History Literature / AChristmasCarol

22nd Aug '16 9:57:05 PM Homemaderat
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationExpansion: One of the most common changes kept in, that was not in the original work is Scrooge meeting Belle at Fezziwig's ball. Belle is only introduced in the next scene which is their breakup.
22nd Aug '16 11:32:06 AM Timjames98
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* EasilyForgiven: Everyone who Scrooge has been tormenting for years forgives him instantly upon his HeelFaceTurn, with no sign of a thought of carrying a grudge.

to:

* EasilyForgiven: Everyone who Scrooge has been tormenting for years forgives him instantly upon his HeelFaceTurn, with no sign of a thought of carrying a grudge. Potentially justified in that most of them are still Scrooges's employees or debtors and therefore might not want to risk turning him bad again by rejecting his change. They literally can not afford to not forgive him.
2nd Aug '16 4:44:14 PM vifetoile
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* IronicHell: Jacob Marley is forever chained to moneyboxes and safes, symbolizing his greed - all his wealth in life is now beyond useless to him. Scrooge sees other ghosts of rich men he knew, roaming the streets of London - now they're forced to witness firsthand the misery of the poor whom they scorned to help in life.
30th Jun '16 3:06:11 PM kyeo
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Added DiffLines:

* EasilyForgiven: Everyone who Scrooge has been tormenting for years forgives him instantly upon his HeelFaceTurn, with no sign of a thought of carrying a grudge.
22nd Jun '16 5:44:01 PM PaulA
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* ArmorPiercingQuestion: The Albert Finney adaption averts the example from the book, giving Scrooge an answer:
-->'''Fred:''' What reason have you to be so dismal? You're rich enough.\\
'''Scrooge:''' There is no such thing as 'rich enough'.



* ParlorGames: In one adaptation, guests at Fred's party play "Similes", and one entry is "As tight as. . . . " with the completion ". . . Uncle Ebeneezer's pockets!" OUCH!
22nd Jun '16 5:39:56 PM PaulA
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* AllJustADream: Or so Scrooge would like to think, at any rate.
** Though like a [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane certain other trope listed elsewhere on this page]] illustrates, it's really left up to the reader as to whether it was ''really'' AllJustADream, or if what transpired was ''very'' real, or even if it was some strange mix between the two.

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* AllJustADream: Or so Scrooge would like to think, at any rate.
**
rate. Though like a [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane certain other trope listed elsewhere on this page]] illustrates, it's really left up to the reader as to whether it was ''really'' AllJustADream, or if what transpired was ''very'' real, or even if it was some strange mix between the two.



** The Albert Finney adaption actually gives Scrooge an answer: "There is no such thing as 'rich enough.'"



* BenevolentBoss: Fezziwig, Scrooge's first employer.

to:

* BenevolentBoss: BenevolentBoss:
**
Fezziwig, Scrooge's first employer.



** In "Jacob Marley's Christmas Carol" a book showing the entire story through Marley's POV, the ghost actually ''is'' the Grim Reaper come to collect his soul, and it's only through Marley's HeroicSacrifice that Scrooge is given a second chance at life.



* HaveAGayOldTime: Scrooge "''had no further intercourse'' with Spirits, but lived upon the Total ''Abstinence'' Principle." By that, Dickens meant that Scrooge did not have any future interaction or communication with ghosts after his reformation. Meanwhile, "Total Abstinence Principle" was a phrase commonly associated with teetotaling, i.e. never drinking any alcohol or "spirits". (Yes, Dickens is indulging in a {{pun}}.) However, the meanings of "intercourse" and "abstinence" have changed to the point where even those who are (old enough to be) ''grandparents'' will raise their eyebrows at that particular passage.
** Also, when the Ghost of Christmas Present was showing Fred's Christmas, there was this line of narration: "Uncle Scrooge had imperceptibly become so gay and light of heart,..."

to:

* HaveAGayOldTime: HaveAGayOldTime:
** When the Ghost of Christmas Present was showing Fred's Christmas, there was this line of narration: "Uncle Scrooge had imperceptibly become so gay and light of heart,..."
**
Scrooge "''had no further intercourse'' with Spirits, but lived upon the Total ''Abstinence'' Principle." By that, Dickens meant that Scrooge did not have any future interaction or communication with ghosts after his reformation. Meanwhile, "Total Abstinence Principle" was a phrase commonly associated with teetotaling, i.e. never drinking any alcohol or "spirits". (Yes, Dickens is indulging in a {{pun}}.) However, the meanings of "intercourse" and "abstinence" have changed to the point where even those who are (old enough to be) ''grandparents'' will raise their eyebrows at that particular passage.
** Also, when the Ghost of Christmas Present was showing Fred's Christmas, there was this line of narration: "Uncle Scrooge had imperceptibly become so gay and light of heart,..."
passage.



* NothingIsScarier: The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come, who is completely shrouded, his true form [[TheUnreveal always just out of sight]]. It makes sense in that he's the embodiment of a man's blindness toward his own future.

to:

* NothingIsScarier: NothingIsScarier:
**
The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come, who is completely shrouded, his true form [[TheUnreveal always just out of sight]]. It makes sense in that he's the embodiment of a man's blindness toward his own future.



* ParlorGames: The guests at Fred's party play some; the original story used both Blind Man's Bluff and Twenty Questions.
** In one adaptation, the game is "Similes", and one entry is "As tight as. . . . " with the completion ". . . Uncle Ebeneezer's pockets!" OUCH!

to:

* ParlorGames: The guests at Fred's party play some; the original story used both some, including Blind Man's Bluff and Twenty Questions.
** In one adaptation, the game is "Similes", and one entry is "As tight as. . . . " with the completion ". . . Uncle Ebeneezer's pockets!" OUCH!
Questions.



* SuicideDare: Creator/CharlesDickens uses this to firmly establish Scrooge as a JerkAss at the beginning. When told that many of the poor would rather die than go to the hellish workhouses, Scrooge replies, "If they would rather die, they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population."
** An alternative (though hardly much better) interpretation is that rather than actually daring them to actually commit suicide, he's just so callous that he thinks that since they're likely to die of various poverty-related issues anyway, they should basically just lie down in the street and let it happen sooner rather than later.

to:

* SuicideDare: Creator/CharlesDickens uses this to firmly establish Scrooge as a JerkAss at the beginning. When told that many of the poor would rather die than go to the hellish workhouses, Scrooge replies, "If they would rather die, they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population."
**
" An alternative (though hardly much better) interpretation is that rather than actually daring them to actually commit suicide, he's just so callous that he thinks that since they're likely to die of various poverty-related issues anyway, they should basically just lie down in the street and let it happen sooner rather than later.



** Certain adaptations have him at the counting house, waiting for Bob, who is very late, to come in before starting in on him, only to proclaim "MERRY CHRISTMAS, BOB!"


Added DiffLines:

* ArmorPiercingQuestion: The Albert Finney adaption averts the example from the book, giving Scrooge an answer:
-->'''Fred:''' What reason have you to be so dismal? You're rich enough.\\
'''Scrooge:''' There is no such thing as 'rich enough'.


Added DiffLines:

* TheGrimReaper: In ''Jacob Marley's Christmas Carol'', a book showing the entire story through Marley's POV, the sinister hooded Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come actually ''is'' the Grim Reaper come to collect Scrooge's soul, and it's only through Marley's HeroicSacrifice that Scrooge is given a second chance at life.


Added DiffLines:

* ParlorGames: In one adaptation, guests at Fred's party play "Similes", and one entry is "As tight as. . . . " with the completion ". . . Uncle Ebeneezer's pockets!" OUCH!


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* {{Troll}}: Certain adaptations have Scrooge at the counting house, waiting for Bob, who is very late, to come in before starting in on him, only to proclaim "MERRY CHRISTMAS, BOB!"
14th May '16 8:37:55 PM SpideyTerry
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** The Magoo version had to drop a fair amount of material, but the most notable may be Scrooge's sister and nephew. This actually serves to make Scrooge even more sympathetic. As one of the songs says, he really is all alone in the world.
11th May '16 10:23:34 AM Jeduthun
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* ObliquelyObfuscatedOccupation: The book never specifies exactly what Scrooge's business is. He's referred to as being hard on his debtors, so many adaptations make him some sort of [[LoanShark moneylender]]. On the other hand, it's mentioned that he's well known on "'Change," that is, the merchandise/stock exchange in London. And he did his apprenticeship with Fezziwig, who was apparently a wholesaler of unspecified goods.
1st May '16 3:37:54 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* FranchiseZombie: Due to the sheer number of versions. Probably the only sequel-less work that qualifies for this.
11th Apr '16 4:15:43 PM Phediuk
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* AnachronismStew: Practically every adaptation depicts Scrooge and his employees using quill pens, even though by 1843, they were practically extinct; steel pens had been the standard since approximately 1820.

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* AnachronismStew: Practically every adaptation depicts Scrooge and his employees using quill pens, even though by 1843, they were practically extinct; steel pens had been the standard since approximately 1820.the 1820s.
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