History InsistentTerminology / RealLife

13th Aug '16 12:48:53 AM Hadjorim
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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America" and no offense is meant by it. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" and has done so for centuries without controversy.

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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America" and no offense is meant by it. America". It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" and has done so for centuries without controversy.any issues.
12th Aug '16 10:35:55 PM Hadjorim
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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America" and no offense is meant by it. It should also be pointed out this is only a controversy among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" and has done so for centuries without controversy.

to:

* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America" and no offense is meant by it. It should also be pointed out this is only a controversy problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" and has done so for centuries without controversy.
12th Aug '16 10:35:32 PM Hadjorim
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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America" and no offense is meant by it. It should also be pointed out this is only a controversy among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" and has done so for centuries without controversy.

to:

* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America" and no offense is meant by it. It should also be pointed out this is only a controversy among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" and has done so for centuries without controversy.
12th Aug '16 10:34:57 PM Hadjorim
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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,'' which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America" and no offense is meant by it. It should also be pointed out this is only a controversy among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" and has done so for centuries without controversy.

to:

* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,'' "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America" and no offense is meant by it. It should also be pointed out this is only a controversy among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" and has done so for centuries without controversy.
12th Aug '16 10:34:30 PM Hadjorim
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** Similar to the above, people in Mexico refer to those from the US as ''norteamericanos'' (North Americans), which gets confusing when you realize that the United States isn't the only North American country; in fact, '''''Mexico itself''''' is part of the North American continent as well.
12th Aug '16 10:34:11 PM Hadjorim
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* The use of the word "American" to mean people from outside of the United States can be a complicated prospect. Some Canadians and Mexicans don't like it, while others think that they're just as much "American" as any other person from the American continents. South American Spanish speakers actually have a distinct word for people just from the United States: "''estadounidense,''" which is sort of like "United Statesian."

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* The use of the word "American" to mean people from outside of the United States can be a complicated prospect. Some Canadians and Mexicans don't like it, while others think prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that they're just there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as much arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,'' which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence the use of the word "American" simply as any other person from a shortening of the American continents. South American Spanish speakers actually have a distinct word for people just from name of the country, "The United States: "''estadounidense,''" which States of America" and no offense is sort meant by it. It should also be pointed out this is only a controversy among the inhabitants of like "United Statesian."Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" and has done so for centuries without controversy.
3rd Aug '16 7:22:04 AM Jhonny
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* They're not prostitutes, they're "''escorts''." This, however is an EnforcedTrope in many countries. You see, almost all of the US (as the best known example) outlaws prostitution defined as an exchange of money for any sexual acts. However, there AintNoLaw against paying for "spending time with someone", "nude housekeeping", "massages" or whatever the euphemism ''du jour'' is. And there is also no rule prohibiting two consenting adults from having sex, even if one of them just so happens to pay the other for something [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial entirely unrelated]]. In theory however, this means that a "not-prostitute" could simply refuse having sex with the client even after being paid and there is nothing the client could do, as they are not paying for sex. Interestingly, despite making pornography being legal in many places where prostitution isn't, nobody has yet tried to abuse that as a loophole for prostitution.

to:

* They're not prostitutes, they're "''escorts''." This, however is an EnforcedTrope in many countries. You see, almost all of the US (as the best known example) outlaws prostitution defined as an exchange of money for any sexual acts. However, there AintNoLaw AintNoRule against paying for "spending time with someone", "nude housekeeping", "massages" or whatever the euphemism ''du jour'' is. And there is also no rule prohibiting two consenting adults from having sex, even if one of them just so happens to pay the other for something [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial entirely unrelated]]. In theory however, this means that a "not-prostitute" could simply refuse having sex with the client even after being paid and there is nothing the client could do, as they are not paying for sex. Interestingly, despite making pornography being legal in many places where prostitution isn't, nobody has yet tried to abuse that as a loophole for prostitution.
3rd Aug '16 7:21:41 AM Jhonny
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* They're not prostitutes, they're "''escorts''."

to:

* They're not prostitutes, they're "''escorts''."" This, however is an EnforcedTrope in many countries. You see, almost all of the US (as the best known example) outlaws prostitution defined as an exchange of money for any sexual acts. However, there AintNoLaw against paying for "spending time with someone", "nude housekeeping", "massages" or whatever the euphemism ''du jour'' is. And there is also no rule prohibiting two consenting adults from having sex, even if one of them just so happens to pay the other for something [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial entirely unrelated]]. In theory however, this means that a "not-prostitute" could simply refuse having sex with the client even after being paid and there is nothing the client could do, as they are not paying for sex. Interestingly, despite making pornography being legal in many places where prostitution isn't, nobody has yet tried to abuse that as a loophole for prostitution.
2nd Aug '16 8:26:12 PM Teakay
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Added DiffLines:

* [[https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/feb/21/internet-shaming-lindsey-stone-jon-ronson As Jon Ronson was once informed]], a bot that tweeted word salad under his name wasn't an identity-stealing spambot, it was an ''infomorph'' that was ''repurposing social media data''.
25th Jul '16 7:50:43 PM kquinn0830
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Added DiffLines:

* While many have called [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Charlie Brown]] the archetypical "lovable loser", Charles Schulz always insisted "he is NOT a loser. A real loser would give up."
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