History Literature / Alatriste

13th Jun '17 1:35:41 AM MadCormorant
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* ActorSharedBackground: In the film, the Basque Íñigo is portrayed by Basque actor [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unax_Ugalde Unax Ugalde]].
13th Jun '17 1:35:19 AM MadCormorant
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Added DiffLines:

* ActorSharedBackground: In the film, the Basque Íñigo is portrayed by Basque actor [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unax_Ugalde Unax Ugalde]].
15th Jan '17 7:43:50 AM LarryMullen
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* CaliforniaDoubling: The decision to film the TV adaptation in Hungary has met criticism.
3rd Aug '16 8:56:28 PM Eagal
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* BlackDudeDiesFirst: Averted in ''The King's Gold'', where Campuzano survives the raid with just some flesh wounds.
* [[spoiler:BolivianArmyEnding:]] In the movie, and confirmed by WordOfGod for the books. It's just that the author has not bothered to write the scene down yet.

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* BlackDudeDiesFirst: Averted in ''The King's Gold'', where Campuzano survives the raid with just some flesh wounds.
* [[spoiler:BolivianArmyEnding:]]
BolivianArmyEnding: In the movie, and confirmed by WordOfGod for the books. It's just that the author has not bothered to write the scene down yet.



* [[CrapsackWorld Crapsack Country]]: The novels portray 17th-century Spain in all its military, literary and artistic glory... and all its political, economical and moral misery.

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* [[CrapsackWorld Crapsack Country]]: CrapsackWorld: The novels portray 17th-century Spain in all its military, literary and artistic glory... and all its political, economical and moral misery.



* CorruptBureaucrat / CorruptChurch: Often alluded to as two of the chief reasons behind the decline of the Spanish Empire. Olmedilla, in ''The King's Gold'', is noted for ''not'' being a corrupt bureaucrat, which makes him a kind of rara avis.

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* CorruptBureaucrat / CorruptChurch: CorruptBureaucrat: Often alluded to as two of the chief reasons behind the decline of the Spanish Empire. Olmedilla, in ''The King's Gold'', is noted for ''not'' being a corrupt bureaucrat, which makes him a kind of rara avis.



* UsefulNotes/TheEightyYearsWar



* HonorBeforeReason: Many, many times.

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* %%* HonorBeforeReason: Many, many times.
27th Apr '16 1:08:37 AM 59Efra
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There is also a movie, starring Creator/ViggoMortensen, that tries to condense the nine plots all at once. A TV series adaptation is in production.

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There is also a movie, starring Creator/ViggoMortensen, that tries to condense the nine plots all at once. A [[Series/{{Alatriste}} TV series adaptation is adaptation]] aired in production.
early 2015, flopping notably.
25th Apr '16 3:21:53 PM Naram-Sin
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-->''"He was not the most honest of men, nor the most pious one, but he was a brave man."''\\

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-->''"He was not the most honest of men, man, nor the most pious one, pious, but he was a brave man."''\\



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21st Nov '15 9:17:25 PM Feasinde
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* ViewersAreGeniuses: Since they are told by a "contemporary" narrator, the original books are in Old Spanish, often with words that are rare or no longer used today, and 17th-century slang popping out constantly in the dialogue. Not to mention the parts written in other languages without translation provided, such as Portuguese or even Germanía - an argot of the criminal underworld that ''has been dead for centuries''. As expected, the series is a pain in the ass for professional translators.

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* ViewersAreGeniuses: Since they are told by a "contemporary" narrator, the original books are in Old 17th century Spanish, often with words that are rare or no longer used today, and 17th-century 17th century slang popping out constantly in the dialogue. Not to mention the parts written in other languages without translation provided, such as Portuguese or even Germanía - an argot of the criminal underworld that ''has been dead for centuries''. As expected, the series is a pain in the ass for professional translators.
8th Oct '15 5:29:09 PM MarkLungo
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''The Adventures of Captain Alatriste'' is a series of HistoricalFiction novels written by Arturo Pérez-Reverte starring a Spanish soldier-turned-mercenary-turned-sword-for-hire, the titular Diego Alatriste y Tenorio (who was never an actual Captain in the Army, [[NonIndicativeName but was called that way]]). Alatriste is a veteran of the [[EightyYearsWar Flanders War]] who lives badly in 17th-century Europe, looking for shady jobs and sometimes being lead to international conspiracies involving the Spanish Crown and the Inquisition. At the same time, Alatriste trains a squire, Íñigo de Balboa, the orphan child of an old friend; Íñigo serves as the narrator of the story. The series includes adventures and noir in a well-researched historical setting.

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''The Adventures of Captain Alatriste'' is a series of HistoricalFiction novels written by Arturo Pérez-Reverte starring a Spanish soldier-turned-mercenary-turned-sword-for-hire, the titular Diego Alatriste y Tenorio (who was never an actual Captain in the Army, [[NonIndicativeName but was called that way]]). Alatriste is a veteran of the [[EightyYearsWar [[UsefulNotes/TheEightyYearsWar Flanders War]] who lives badly in 17th-century Europe, looking for shady jobs and sometimes being lead to international conspiracies involving the Spanish Crown and the Inquisition. At the same time, Alatriste trains a squire, Íñigo de Balboa, the orphan child of an old friend; Íñigo serves as the narrator of the story. The series includes adventures and noir in a well-researched historical setting.



* EightyYearsWar

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* EightyYearsWarUsefulNotes/TheEightyYearsWar






<<|{{Literature}}|>>
20th Aug '15 12:45:30 AM Koveras
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''The Adventures of Captain Alatriste'' is a series of HistoricalFiction novels written by Arturo Pérez-Reverte starring a Spanish soldier-turned-mercenary-turned-sword-for-hire, the titular Diego Alatriste y Tenorio (who was never an actual Captain in the Army, [[NonIndicativeName but was called that way]]). Alatriste is a veteran of the [[EightyYearsWar Flanders War]] that lives badly in 17th-century Europe, looking for shady jobs and sometimes being lead to international conspiracies involving the Spanish Crown and the Inquisition. At the same time, Alatriste trains a squire, Íñigo de Balboa, the orphan child of an old friend; Íñigo serves as the narrator of the story. The series includes adventures and noir in a well-researched historical setting.

to:

''The Adventures of Captain Alatriste'' is a series of HistoricalFiction novels written by Arturo Pérez-Reverte starring a Spanish soldier-turned-mercenary-turned-sword-for-hire, the titular Diego Alatriste y Tenorio (who was never an actual Captain in the Army, [[NonIndicativeName but was called that way]]). Alatriste is a veteran of the [[EightyYearsWar Flanders War]] that who lives badly in 17th-century Europe, looking for shady jobs and sometimes being lead to international conspiracies involving the Spanish Crown and the Inquisition. At the same time, Alatriste trains a squire, Íñigo de Balboa, the orphan child of an old friend; Íñigo serves as the narrator of the story. The series includes adventures and noir in a well-researched historical setting.
6th Jul '15 8:52:27 AM Morgenthaler
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* {{Homage}}: The whole series can be read as Pérez Reverte's homage to the genre of historical adventure, especially AlexandreDumas and [[Literature/AubreyMaturin PatrickO'Brien]], but with a DarkerAndEdgier twist. It also reads as a PerspectiveFlip, since much of that literature has traditionally been written by British or French authors and tends to portray Spaniards as the bad guys.

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* {{Homage}}: The whole series can be read as Pérez Reverte's homage to the genre of historical adventure, especially AlexandreDumas Creator/AlexandreDumas and [[Literature/AubreyMaturin PatrickO'Brien]], but with a DarkerAndEdgier twist. It also reads as a PerspectiveFlip, since much of that literature has traditionally been written by British or French authors and tends to portray Spaniards as the bad guys.
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