History Literature / AesopsFables

20th Aug '17 6:34:49 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: In "The Frogs Pick a King", a community of frogs prays to Jupiter to send them a king. In order to quiet them, he drops a log into their pond. The frogs were frightened of the log at first, but before long, they started using it as a platform. They grew dissatisfied with their "sovereign" and asked Jupiter for a different king. His response was to send a stork to eat them.



* CaligulasHorse: In "The Frogs Pick a King", a community of frogs prays to Jupiter for a king. He responds by dropping a log in their pond and calling it their king.
* CatsAreMean / KingOfBeasts: Lions are the king of beasts, and in Aesop's Fables they won't let you forget it.



* CatsAreMean / KingOfBeasts: Lions are the king of beasts, and in Aesop's Fables they won't let you forget it.
16th Dec '16 9:03:49 PM WanderingBrowser
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* ConsummateLiar: One of the two travellers in "The Apes and the Two Travellers", the other traveller [[CannotTellALie is an inversion]] of this.

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* ConsummateLiar: One of the two travellers travelers in "The Apes and the Two Travellers", Travelers", the other traveller traveler [[CannotTellALie is an inversion]] of this.



* GenderBender: The core theme of "The Hyena and the Fox" (also titled "The Fox and the Hyena") and "The Two Hyenas". In the former, the hyena is rejected by the fox because the hyena's gender-bending nature makes it impossible for the fox to place as girlfriend or boyfriend, with the moral basically amounting to "don't be too ambiguous". In the latter uses the hyena's gender-bending nature comes into play in a dispute; the current male wants the current female to perform an "unnatural" sexual act or is abusing her, so the current female warns him to remember that eventually the tables will be turned.



* LiminalBeing: The bat, in one fable, tried to be a bird or a beast according to what it brought it. The birds and beasts unite in the end to agree that it's expelled from both.

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* LiminalBeing: The bat, in one fable, tried took advantage of its differing traits to be a bird or a beast according to what it brought it. The keep flip-flopping between the sides of the birds and the beasts when they went to war. Eventually, they made peace just long enough to unite in the end to agree and declare that it's expelled from both.the bat did not belong to either side, and that is why bats only come out at night.
2nd Dec '16 10:52:31 PM Xtifr
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'''Aesopos''' (Greek Αἴσωπος, shortened to Aesop in modern English) was a slave, later freedman, living somewhere in Asia Minor in the sixth century BC. If, that is, he existed at all.

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'''Aesopos''' Aesopos (Greek Αἴσωπος, shortened to Aesop in modern English) was a slave, later freedman, living somewhere in Asia Minor in the sixth century BC. If, that is, he existed at all.
28th Oct '16 9:15:59 AM Allronix
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** Subverted in "The Crow, the Fox, and the Cheese." The crow has a nice piece of cheese that the fox wants, so the fox resorts to flattery and coaxing to get her to "sing" which drops the cheese right in front of him. He slinks off with a full stomach and a warning to the crow to beware flatterers.



* UnpleasableFanbase: "The Man, the Boy, and the Ass" illustrate it ''perfectly.'' A man and a boy are taking their donkey to market, but various people on the side of the road all have suggestions about what should be done (Do you walk with the donkey or ride it? Is it better for the man or the child to be riding it, or both?). Eventually, the man and the boy end up trying to carry the donkey, who kicks free and drowns. The lesson is phrased as "please all, please none," but the pun in the English translation can be stated "trying to please everyone will make you lose your ass."
28th Oct '16 9:13:21 AM Allronix
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Added DiffLines:

* UnpleasableFanbase: "The Man, the Boy, and the Ass" illustrate it ''perfectly.'' A man and a boy are taking their donkey to market, but various people on the side of the road all have suggestions about what should be done (Do you walk with the donkey or ride it? Is it better for the man or the child to be riding it, or both?). Eventually, the man and the boy end up trying to carry the donkey, who kicks free and drowns. The lesson is phrased as "please all, please none," but the pun in the English translation can be stated "trying to please everyone will make you lose your ass."
16th Jun '16 2:02:47 AM Doug86
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* JerkassGods: Jupiter could sometimes come off as this for example in one story where he judged the animals' children, to find out which one was most beautiful, and coldly laughed at an ape's attempt. The ape's reaction was to say that Jupiter could have his judgement but [[HeartwarmingMoments to her, her offspring was the most beautiful of all. ]]

to:

* JerkassGods: Jupiter could sometimes come off as this for example in one story where he judged the animals' children, to find out which one was most beautiful, and coldly laughed at an ape's attempt. The ape's reaction was to say that Jupiter could have his judgement but [[HeartwarmingMoments [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments to her, her offspring was the most beautiful of all. ]]
14th Mar '16 7:16:58 PM Gamermaster
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Added DiffLines:

* LastSecondShowoff: "The Tortoise and the Hare" is the TropeCodifier.
15th Jan '16 3:27:47 AM Anddrix
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* [[ViewersAreMorons Readers Are Morons]]: Some of the fables (usually the more famous ones) outright stated the {{aesop}} of the story in the form of a sentence at the end of the story.
2nd Dec '15 9:27:56 AM Jamoa
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* CatsAreMean/KingOfBeasts: Lions are the king of beasts, and in Aesop's Fables they won't let you forget it.

to:

* CatsAreMean/KingOfBeasts: CatsAreMean / KingOfBeasts: Lions are the king of beasts, and in Aesop's Fables they won't let you forget it.
2nd Dec '15 9:26:38 AM Jamoa
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* CatsAreMean: Those lions you see at the zoo are apparently very evil.

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* CatsAreMean: Those lions CatsAreMean/KingOfBeasts: Lions are the king of beasts, and in Aesop's Fables they won't let you see at the zoo are apparently very evil.forget it.
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