History InsistentTerminology / RealLife

24th Mar '17 11:32:15 AM TheNicestGuy
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* If you ask any serious paintball enthusiast--and especially any proprietor of a paintball venue--the name of the thing that shoots the paintballs, it is never a paintball "gun". It is a paintball "marker". This is because of the fine line the sport rides, trying to dissociate itself from notions of "gun violence", and yet wanting to attract players who are looking for something like a war game.
22nd Mar '17 8:50:56 PM TheNewBig
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* The field of mental health is full of this trope. For some, it's not even "mental health." It's "behavioral health." Patients are "clients" or "consumers." And don't you dare, under any circumstances, ever use the word "crazy."

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* The field of mental health is full of this trope. For some, it's not even "mental health." It's "behavioral health." Patients are "clients" or "consumers." And don't you dare, under any circumstances, ever use the word "crazy."
22nd Mar '17 4:52:51 PM LucaEarlgrey
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** ATC personnel are only permitted to say "takeoff" when clearing an aircraft for takeoff or cancelling an aircraft's previously-granted takeoff clearance; any other time while on duty, they must use the term "departure" instead. There is a very, ''very'' good reason for this: the infamous [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenerife_airport_disaster Tenerife airport disaster]] was caused by ATC telling a pilot to "stand by for takeoff" and said pilot took it to mean "cleared for takeoff", not knowing there was another jet taxiing down the runway until it was too late.
22nd Mar '17 4:51:49 PM LucaEarlgrey
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** ATC personnel are only permitted to say "takeoff" when clearing an aircraft for takeoff or cancelling an aircraft's previously-granted takeoff clearance; any other time while on duty, they must use the term "departure" instead. There is a very, ''very'' good reason for this: the infamous [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenerife_airport_disaster Tenerife airport disaster]] was caused by ATC telling a pilot to "stand by for takeoff" and said pilot took it to mean "cleared for takeoff", not knowing there was another jet taxiing down the runway until it was too late.
8th Mar '17 11:50:04 AM hszmv1
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** The United States Army (though other branches of the Department of Defense have adopted this as well) does not fight enemies. It fight's adversaries (this one stems more as a joke about this than actually sensible police. As one general once noted "The Russians are our Adversary, the Navy is our enemy." It was funny enough to become common usage.)
20th Feb '17 5:23:53 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[BritishNewspapers The Times]]'', British newspaper of record, may be printed on tabloid sized paper, but don't you ''[[BerserkButton dare]]'' call it a tabloid. It's a "quality compact", thank you very much! The same is true of ''The Independent''. ''The Guardian'' would also like to remind you that it is in the slightly-larger Berliner format.

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* ''[[BritishNewspapers ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers The Times]]'', British newspaper of record, may be printed on tabloid sized paper, but don't you ''[[BerserkButton dare]]'' call it a tabloid. It's a "quality compact", thank you very much! The same is true of ''The Independent''. ''The Guardian'' would also like to remind you that it is in the slightly-larger Berliner format.
2nd Feb '17 7:15:46 PM Saurubiker
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** As for the proper names of the consoles themselves, Nintendo officially discouraged the use of "Nintendo" and "Super Nintendo" for their 8-bit and 16-bit home console respectively despite their common use in colloquial speech. They instead encouraged the use of the officially accepted abbreviations of NES and Super NES respectively.

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** As for the proper names of the consoles themselves, Nintendo officially discouraged the use of "Nintendo" and "Super Nintendo" for their 8-bit and 16-bit home console "Entertainment Systems" respectively despite their common use in colloquial speech. They instead encouraged the use of prefer the officially accepted abbreviations of NES and Super NES respectively.
2nd Feb '17 4:33:01 PM Saurubiker
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** As for the proper names of the consoles themselves, Nintendo officially discouraged the use of "Nintendo" and "Super Nintendo" for their 8-bit and 16-bit home console respectively, preferring instead to use the proper full names or the officially accepted abbreviations of NES and Super NES respectively.

to:

** As for the proper names of the consoles themselves, Nintendo officially discouraged the use of "Nintendo" and "Super Nintendo" for their 8-bit and 16-bit home console respectively, preferring respectively despite their common use in colloquial speech. They instead to encouraged the use the proper full names or of the officially accepted abbreviations of NES and Super NES respectively.
2nd Feb '17 4:24:59 PM Saurubiker
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** Naval aircraft pilots prefer the term "aviators," probably because [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritime_pilot Pilot]] refers to an entirely different job in the maritime trades. Marine pilots also use this phrase, since they too fly their aircraft off ships.

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** Naval aircraft pilots prefer the term "aviators," probably because [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritime_pilot Pilot]] refers to an entirely different job in the maritime trades. Marine pilots also use this phrase, since they too fly their aircraft off ships.



** Naval aviators, particularly carrier based aviators have their own unique terms, distinct from regular sailors.
*** Contrary to the example cited above, aviators will call their home carrier "The Boat", and they don't serve "in" the ship, they serve "on" the ship.
** + Aviators call a flight deck crash while attempting to land, a "Ramp Strike" as opposed to a "crash". This is because technically, every carrier landing is a "controlled crash".
*** Aviators call the Integrated Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System the "meatball" or "ball", while Landing Signal Officers who advise an aviator on proper landing are called "paddles".
*** A carrier based air wing commander is always called '''CAG''' (rhymes with "bag"), never "Captain" or "skipper". This is because the "skipper" is what they call ''squadron commanders'', while "Captain" is reserved for their carrier's captain, who is different from the CAG.
*** The flight deck and air traffic control commander is called "Air Boss" or "Boss", thereby precluding aviators from calling their commanders "boss".



* When marketing the NintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo tried to avoid using terminology used by previous consoles. This was part of their vain attempt to pass the [=NES=] off as something other than a video game console in order to get retailers, skeptical about video games after the Great Crash, to go along with them. The name says it all; it was an "Entertainment System," not a video game system. The games didn't come on cartridges, but "Game Paks", which were inserted into the "Control Deck," not the console.

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* When marketing the NintendoEntertainmentSystem [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem NES]] Nintendo tried to avoid using terminology used by previous consoles. This was part of their vain attempt to pass the [=NES=] off as something other than a video game console in order to get retailers, skeptical about video games after the Great Crash, to go along with them. The name says it all; it was an "Entertainment System," not a video game system. The games didn't come on cartridges, but "Game Paks", which were inserted into the "Control Deck," not the console.console.
** As for the proper names of the consoles themselves, Nintendo officially discouraged the use of "Nintendo" and "Super Nintendo" for their 8-bit and 16-bit home console respectively, preferring instead to use the proper full names or the officially accepted abbreviations of NES and Super NES respectively.
2nd Feb '17 4:16:35 PM manofwarb
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** Naval aircraft pilots prefer the term "aviators," probably because [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritime_pilot Pilot]] refers to an entirely different job in the maritime trades.

to:

** Naval aircraft pilots prefer the term "aviators," probably because [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritime_pilot Pilot]] refers to an entirely different job in the maritime trades. Marine pilots also use this phrase, since they too fly their aircraft off ships.


Added DiffLines:

** Naval aviators, particularly carrier based aviators have their own unique terms, distinct from regular sailors.
*** Contrary to the example cited above, aviators will call their home carrier "The Boat", and they don't serve "in" the ship, they serve "on" the ship.
**+ Aviators call a flight deck crash while attempting to land, a "Ramp Strike" as opposed to a "crash". This is because technically, every carrier landing is a "controlled crash".
*** Aviators call the Integrated Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System the "meatball" or "ball", while Landing Signal Officers who advise an aviator on proper landing are called "paddles".
*** A carrier based air wing commander is always called '''CAG''' (rhymes with "bag"), never "Captain" or "skipper". This is because the "skipper" is what they call ''squadron commanders'', while "Captain" is reserved for their carrier's captain, who is different from the CAG.
*** The flight deck and air traffic control commander is called "Air Boss" or "Boss", thereby precluding aviators from calling their commanders "boss".
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