History IronicEcho / Theater

7th Jan '16 11:18:20 AM nombretomado
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* In ''MissSaigon'', Chris asks Kim, "How in the light of one night did we come so far?", as they fall madly in love and spend the night together. But at the end of the show, as she lies dying in his arms, she asks him the question ("How in one night have we come... so far?"), but this time, it's mourning their lost chance at happiness. * In ''SouthPacific'', "Younger Than Springtime" initially describes Joe Cable's newfound love for Liat. But after he refuses to marry her (unwilling to confront the prejudice they would face as an interracial couple), the song's reprise now represents the end of their relationship.
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* In ''MissSaigon'', ''Theatre/MissSaigon'', Chris asks Kim, "How in the light of one night did we come so far?", as they fall madly in love and spend the night together. But at the end of the show, as she lies dying in his arms, she asks him the question ("How in one night have we come... so far?"), but this time, it's mourning their lost chance at happiness. * In ''SouthPacific'', ''Theatre/SouthPacific'', "Younger Than Springtime" initially describes Joe Cable's newfound love for Liat. But after he refuses to marry her (unwilling to confront the prejudice they would face as an interracial couple), the song's reprise now represents the end of their relationship.
24th Jul '15 4:25:29 PM nombretomado
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* In an unusual variation, ''MerrilyWeRollAlong'' is told in reverse order, so the ironic echoes are heard first. For instance, Mary's rather desperate reprise of "Old Friends" is after the friendship has fallen apart; we don't hear it sung genuinely until several more timeskips back.
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* In an unusual variation, ''MerrilyWeRollAlong'' ''Theatre/MerrilyWeRollAlong'' is told in reverse order, so the ironic echoes are heard first. For instance, Mary's rather desperate reprise of "Old Friends" is after the friendship has fallen apart; we don't hear it sung genuinely until several more timeskips back.
7th Feb '15 8:53:32 PM damus2300
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*** Valjean tells Javert "You know nothing of my life/the world!" to which the latter throws back "You know nothing of Javert!"

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**Valjean and Javert's first meeting. --->'''Javert''': "You will starve again! Unless you learn the meaning of The Law." --->'''Valjean''': "I learned in those 19 years, a slave of ''the law''."
2nd Dec '14 8:25:57 PM Aiguille
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* In the musical version of ''TheAddamsFamily'', Morticia refuses to dance with Gomez after learning [[BerserkButton he's keeping something from her]], telling him, "Not today." Later, Gomez is distraught that Morticia is leaving him and wondering if it's the end of his marriage and their family. He eventually proclaims, "Not today!"
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* In the musical version of ''TheAddamsFamily'', ''Theatre/TheAddamsFamily'', Morticia refuses to dance with Gomez after learning [[BerserkButton he's keeping something from her]], telling him, "Not today." Later, Gomez is distraught that Morticia is leaving him and wondering if it's the end of his marriage and their family. He eventually proclaims, "Not today!"
12th Aug '14 3:25:43 PM SpacemanSpoof
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** And another one - at the barricade, Valjean prays for Marius to survive, asking God to "Bring him home." Later on, [[spoiler: when Valjean feels that his life is all wrapped up and he's ready to die]] his prayer is similar, but changes to "Bring me home". ** Then there's "Little People". This song introduces Gavroche as a bright, upbeat sort of kid who has a lot of potential. Its reprise is one of the biggest tearjerkers in the whole play: [[spoiler: the rebels are running low on ammo, and Gavroche goes out to loot some from the dead soldiers, singing this song as a sort of Determinator mantra despite being shot repeatedly. He doesn't even finish the song.]]
29th Jul '14 4:37:51 AM WiddershinsDaughter
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29th Jul '14 4:37:50 AM WiddershinsDaughter
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* In the stage play ''AFewGoodMen,'' Lt. Kaffey does this to Col. Jessep in a deconstruction of his motives. ** ''Kaffee:'' You trashed the law! But hey, we understand, you're permitted. You have a greater responsibility than we can possibly fathom. You provide us with a blanket of freedom. We live in a world that has walls and those walls have to be guarded by men with guns, and nothing is going to stand in your way of doing it. Not Willie Santiago, not Dawson and Downey, not Markinson, not 1,000 armies, not the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and not the Constitution of the United States! ''That's the truth isn't it Colonel? '''I can handle it.'''''
5th Mar '14 5:42:05 AM ikissfrogs
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* Used repeatedly in Theatre/SweeneyToddTheDemonBarberOfFleetStreet. Nearly all of the main characters get ironic echoes, and most of those echoes are ''much'' darker the second time round. ** ''There was a barber and his wife, and she was beautiful...'' - the first time Todd is mourning the wife he was forced to leave behind. The second time he's still mourning... having just realised that he's responsible for her death. ** ''Eminently practical and yet appropriate as always...'' - first time a genuine compliment from Todd to Mrs Lovett, regarding her idea of making his victims into pies. The second time he's trying to get her guard down...
20th Nov '13 12:42:02 PM LordGro
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* Common in older theatrical writing, particularly in the Victorian period. GilbertAndSullivan's ''The Yeomen of the Guard'' has a lot of this, the most obvious being the repeat of "I have a Song to Sing-O", first as Jack and Elsie working together to entertain a crowd as street performers, and then at Elsie's wedding to Fairfax, as him trying to win her back, and her rejecting him, as gently as she can, with the only change in lyrics making it worse, by indicating the rest of the story the song tells, where the jester gets the woman back, will ''not'' follow. However, that's only the most obvious; lines bounce around characters and situations throughout the work, reflecting ironically on the changing circumstances.
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* Common in older theatrical writing, particularly in the Victorian period. GilbertAndSullivan's ''The Yeomen of the Guard'' Creator/GilbertAndSullivan's ''Theatre/TheYeomenOfTheGuard'' has a lot of this, the most obvious being the repeat of "I have a Song to Sing-O", first as Jack and Elsie working together to entertain a crowd as street performers, and then at Elsie's wedding to Fairfax, as him trying to win her back, and her rejecting him, as gently as she can, with the only change in lyrics making it worse, by indicating the rest of the story the song tells, where the jester gets the woman back, will ''not'' follow. However, that's only the most obvious; lines bounce around characters and situations throughout the work, reflecting ironically on the changing circumstances.

* ''ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' uses both identical melodies and lyrics. "All I Ask Of You" is a joyous love song between Christine and Raoul, but when the Phantom sings it to Christine, it's a desperate plea for her love. And most notably, the final lines of "Music of the Night", "You alone can make my song take flight, help me make the music of the night", are a passionate declaration of love, but when the Phantom sings them at the end of the show, he is now despairing of having lost Christine. "It's ''over'' now, the music of the night."
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* ''ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' ''Theatre/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' uses both identical melodies and lyrics. "All I Ask Of You" is a joyous love song between Christine and Raoul, but when the Phantom sings it to Christine, it's a desperate plea for her love. And most notably, the final lines of "Music of the Night", "You alone can make my song take flight, help me make the music of the night", are a passionate declaration of love, but when the Phantom sings them at the end of the show, he is now despairing of having lost Christine. "It's ''over'' now, the music of the night."
26th Jul '13 6:04:18 PM toru771
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Adding an example.
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** A somewhat subtle example -- the line "Jean Valjean is nothing now" can also be seen as this. It first appears in "Valjean's Soliloquy" when Valjean resolves to [[ThatManIsDead forsake his old identity and become a better man.]] In "Confrontation," it's sung by Javert after he has learned that the mayor he's been serving is actually Valjean, a convict who has broken his parole and whom Javert has resolved to capture.
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