History Literature / AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn

30th May '16 2:29:33 PM Vilui
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A satire first and foremost, experienced readers tend to find it even more entertaining, and knowing a good deal of history [[GeniusBonus doesn't hurt either]]. ''Huck Finn'' was revolutionary at the time for including a black slave as a main character. In doing so, though, it uses the words that were normal at the time, including "nigger" as a common description -- which of course isn't common anymore. The novels remains widely considered to be a pillar of American literature.

to:

A satire first and foremost, experienced readers tend to find it even more entertaining, and knowing a good deal of history [[GeniusBonus doesn't hurt either]]. ''Huck Finn'' was revolutionary at the time for including a black slave as a main character. In doing so, though, it uses the words that were normal at the time, including "nigger" as a common description -- which of course isn't common anymore. any more. The novels novel remains widely considered to be a pillar of American literature.
1st May '16 7:43:19 PM Jeduthun
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* ShamingTheMob: Colonel Sherburn calmly disperses an angry Lynch Mob with an epic TheReasonYouSuckSpeech.

to:

* ShamingTheMob: Colonel Sherburn calmly disperses an angry Lynch Mob with an epic TheReasonYouSuckSpeech.TheReasonYouSuckSpeech, telling them (as it turns out, correctly) that they are all [[DirtyCoward too cowardly]] to lynch him. However, this is made ambiguous by the fact that Sherburn definitely does not have the moral high ground; he had just shot and killed a man in cold blood in the middle of the street in broad daylight. Twain was not a fan of the old Southern code of justice.
28th Apr '16 5:58:59 PM Orbiting
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-->--'''MarkTwain'''

to:

-->--'''MarkTwain'''
-->-- '''MarkTwain's preface to the book'''
15th Apr '16 6:27:45 PM Jeduthun
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* TheAllAmericanBoy: Huck is this as an UnbuiltTrope.



* {{Flanderization}}: Tom Sawyer in this book is defined by his love of adventure stories, which was only one aspect of his character in ''Tom Sawyer''.

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* {{Flanderization}}: Tom Sawyer in this book is defined by his love of adventure stories, which was only one aspect of his character in ''Tom Sawyer''. (This gets even worse in the [[{{Sequelitis}} lesser-known later sequels]] ''Tom Sawyer Abroad'' and ''Tom Sawyer, Detective''.)



* MutualEnvy: Both TomSawyer and HuckleberryFinn put each other on pedastals, thinking the other the smartest person they know and wishing that they had the other's life.

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* MutualEnvy: Both TomSawyer and HuckleberryFinn put each other on pedastals, pedestals, thinking the other the smartest person they know and wishing that they had the other's life.


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* ShamingTheMob: Colonel Sherburn calmly disperses an angry Lynch Mob with an epic TheReasonYouSuckSpeech.
15th Apr '16 6:14:28 PM Jeduthun
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* {{Bowdlerize}}: An edition has recently been released with every incidence of the n-word changed to "slave". It creates several problems such as a free black man still being refered to as a slave. In their piece on it, ''Series/TheDailyShow'' pointed out a 1955 TV adaptation that ''wrote Jim out entirely''.

to:

* {{Bowdlerize}}: An edition has recently been released with every incidence of the n-word changed to "slave". It creates several problems such as a free black man still being refered referred to as a slave. In their piece on it, ''Series/TheDailyShow'' pointed out a 1955 TV adaptation that ''wrote Jim out entirely''.



* FeudingFamilies: The Grangerfords and Shepardsons; Huck stops by just before the tipping point in their feud. He tries to have Buck Grangerford to explain why the two families came to be at each other's troats in the first place, but Buck admits that the exact reasons why are rather unclear and that no one actually knows which family offended the other one first.

to:

* FeudingFamilies: The Grangerfords and Shepardsons; Huck stops by just before the tipping point in their feud. He tries to have Buck Grangerford to explain why the two families came to be at each other's troats throats in the first place, but Buck admits that the exact reasons why are rather unclear and that no one actually knows which family offended the other one first.


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* ThoseTwoBadGuys: The Duke and the Dauphin are a two-man ConArtist team with DelusionsOfEloquence.
13th Mar '16 8:08:34 AM Leliel
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Added DiffLines:

* ThenLetMeBeEvil: Subverted and probably deconstructed. Huck's internal "All right, I'll go to Hell" speech is about him deciding that being "righteous" isn't worth it if a friend is going to suffer. That already puts his "evil" under suspicion, which becomes even more so in context: said friend is Jim, and said Hell-worthy act is [[DeliberateValuesDissonance refusing to send him back to slavery]].
1st Feb '16 5:20:19 PM Awesomekid42
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Added DiffLines:

** TookALevelInJerkass: Tom also becomes far more selfish than previously, and is perfectly willing to put Jim's freedom at stake just so he can have an adventure,
23rd Oct '15 7:49:44 AM Morgenthaler
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A satire first and foremost, [[GenreSavvy genre-savvy]] readers tend to find it even more entertaining, and knowing a good deal of history [[GeniusBonus doesn't hurt either]]. ''Huck Finn'' was revolutionary at the time for including a black slave as a main character. In doing so, though, it uses the words that were normal at the time, including "nigger" as a common description -- which of course isn't common anymore. The novels remains widely considered to be a pillar of American literature.

to:

A satire first and foremost, [[GenreSavvy genre-savvy]] experienced readers tend to find it even more entertaining, and knowing a good deal of history [[GeniusBonus doesn't hurt either]]. ''Huck Finn'' was revolutionary at the time for including a black slave as a main character. In doing so, though, it uses the words that were normal at the time, including "nigger" as a common description -- which of course isn't common anymore. The novels remains widely considered to be a pillar of American literature.
24th Sep '15 1:34:11 AM PaulA
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* CreatorBreakdown: Twain ran into writer's block at several points during the writing process; the EndingFatigue was one result.



* WriteWhatYouKnow: Twain incorporated many events from his own life and adventures on the Mississippi into the fictional narrative. Two of the best examples are Colonel Sherburn's killing of Boggs and Huck finding the runaway Jim on the island, both of which were based on things that Twain actually witnessed firsthand. Both of these incidents were worse in RealLife, however. The {{Expy}} of Colonel Sherburn was acquitted on self-defense charges, and the slave Twain found on the island had been tortured to death by slavehunters and left to rot.[[note]]In case any of you are interested in traveling, St. Petersburg is Hannibal, MO, where you can camp outside of the cave and buy passage on a boat that will take you right past 'Jackson's Island' (making it easier to find later). 'Cardiff Hill' has a lighthouse on it. Be warned, however: the town ''knows'' that Mark Twain is its selling point, and they are capitalizing on it.[[/note]]
* WriteWhoYouKnow: Most of the townsfolk in St. Petersburg are based on members of Twain's family and his childhood friends from Hannibal, Missouri. Huck and Jim themselves are [[{{Expy}} Expys]] of the son of the town drunk and a slave Twain's uncle owned.
9th Sep '15 6:38:41 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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* FeudingFamilies: The Grangerfords and Shepardsons; Huck stops by just before the tipping point in their feud.

to:

* FeudingFamilies: The Grangerfords and Shepardsons; Huck stops by just before the tipping point in their feud. He tries to have Buck Grangerford to explain why the two families came to be at each other's troats in the first place, but Buck admits that the exact reasons why are rather unclear and that no one actually knows which family offended the other one first.


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* SuspiciouslySpecificSermon: Played for BlackComedy. The FeudingFamilies of the Grangerfords and Shepardsons both attend the same curch and on the sunday Finn visits along with the Grangerfords, the sermon is ironically about showing brotherly love for your neighbors.
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