History Literature / AubreyMaturin

8th Jan '17 2:03:11 PM Divra
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** Not that Jack didn't have his moments, especially early in the series. He openly disdains the Irish, makes some ugly remarks about Catholics and comments on how Spaniards are innately cruel, sometimes right in half-Catalan, half-Irish Catholic Stephen's face (though he is usually quite quick to apologize, and gets better the more he interacts with Stephen). He is mildly leaning pro-slavery, albeit only because he considers abolition a threat to Britain's ability to fund the war (he has absolutely no hang-ups about race, and after he gets to see the conditions on a slaving ship first-hand he becomes a committed abolitionist). He makes several disparaging remarks about the American political system and considers "one man, one vote" to be the equivalent of anarchy, while defending the property-based and deeply corrupt British parliamentary system. He is less happy about flogging his men than many other captains, but completely ruthless in applying ATasteOfTheLash when he considers it to be necessary.
** Stephen was also remarkably progressive for the time, but he was also a 19th-century Catalan nobleman, and quite ready to protect his honor against any slights, real or imagined, by killing the offending party. He was also quite openly islamophobic and hated "the Moors".
7th Dec '16 5:42:54 AM Dawkeye
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* CombatPragmatist: Played straight, played with and occasionally averted. Aubrey, while enjoying a fair fight with a ship of equal or similar force, is not adverse to trickery, deception and plain running away from a superior opponent. On one notable occasion he is sent to intercept a French ship which is due to sail from a port on a certain date. Rather that wait for her to come out and engage in honourable combat at sea he sneaks his men into the port the night before she is due to sail, assuming that most of the French will be ashore getting drunk, and takes the ship out himself.
4th Dec '16 4:25:19 PM Exxolon
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[[caption-width-right:342:Yes, in the first published edition, Jack Aubrey was played by a young Clint Eastwood.]]

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[[caption-width-right:342:Yes, [[caption-width-right:200:Yes, in the first published edition, Jack Aubrey was played by a young Clint Eastwood.]]
4th Dec '16 4:25:04 PM Exxolon
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[[quoteright:342:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/master_commander_r_8778.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:342:http://static.[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/master_commander_r_8778.jpg]]
27th Nov '16 3:25:53 AM MissIzzy2
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* SealedOrders: Make an appearance in ''The Commodore.'' O'Brian even [[ShownTheirWork goes into detail]] about how they come with lead and are to be thrown overboard if the ship is taken.
16th Oct '16 4:46:41 PM Exxolon
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Compare with: HoratioHornblower.

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Compare with: HoratioHornblower.
with ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'', the final novel of which was published in 1967, two years before ''Master and Commander'' was published.
24th Jul '16 1:57:51 PM Someoneman
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* {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Dr. Maturin, frequently. The whole world could be blowing up around his ears, and he'd be prancing about the ship with a rare snake or a pair of mating insects or somesuch. Of course, that assumes he didn't cause the explosion in question, in which case see CrowningMomentOfAwesome.

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* {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Dr. Maturin, frequently. The whole world could be blowing up around his ears, and he'd be prancing about the ship with a rare snake or a pair of mating insects or somesuch. Of course, that assumes he didn't cause the explosion in question, in which case see CrowningMomentOfAwesome.question.



* ComeToGawk: The pillory is shown in ''The Reverse of the Medal''. And then it turns into a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming as hundreds of sailors Jack has known over the years come and guard Jack while he's there, even dismissing the hired help Stephen has brought.

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* ComeToGawk: The pillory is shown in ''The Reverse of the Medal''. And then it turns into a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming as hundreds of sailors Jack has known over the years come and guard Jack while he's there, even dismissing the hired help Stephen has brought.



* PottyEmergency: normally, arrival at a secret prison run by one of the dreaded intelligence agencies is an imposing affair, which makes things [[FunnyMoments all the funnier]] in ''The Surgeon's Mate'' when--as a result of having eaten some rather dubious crayfish--Jack, Jagiello, and their captor, the ConsummateProfessional Duhamel, all make a mad dash through the prison in search of a restroom upon arrival. (Stephen had medicated himself, so he's the one whom the astonished prison officers turn to for an explanation.)

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* PottyEmergency: normally, arrival at a secret prison run by one of the dreaded intelligence agencies is an imposing affair, which makes things [[FunnyMoments all the funnier]] funnier in ''The Surgeon's Mate'' when--as a result of having eaten some rather dubious crayfish--Jack, Jagiello, and their captor, the ConsummateProfessional Duhamel, all make a mad dash through the prison in search of a restroom upon arrival. (Stephen had medicated himself, so he's the one whom the astonished prison officers turn to for an explanation.)



* RememberWhenYouBlewUpASun: despite the huge, huge list of [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome crowning moments of awesome]] that Aubrey pulls off as a captain, the one that comes up most often in-universe is his first: ''Sophie'' versus ''Cacafuego''. Stephen Maturin's own such moment also comes during his first adventure with Jack, when he successfully trepans a crew member to repair a brain injury; his naval friends, colleagues and crewmates cite this ever after as ''prima facie'' evidence of his sheer awesomeness in the field of medicine.

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* RememberWhenYouBlewUpASun: despite the huge, huge list of [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome crowning moments of awesome]] accomplishments that Aubrey pulls off as a captain, the one that comes up most often in-universe is his first: ''Sophie'' versus ''Cacafuego''. Stephen Maturin's own such moment also comes during his first adventure with Jack, when he successfully trepans a crew member to repair a brain injury; his naval friends, colleagues and crewmates cite this ever after as ''prima facie'' evidence of his sheer awesomeness in the field of medicine.



* ShutUpHannibal: when Stephen ''finally'' has enough of Mrs. Williams' badgering of Jack Aubrey and his family, he coldly informs her that unless she stops he will inform the authorities about her illegal gambling racket. It's just one of his many AwesomeMoments.

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* ShutUpHannibal: when Stephen ''finally'' has enough of Mrs. Williams' badgering of Jack Aubrey and his family, he coldly informs her that unless she stops he will inform the authorities about her illegal gambling racket. It's just one of his many AwesomeMoments.
22nd Jun '16 2:38:28 PM margdean56
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* TwentyOneGunSalute: This shows up frequently in the series; fitting, as the tradition originated with the navy in the 17th century and this is a naval series set in the 19th. A captain gets a certain number of guns, an admiral a certain number more. After a particularly well fought battle in the first book, a number of ships fire off their guns as a salute to the HMS Sophie and her crew.

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* TwentyOneGunSalute: This shows up frequently in the series; fitting, as the tradition originated with the navy in the 17th century and this is a naval series set in the 19th. A captain gets a certain number of guns, an admiral a certain number more. After a particularly well fought battle in the first book, a number of ships fire off their guns as a salute to the HMS Sophie ''HMS Sophie'' and her crew.



*** Once pointed out by a female prisoner, who happens to see him swimming naked. Maturin replies 'Perhaps he is a bit cut about. But you will notice that his scars are all received honorably from the front, except those that are from the rear."

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*** Once pointed out by a female prisoner, who happens to see him swimming naked. Maturin replies 'Perhaps "Perhaps he is a bit cut about. But you will notice that his scars are all received honorably from the front, except those that are from the rear."



** In ''The Truelove'', a red silk wedding dress is striking and symbolic of trouble to the reader, while being unremarkable to the characters, since white wedding dresses were uncommon at best at the time - a wedding dress would just be the nicest dress the lady owned or could afford, regardless of color. White wedding dresses did not become standard issue for brides in the Western world until [[VictorianBritain The Victorian Era]].
* WhatAPieceOfJunk: ''HMS Sophie'' in the first book. She's actually a brig (a two-masted coastal patrol vessel), but officially listed as a three-masted frigate due to social promotion - brigs were considered lieutenants' commands, so rather than demote the commander, the Navy promoted the ship. That becomes a problem when she's expected to handle the duties of a vessel her rating. She's old, leaky, slow before the wind, slower in turning, has a pittance of a broadside and even less chase armament, and her crew is both woefully understrength and composed of an equal mix of [[ArmyOfThievesAndWhores total lubbers, press-ganged felons and near-senile old salts.]] Through a mix of clever naval engineering and just-as-clever social engineering, Aubrey manages to turn her into an absolutely deadly commerce raider anyway.

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** In ''The Truelove'', a red silk wedding dress is striking and symbolic of trouble to the reader, while being unremarkable to the characters, since white wedding dresses were uncommon at best at the time - -- a wedding dress would just be the nicest dress the lady owned or could afford, regardless of color. White wedding dresses did not become standard issue for brides in the Western world until [[VictorianBritain The Victorian Era]].
* WhatAPieceOfJunk: ''HMS Sophie'' in the first book. She's actually a brig (a two-masted coastal patrol vessel), but officially listed as a three-masted frigate due to social promotion - -- brigs were considered lieutenants' commands, so rather than demote the commander, the Navy promoted the ship. That becomes a problem when she's expected to handle the duties of a vessel of her rating. She's old, leaky, slow before the wind, slower in turning, has a pittance of a broadside and even less chase armament, and her crew is both woefully understrength and composed of an equal mix of [[ArmyOfThievesAndWhores total lubbers, press-ganged felons and near-senile old salts.]] Through a mix of clever naval engineering and just-as-clever social engineering, Aubrey manages to turn her into an absolutely deadly commerce raider anyway.
22nd Jun '16 2:21:37 PM margdean56
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* LovingAShadow: Stephen himself is afraid that his own feelings toward Diana were false after he runs into her again in Boston, and discovers that he no longer loves her, leading to endless self-questioning if his earlier passion were based on reality. Even their marriage was acknowledged by both as an act of convenience, in order to regain Diana's lost British citizenship so that she couldn't be deported to America. Despite their close friendship, it isn't until ''The Letter of Marque'' when it is finally established, without a doubt, that Diana and Stephen truly love each other.
* MarriedAtSea: Stephen and Diana at the end of ''The Surgeon's Mate'', possibly also Jack and Sophie at the end of ''The Mauritius Command'' (though in-text it's implied that Sophie prefers a proper church wedding ashore.) Stephen had wanted to marry Diana aboard the H.M.S. ''Shannon'' in ''The Fortune of War'', and the captain was preparing to do it (he even had the proper passages marked in the Book of Common Prayer) when he was interrupted by the ship-to-ship duel with the U.S.S. ''Chesapeake''.

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* LovingAShadow: Stephen himself is afraid that his own feelings toward Diana were false after he runs into her again in Boston, and discovers that he no longer loves her, leading to endless self-questioning if his earlier passion were was based on reality. Even their marriage was acknowledged by both as an act of convenience, in order to regain Diana's lost British citizenship so that she couldn't be deported to America. Despite their close friendship, it isn't until ''The Letter of Marque'' when it is finally established, without a doubt, that Diana and Stephen truly love each other.
* MarriedAtSea: Stephen and Diana at the end of ''The Surgeon's Mate'', possibly also Jack and Sophie at the end of ''The Mauritius Command'' (though in-text it's implied that Sophie prefers a proper church wedding ashore.) ashore). Stephen had wanted to marry Diana aboard the H.M.S. ''Shannon'' in ''The Fortune of War'', and the captain was preparing to do it (he even had the proper passages marked in the Book of Common Prayer) when he was interrupted by the ship-to-ship duel with the U.S.S. ''Chesapeake''.



'''Aubrey:''' No, no, it is not quite that, neither. I mean? I wish you would not confuse my mind, Stephen.

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'''Aubrey:''' No, no, it is not quite that, neither. I mean? mean... I wish you would not confuse my mind, Stephen.



* TheMovie: "[[LongTitle Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World]]." Based mostly on the tenth book, but it includes elements and lines from much of the series.

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* TheMovie: "[[LongTitle ''[[LongTitle Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World]]." World]]''. Based mostly on the tenth book, but it includes elements and lines from much of the series.
22nd Jun '16 2:10:37 PM margdean56
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* LastNameBasis: Used [[TruthInTelevision accurately]], as during that period only the very most intimate friends or lovers would address one another by unadorned first name. Except for Jack, all of Stephen's old comrades/shipmates - and by the end of the series he has amassed a very wide circle of naval friends - address him by his professional title, and even Jack addresses him as "Doctor" during, so to speak, business hours. Diana Villiers, Stephen's great love throughout most of the series, most frequently calls him "Maturin" before their marriage (and even occasionally after), and Stephen reciprocates by calling her "Villiers". In fact, Jack, Jack's wife Sophie, Diana, [[spoiler:and later on in the series, Sir Joseph Blaine and Christine Wood]] are the only people who are entitled, by the intimacy of their relationship, to address Stephen by his first name. (It should be emphasized that LastNameBasis does ''not'' imply coldness or distance in the relationship; for instance, Tom Pullings, who has been a close friend of Stephen's ever since their first commission together in the ''Sophie'', invariably addresses him as "Doctor". Stephen, however, does customarily address Pullings as "Tom" in informal conversation. Stephen and Diana, during their long courtship, are another obvious example.)
** Jack's very old shipmates, especially those who follow him from commission to commission - his "followers" - invariably address him as "Captain" out of their deep respect for him, no matter how close their relationship is. Jack will customarily address old friends/subordinates such as Pullings, James Mowett, William Babbington (and later on in the series, William Reade) by their first name in informal conversation; when naval business is being done, he will call them "Mr. (insert surname here)" or address them by rank.
** LastNameBasis saves Stephen's fortune on at least one occasion: [[spoiler:Before leaving on his circumnavigation recounted in the arc beginning with ''The Thirteen Gun Salute'', Stephen writes a power-of-attorney letter authorizing Sir Joseph Blaine to move his money from his current bank, which is providing highly unsatisfactory service, to a different one recommended by Jack. However, Stephen is writing a note to Diana at the same time, and in true {{Cloudcuckoolander}} fashion, signs that note with the formal "S. Maturin" signature that he uses for business letters and signs the power-of-attorney as "Stephen". This turns out to be very fortunate, however, as the bank Stephen had intended to shift his fortune to unexpectedly goes bust during the voyage. and because Sir Joseph can't move the funds with the incorrectly signed power-of-attorney, the money is safe in the "highly unsatisfactory" bank. Another happy result is that, from that point on, Stephen and Sir Joseph, already close friends, enjoy the liberty to address each other by unadorned first names.]]

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* LastNameBasis: Used [[TruthInTelevision accurately]], as during that period only the very most intimate friends or lovers would address one another by unadorned first name. Except for Jack, all of Stephen's old comrades/shipmates - -- and by the end of the series he has amassed a very wide circle of naval friends - -- address him by his professional title, and even Jack addresses him as "Doctor" during, so to speak, business hours. Diana Villiers, Stephen's great love throughout most of the series, most frequently calls him "Maturin" before their marriage (and even occasionally after), and Stephen reciprocates by calling her "Villiers". In fact, Jack, Jack's wife Sophie, Diana, [[spoiler:and later on in the series, Sir Joseph Blaine and Christine Wood]] are the only people who are entitled, by the intimacy of their relationship, to address Stephen by his first name. (It should be emphasized that LastNameBasis does ''not'' imply coldness or distance in the relationship; for instance, Tom Pullings, who has been a close friend of Stephen's ever since their first commission together in the ''Sophie'', invariably addresses him as "Doctor". Stephen, however, does customarily address Pullings as "Tom" in informal conversation. Stephen and Diana, during their long courtship, are another obvious example.)
** Jack's very old shipmates, especially those who follow him from commission to commission - -- his "followers" - -- invariably address him as "Captain" out of their deep respect for him, no matter how close their relationship is. Jack will customarily address old friends/subordinates such as Pullings, James Mowett, William Babbington (and later on in the series, William Reade) by their first name in informal conversation; when naval business is being done, he will call them "Mr. (insert surname here)" or address them by rank.
** LastNameBasis saves Stephen's fortune on at least one occasion: [[spoiler:Before leaving on his circumnavigation recounted in the arc beginning with ''The Thirteen Gun Salute'', Stephen writes a power-of-attorney letter authorizing Sir Joseph Blaine to move his money from his current bank, which is providing highly unsatisfactory service, to a different one recommended by Jack. However, Stephen is writing a note to Diana at the same time, and in true {{Cloudcuckoolander}} fashion, signs that note with the formal "S. Maturin" signature that he uses for business letters and signs the power-of-attorney as "Stephen". This turns out to be very fortunate, however, as the bank Stephen had intended to shift his fortune to unexpectedly goes bust during the voyage. voyage, and because Sir Joseph can't move the funds with the incorrectly signed power-of-attorney, the money is safe in the "highly unsatisfactory" bank. Another happy result is that, from that point on, Stephen and Sir Joseph, already close friends, enjoy the liberty to address each other by unadorned first names.]]
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