History Literature / AChristmasCarol

4th Jan '17 10:15:01 AM AnotherGuy
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** It's now believed that Tim suffered from rickets, thanks to smoky conditions at the time in London as well as malnutrition. Poor children were particularly susceptible, and those afflicted were vulnerable to other diseases like tuberculosis and pneumonia. It was a problem that would be solved by eating vitamin D rich foods such as fish, cheese and liver, Scrooge probably made sure Tim was well-fed and helped cure his rickets.

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** It's now believed that Tim suffered from rickets, thanks to smoky conditions at the time in London as well as malnutrition. Poor children were particularly susceptible, and those afflicted were vulnerable to other diseases like tuberculosis and pneumonia. It was a problem that would be solved by eating vitamin D rich foods such as fish, cheese and liver, Scrooge probably made sure Tim was well-fed and helped cure his rickets. This theory was aided by the fact that 20 years after the novel was published, Dickens railed against malnutrition and rickets in children.
4th Jan '17 10:14:20 AM AnotherGuy
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* LittlestCancerPatient: UnbuiltTrope version. Unusual in that Tiny Tim's illness is not ''necessarily'' fatal, it is just that the Cratchits are too poor to afford treatment, which is why he dies in the alternate future. So when Scrooge has his change of heart and increases Bob's salary, Tim presumably doesn't succumb to his illness.

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* LittlestCancerPatient: LittlestCancerPatient:
**
UnbuiltTrope version. Unusual in that Tiny Tim's illness is not ''necessarily'' fatal, it is just that the Cratchits are too poor to afford treatment, which is why he dies in the alternate future. So when Scrooge has his change of heart and increases Bob's salary, Tim presumably doesn't succumb to his illness.illness.
** It's now believed that Tim suffered from rickets, thanks to smoky conditions at the time in London as well as malnutrition. Poor children were particularly susceptible, and those afflicted were vulnerable to other diseases like tuberculosis and pneumonia. It was a problem that would be solved by eating vitamin D rich foods such as fish, cheese and liver, Scrooge probably made sure Tim was well-fed and helped cure his rickets.
30th Dec '16 10:43:12 PM pwiegle
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* CreepyChild: Possibly CreepyTwins, though it's never specified. The Ghost of Christmas Present keeps a silent, wraith-like boy and girl -- Ignorance and Want, respectively -- under his cloak, telling Scrooge that they are mankind's children.

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* CreepyChild: Possibly CreepyTwins, though it's never specified. The Ghost of Christmas Present keeps a silent, wraith-like boy and girl -- Ignorance and Want, respectively -- under his cloak, telling Scrooge that they are mankind's children.children, born of poverty.



** In the [[Film/AChristmasCarol1984 George C. Scott movie,]] the spirit of Yet to Come doesn't speak, but every time it "responds" to Scrooge, a weird metallic wail is heard in the background.

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** In the [[Film/AChristmasCarol1984 George C. Scott movie,]] the spirit of Yet to Come doesn't speak, but every time it "responds" to Scrooge, a weird metallic wail is heard in the background.background, reminiscent of the rusty iron gates of a cemetery.
22nd Dec '16 11:09:15 PM jamespolk
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* AnachronismStew: Practically every adaptation depicts Scrooge and his employees using quill pens, even though by 1843, they were practically extinct; steel pens had been the standard since the 1820s.



* BreakingTheFourthWall: At the beginning CharlesDickens speaks directly to the reader to impress upon them that Jacob Marley was DeadToBeginWith. He explains this one fact is absolutely crucial to the story, and therefore warrants extensive WordOfGod confirmation, from death certificate to door-nail.

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* BreakingTheFourthWall: At the beginning CharlesDickens Charles Dickens speaks directly to the reader to impress upon them that Jacob Marley was DeadToBeginWith. He explains this one fact is absolutely crucial to the story, and therefore warrants extensive WordOfGod confirmation, from death certificate to door-nail.



* [[IllGirl Ill Boy]]: Tiny Tim. Though the cause of his illness is never specified, tuberculosis, polio, or renal tubercular acidosis seem like good candidates. Rickets is another one. [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1340779 Medical papers on Tiny Tim]] are numerous.

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* [[IllGirl Ill Boy]]: IllGirl: Tiny Tim. Though the cause of his illness is never specified, tuberculosis, polio, or renal tubercular acidosis seem like good candidates. Rickets is another one. [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1340779 Medical papers on Tiny Tim]] are numerous.



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* AdaptationExpansion:
** One of the most common changes kept in, that was not in the original work is Scrooge meeting Belle at Fezziwig's ball. Belle is only introduced in the next scene which is their breakup.

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* AdaptationExpansion:
**
AdaptationExpansion: One of the most common changes kept in, that was not in the original work is Scrooge meeting Belle at Fezziwig's ball. Belle is only introduced in the next scene which is their breakup.
22nd Dec '16 10:33:37 PM jamespolk
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* ''WesternAnimation/AChristmasCarol'' (1971, Alistair Sim {voice})
* ''Disney/MickeysChristmasCarol'' (1983, Creator/AlanYoung {voice})

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* ''WesternAnimation/AChristmasCarol'' (1971, (1971 animated short, Alistair Sim {voice})
Sim)
* ''Disney/MickeysChristmasCarol'' (1983, Creator/AlanYoung {voice})(1983 animated short, Creator/AlanYoung)



** In Dickens' book, the Ghost of Christmas Present takes Scrooge to see the Christmas celebrations of an isolated group of miners, a pair of lighthouse keepers, and the crew of a ship at sea. These scenes are rarely included in film or television adaptations, though ''Scrooge'' (1935) and the Patrick Stewart TV version (1999) has them, and the 1951 ''Film/{{Scrooge|1951}}'' has the miners.

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** In Dickens' book, the Ghost of Christmas Present takes Scrooge to see the Christmas celebrations of an isolated group of miners, a pair of lighthouse keepers, and the crew of a ship at sea. These scenes are rarely included in film or television adaptations, though ''Scrooge'' (1935) (1935), the 1971 animated short, and the 1999 Patrick Stewart TV version (1999) has have them, and the 1951 ''Film/{{Scrooge|1951}}'' has the miners.
22nd Dec '16 9:13:58 PM Mdumas43073
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* AmbitionIsEvil: When Belle is calls off their engagement, telling him that a "golden" idol has displaced her in his heart, the young Scrooge attempts to defend himself by invoking (and mocking) the trope:

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* AmbitionIsEvil: When Belle is calls off their engagement, telling him that a "golden" idol has displaced her in his heart, the young Scrooge attempts to defend himself by invoking (and mocking) the trope:
21st Dec '16 7:58:00 PM rockmanx
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Dickens continues to do this throughout the book, at one point telling the reader that "I am standing, in the spirit, at your elbow."

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Dickens **Dickens continues to do this throughout the book, at one point telling the reader that "I am standing, in the spirit, at your elbow."
21st Dec '16 12:23:24 AM MisterCPC
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** Fezziwig is a PosthumousCharacter in the story and only seen during one of Scrooge's visions of the past, while in ''Film/TheMuppetChristmasCarol'' he, or rather Fozziwig as he's called due to who's playing him, is still alive and well in the present as he's visited by Scrooge during the ending.
21st Dec '16 12:19:12 AM MisterCPC
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* AdaptationExpansion: One of the most common changes kept in, that was not in the original work is Scrooge meeting Belle at Fezziwig's ball. Belle is only introduced in the next scene which is their breakup.

to:

** Another common change used is having Scrooge visit the Crachits on Christmas Day to reveal his change of heart to them, when in the original story he spent the entire day at Fred's and Bob did not learn about his attitude change until the day after. Some versions work in ways to justify this - in the 1938 version Scrooge had previously fired Bob the day before, so he went to the Crachits' home to rehire him, while in Mickey's Christmas Carol Bob originally only had half a day off so Scrooge was visiting him before he attempted to head to the office later on.
* AdaptationExpansion: AdaptationExpansion:
**
One of the most common changes kept in, that was not in the original work is Scrooge meeting Belle at Fezziwig's ball. Belle is only introduced in the next scene which is their breakup.


Added DiffLines:

** Fezziwig is a PosthumousCharacter in the story and only seen during one of Scrooge's visions of the past, while in ''Film/TheMuppetChristmasCarol'' he, or rather Fozziwig as he's called due to who's playing him, is still alive and well in the present as he's visited by Scrooge during the ending.
20th Dec '16 2:31:52 PM DeanMT94
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Added DiffLines:

Dickens continues to do this throughout the book, at one point telling the reader that "I am standing, in the spirit, at your elbow."
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.AChristmasCarol