History LastNameBasis / RealLife

15th Feb '17 1:15:23 AM bwburke94
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** The main exceptions to this being some female politicians and [[LegacyCharacter political legacies]] whose last names aren't distinctive enough (Hillary Clinton, almost universally referred to as "Hillary", is an example of both). UsefulNotes/SaddamHussein was almost always referred to as "Saddam," presumably because "Hussein" is an all-too-common name in the Arab world.
** Saddam is just as common a first name as Hussein is as a surname. "Saddam Hussein" in the Arab world is about as distinctive as John Smith. Why the world came to refer to Saddam on a first name basis isn't clear, but it may have been propagated by Saddam himself as part of his cult of personality.
*** Before the first Gulf War, King Hussein of Jordan was also frequently in the news. There was confusion until the media settled on "Saddam".
** One extreme example was Abraham Lincoln. He didn't like the name Abe or Abraham and even his family and friends addressed him as Lincoln.

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** The main exceptions to this being some female politicians and [[LegacyCharacter political legacies]] whose last names aren't distinctive enough (Hillary Clinton, (UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton, almost universally referred to as "Hillary", is an example of both). UsefulNotes/SaddamHussein was almost always referred to as "Saddam," presumably because "Hussein" is an all-too-common name in the Arab world.
** Saddam is just as common a first name as Hussein is as a surname. "Saddam Hussein" in the Arab world is about as distinctive as John Smith. Why the world came
initially to refer to Saddam on a first name basis isn't clear, but it may have been propagated by Saddam himself as part of his cult of personality.
*** Before the first Gulf War,
avoid confusion with King Hussein of Jordan was also frequently in the news. There was confusion until the media settled on "Saddam".
Jordan.
** One extreme example was Abraham Lincoln.UsefulNotes/AbrahamLincoln. He didn't like the name Abe or Abraham and even his family and friends addressed him as Lincoln.
5th Jan '17 11:04:30 AM tropower
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* In the educational setting, students are commonly expected to address teachers, administrators -- and to a lesser extent, support staff -- by a courtesy title (Mr., Mrs. or Miss), administrative title (Principal or Superintendent), Coach, or Dr. (if they have a doctorate degree of some sort) and their surname, especially in the classroom. Sometimes, teachers will allow them to use a shortened last name (e.g., "Mrs. K" for Krabappel) if it is long or cumbersome to use. Sometimes, teachers and faculty will do this to each other as well when students are present.

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* In the educational setting, students are commonly expected to address teachers, administrators -- and to a lesser extent, support staff -- by a courtesy title (Mr., Mrs. or Miss), administrative title (Principal or Superintendent), Coach, or Dr. (if they have a doctorate degree of some sort) and their surname, especially in the classroom. Sometimes, teachers will allow them to use a shortened last name (e.g., "Mrs. K" for Krabappel) [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Krabappel]]) if it is long or cumbersome to use. Sometimes, teachers and faculty will do this to each other as well when students are present.
31st Jul '16 4:58:03 PM trixus
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* In cultures where FirstNameBasis is normal, a person with a common first name but an uncommon last name might be addressed on LastNameBasis by their friends and peers, just because it's a more distinctive name.

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* In cultures where FirstNameBasis is normal, a person with a common first name but an uncommon last name might be addressed on LastNameBasis by their friends and peers, just because it's a more distinctive name. Or because it sounds cooler.
3rd May '16 1:54:51 PM Briguy52748
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* Standard practice in [[JapanesePoliteness Japan]], combined with {{UsefulNotes/Japanese Honorifics}}. [[{{FirstNameBasis}} First name]] + honorific is more intimate, and ''yobisute'' (null honorific) even more so.
* Standard practice in all armed forces around the world.



** At least in North America, most schools[[note]]As well as day care centers, usually.[[/note]] expect their students to refer to their teachers and faculty as Mr./Ms./Miss/Mrs. [last name]. The teachers and faculty will usually do this to each other as well (well, in front of the students, anyway).

to:

** At least in North America, most schools[[note]]As well as day care centers, usually.[[/note]] expect their * In the educational setting, students are commonly expected to refer address teachers, administrators -- and to a lesser extent, support staff -- by a courtesy title (Mr., Mrs. or Miss), administrative title (Principal or Superintendent), Coach, or Dr. (if they have a doctorate degree of some sort) and their surname, especially in the classroom. Sometimes, teachers and faculty as Mr./Ms./Miss/Mrs. [last name]. The will allow them to use a shortened last name (e.g., "Mrs. K" for Krabappel) if it is long or cumbersome to use. Sometimes, teachers and faculty will usually do this to each other as well (well, in front of when students are present.
* Clergymen, except for their closest friends and family, often expect their parishioners to refer to them by their title (e.g., "Pastor," "Reverend," "Rabbi," etc.) and their last name, although some are fine with people using
the students, anyway).first name in combination with their title (e.g., "Pastor Dan").
* Years ago, before social conventions became relaxed, minors were often expected to refer to adults -- the exceptions needing to be explicitly stated -- by a courtesy title and their last name, or "sir" or "ma'am." This included dating relationships, where the date would be expected to address to his/her significant other's parents with the courtesy title Mr. and Mrs.
** In business relationships, where the customer service representative was speaking with a client they did not otherwise have an established relationship with (previous or personal), they might be expected to call them "Mr." or "Mrs.," or short of that, sir or ma'am. Also, in some businesses or companies, subordinate workers might be asked -- at least initially -- to refer to their superiors by Mr. or Mrs., although many are informal enough that they are allowed to call their supervisors and bosses by first name almost immediately.
* In the courtroom, in addition to attorneys referring to adult litigants, witnesses and defendants (and sometimes, minors over a certain age) by a courtesy title and last name, everyone is expected to refer to judges as "Your Honor" or, short of that, "Judge (last name)." Erroneously addressing a judge otherwise may earn a stern reprimand to a contempt of court citation, although for children a gentle reminder is all that's needed.
* Standard practice in [[JapanesePoliteness Japan]], combined with {{UsefulNotes/Japanese Honorifics}}. [[{{FirstNameBasis}} First name]] + honorific is more intimate, and ''yobisute'' (null honorific) even more so.
* Standard practice in all armed forces around the world.
4th Feb '16 5:27:46 PM tropower
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* The historical scientist (Nicolaus) Copernicus.

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* The historical scientist (Nicolaus) Copernicus.Copernicus.
* UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne hero [[Film/SergeantYork Sergeant (Alvin C.) York]][[note]]He was still referred to in the media as "Sergeant" even after he had been promoted at one point.[[/note]].
24th Jan '16 9:47:36 AM tropower
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* The historical scientist (Nicolaus) Copernicus

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* The historical scientist (Nicolaus) CopernicusCopernicus.
24th Jan '16 9:47:15 AM tropower
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* Stand-up comedian Creator/ChristopherTitus, with a few exceptions, has gone by his last name since at least high school. Also, at least one album has just used "Titus" on the front cover.

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* Stand-up comedian Creator/ChristopherTitus, with a few exceptions, has gone by his last name since at least high school. Also, at least one album has just used "Titus" on the front cover.cover.
* The historical scientist (Nicolaus) Copernicus
27th Nov '15 8:09:29 PM KingLyger
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* Colonel (Harland) Sanders (founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken)

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* Colonel (Harland) Sanders (founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken)Chicken)
* Stand-up comedian Creator/ChristopherTitus, with a few exceptions, has gone by his last name since at least high school. Also, at least one album has just used "Titus" on the front cover.
23rd Nov '15 9:43:43 AM tropower
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* A vast majority of political figures are referred mainly by their last name, unless they get some kind of nickname ([[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]]).

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** At least in North America, most schools[[note]]As well as day care centers, usually.[[/note]] expect their students to refer to their teachers and faculty as Mr./Ms./Miss/Mrs. [last name]. The teachers and faculty will usually do this to each other as well (well, in front of the students, anyway).
* A vast majority of political figures are referred mainly by their last name, unless they get some kind of nickname ([[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy (e.g.,[[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]]).
20th Nov '15 6:09:24 AM LaptopGuy
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** Fans also typically refer to sports figures only by their last name, with only a few exceptions (Kobe Bryant is "Kobe," Shaquille O'Neal is "Shaq," etc.).

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** Fans also typically refer to sports figures only by their last name, with only a few exceptions (Kobe Bryant is "Kobe," Shaquille O'Neal is "Shaq," "Shaq", [=LeBron=] James is "[=LeBron=]", Alex Rodriguez is "A-Rod", etc.).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=LastNameBasis.RealLife