History Literature / Another

5th Nov '16 10:35:30 AM Tropedout24
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* CounterpartComparison: Sums up the whole anime as it is [[FinalDestination Final Destination's]] [[SpiritualSuccessor spiritual cousin]].
31st Oct '16 11:50:03 AM TheBigBopper
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* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: The instance of ElevatorFailure focuses on the accident which causes the cables holding the elevator up to snap, but for the elevator to freefall down the shaft would also require the safety breaks to malfunction, a very unlikely occurence. This mechanism, invented by Elisha Otis all the way back in 1852, causes the elevator to stick in the shaft the instant the tension goes out of the cables and was the main selling point by which he was able to convince prospective buyers that elevators were safe. Perhaps the curse could have contrived a way for this safety to fail, but the police don't even mention the safety mechanism in their report. There are rare instances in which elevators kill people, but these accidents tend to involve the elevator mangling people who were caught between the car and the shaft, or ascending or descending in an uncontrolled fashion, rather than from the car going into freefall.

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* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: The instance kind of catastrophic ElevatorFailure focuses on depicted is ''very'' unlikely because of the multiple safety mechanisms in modern elevators. In the first place, there are usually multiple hoist cables, which can individually hold up the car's entire weight and collectively hold up multiple times the car's weight. It would take a ''real'' freak accident which causes to sever them all at once. If the cables holding computer controlling the elevator up to snap, but for detects anything unsafe, it will shut off the motor and apply the brakes, which include both a clamp that closes on the pulley above the car, and safety brakes underneath the car that jam a metal brake into the guide rails along which the elevator travels. Lastly, there is a set of counterweights on the opposite end of the cables that attatch to freefall the car, which weigh slightly more than an empty car and slightly more than a full car, so that even if every other safety system failed the ascent or descent would accelerate only slowly, and the car would eventually come to a rough but hopefully survivable stop. Whatever the case, the elevator would not immediately plunge uncontrolled down the shaft would also require the safety breaks to malfunction, a very unlikely occurence. This mechanism, invented by Elisha Otis all the way back in 1852, causes the elevator to stick in the shaft the instant the tension goes out of the manner depicted just from some cables and was the main selling point by which he was able to convince prospective buyers that elevators were safe. Perhaps the snapping. Granted, a supernatural curse could have contrived contrive such a way for this safety to fail, catastrophic failure across multiple systems, but the police don't even mention talk as if the safety mechanism in their report. There are rare instances in which elevators kill people, but these accidents tend to involve cables snapping was the elevator mangling people who were caught between only thing that caused the car and the shaft, or ascending or descending in an uncontrolled fashion, rather than from the car going into freefall.accident.
31st Oct '16 7:38:22 AM TheBigBopper
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* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: The instance of ElevatorFailure focuses on the accident which causes the cables holding the elevator up to snap, but for the elevator to freefall down the shaft would also require the safety breaks to malfunction, a very unlikely occurence. This mechanism, invented by Elisha Otis all the way back in 1852, causes the elevator to stick in the shaft the instant the tension goes out of the cables and was the main selling point by which he was able to convince prospective buyers that elevators were safe. Perhaps the curse could have contrived a way for this safety to fail, but the police don't even mention the safety mechanism in their report. There are rare instances in which elevators kill people, but these accidents tend to involve the elevator mangling people who were caught between the car and the shaft, or ascending or descending in an uncontrolled fashion, rather than going into freefall.

to:

* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: The instance of ElevatorFailure focuses on the accident which causes the cables holding the elevator up to snap, but for the elevator to freefall down the shaft would also require the safety breaks to malfunction, a very unlikely occurence. This mechanism, invented by Elisha Otis all the way back in 1852, causes the elevator to stick in the shaft the instant the tension goes out of the cables and was the main selling point by which he was able to convince prospective buyers that elevators were safe. Perhaps the curse could have contrived a way for this safety to fail, but the police don't even mention the safety mechanism in their report. There are rare instances in which elevators kill people, but these accidents tend to involve the elevator mangling people who were caught between the car and the shaft, or ascending or descending in an uncontrolled fashion, rather than from the car going into freefall.
31st Oct '16 7:36:51 AM TheBigBopper
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Added DiffLines:

* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: The instance of ElevatorFailure focuses on the accident which causes the cables holding the elevator up to snap, but for the elevator to freefall down the shaft would also require the safety breaks to malfunction, a very unlikely occurence. This mechanism, invented by Elisha Otis all the way back in 1852, causes the elevator to stick in the shaft the instant the tension goes out of the cables and was the main selling point by which he was able to convince prospective buyers that elevators were safe. Perhaps the curse could have contrived a way for this safety to fail, but the police don't even mention the safety mechanism in their report. There are rare instances in which elevators kill people, but these accidents tend to involve the elevator mangling people who were caught between the car and the shaft, or ascending or descending in an uncontrolled fashion, rather than going into freefall.


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* ElevatorFailure: [[spoiler:Sanae Mizuno]] gets killed gruesomely inside an elevator when the cables snap and the car plummets to the bottom of the shaft. The investigation afterward finds lack of maintainence at fault, but the main characters know that the curse on class 3 was the real cause.
22nd Jul '16 12:15:05 PM triscion
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* IllGirl: Kouichi is introduced as an IllBoy, his left lung having collapsed on the day of his fifteenth birthday. Takabayashi is also one, explained as some sort of heart condition. [[spoiler: Misaki Fujioka is a far more typical example. She dies of leukemia in the anime, and of an unspecific kidney disease in the manga.]]

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* IllGirl: Kouichi is introduced as an IllBoy, his left lung having collapsed collapsed[[note]]for those curious this is know as a "[[https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/primary-spontaneous-pneumothorax spontaneous pneumothorax]]"[[/note]] on the day of his fifteenth birthday. Takabayashi is also one, explained as some sort of heart condition. [[spoiler: Misaki Fujioka is a far more typical example. She dies of leukemia in the anime, and of an unspecific kidney disease in the manga.]]
9th May '16 3:01:12 PM Godzillafan93
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** [[spoiler: Send the Dead Back to Death]] is also one.
9th May '16 3:00:10 PM Godzillafan93
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9th May '16 2:53:54 PM Godzillafan93
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* StrawManHasaPoint: During the dinner confrontation at the Inn in the novel, Takako's sole real contribution to the narrative is to suggest, had Kouichi not stopped to talk to Mei, or at least, had Yukari not ''seen'' the two of them flagrantly breaking the rules, she wouldn't have panicked and [[spoiler: fallen to her death running the other way.]] Kouichi himself admits she probably has a point there. Interestingly, despite having a much larger role in the anime, this scene is ''not'' [[petthedog present]] (it's referred to earlier by Aya, but only insofar as to mention Takako saw Yukari's death).

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* StrawManHasaPoint: During the dinner confrontation at the Inn in the novel, Takako's sole real contribution to the narrative is to suggest, had Kouichi not stopped to talk to Mei, or at least, had Yukari not ''seen'' the two of them flagrantly breaking the rules, she wouldn't have panicked and [[spoiler: fallen to her death running the other way.]] Kouichi himself admits she probably has a point there. Interestingly, despite having a much larger role in the anime, this scene is ''not'' [[petthedog present]] [[PetTheDog present (it's referred to earlier by Aya, but only insofar as to mention Takako saw Yukari's death).death, but that's it).]]
9th May '16 2:52:58 PM Godzillafan93
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* StrawManHasaPoint: During the dinner confrontation at the Inn in the novel, Takako's sole real contribution to the narrative is to suggest, had Kouichi not stopped to talk to Mei, or at least, had Yukari not ''seen'' the two of them flagrantly breaking the rules, she wouldn't have panicked and [[spoiler: fallen to her death running the other way.]] Kouichi himself admits she probably has a point there. Interestingly, despite having a much larger role in the anime, this scene is ''not'' [[petthedog present (it's referred to earlier by Aya, but only insofar as to mention Takako saw Yukari's death).

to:

* StrawManHasaPoint: During the dinner confrontation at the Inn in the novel, Takako's sole real contribution to the narrative is to suggest, had Kouichi not stopped to talk to Mei, or at least, had Yukari not ''seen'' the two of them flagrantly breaking the rules, she wouldn't have panicked and [[spoiler: fallen to her death running the other way.]] Kouichi himself admits she probably has a point there. Interestingly, despite having a much larger role in the anime, this scene is ''not'' [[petthedog present present]] (it's referred to earlier by Aya, but only insofar as to mention Takako saw Yukari's death).
9th May '16 2:52:12 PM Godzillafan93
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* StrawManHasaPoint: During the dinner confrontation at the Inn in the novel, Takako's sole real contribution to the narrative is to suggest, had Kouichi not stopped to talk to Mei, or at least, had Yukari not ''seen'' the two of them flagrantly breaking the rules, she wouldn't have panicked and [[spoiler: fallen to her death running the other way.]] Kouichi himself admits she probably has a point there. Interestingly, despite having a much larger role in the anime, this scene is ''not'' [[petthedog present (it's referred to earlier by Aya, but only insofar as to mention Takako saw Yukari's death).]]

to:

* StrawManHasaPoint: During the dinner confrontation at the Inn in the novel, Takako's sole real contribution to the narrative is to suggest, had Kouichi not stopped to talk to Mei, or at least, had Yukari not ''seen'' the two of them flagrantly breaking the rules, she wouldn't have panicked and [[spoiler: fallen to her death running the other way.]] Kouichi himself admits she probably has a point there. Interestingly, despite having a much larger role in the anime, this scene is ''not'' [[petthedog present (it's referred to earlier by Aya, but only insofar as to mention Takako saw Yukari's death).]]
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