History InsistentTerminology / RealLife

30th Nov '16 3:15:27 AM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Football is also used by Aussie rules and Gaelic football players to refer to their own sports with Association Football also referred to as soccer.

to:

*** Football is also used by Aussie rules and Gaelic football players to refer to their own sports with Association Football also referred to as soccer. You'll often hear "soccer" used in Ireland because of the presence of Gaelic football; even association football fans will use "soccer" if they feel it's necessary to avoid confusion.



** Many pro sports teams have gold as an official color. Almost none have yellow as an official color ("yellow" can also mean cowardly). Even teams whose shade of "gold" is very obviously yellow, like the Pittsburgh Steelers, Oakland Athletics, Green Bay Packers, Los Angeles Lakers, and so on. Do not refer to those teams' colors as "yellow" around ardent fans; they will quickly correct you. The dictinction probably arose from heraldic conventions, where yellow is referred to as ''or'' (gold).

to:

** Many pro sports teams have gold as an official color. Almost none have yellow as an official color ("yellow" can also mean cowardly). Even teams whose shade of "gold" is very obviously yellow, like the Pittsburgh Steelers, Oakland Athletics, Green Bay Packers, Los Angeles Lakers, and so on. Do not refer to those teams' colors as "yellow" around ardent fans; they will quickly correct you. The dictinction distinction probably arose from heraldic conventions, where yellow is referred to as ''or'' (gold).



** Incidentally, most actual socialists/communists/assorted other far left groups object to being compared to the Democratic Party, the mainstream of which is too conservative for their tastes. Center-lefties tend to return the favor, as the center left tends to have no particular problem with (properly regulated) capitalism and don't tend to hold the more collectivist principles of socialism and Communism as gospel. (Also, Communists are a radical subset of socialists, [[WeAreStrugglingTogether etc.]])

to:

** Incidentally, most actual socialists/communists/assorted other far left groups object to being compared to the Democratic Party, the mainstream of which is too conservative for their tastes. Center-lefties tend to return the favor, as the center left tends to have no particular problem with (properly regulated) capitalism and don't tend to hold the more collectivist principles of socialism and Communism as gospel. (Also, Communists are a radical subset of socialists, [[WeAreStrugglingTogether [[WeAREStrugglingTogether etc.]])



* George H.W. Bush promised "no new taxes" then imposed what he termed "revenue enhancements". (This is also ExactWords; he "enhanced" the existing taxes rather than creating new ones.) The presidential election of 1992 indicated that [[UsefulNotes/BillClinton most of the country did not agree with him]].

to:

* George H.W. Bush UsefulNotes/GeorgeHWBush promised "no new taxes" then imposed what he termed "revenue enhancements". (This is also ExactWords; he "enhanced" the existing taxes rather than creating new ones.) The presidential election of 1992 indicated that [[UsefulNotes/BillClinton most of the country did not agree with him]].



* The [[EastGermany German Democratic Republic]] used this trope a lot:
** Renaming its more oppressive features, similar to PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny - the Berlin Wall was officially referred to as the ''Anti-Imperialistischer''/''Antifaschistischer Schutzwall'' (anti-imperialist or anti-fascist protection rampart), both terms targeted at WestGermany.

to:

* The [[EastGermany [[UsefulNotes/EastGermany German Democratic Republic]] used this trope a lot:
** Renaming its more oppressive features, similar to PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny - the Berlin Wall was officially referred to as the ''Anti-Imperialistischer''/''Antifaschistischer Schutzwall'' (anti-imperialist or anti-fascist protection rampart), both terms targeted at WestGermany.UsefulNotes/WestGermany.



** You can both date and place the origin of a German language text by the terms it uses to refer to the largest German speaking city, or rather its parts. West-Berlin, Berlin (West) for the West and Ost-Berlin or Berlin, Hauptstadt der DDR for the East. "Pankow" (a neighborhood in East-Berlin) was also often used pars pro toto for East-Berlin, especially when talking about the political leadership. Probably because it sounds "Russian" to most Germans and thus underscores the "foreign government" aspect the West-German conservatives liked to emphasize about the GDR.

to:

** You can both date and place the origin of a German language German-language text by the terms it uses to refer to the largest German speaking city, or rather its parts. West-Berlin, Berlin (West) for the West and Ost-Berlin or Berlin, Hauptstadt der DDR for the East. "Pankow" (a neighborhood in East-Berlin) was also often used pars pro toto for East-Berlin, especially when talking about the political leadership. Probably because it sounds "Russian" to most Germans and thus underscores the "foreign government" aspect the West-German conservatives liked to emphasize about the GDR.



** This is true for the almost all of Germany which makes matters complicated even for germans. A "Gast" (guest) is someone that stays for a long time and is serviced (in a hotel, in a restaurant, etc) while a Kunde (customer) is someone that is in a shop and is mostly independent. Things get complicated since self-service restaurants often have customers while exclusive shops have guests, gas stations can mess it up entirely depending on if there is someone filling your car, if there is simply a cashier or if it is a purely automated station and so on...

to:

** This is true for the almost all of Germany which makes matters complicated even for germans.Germans. A "Gast" (guest) is someone that stays for a long time and is serviced (in a hotel, in a restaurant, etc) while a Kunde (customer) is someone that is in a shop and is mostly independent. Things get complicated since self-service restaurants often have customers while exclusive shops have guests, gas stations can mess it up entirely depending on if there is someone filling your car, if there is simply a cashier or if it is a purely automated station and so on...



* Japan's Constitution bans it from having a "offensive" military. However, is said nothing against [[KaijuDefenseForce "Self-defense forces",]] [[LoopholeAbuse even if said force happens to include Fighter Jets, helicopter carriers, and Tanks.]]
** Same for Germany. It was forced to have no war forces after WWII, but it is allowed to have a defense force, leading to the "Bundeswehr" (country defense). It mostly works like normal military, except that it strongly advertises that everything it does - in Germany or abroad - is to "protect" something regarding Germany to justify them being there. This is also reflected by the ministry that is responsible for it, the "Bundesministerium für Verteidigung" (Federal Ministry of Defense). Whenever media accuse the Bundeswehr or the ministry of invading or attacking, they are very quick to point out that they are only "defending" or "protecting" something. It becomes weirder since NATO and EU both require Germany to send forced for active battle into areas which is officially forbidden.

to:

* Japan's Constitution bans it from having a "offensive" military. However, is it said nothing against [[KaijuDefenseForce "Self-defense forces",]] [[LoopholeAbuse even if said force happens to include Fighter Jets, helicopter carriers, and Tanks.]]
** Same for Germany. It was forced to have no war forces after WWII, but it is allowed to have a defense force, leading to the "Bundeswehr" (country defense). It mostly works like normal military, except that it strongly advertises that everything it does - in Germany or abroad - is to "protect" something regarding Germany to justify them being there. This is also reflected by the ministry that is responsible for it, the "Bundesministerium für Verteidigung" (Federal Ministry of Defense). Whenever media accuse the Bundeswehr or the ministry of invading or attacking, they are very quick to point out that they are only "defending" or "protecting" something. It becomes weirder since NATO and EU both require Germany to send forced forces for active battle into areas which is officially forbidden.



** Like Japan, Israel has the [[UsefulNotes/IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles Israel Defense Forces (IDF)]].[[note]]Note that the IDF officially uses the American spelling of "Defense" instead of the Commonwealth "Defence".[[/note]] The name literally translates from Hebrew as "The Army of Defense for Israel".

to:

** Like Japan, Israel has the [[UsefulNotes/IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles Israel Defense Forces (IDF)]].[[note]]Note that in English, the IDF officially uses the American spelling of "Defense" instead of the Commonwealth "Defence".[[/note]] The name literally translates from Hebrew as "The Army of Defense for Israel".



* In Germany, euthanasia is called "Einschläferung" (starting to sleep) while assissted suicide is called "Sterbehilfe" (dying help). Whenever a big argument about assissted suicide starts, defenders will persist on positive sounding words such as "Einschläferung", "Sterbehilfe" or "Begleitetes Sterben" (accompanied dying) while opponents will usually stay with more cruel sounding words refering to "suicide" or even "murder".

to:

* In Germany, euthanasia is called "Einschläferung" (starting to sleep) while assissted assisted suicide is called "Sterbehilfe" (dying help). Whenever a big argument about assissted suicide starts, defenders will persist on positive sounding words such as "Einschläferung", "Sterbehilfe" or "Begleitetes Sterben" (accompanied dying) while opponents will usually stay with more cruel sounding words refering to "suicide" or even "murder".



** Whatever you do, don't confuse [[WeAreStrugglingTogether "free software" and "open-source software"]] around members of the Free Software Foundation (especially Stallman) or Open Source Initiative. [[note]]Open source software is released in an uncompiled "source" format, which can be edited directly by the end user, as opposed to a compiled "binary" format which cannot; it's unrelated to whether the software is offered for any purpose or not, or indeed whether money is requested or not. Put another way, free vs. non-free is a legal distinction; open-source vs. closed-source is a technical one.[[/note]]

to:

** Whatever you do, don't confuse [[WeAreStrugglingTogether [[WeAREStrugglingTogether "free software" and "open-source software"]] around members of the Free Software Foundation (especially Stallman) or Open Source Initiative. [[note]]Open source software is released in an uncompiled "source" format, which can be edited directly by the end user, as opposed to a compiled "binary" format which cannot; it's unrelated to whether the software is offered for any purpose or not, or indeed whether money is requested or not. Put another way, free vs. non-free is a legal distinction; open-source vs. closed-source is a technical one.[[/note]]



* 9/11 Truthers claim for their ConspiracyTheories that the demolitions that bought down WTC 1,2, and 7 were caused by a substance known as "nano-thermite". Their opposition will derisively refer to it as "super-thermite", one of its other names. The Truthers will almost inevitably "correct" their opposition with "nano-thermite".

to:

* 9/11 Truthers claim for their ConspiracyTheories that the demolitions that bought down WTC 1,2, 1, 2, and 7 were caused by a substance known as "nano-thermite". Their opposition will derisively refer to it as "super-thermite", one of its other names. The Truthers will almost inevitably "correct" their opposition with "nano-thermite".



* If you're talking to or around a person from England, never refer to the most commonly known accent from that place as 'a British accent' unless you want to start a flame war. Its correct name is Received Pronunciation (RP) and is actually not an "accent" at all, but an arbitrary pronounciation chosen for clearness to be used in radio broadcasts. The "posh" dialect used by the Queen and other members of the upper crust is as distinct to RP as the broadest working class brogue (It sounds a bit like South African english)

to:

* If you're talking to or around a person from England, never refer to the most commonly known accent from that place as 'a British accent' unless you want to start a flame war. Its correct name is Received Pronunciation (RP) and is actually not an "accent" at all, but an arbitrary pronounciation pronunciation chosen for clearness to be used in radio broadcasts. The "posh" dialect used by the Queen and other members of the upper crust is as distinct to RP as the broadest working class brogue (It sounds a bit like South African english)
4th Nov '16 4:03:51 AM skarl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Try using the term "football" to describe American Football in any country where it is not the dominant variety of football (i.e. most of the not-USA world). Especially in places where Association Football (soccer) is popular. You will likely be reminded that soccer is "real" football and American Football is a joke (they use their hands more than their feet, so how is it ''foot''ball?) and find that people insist on calling it ''American'' Football (or "handegg"). Whereas Americans insist on calling Association Football "soccer" and American Football "football". The word "soccer" was coined by Oxford fans of rugby as a pejorative term for a sport they considered inferior, which is why it's not used or particularly liked by its followers.
*** It's not so much ''countries'' as ''fans of a certain sport'' - American soccer fans have adopted a lot of British terms for "Football" (soccer) and the (American) Football leagues of Europe often have "Football" in the name without necessarily having "American" there as well. And don't even get into Gaelic Football, Aussie rules Football and all that. It's just that outside the US (and Canada, and Australia, and New Zealand and Ireland and...) soccer is the dominant sport claiming to be "Football".

to:

*** Try using ** People from outside of the term United States, Canada, and Australia hate it when people from those countries refer to Association Football as "soccer" for short rather than "football." People in those countries use "football" to describe American Football in any country where it is not various other sports. All sides seem to hate the dominant variety of football (i.e. most of term "football" being used for the not-USA world). Especially in places where Association Football (soccer) is popular. You will likely be reminded that soccer is "real" football and American Football is a joke (they use their hands more than their feet, so how is it ''foot''ball?) and find that people insist on calling it ''American'' Football (or "handegg"). Whereas Americans insist on calling Association Football "wrong" sport. Although hatred over the term "soccer" and American Football "football". The word "soccer" is often a part of anti-American sentiment, the nickname originated in ''Britain'', not America. It was coined by Oxford fans of rugby as a pejorative term for a sport they considered inferior, which is why it's not used or particularly liked by its followers.
*** It's not You may hear the argument that soccer is "real" football and American Football is a joke (they use their hands more than their feet, so much ''countries'' how is it ''foot''ball?)
*** Football is also used by Aussie rules and Gaelic football players to refer to their own sports with Association Football also referred to
as ''fans soccer.
*** In South Africa, all cultural groups use "soccer" for association football, even though the main competing football code (rugby union) was historically played mainly by whites in general and Afrikaners in particular.
*** It is called "soccer" in Japan as well, most likely due to a combination
of a certain sport'' - the trendiness of American culture and the popularity of American Football in Japan.
***
American soccer fans have adopted a lot of British terms for "Football" (soccer) and the (American) Football leagues of Europe often have "Football" in the name without necessarily having "American" there as well. And don't even get into Gaelic Football, Aussie rules Football and all that. It's just that outside the US (and Canada, and Australia, and New Zealand and Ireland and...) soccer there is the another dominant sport claiming to be "Football"."Football".



* People from outside of the United States, Canada, and Australia hate it when people from those countries refer to Association Football as "soccer" for short rather than "football." People in those countries use "football" to describe various other sports. All sides seem to hate the term "football" being used for the "wrong" sport. Although hatred over the term "soccer" is often a part of anti-American sentiment, the nickname originated in ''Britain'', not America.
** Football is also used by Aussie rules and Gaelic football players to refer to their own sports with Association Football also referred to as soccer.
** In South Africa, all cultural groups use "soccer" for association football, even though the main competing football code (rugby union) was historically played mainly by whites in general and Afrikaners in particular.
** It is called "soccer" in Japan as well, most likely due to a combination of the trendiness of American culture and the popularity of American Football in Japan.
30th Oct '16 10:10:53 PM Steam_Lord
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Richard M. Stallman refers to "GNU/Linux", the free operating system preferred by {{Playful Hacker}}s everywhere. Many call it "Linux". He wants to differentiate the kernel (Linux), the program that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that are running, from the operating system as a whole; he claims that the GNU project deserves credit for writing much of the "userland", the part of the operating system made of libraries and utilities outside the kernel. He also wants people to recognize the idealism behind the project and community.

to:

* Richard M. Stallman refers to "GNU/Linux", the free operating system preferred by {{Playful Hacker}}s everywhere.everywhere as "GNU/Linux". Many call it "Linux". He wants to differentiate the kernel (Linux), the program that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that are running, from the operating system as a whole; he claims that the GNU project deserves credit for writing much of the "userland", the part of the operating system made of libraries and utilities outside the kernel. He also wants people to recognize the idealism behind the project and community.
27th Oct '16 6:23:01 PM billybobfred
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Similarly to the cricket example, "draw" and "stalemate" have different meanings in TabletopGame/{{Chess}} despite being synonyms in everyday usage.
*** To be more precise, every stalemate is a draw, but not every draw is a stalemate.

to:

** Similarly to the cricket example, Similarly, "draw" and "stalemate" have different meanings in TabletopGame/{{Chess}} despite being synonyms in everyday usage.
*** To be more precise, every stalemate
usage. A "draw" is any game which concludes with neither player winning. A "stalemate" is a draw, but not every draw caused when the player next to move has no legal move options, but their king is a stalemate.not in check -- as opposed to all those other kinds of draws, such as the 50-move rule, threefold repetition, or mutual agreement.
20th Oct '16 8:05:49 AM jtgibson
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Also fun is "recoilless rifle", which almost always refers to a smoothbore recoilless ''gun''. "Actual" recoilless rifles with spiral-grooved barrels exist, but were overshadowed in popularity by the smoothbore ones such as the Soviet SPG-9. The name stuck anyway.
2nd Oct '16 4:20:53 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** American football announcers presumably fearful lest those of us watching/listening to the games get confused as to exactly which sport is being played take great pains to insert the word ''football'' into as much of their commentary as possible. So instead of saying, "These players need to move the ball down the field if they're going to win this game", they'll go with something like, "These ''football'' players need to move the ''football'' down the ''football'' field if they're going to win this ''football'' game," and so forth.

to:

** American football announcers presumably fearful lest those of us watching/listening to the games get confused as to exactly which sport is being played take great pains to insert the word ''football'' (as both noun and adjective) into as much of their commentary as possible. So instead of saying, "These players need to move the ball down the field if they're going to win this game", they'll go with something like, "These ''football'' players need to move the ''football'' down the ''football'' field if they're going to win this ''football'' game," and so forth.
30th Sep '16 11:45:21 AM Gjallarhorn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A rifle is a contraption containing a metal tube, which itself contains a spiral-shaped groove or grooves ("rifling") on the inside meant to increase the efficiency of straight-line projectiles fired through the tube. A gun is a contraption containing a metal tube through which straight-line projectiles are fired (although you can use it by analogy to refer to other firing methods, such as a [[MagneticWeapons railgun]]). Calling a rifle a gun is likely to irk any pedants with formal firearms training. Calling a smooth-bore gun a rifle is [[CriticalResearchFailure just wrong]].
** Just to confuse non-pedants even more, there are rifled weapons which are never referred to as "rifles" -- such as most handguns, or many artillery pieces which are, in the grandest tradition of not making things easy on viewers, merely called guns.



* Most people don't know the difference between a firearm's clip and a magazine. Referring to the latter as the former is often [[BerserkButton a remarkably effective method of trolling firearms enthusiasts]].
** For reference, a magazine is a container of ammunition. On a gun, it's the part of the gun that stores the bullets that will be fired, which on some guns is removable so you can replace an empty one with a full one. A clip is multiple bullets held together by a piece of metal, designed for quickly refilling a magazine (handy if you need to reload your spent magazines while you are being shot at.)

to:

* The firearms community and industry are full of examples, largely due to having fairly specific definitions within the field, with lots of legal and political interference. Several of these terms depend on [[UsefulNotes/AmericanGunPolitics which side of the gun control argument]] the speaker is on.
**
Most people don't know the difference between a firearm's clip and a magazine. Referring to the latter as the former is often [[BerserkButton a remarkably effective method of trolling firearms enthusiasts]].
** *** For reference, a magazine is a container of ammunition. On a gun, it's the part of the gun that stores the bullets that will be fired, which on some guns is removable so you can replace an empty one with a full one. A clip is multiple bullets held together by a piece of metal, designed for quickly refilling a magazine (handy if you need to reload your spent magazines while you are being shot at.))
*** Also the size of a magazine can be described differently depending on the speaker's view of magazine capacity, or jurisdiction. Thirty-round magazines, the typical size of an AR-15 or AK-style rifle, can be either "high-capacity" or "standard-capacity".



*** Although the man who invented (Hiram Percy Maxim) it called it the Maxim Silencer.

to:

*** Although the man who invented (Hiram Percy Maxim) it called it the Maxim Silencer.Silencer, and the ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives) refers to the devices as silencers as well. The term "suppressor" was meant to be a less "scary" term than silencer, and to emphasize that a suppressed rifle is still about as loud as a jackhammer.


Added DiffLines:

** The term used for intermediate caliber, semi-automatic, magazine-fed firearms tends to change every few years. An "assault rifle" is defined as an intermediate caliber, selective fire[[note]]Can fire on semi-automatic, burst, and/or full automatic[[/note]] magazine-fed rifle. Civilian versions of the AR-15, AK-family, and other similar rifles do not have a widely agreed-upon term. "Assault Weapon" is a common term used by proponents of stricter gun control measures, often with "military-grade" or "-style" added on. Opponents of further measures tend to use different terms, but currently "Modern Sporting Rifle" seems to be the most popular.
** A rifle is a contraption containing a metal tube, which itself contains a spiral-shaped groove or grooves ("rifling") on the inside meant to increase the efficiency of straight-line projectiles fired through the tube. A gun is a contraption containing a metal tube through which straight-line projectiles are fired (although you can use it by analogy to refer to other firing methods, such as a [[MagneticWeapons railgun]]). Calling a rifle a gun is likely to irk any pedants with formal firearms training. Calling a smooth-bore gun a rifle is [[CriticalResearchFailure just wrong]].
*** Just to confuse non-pedants even more, there are rifled weapons which are never referred to as "rifles" -- such as most handguns, or many artillery pieces which are, in the grandest tradition of not making things easy on viewers, merely called guns or howitzers[[note]]Although most modern artillery would more correctly termed "gun-howitzers"[[/note]].
*** And it gets even more fun with translations- the Russian word typically translated as "rifle" could be more correctly translated as "shoulder-fired longarm", leading to shotguns, which are smoothbore, being termed as "rifles", entirely correctly from the translator's point of view.
22nd Sep '16 12:53:06 PM Hadjorim
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile schoolchildren in the United States are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. In Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian." This does not sound so well in English, hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the United States "Americans" without any issues.

to:

* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile schoolchildren in the United States are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. In Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian." This does not sound so well doesn't really work in English, hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the United States "Americans" without any issues.
22nd Sep '16 12:51:27 PM Hadjorim
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (ahem) schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America". It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" without any issues.

to:

* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (ahem) schoolchildren in the United States are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in In Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this Statesian." This does not sound so well in English. Hence English, hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America". country. It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US United States "Americans" without any issues.
22nd Sep '16 12:46:13 PM Hadjorim
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America". It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" without any issues.

to:

* The use of the word "American" can be a complicated prospect for some. Latinos are taught in school that there is only one continent called "America," and that the people who live there are "Americans." Therefore they take it as arrogance (and a slight against themselves) that people in the United States call themselves "Americans," as if they alone represent the continent. Meanwhile American (''ahem'') (ahem) schoolchildren are taught that there are ''two'' continents, North America and South America. While in Spanish, speakers actually call the inhabitants of the US "''estadounidense,''" which means "United Statesian," this does not sound so well in English. Hence in English the use of the word "American" simply as a shortening of the name of the country, "The United States of America". It should also be pointed out this is only a problem among the inhabitants of Latin America - the rest of the world just calls citizens of the US "Americans" without any issues.
This list shows the last 10 events of 326. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=InsistentTerminology.RealLife