** LastNameBasis saves Stephen's fortune on at least one occasion: [[spoiler:Before leaving on his circumnavigation recounted in the arc beginning with ''The Thirteen Gun Salute'', Stephen writes a power-of-attorney letter authorizing Sir Joseph Blaine to move his money from his current bank, which is providing highly unsatisfactory service, to a different one recommended by Jack. However, Stephen is writing a note to Diana at the same time, and in true {{Cloudcuckoolander}} fashion, signs that note with the formal "S. Maturin" signature that he uses for business letters and signs the power-of-attorney as "Stephen". This turns out to be very fortunate, however, as the bank Stephen had intended to shift his fortune to unexpectedly goes bust during the voyage. voyage, and because Sir Joseph can't move the funds with the incorrectly signed power-of-attorney, the money is safe in the "highly unsatisfactory" bank. Another happy result is that, from that point on, Stephen and Sir Joseph, already close friends, enjoy the liberty to address each other by unadorned first names.]]
22nd Jun '16 2:06:31 PM margdean56
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* FrozenInTime: Around book 7, O'Brian realized he was running out of Napoleonic War in which the story could take place, so he put the year 1813 on constant loop for the next 10 books). Fans like to characterize certain actions as taking place in 1812 or 1812a.

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* FrozenInTime: Around book 7, O'Brian realized he was running out of Napoleonic War in which the story could take place, so he put the year 1813 on constant loop for the next 10 books).books. Fans like to characterize certain actions as taking place in 1812 or 1812a.



-->Not quite played straight, as Padeen badly beats three men for mocking his bandaged jaw, throwing one into a horse pond and holding another in a fire. Padeen is clearly enormously strong, being able to lift a very large, very heavy door clear off of its hinges to get at opiates. He was also capable of restraining the deranged gunner (who was one of the strongest men in the ship, and had just beat his wife and her liaison to death)threatening Stephen.

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-->Not quite played straight, as Padeen badly beats three men for mocking his bandaged jaw, throwing one into a horse pond and holding another in a fire. Padeen is clearly enormously strong, being able to lift a very large, very heavy door clear off of its hinges to get at opiates. He was also capable of restraining the deranged gunner (who was one of the strongest men in the ship, and had just beat beaten his wife and her liaison to death)threatening death) threatening Stephen.



* HandOfGlory: In ''The Hundred Days'', Dr. Maturin is given a hand by a fellow physician that exhibits [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dupuytren%27s_contracture palmar aponeurosis]] to the point that the fingers are bent inwards and the fingernails growing through the flesh of the palm. The superstitious crew believe that it is a Hand of Glory and that it is a GoodLuckCharm making them upset when the dog eats it.

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* HandOfGlory: In ''The Hundred Days'', Dr. Maturin is given a hand by a fellow physician that exhibits [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dupuytren%27s_contracture palmar aponeurosis]] to the point that the fingers are bent inwards and the fingernails growing through the flesh of the palm. The superstitious crew believe that it is a Hand of Glory and that it is a GoodLuckCharm GoodLuckCharm, making them upset when the dog eats it.
22nd Jun '16 1:53:51 PM margdean56
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* CrazyPrepared: Babbington is prepared to perform a wedding on two minute's notice, as Jack taught him to be ready for anything.

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* CrazyPrepared: Babbington is prepared to perform a wedding on two minute's minutes' notice, as Jack taught him to be ready for anything.



** It needs to be taken into account that C.S. Forester was writing in the early part of the 20th century, a much more straitlaced era for mainstream literature; O'Brian, who wrote the series over a period spanning the late 1960's to his death in 2000, had much more freedom to write about the topics mentioned above.

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** It needs to be taken into account that C.S. Forester was writing in the early part of the 20th century, a much more straitlaced era for mainstream literature; O'Brian, who wrote the series over a period spanning the late 1960's 1960s to his death in 2000, had much more freedom to write about the topics mentioned above.



* DavidVersusGoliath: Aubrey's many awesome achievements are often a result of taking a small, undergunned ship against a superior opponent, and winning. In ''Sophie'' of 14 guns and 54 men, he closes beneath the guns of the 32-gun, 319-man ''Cacafuego'', blasts her from point-range, and takes her; in ''Surprise'' of 28 guns, he slugs it out in heavy seas against Admiral Linois' 74-gun flagship, giving nearly as good as he got until the convoy of Indiamen manages to swarm in close and force Linois to break off.[[note]]The heavy seas were why ''Surprise'' managed to survive: engaging from leeward the big 74 could not open the ports of its lowest gundeck, which housed her heaviest guns. It was touch-and-go, however, and ''Surprise'' was within one broadside of being sent to the bottom before the East Indiamen arrived and threatened to overwhelm Linois through weight of numbers.[[/note]] And in ''Leopard'', of 50 guns and extremely dubious repute (whereas both ''Sophie'' and ''Surprise'' were quick and nimble), he manages to sink a Dutch 74, though that came down to a [[SingleStrokeBattle single lucky shot]] in a very heavy storm: the first ship to lose control would broach-to and be swamped, and ''Leopard'' managed to snap ''Waakzeimheid'''s foremast with a shot from her stern chaser.

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* DavidVersusGoliath: Aubrey's many awesome achievements are often a result of taking a small, undergunned ship against a superior opponent, and winning. In ''Sophie'' of 14 guns and 54 men, he closes beneath the guns of the 32-gun, 319-man ''Cacafuego'', blasts her from point-range, point-blank range, and takes her; in ''Surprise'' of 28 guns, he slugs it out in heavy seas against Admiral Linois' 74-gun flagship, giving nearly as good as he got gets until the convoy of Indiamen manages to swarm in close and force Linois to break off.[[note]]The heavy seas were why ''Surprise'' managed to survive: engaging from leeward the big 74 could not open the ports of its lowest gundeck, which housed her heaviest guns. It was touch-and-go, however, and ''Surprise'' was within one broadside of being sent to the bottom before the East Indiamen arrived and threatened to overwhelm Linois through weight of numbers.[[/note]] And in ''Leopard'', of 50 guns and extremely dubious repute (whereas both ''Sophie'' and ''Surprise'' were quick and nimble), he manages to sink a Dutch 74, though that came down to a [[SingleStrokeBattle single lucky shot]] in a very heavy storm: the first ship to lose control would broach-to and be swamped, and ''Leopard'' managed to snap ''Waakzeimheid'''s foremast with a shot from her stern chaser.
22nd Jun '16 1:47:32 PM margdean56
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* ComeToGawk: The pillory is shown in ''The Reverse of the Medal''. And then it turns into a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming hundred of sailors Jack has known over the years come and guard Jack while he's there, even dismissing the hired help Stephen has brought.

to:

* ComeToGawk: The pillory is shown in ''The Reverse of the Medal''. And then it turns into a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming hundred as hundreds of sailors Jack has known over the years come and guard Jack while he's there, even dismissing the hired help Stephen has brought.



** Also slightly subverted in book one, as the ''Sophie'' is very much the Age of Sail equivalent of a rustbucket. She's called a ship-sloop, a three-masted unrated ship, but is actually a brig, which is two-masted. (Yay for Royal Navy social promotion - a brig is only a lieutenant's command, so any ship given to a commander automatically becomes a sloop, regardless of what it actually is.) Worse, she's dead slow, under-sailed, under-manned and under-gunned. Through clever naval and (ahem) social engineering, Aubrey manages to turn her into a top-notch commerce raider anyway. Jack's biggest concern with the Sophie is the undersized 4 pounders that make up her broadside. Unfortunately those are all the ship can bear. He once tried to mount a nine pounder bow-chaser cannon, but the ship's carpenter stopped Jack from a second test shot because the stress it put on the knees threatened to rip the ship apart.
*** Even the ''Surprise'' is outdated and undergunned compared to Frigates of the time (being 28 gun at a time when new Frigates had 36 or 38 guns, and 44 gun Frigates were starting to appear), but does have the advantage of being fast, especially into the wind. Even when built, the French classed her as a Corvette (a type of fast, light Frigate), though she actually carried more guns than was the norm for a corvette, her class of ship bridging a gap between smaller warships and frigates.

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** Also slightly subverted in book one, as the ''Sophie'' is very much the Age of Sail equivalent of a rustbucket. She's called a ship-sloop, a three-masted unrated ship, but is actually a brig, which is two-masted. (Yay for Royal Navy social promotion - -- a brig is only a lieutenant's command, so any ship given to a commander automatically becomes a sloop, regardless of what it actually is.) Worse, she's dead slow, under-sailed, under-manned and under-gunned. Through clever naval and (ahem) social engineering, Aubrey manages to turn her into a top-notch commerce raider anyway. Jack's biggest concern with the Sophie ''Sophie'' is the undersized 4 pounders 4-pounders that make up her broadside. Unfortunately those are all the ship can bear. He once tried to mount a nine pounder nine-pounder bow-chaser cannon, but the ship's carpenter stopped Jack from a second test shot because the stress it put on the knees threatened to rip the ship apart.
*** Even the ''Surprise'' is outdated and undergunned compared to Frigates of the time (being 28 gun 28-gun at a time when new Frigates had 36 or 38 guns, and 44 gun 44-gun Frigates were starting to appear), but does have the advantage of being fast, especially into the wind. Even when built, the French classed her as a Corvette (a type of fast, light Frigate), though she actually carried more guns than was the norm for a corvette, her class of ship bridging a gap between smaller warships and frigates.
22nd Jun '16 1:42:25 PM margdean56
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* ColourfulThemeNaming: Aubrey and his friend and fellow post-captain Heneage Dundas discuss the captain of ''HMS Iris'', who not only wants to dress his bargemen in the colors of the rainbow (due to the connotation of his ships name), but specifically seeks out sailors ''named'' for said colors: e.g., with surnames like "Scarlett," "White," or "Green." He offered Dundas a brass "chaser" cannon in exchange for one of his sailors whose name was Blew. (Dundas declined, sharing with Aubrey a dislike for "costumed" bargemen. Also, bargemen are a select group, following the captain especially from ship to ship, and are the first behind him in combat. Trading one for a cannon...)

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* ColourfulThemeNaming: Aubrey and his friend and fellow post-captain Heneage Dundas discuss the captain of ''HMS Iris'', who not only wants to dress his bargemen in the colors of the rainbow (due to the connotation of his ships ship's name), but specifically seeks out sailors ''named'' for said colors: e.g., with surnames like "Scarlett," "White," or "Green." He offered Dundas a brass "chaser" cannon in exchange for one of his sailors whose name was Blew. (Dundas declined, sharing with Aubrey a dislike for "costumed" bargemen. Also, bargemen are a select group, following the captain especially from ship to ship, and are the first behind him in combat. Trading one for a cannon...)
22nd Jun '16 1:30:00 PM margdean56
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--> "------ old Harte, ------ old Harte, that red-faced son of a blue French fart..." It's strongly implied that this is [[NarrativeProfanityFilter the only verse clean enough for print.]]
--> To be fair, Harte's wife Molly DID cheat on him WITH Jack Aubrey, with Harte eventually finding out through rumor.

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--> "------ old Harte, ------ old Harte, that red-faced son of a blue French fart..." "\\
It's strongly implied that this is [[NarrativeProfanityFilter the only verse clean enough for print.]]
-->
]]
**
To be fair, Harte's wife Molly DID cheat on him WITH Jack Aubrey, with Harte eventually finding out through rumor.
17th May '16 4:34:12 AM Divra
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* MenCannotKeepHouse: Subverted. Sophie's mother assumes this is the case and is horrified when she learns Jack's domestic staff consists entirely of sailors. However, the joke's on her; Jack's entourage of Royal Navy sailors can keep house far better than most domestics. Of course, they keep up the house as if it were a Royal Navy man-o'-war, which means dusting, sweeping and mopping the entire house before breakfast every day, routine daily inspections and maintenance, bi-weekly baths for everyone, and a fresh coat of paint once a week. Also, Sophie's mother is favorably impressed by Killick's cooking, although by that point Killick has been cooking his captain's meals three times a day for nearly a decade.

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* MenCannotKeepHouse: MenCantKeepHouse: Subverted. Sophie's mother assumes this is the case and is horrified when she learns Jack's domestic staff consists entirely of sailors. However, the joke's on her; Jack's entourage of Royal Navy sailors can keep house far better than most domestics. Of course, they keep up the house as if it were a Royal Navy man-o'-war, which means dusting, sweeping and mopping the entire house before breakfast every day, routine daily inspections and maintenance, bi-weekly baths for everyone, and a fresh coat of paint once a week. Also, Sophie's mother is favorably impressed by Killick's cooking, although by that point Killick has been cooking his captain's meals three times a day for nearly a decade.
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