History InsistentTerminology / RealLife

9th Dec '17 9:29:26 AM moloch
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* Nationalists in Northern Ireland (and most residents of the republic as well) refer to the city in the west of Northern Ireland as "Derry". Unionists (and most residents of the rest of the UK) refer to it as "Londonderry". The distinction is so well-known in Ireland that it's often a convenient shortcut of figuring out an individual's political allegiances (and often their religion too).
** The Nationalist community tend to self-identify as "Irish", while the Unionist community self-identify as "British" (or "Ulster" / "Ulster Scots"). As such, Nationalists insist on referring to the Six Counties as "Northern Ireland", while Unionists often prefer "Ulster", stressing what they see as a distinct, non-Irish identity. For those unsure of the identity of any one individual "Northern Irish" and "Northern Ireland" are generally considered acceptable neutral terms, at least until any particular preferences are highlighted. (For nitpickers, Ulster also includes Donegal, which is part of the Republic of Ireland and extends farther north than Northern Ireland does.)

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* Nationalists in Northern Ireland (and most residents of the republic Republic as well) refer to the city in the west of Northern Ireland as "Derry". "Derry", the Anglicisation of its Irish name. Unionists (and most many residents of the rest of the UK) refer to it as "Londonderry". "Londonderry", a name it gained in the 17th century. The distinction is so well-known in Ireland that it's often a convenient shortcut of shibboleth for figuring out an individual's political allegiances (and often their religion too).
** The Nationalist community tend to self-identify as "Irish", while the Unionist community self-identify as "British" (or "Ulster" / "Ulster Scots"). As such, Nationalists insist on referring to the Six Counties as "Northern Ireland", while Unionists often prefer "Ulster", stressing what they see as a distinct, non-Irish identity. For those unsure of the identity of any one individual "Northern Irish" and "Northern Ireland" are generally considered acceptable neutral terms, at least until any particular preferences are highlighted. (For nitpickers, Ulster also includes the state of Northern Ireland is only two-thirds of Ulster, and Donegal, which is part of the Republic of Ireland and extends farther Ulster but not Northern Ireland, reaches further north than Northern Ireland does.)does).
27th Nov '17 6:15:10 PM nombretomado
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* Japan's Constitution bans it from having a "offensive" military. However, it said nothing against [[KaijuDefenseForce "Self-defense forces",]] [[LoopholeAbuse even if said force happens to include Fighter Jets, helicopter carriers, and Tanks.]]

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* Japan's Constitution bans it from having a "offensive" military. However, it said nothing against [[KaijuDefenseForce [[UsefulNotes/KaijuDefenseForce "Self-defense forces",]] [[LoopholeAbuse even if said force happens to include Fighter Jets, helicopter carriers, and Tanks.]]
25th Nov '17 11:20:56 AM MarqFJA
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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent (not helped by the fact that the USA tends to overshadow the other countries of the continent). Meanwhile schoolchildren in the United States are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. In Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian." This doesn't really work in English, hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America and the Spanish language since the RAE (Royal Spanish Academy) recognizes the use of the term "American" for everyone born in the continent and calls out against its use as a synonym for a citizen of the United States - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the United States "Americans" without any issues. That being said, some languages do observe the distinction between the country and the continent(s) if the context isn't sufficiently clear; German, for example, has ''US-Amerikaner'' and ''US-Amerikanisch'' for citizens and as an adjective respectively (the logical English equivalent would be "US-American"), althought they're regarded as "politically correct" terms rather than normal parlance.

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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent (not helped by the fact that the USA tends to overshadow the other countries of the continent). Meanwhile schoolchildren in the United States are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. In Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian." This doesn't really work in English, hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America and the Spanish language since the RAE (Royal Spanish Academy) recognizes the use of the term "American" for everyone born in the continent and calls out against its use as a synonym for a citizen of the United States - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the United States "Americans" without any issues. That being said, some languages other than Spanish do observe the distinction between the country and the continent(s) if the context isn't sufficiently clear; German, for example, has ''US-Amerikaner'' and ''US-Amerikanisch'' for citizens and as an adjective respectively (the logical English equivalent would be "US-American"), althought they're regarded as "politically correct" terms rather than normal parlance.
25th Nov '17 11:18:51 AM MarqFJA
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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent (not helped by the fact that the USA tends to overshadow the other countries of the continent). Meanwhile schoolchildren in the United States are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. In Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian." This doesn't really work in English, hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America and the Spanish language since the RAE (Royal Spanish Academy) recognizes the use of the term "American" for everyone born in the continent and calls out against its use as a synonym for a citizen of the United States - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the United States "Americans" without any issues.

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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent (not helped by the fact that the USA tends to overshadow the other countries of the continent). Meanwhile schoolchildren in the United States are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. In Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian." This doesn't really work in English, hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America and the Spanish language since the RAE (Royal Spanish Academy) recognizes the use of the term "American" for everyone born in the continent and calls out against its use as a synonym for a citizen of the United States - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the United States "Americans" without any issues. That being said, some languages do observe the distinction between the country and the continent(s) if the context isn't sufficiently clear; German, for example, has ''US-Amerikaner'' and ''US-Amerikanisch'' for citizens and as an adjective respectively (the logical English equivalent would be "US-American"), althought they're regarded as "politically correct" terms rather than normal parlance.
23rd Nov '17 8:52:34 PM ladyofthelibrary
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Added DiffLines:

* Despite UsefulNotes/AspergersSyndrome having been folded into a blanket description of "High-Functioning Autism", many people who were diagnosed before the change and their loved ones continue to insist that Asperger's should remain its own diagnosis and continue to identify it as such.
22nd Nov '17 7:16:07 PM nombretomado
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* During the CubanMissileCrisis, the United States implemented a "quarantine" on shipments to Cuba, since a blockade is an act of war.

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* During the CubanMissileCrisis, UsefulNotes/CubanMissileCrisis, the United States implemented a "quarantine" on shipments to Cuba, since a blockade is an act of war.
15th Nov '17 8:26:08 PM KYCubbie
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** On that note - Hitler himself saw to it that anything remotely connecting his politics to classical "socialism" was eradicated from his party - so, the term "Socialist" in NSDAP is an InNameOnly issue. Hitler was, for all practical reasons, a fascist.

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** On that note - Hitler himself saw to it that anything remotely connecting his politics to classical "socialism" was eradicated from his party - so, the term "Socialist" in NSDAP is an InNameOnly issue. Hitler was, for all practical reasons, purposes, a fascist.



** In the eyes of the U.S. government, Indiana natives ''were'' "Indianans" in all official publications for generations. The feds didn't adopt "Hoosiers" as the official demonym until ''January 2017''.



** On the other hand, lawyers who specialize in the field will point out that there really is ''no'' correct way to use the term "intellectual property". If you want to say anything legally meaningful, you have use the specific term "copyright", "trademark / service mark / trade dress", or "patent". The three areas of the law work quite differently, so lumping them all as "IP" is both a cause and effect of layperson confusion.

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** On the other hand, lawyers who specialize in the field will point out that there really is ''no'' correct way to use the term "intellectual property". If you want to say anything legally meaningful, you have use the specific term "copyright", "trademark / service mark / trade dress", "patent", or "patent". "trade secret". The three four areas of the law work quite differently, so lumping them all as "IP" is both a cause and effect of layperson confusion.
10th Nov '17 10:15:45 PM KYCubbie
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** According to Richard Dawkins and Stephen J. Gould, most paleontologists don't like the name ''Apatosaurus'' either, and a common day dream in the dinosaur community is discovering a document that would give the naming precedence back to ''Brontosaurus''.

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** According to Richard Dawkins and Stephen J. Gould, most paleontologists don't like the name ''Apatosaurus'' either, and a common day dream daydream in the dinosaur community is discovering a document that would give the naming precedence back to ''Brontosaurus''.



* They're not prostitutes, they're "''escorts''." This, however is an EnforcedTrope in many countries. You see, almost all of the US (as the best known example) outlaws prostitution defined as an exchange of money for any sexual acts. However, there AintNoRule against paying for "spending time with someone", "nude housekeeping", "massages" or whatever the euphemism ''du jour'' is. And there is also no rule prohibiting two consenting adults from having sex, even if one of them just so happens to pay the other for something [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial entirely unrelated]]. In theory however, this means that a "not-prostitute" could simply refuse having sex with the client even after being paid and there is nothing the client could do, as they are not paying for sex. Interestingly, despite making pornography being legal in many places where prostitution isn't, nobody has yet tried to abuse that as a loophole for prostitution.

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* They're not prostitutes, they're "''escorts''." "''escorts''". This, however is an EnforcedTrope in many countries. You see, almost all of the US (as the best known example) outlaws prostitution defined as an exchange of money for any sexual acts. However, there AintNoRule against paying for "spending time with someone", "nude housekeeping", "massages" or whatever the euphemism ''du jour'' is. And there is also no rule prohibiting two consenting adults from having sex, even if one of them just so happens to pay the other for something [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial entirely unrelated]]. In theory however, this means that a "not-prostitute" could simply refuse having sex with the client even after being paid and there is nothing the client could do, as they are not paying for sex. Interestingly, despite making pornography being legal in many places where prostitution isn't, nobody has yet tried to abuse that as a loophole for prostitution.



* Some creators of anthropomorphic animal illustration are ''very'' insistent on not being called "[[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom furry artists]]."

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* Some creators of anthropomorphic animal illustration are ''very'' insistent on not being called "[[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom furry artists]]."artists]]".



** The plurals also demonstrate this trope. The Māori language, spoken by the Polynesian people who arrived in New Zealand before European contact, does not have a plural form as we know it in English, instead adding a pronoun or article to the singular word. In New Zealand English, words borrowed from Māori, such as "kiwi" (the bird), do not change in the plural. Therefore, "two kiwi" always refers to two birds, while "two Kiwis" (capitalized) are two (human) New Zealanders, and "two kiwis" (lower case) are two NZ dollars.

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** The plurals also demonstrate this trope. The Māori language, spoken by the Polynesian people who arrived in New Zealand before European contact, does not have a plural form as we know it in English, instead adding a pronoun or article to the singular word. In New Zealand NZ English, words borrowed from Māori, such as "kiwi" (the bird), do not change in the plural. Therefore, "two kiwi" always refers to two birds, while "two Kiwis" (capitalized) are two (human) New Zealanders, and "two kiwis" (lower case) are two NZ dollars.



* Similarly its never a non-lethal weapon its a less than lethal weapon. Very much [[JustifiedTrope justified]] in this case, as there have been many avoidable deaths caused when someone used a weapon marketed as non-lethal. Most of these occurred when they used the weapon in a situation they didn't need to because they thought it was harmless.

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* Similarly its it's never a non-lethal weapon its weapon, it's a less than lethal less-than-lethal weapon. Very much [[JustifiedTrope justified]] {{justified|Trope}} in this case, as there have been many avoidable deaths caused when someone used a weapon marketed as non-lethal. Most of these occurred when they used the weapon in a situation they didn't need to because they thought it was harmless.



* People don't die of certain diseases, such as AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis, or Diabetes, but instead they die of complications of those diseases. For medical examiners, ''proximate'' vs. ''ultimate'' cause of death is an important issue that has bearing on whether a death is natural, accidental, or intentional. For example, with a death from hypoglycemic coma, the proximate cause is asphyxiation due to respiratory failure while the ultimate cause is diabetes leading to a major drop in blood sugar. If the drop in blood sugar may have been intentionally induced, then the death is a potential homicide.

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* People don't die of certain diseases, such as AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, or Diabetes, diabetes, but instead they die of complications of those diseases. For medical examiners, ''proximate'' vs. ''ultimate'' cause of death is an important issue that has bearing on whether a death is natural, accidental, or intentional. For example, with a death from hypoglycemic coma, the proximate cause is asphyxiation due to respiratory failure while the ultimate cause is diabetes leading to a major drop in blood sugar. If the drop in blood sugar may have been intentionally induced, then the death is a potential homicide.



* The musical theatre fandom has this a-plenty.

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* The musical theatre fandom has this a-plenty.aplenty.



* By contrast, the most common umbrella term for black people in Canada is "Black Canadian". Unlike the States, where the large majority of the black population is descended from slaves brought over from Africa, the black population in Canada has more diverse origins. Most are immigrants from the Caribbean or their descendants; a large minority is made up of more recent immigrants from Africa (and ''their'' descendants); and a small number (mostly concentrated in Nova Scotia and southwest Ontario) trace their Canadian origins from U.S. immigrants.[[note]]The U.S. diaspora was mainly in two waves. The first was the so-called Black Loyalists, free blacks who left for British Canada after the American Revolution. The second was escaped slaves who made their way north via the Underground Railroad in the years before the Civil War.[[/note]] "African Canadian" is strongly objected to by those in the Caribbean-descended community; "Afro-Caribbean Canadian" is used in the names of some events and organizations, but isn't as easy on the tongue as "Black Canadian".

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* By contrast, the most common umbrella term for black people in Canada is "Black Canadian". Unlike the States, where the While a large majority of the black population in both countries descends from enslaved Africans, the origins of the U.S. and Canadian communities are nonetheless radically different. The bulk of the African-American population is descended from slaves Africans who were brought over from Africa, to the U.S. as slaves, but the black population in Canada has more diverse origins. results almost exclusively from voluntary migration to Canada. Most Black Canadians are immigrants from the Caribbean or their descendants; a large minority is made up of more recent immigrants from Africa (and and ''their'' descendants); descendants; and a small number (mostly concentrated in Nova Scotia and southwest Ontario) trace their Canadian origins from U.S. immigrants.[[note]]The U.S. diaspora was mainly in two waves. The first was the so-called Black Loyalists, free blacks who left for arrived in British Canada in the decades after the American Revolution.Revolution, consisting of free "Black Loyalists" and some fugitive slaves. The second was escaped slaves who made their way north via the Underground Railroad in the years before the Civil War.[[/note]] "African Canadian" is strongly objected to by those in the Caribbean-descended community; "Afro-Caribbean Canadian" is used in the names of some events and organizations, but isn't as easy on the tongue as "Black Canadian".
2nd Nov '17 10:02:37 AM raziel365
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* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile schoolchildren in the United States are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. In Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian." This doesn't really work in English, hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the United States "Americans" without any issues.

to:

* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent.continent (not helped by the fact that the USA tends to overshadow the other countries of the continent). Meanwhile schoolchildren in the United States are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. In Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian." This doesn't really work in English, hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America and the Spanish language since the RAE (Royal Spanish Academy) recognizes the use of the term "American" for everyone born in the continent and calls out against its use as a synonym for a citizen of the United States - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the United States "Americans" without any issues.
19th Oct '17 8:05:52 AM bowserbros
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* Among audiophiles, the device that plays vinyl records is a turntable, not a record player. Record players are cheap, nasty machines that will wear down the grooves of your records. A turntable is a high-end component of an audio system.

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* Among audiophiles, the device that plays vinyl records is a turntable, not a record player. Record players are cheap, nasty machines that will wear down the grooves of your records. A turntable is a high-end component of an audio system. The term "vinyl" in this context is also an example of this trope: the term simply refers to the material the record is made of, yet most analog enthusiasts insist on using it to describe the medium as a whole (despite the fact that records aren't always made from vinyl, with early ones being made from shellac resin and master records being made from acetate or lacquer).
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