History InsistentTerminology / RealLife

23rd Jun '16 7:30:27 AM Jhonny
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***It's not so much ''countries'' as ''fans of a certain sport'' - American soccer fans have adopted a lot of British terms for "Football" (soccer) and the (American) Football leagues of Europe often have "Football" in the name without necessarily having "American" there as well. And don't even get into Gaelic Football, Aussie rules Football and all that. It's just that outside the US (and Canada, and Australia, and New Zealand and Ireland and...) soccer is the dominant sport claiming to be "Football".
23rd Jun '16 6:50:25 AM Sharlee
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** Likewise, all those other gadgets for "foot massage" or "relaxation" that, since Victorian times, have refused to admit they're vibrators.

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** Likewise, all those other gadgets for "foot massage" "massage" or "relaxation" that, since Victorian times, have refused to admit they're vibrators.
23rd Jun '16 6:49:21 AM Sharlee
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** Likewise, all those other gadgets for "foot massage" or "relaxation" that, since Victorian times, have refused to admit they're vibrators.
18th Jun '16 2:23:38 AM ZombieAladdin
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* In {{pinball}}, shaking the machine to influence the ball is referred to as "nudging," not "tilting." Tilting is a type of nudging that lands the player a tilt penalty [[note]]A tilt penalty ends the ball without an end-of-ball bonus on more recent machines; a tilt penalty outright ''ends the game'' on older machines[[/note]]. Hence, a player will never intentionally try to "tilt" the ball or the machine unless he or she wants to get that penalty.

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* In {{pinball}}, shaking the machine to influence the ball is referred to as "nudging," not "tilting." Tilting is a type of nudging that lands the player a tilt penalty penalty, simply called a "tilt" on nearly all machines [[note]]A tilt penalty ends the ball without an end-of-ball bonus on more recent machines; a tilt penalty outright ''ends the game'' on older machines[[/note]]. Hence, a player will never intentionally try to "tilt" tilt the ball or the machine unless he or she wants to get that penalty.penalty, but that player might nudge until he or she feels a tilt is imminent.
18th Jun '16 2:21:22 AM ZombieAladdin
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* In {{pinball}}, shaking the machine to influence the ball is referred to as "nudging," not "tilting." Tilting is a type of nudging that lands the player a tilt penalty [[note]]A tilt penalty ends the ball without an end-of-ball bonus on more recent machines; a tilt penalty outright ''ends the game'' on older machines[[/note]]. Hence, a player will never intentionally try to "tilt" the ball or the machine unless he or she wants to get that penalty.
** When you lose a ball, it goes down the "drain." It is NOT a "hole" [[note]]as those can refer to scoops or gobble holes, which have different mechanisms and thus function differently[[/note]], and it is NOT a "gutter" [[note]]that is a bowling term[[/note]].
** Due to a storm of trademarks from different manufacturers, bumpers go by different names but is consistent within machines made by each manufacturer. Creator/MidwayGames calls them "jet bumpers," Creator/DataEast calls them "pop bumpers," and Creator/{{Gottlieb}} calls them "thumper bumpers." As Data East's pinball division would be given to Creator/{{Sega}} and then became Creator/{{Stern}}, which is now the leading pinball manufacturer, "pop bumper" has become the standard name. However, the entire industry agrees that the triangular bumpers located right above the flippers are "slingshots." As for why they are not simply called "bumpers," it's to differentiate them from the "passive bumper" or the "mushroom bumper," which do not have a mechanism to forcibly propel the ball away once hit.
11th Jun '16 12:25:31 PM KYCubbie
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*** Cal and California are the only approved terms for the athletic program. The school's alumni association also uses "Cal".

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*** Cal and California are the only approved terms for the athletic program. The "Cal" is also used by the school's alumni association also uses "Cal".and development (fundraising) office.



* UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} does not have a downtown. Downtown is for New York. Philadelphia has "Center City." So do Allentown, Pennsylvania and Wilmington, Delaware, and apparently also Toledo, Ohio, but it's not as serious there as in Philly.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} does not have a downtown. Downtown is for New York. Philadelphia has "Center City." So do Allentown, Pennsylvania and Wilmington, Delaware, and apparently also Toledo, Ohio, UsefulNotes/ToledoOhio, but it's not as serious there as in Philly.
28th May '16 8:06:33 PM nombretomado
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** Other console manufacturers have also used fancy sounding monikers to describe their products. Sony, for instance, refers to the PlayStation line as "Computer Entertainment Systems."

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** Other console manufacturers have also used fancy sounding monikers to describe their products. Sony, for instance, refers to the PlayStation UsefulNotes/PlayStation line as "Computer Entertainment Systems."
25th May '16 9:02:00 PM KYCubbie
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*** Or if you go to Boston College, which is also technically a university... and not to be confused with Boston University, a totally separate institution located a few miles away.
23rd May '16 12:01:09 PM KYCubbie
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** The University of California, Berkeley has long discouraged people from calling it UCB or The University of California '''at''' Berkeley, and now discourages the use of "Berkeley", but several other terms are acceptable:
*** UC Berkeley and the whole name are acceptable for the university, but ''not'' for the athletic program.
*** Cal and California are the only approved terms for the athletic program.

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** The University of California, Berkeley has long discouraged people from calling it UCB or The University of California '''at''' Berkeley, and now discourages the use of "Berkeley", but several other terms are acceptable:
*** UC Berkeley, Berkeley and the whole name are acceptable for the university, but ''not'' for the athletic program.
program.
*** Cal and California are the only approved terms for the athletic program. The school's alumni association also uses "Cal".
22nd May '16 2:06:51 PM Jhonny
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*** In some places (notably Central America) saying "I don't eat meat" will get you an offer of chicken. "Meat" (carne) being understood to mean pork or beef.
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