History IdiotPlot / VideoGames

5th Dec '17 9:16:36 AM WaywardTotodile
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%%Please put examples in alphabetical order so this doesn't become a clusterfuck. Thank you.%%



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* IdiotPlot/KingdomHearts franchise



* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'':
** The plot only really keeps going because the main heroes are idiots that [[PoorCommunicationKills lack common sense and social skills]]. [[UnwittingPawn Terra]] and [[WhatAnIdiot Eraqus]] are the worst examples, [[spoiler:[[TooDumbToLive and Eraqus even gets taken out for his role in starting the mess]]]], but [[PlotCoupon Ventus]] and [[TeamMom Aqua]] aren't much better. (The former mostly has [[BigBrotherWorship denial issues]] and the latter is a little TOO willing to call Terra out.) By the time they wise up enough to take on the BigBad, [[spoiler: [[TooDumbToLive it turns out to be too late and their stupid decisions catch up to them]] leading to a DownerEnding.]]
** To give one a view of the tree of lack of communication that keeps the plot going: Aqua immediately believes Maleficent's claim that [[spoiler:Terra removed [[Disney/SleepingBeauty Aurora]]'s heart]], even though the person telling her that is, well, [[DevilInPlainSight Maleficent]] [[note]] that was only very partially true[[/note]]. Terra, we should note, believes in just about every Disney villain he comes across (save one or two exceptions), and has his journey driven by the words of [[DevilInPlainSight Master Xehanort]]. You could say he isn't guilty of trusting Xehanort, and that is true, since Eraqus didn't give him any reason to not do so... but he ''should have''; Eraqus for whatever reason never seems to mention that Xehanort [[spoiler: kind of tried to commit genocide for shits and giggles]], instead opting for presenting him to his pupils as a righteous, good Master. The plot moves along because the good guys never, ''ever'' seem to stop and tell each other why they are doing what they're doing, or what have they found out about their particular quests, which increasingly accumulates doubt and grievances among them. [[spoiler: Predictably, it doesn't end well for any of them]].
** It's not the first time in the series either. The entire plot of ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories'' happens because Sora and Co. decide to follow a ominous guy in a black coat that might as well have [[ObviouslyEvil EVIL written across his chest]] into an creepy castle, and once they realize their memories are being screwed with but before any real brainwashing happens they decide to keep going instead of just leaving. By the time Sora gets halfway up the castle he's too brainwashed to even consider going back.
** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' isn't immune to this either. Yen Sid tells Riku and Sora that they haven't had any formal training and thus are not as strong as they could be. Fair enough; but then he strips them of their experience, and sends them on their way to learn through experience...exactly as they had done before. Sora himself points this out roughly three to five minutes into the plot and that compared to their feats, the Mark of Mastery is at this point just a formality. Which means that ''there is no need for them to take this exam'' unlike in ''[=Birth By Sleep=]'' where the master was trusted with a few secrets about things. At one point, Yen Sid feels Xehanort's manipulations and can't do anything to stop the exam. This leads to [[spoiler: Sora's heart being broken by Xehanort in the process.]] All of which culminates in Riku becoming a keyblade master while Sora gets screwed over; which to viewers felt like Sora was disqualified on an exam because some other kid (Xehanort) screwed him.
*** Though in Yen Sid's defence, it is stated that awakening the sleeping worlds would grant a power to help stop Xehanort which does show up as a plot point in the end. Turning it into a test, in a way, really was a formality.
** Almost all the tension and conflicts of ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2'' wouldn't have happened if the trio of Roxas, Axel, and Xion actually communicate with each other but especially the latter two. Axel withholds information from Roxas and Xion because he thinks that it is "for their own good". Xion also keeps the secrets she learned from both of them to the point that they actually have to pursue her. Ultimately their inability to communicate causes their bonds and friendship to fall apart, leading to the series' first DownerEnding,
5th Dec '17 9:12:33 AM WaywardTotodile
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* IdiotPlot/FinalFantasy franchise



* ''FinalFantasyIII'''s plot happened because the antagonist was stripped of his immortality as a ''reward'' for mastering magic. The entire game could've been avoided if the "villain"'s master thought for a moment about what he was doing before making him mortal, or allowed him to trade rewards with one of his two fellow students, who consider mortality to be a gift.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV''.
** The Crowning Moment of Stupidity comes when one of your party members ''blows himself up for absolutely no reason whatsoever''.
** The above example only hints with what's really wrong with [=FF4=]: the game's tendency to make too many of its heroes commit [[StupidSacrifice acts of self-sacrifice]], simply to shuffle new characters into the mix. With [[spoiler: Tellah (who died trying to summon meteor to kill [[BigBad Golbez]]) and The Black/White Mage twins (who turned into stone to stop moving walls from crushing the heroes)]], those acts made sense. But when later characters do the same thing with increasingly arbitrary methods, players have a [[FridgeLogic very hard time suspending disbelief]]. [[spoiler: Exactly how does a monk with no experience with technology manage to stop an exploding computer, or how does a mechanic bombing the entrance to a world seal it away?]] To make the entire thing even dumber, [[spoiler: with the exception of Tellah, all of the dead heroes came back, [[DeathIsCheap having survived their near-death experiences]] ]].
** Worse still after having defeated the main antagonist in battle right before he can steal one of the last {{Mac Guffin}}s, they just turn around and walk out leaving him on the floor where he promptly gets up, takes the MacGuffin and warps away. Seriously. Particularly baffling considering the fact that it's a plot point that the main antagonist is out trying to get one of the {{Mac Guffin}}s when they assault his tower. They easily could have just repelled him the first time only for him to come back and steal it when they were busy storming his tower. Would certainly make a lot more sense then just ignoring him after his defeat.
* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'', at one point [[BigBad Exdeath]] tricks the party into [[NiceJobBreakingItHero destroying]] [[spoiler: the spirits guarding the [[CosmicKeystone Crystals]] in Galuf's world]]. The party fell for this despite the fact that [[spoiler: this involved a boss fight with exactly four enemies, each visibly crystalline in form, and each using spells of a specific element, and they had seen Exdeath trick others into destroying Crystals on at least three separate occasions already]].
** This in a game that started with the (unexpected and devastating) destruction of the Wind Crystal, after which no one in authority showed any interest in listening to you about the danger to the Water or Fire crystals.
* The second half of the second disc of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' pretty much runs on this, with a generous helping of LetsYouAndHimFight for added flavor. At the midpoint of the disc, [[BigBad Sephiroth]] summons an enormous meteor which, if allowed to impact with the planet, will wipe out all life other than him. One would think that under these circumstances, someone among the party or the leadership of Shinra corporation would have the bright idea to [[EnemyMine put aside their differences for at least long enough to work out how to stop the impending apocalypse.]] One would think. Instead, the substantial majority of this segment of the story is devoted to the two groups fighting each other.
* The end of the first disc of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'' is rife with people making bad decisions. Rinoa has her Odine Bangle plot, which depends entirely on a powerful sorceress not only being unaware of what Odine jewelry does, but willing to believe that a random girl got past security unannounced to give her a nice, totally trustworthy present. Then you have Quistis criticizing this plan, going all the way to her mission objective point, and then changing her mind and wanting to apologize, which wastes a huge amount of time and almost ruins everything. Then you have Irvine, who waits until the very last second to admit that he's actually a terrible sniper because he chokes under pressure [[spoiler: and although this is probably a lie to get out of shooting Edea, he still only comes up with that lie right at the last second]].
* Practically everyone in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' has a surgically-implanted IdiotBall with a [[PowerGlows glowing scar]] at the insertion site.
** The Sanctum initiates the [[KillEmAll Purge]] to eliminate a handful of Pulse l'Cie, ''all of whom have visible brands on their bodies!'' The brands are common knowledge, and they sometimes even [[PowerGlows GLOW]]!
** The only reason there even ARE Pulse l'cie on Cocoon is because the authorities on Cocoon used a big chunk of Pulse as building material without noticing [[SealedEvilInACan the Pulse fal'cie that was inside]]. This happened hundreds of years ago.
*** And by the way, the highest authorities on Cocoon are fal'cie and l'cie, who would have personal experience with how these things work even if it weren't common knowledge.
** The [[EnigmaticEmpoweringEntity fal'cie]] transform humans into [[BadassAbnormal l'cie]] to force them to perform some kind of task, with the penalty for [[YouHaveFailedMe failure]] a FateWorseThanDeath [[spoiler:and success not being much better]], but ''[[CanNotSpitItOut refuse to just TELL them what their job is]]''. [[spoiler:This ends up subverted -- they're doing this not because they're stupid, but because they actually ''actively hate humanity'' and want them to suffer.]]
** The party can't seem to figure out whether their job is to [[SaveTheWorld save Cocoon]], [[EarthShatteringKaboom destroy]] [[ColonyDrop Cocoon]], [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs save Cocoon]] '''[[DestructiveSavior by destroying it]]''', or something else entirely, nor can they agree on whether or not they're [[ScrewDestiny going to actually DO this job]]. All they get is a cryptic vision of a giant monster (with no indication if they're supposed to stop it, kill it, help it, become it, or if it's some kind of threat about what will happen to them if they fail), some [[ShroudedInMyth old legends]], and the cryptic last words of a woman most of them didn't even know as she [[TakenForGranite turned to crystal]].
*** There are two characters in the very first chapter who know the answers to these questions, but one of them never speaks at all, and the other is keeping it a secret.
*** Eventually, Vanille comes to the conclusion that since the BigBad's plan involves someone in their group, [[TheCuckoolanderWasRight the best thing to do is to do nothing at all]]. Even after generally agreeing with her, they still charge on like nothing. Despite Cid telling them the exact same thing literally seconds later.
5th Dec '17 9:04:50 AM WaywardTotodile
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* IdiotPlot/AceAttorney

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* IdiotPlot/AceAttorneyIdiotPlot/AceAttorney franchise
* IdiotPlot/MegaMan franchise



* ''VideoGame/MegaMan''.
** ''9'' Dr. Wily, the villain for the last 9 games, appears on TV to declare that Dr. Light, the man who helped put him away the last 8 times, is the true villain. He then goes on to ask for money to be transferred into his SwissBankAccount, so that he can fight Dr. Light himself. For some reason, a planet full of idiots falls for this, and Dr. Light is arrested.
** In ''10'':
*** Many robots are [[spoiler:infected by a computer virus that makes robots violent.]] No one is able to make a cure because humanity doesn't have the support that robots provide. No one, not even Dr. friggin' Light himself, decides to either just cut their losses, back up as much data as possible, and reset the robots to factory settings to purge the virus. Hell, this game points out how stupid humanity is since they followed Dr. Light's example and made the robots that friggin' complicated in the first place.
*** ''10'' also gets a special notice in that it's the '''third''' time Dr. Wily has gotten something of his to Dr. Light's lab. The first was when Dark Man kidnapped Dr. Light in ''5's'' intro. The second time was Bass infiltrating Light's lab in 7 so he could steal Mega Man's Rush Adapter. Instead of piloting his flying saucer himself Dr. Wily could've flown it by remote with a bomb inside and turned Mega Man into a crater. Heck, just shooting Dr. Light at ''any'' point in 5 would've saved Wily so much trouble.
** Every Mega Man game is full of idiots. In ''VideoGame/MegaManX'', humans actually thought it was a good idea to build robots with free will, without taking any time to test their morality as X was, then give them a massive amount of built-in weapons, and then keep producing them till they outnumber humans. And later on, they make them godlike by giving them copychips, which allow them to transform into anyone else. And, of all people, they put the thoughts of the '''''main villain Sigma''''' into the chips.
*** The plot of ''X4'', where the Repliforce is implicated in the destruction of a space colony and the Maverick Hunters ask their Colonel to disarm and come to their HQ for questioning, wherein the Colonel [[HonorBeforeReason promptly refuses due to a fault in his programming.]] But, even if he refused to surrender, the proper authorities could have gone to the Repliforce with warrants and whatnot to investigate and get testimony. [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman Because he was a Reploid,]] [[KillEmAll the humans decided to just label the Repliforce as Mavericks and put the Hunters on their tail.]] The Reploids are fully sapient and capable of feelings like humans, but humans make them to serve as convenient super powered workers without giving them a choice in the matter to begin with. Then they get surprised when the ones that aren't infected by the Sigma Virus turn on them anyways.
** However, the final nail in the coffin is that despite their claims to the contrary, there's no evidence the Repliforce hasn't gone Maverick. In fact, The Reveal that General has been in contact with Sigma, possibly for months, makes it rather likely that he contracted the Sigma Virus and spread it to the rest of his troops. While Colonel refuses to surrender and be questioned (something all military is forced to do) They (the rest of the unit) refuse to disarm and come in for questioning about their suspicious presence at the Sky Lagoon, they declare they will break away to form their own nation and attack humans and Maverick Hunters in their plan to do so, and at no point do they attempt to reason with X or Zero. Furthermore, the English manual mentions that Repliforce was formed to support the Hunters in fighting Mavericks, but since their formation the number of outbreaks has increased, which is rather suspicious. As far as can be told from their actions, X and Zero have perfectly valid reasons that they have gone Maverick, and act like it as every turn while trying to insist they aren't.
* ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'':
** In every sequel people ''anyone'' seem to forget that Lan saved the world in the previous game(s), which makes for a bunch of dialogue of how he is just an ''ordinary kid'' or how ''inexperienced'' he is to fight this time.
** Lan doesn't really help his own case, as he not only [[BagOfSpilling regularly throws away his godly chipsets and configurations altogether]], but also [[ForcedTutorial seems to forget how to battle or use chips at all]] after every world-saving. It's part GameplayAndStorySegregation, but some fans offer some FridgeBrilliance [[note]]Someone thought that maybe Lan received updates since his PET appears to have been updated and likewise the old chips probably wouldn't have been useful anymore[[/note]]...and in ''5'', he's actually acknowledged as the person who saved the world from the WWW. Though any time Lan goes to the undernet he acts fearful of it.. despite defeating the administrator of said undernet AND the guy who defeated the administrator before him, two of the most powerful navis to ever exist.
*** The update theory would then lead to the implication that Lan get updates that would debilitate Megaman without gathering helpful available equipment beforehand (buying updated chips to use after the update rather than having near nothing) and without actually knowing how to use them (still needing to be taught basic battle techniques).
** Although there might be some reasonable explanations for chips, such as Lan selling them to help pay for damages caused or them becoming useless, let's not forget the ''people''. Good freaking Bass, those people can be idiots. Now, for the most part it's slightly characteristic, people learn about navis and netbattle and whatever other hobbies and don't learn about extensive stuff, but that doesn't excuse some of the reasons for plot events. Let's start with the most obvious one: Mr. Match. In one game out of all them that he's actually honest, the last one, the rest of them he's still working against Lan. In the third one SciLab, after having already witnessed his crimes, actually put him on as a scientist there. After he's already tried to cripple the world twice before.
** Also the fact, terrorists can and do constantly hack into every single household item through the net (in which every single item in existence is connected to) said terrorists can do things like [[note]] not all of these actually happened but are possible examples in-universe [[/note]] burning your house down, locking you inside a hot shower as the temperature slowly increases, or programming your robotic teddy bear to murder you in your sleep. You'd think people would be paranoid enough to simply shut down the net entirely [[note]] especially since the net is barely anything more than glorified digital highways [[/note]] and allow everything to run like our real world counterparts (Thus eliminating the need for [=NetBattles=] aside from sport) while still keeping [=NetNavis=] for casual use like E-Mail, remembering events, or simply just for conversation. But apparently it's too important, that the Government has to continue risking billions of innocent lives.
** And let's talk about the entire plot of [=BN3=]. The bad guys want to get the keys to unlock a cyber abomination that would destroy the world. Where are these keys? Places where there are a lot of vulnerable civilians. A school, a zoo, a hospital, and a lab that hired the aforementioned pyromaniac. No one thought to put the keys somewhere secure or better yet, destroy the keys entirely. Keep in mind there's nothing preventing destroying the keys to Sealed Evils in a Can unlike most fantasy settings. BN1 had a similar problem. It is a wonder that the local police officials haven't been deposed by an angry mob for leaving keys to the apocalypse so easily accessible. Twice.
*** And where does [=SciLab=] put said Sealed Evil? They put it ''on the internet'' instead of, say, on an isolated computer hidden deep in a military base and protected 24/7 by armed personnel.
** Inversely, the bad guys almost never think to try to stop people from reaching internet access points. No matter how powerful Mega Man is he can't do anything at all if he can't access the electronic device that's being hacked. Despite this, one of the only times an active attempt is made on protecting an access point is when Bubble Man uses killer dishwashers (seriously) and makes them specifically lack external access ports. Or even failing that, that when inside Mega Man still needs constant support from Lan to fight effectively. All they would have to do to dramatically raise the chance of success for any given evil plot is hire a goon or two to walk over and restrain a high school kid.
5th Dec '17 9:02:44 AM WaywardTotodile
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* Franchise/AceAttorney

to:

* Franchise/AceAttorneyIdiotPlot/AceAttorney
5th Dec '17 9:02:00 AM WaywardTotodile
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Examples with their own page:
*Franchise/AceAttorney



* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series is ''really'' guilty of this (pun unintended). Most of the time your clients are in a pickle because they [[BeAsUnhelpfulAsPossible won't talk]].
** In Case 1-5, Lana Skye is extremely uncooperative because [[spoiler:she's afraid that if she talks, Gant will have her sister arrested for murdering Neil Marshall.]] Just as the protagonists try to get her to crack... [[spoiler:Gant]] pops into the court room and tells her not to talk or else. Phoenix and Edgeworth already know what he's referring to, but the Judge apparently takes ''no notice'' of the fact that the defendant is being publicly threatened with blackmail [[spoiler:by the ''chief of police'']], proving that the IdiotBall has been superglued to his hands. Oh, and the thing she's being blackmailed with? [[spoiler:It hinges on the plausibility of a scared fourteen-year-old hitting a grown man so hard that she knocks him upward and with enough force to leave him dangling on a decorative sword. (The first part ''did'' happen, but the second part still strains physics.) And that said man somehow wrote Ema's name on a vase that even morely-somehow flew into his arms from the impact rather than reacting to his life-threatening injury.]]
** The defendant of Case 2-1 is implicated because the victim apparently wrote her name in the sand. The problem is that a) her name is spelled wrong, despite the fact the two were lovers (this is the contradiction you point out) and no one investigating notices this despite the fact that the two were both police officers and their relationship was well known around the station and b) the victim died from a broken neck sustained in a fall so should not have been able to write the name in the first place.
** ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' Case 3:
*** The protagonist must figure out how a magic trick is performed, not because it has any relevance to the case but simply because ''the judge wants to know''. Despite the fact that everyone else in the courtroom has figured it out, including your client and your assistant, no-one will help because "[[SeriousBusiness you can't tell a magician's trick]]". One of the witnesses, at least, had the excuse that she was under contract to keep the trick a secret, along with hiding the fact that [[spoiler:she was blind.]] One would think that her employers would make an exception for her standing witness for a ''murder trial'', but apparently not.
*** The eyewitness who saw the crime would have saved everyone a lot of trouble if she had explained that [[spoiler: she heard the crime take place earlier than everyone thought it was committed and at a time when the defendant had an ironclad alibi.]]
*** The case of the prosecution rests on the idea that a frail, fourteen-year-old pianist with no firearms training could fire a 45-caliber pistol without injury, ''despite'' the fact that it is constantly stated that the recoil would be enough to dislocate the arm of a grown man of average build (itself a laughably stupid assertion treated as some kind of hard fact). Even worse, this fact comes up as a plot point later to uncover the real killer. (This is given a minor HandWave early on; the ''only'' reason such a flimsy case is going on trial is because the Borginian Embassy is pressing for a swift resolution to the case--an in-universe case of ExecutiveMeddling. Likely someone in the Borginian government knew about [[spoiler:the cocoon smuggling going on, and that the murder victim, Romein [=LeTouse=], was investigating it]].) The player also doesn't get to question how his client was supposed to move the body of a much larger man all the way from the dressing room to the stage.
** Gumshoe in ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigations'' Case 4 gives false testimony and implicates himself because [[spoiler:he refuses to admit that he shared a Swiss roll with the young Kay Faraday, who broke her promise never to take anything from strangers]]. He only cracks when Edgeworth not only deduces the entire sequence, but also the reason he wouldn't spill.
** This carries over to ''VideoGame/ProfessorLaytonVsAceAttorney''. It's revealed that [[spoiler:Labyrinthia was created by the Storyteller as a means to heal his emotionally traumatized daughter after she believed she caused their entire town and everyone in it to burn up.]] Ignoring the fact that apparently [[spoiler:[[ThereAreNoTherapists therapy was out of the question]], he somehow went from staging simple plays to help his daughter (which, by his own admission, were enough to get her to smile and react again) to building an entire town and hypnotizing its residents into thinking they were in MedievalStasis ''and'' staging massive witch hunts, which were rigged to not let anyone actually die, but still should have been considered potentially triggery for the daughter (and certainly didn't do any mental health favors for the women and girls that went on trial). The part that tops it all off is that the Storyteller lets himself get so wrapped up in running Labyrinthia that he completely failed to notice that almost all of the town, manipulated by his own right-hand woman, believed that his daughter was the Great Witch Bezella and repeatedly tried to put her on trial for it, which was ''the very thing he started the whole thing to prevent''!]] He admits that he made a lot of bad decisions.
** Another example appears in ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice''. The first of two trials in the game's fifth and final case pits Apollo and Athena against Phoenix in a civil trial. Phoenix appears quite out-of-character until near the very end, when it's revealed that [[spoiler:his client is holding Maya hostage to force his cooperation in the case. This plot is in itself a RecycledScript of the second game's final case, which placed Phoenix in the same scenario.]] The first time, it was only after he convinced himself to inform others of what had happened and accept their help that he was able to avert the crisis. In the civil trial, however, [[spoiler:Phoenix simply behaves as if he didn't learn a single thing from the first time this happened, which to the audience causes him to appear as if he is acting completely out-of-character and causing an entirely unnecessary conflict between himself and his employees.]] In addition, Athena suffers from the same problem. Despite [[spoiler:learning about Maya's kidnapping offscreen between court sessions, Athena simply [[BeAsUnhelpfulAsPossible decides to keep her mouth shut and leave Apollo -- and by extension the player -- completely in the dark.]] And then there's the fact that Dhurke, who ''knows'' better than ''anyone'' that Maya is in fact quite safe, refuses to let Phoenix in on it.]]
5th Oct '17 6:13:37 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* In ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'', the citizens of the DC universe become self-aware enough to realize that Arkham Asylum has a terrible track record of keeping its inmates penned up. So they solve the problem by sectioning off a huge swathe of Gotham into a walled prison ghetto and outsourcing the guard duty to shady mercenaries. This program would have obviously turned thousands of the city's people into refugees, closed hundreds of businesses, and cost a disgusting amount of money to finance, while only giving criminals even more freedom and turning the most dangerous ones into powerful warlords. But hey, now Batman has a large urban environment to zip around in and beat up almost anyone he sees.
** To be fair, [[spoiler: This plan was done solely for the purpose of rounding up all of Gotham's most dangerous villains and essentially killing them all as planned by Ra's Al Ghul and Hugo Strange]]
5th Oct '17 6:10:09 PM M3
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Added DiffLines:

** However, the final nail in the coffin is that despite their claims to the contrary, there's no evidence the Repliforce hasn't gone Maverick. In fact, The Reveal that General has been in contact with Sigma, possibly for months, makes it rather likely that he contracted the Sigma Virus and spread it to the rest of his troops. While Colonel refuses to surrender and be questioned (something all military is forced to do) They (the rest of the unit) refuse to disarm and come in for questioning about their suspicious presence at the Sky Lagoon, they declare they will break away to form their own nation and attack humans and Maverick Hunters in their plan to do so, and at no point do they attempt to reason with X or Zero. Furthermore, the English manual mentions that Repliforce was formed to support the Hunters in fighting Mavericks, but since their formation the number of outbreaks has increased, which is rather suspicious. As far as can be told from their actions, X and Zero have perfectly valid reasons that they have gone Maverick, and act like it as every turn while trying to insist they aren't.
3rd Oct '17 7:37:27 AM DenisK21
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** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' isn't immune to this either. Yen Sid tells Riku and Sora that they haven't had any formal training and thus are not as strong as they could be. Fair enough; but then he strips them of their experience, and sends them on their way to learn through experience...exactly as they had done before. Sora himself points this out roughly three to five minutes into the plot and that compared to their feats, the Mark of Mastery is at this point just a formality. Which means that ''there is no need for them to take this exam'' unlike in ''[=Birth By Sleep=]'' where the master was trusted with a few secrets about things. At one point, Yen Sid feels Xehanort's manipulations and does nothing to halt the exam as is. This leads to [[spoiler: Sora's heart being broken by Xehanort in the process.]] All of which culminates in Riku becoming a keyblade master while Sora gets screwed over; which to viewers felt like Sora was disqualified on an exam because some other kid (Xehanort) screwed him.

to:

** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' isn't immune to this either. Yen Sid tells Riku and Sora that they haven't had any formal training and thus are not as strong as they could be. Fair enough; but then he strips them of their experience, and sends them on their way to learn through experience...exactly as they had done before. Sora himself points this out roughly three to five minutes into the plot and that compared to their feats, the Mark of Mastery is at this point just a formality. Which means that ''there is no need for them to take this exam'' unlike in ''[=Birth By Sleep=]'' where the master was trusted with a few secrets about things. At one point, Yen Sid feels Xehanort's manipulations and does nothing can't do anything to halt stop the exam as is.exam. This leads to [[spoiler: Sora's heart being broken by Xehanort in the process.]] All of which culminates in Riku becoming a keyblade master while Sora gets screwed over; which to viewers felt like Sora was disqualified on an exam because some other kid (Xehanort) screwed him.
27th Sep '17 8:01:17 PM rjd1922
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** Though, the game actually uses the trope and plays it quite cleverly. The whole purpose of the professor staging a hunt for conker was the intent to buy time. The real plan hatched by the professor is to take over the world via the Tediz and had something waiting for the Panther King, but needed time for the plan [[spoiler: and the monster]] to grow.

to:

** Though, the game actually uses the trope and plays it quite cleverly. The whole purpose of the professor staging a hunt for conker Conker was the intent to buy time. The real plan hatched by the professor is to take over the world via the Tediz and had something waiting for the Panther King, but needed time for the plan [[spoiler: and the monster]] to grow.
20th Sep '17 8:24:40 PM MLDKF
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Added DiffLines:

** To be fair, [[spoiler: This plan was done solely for the purpose of rounding up all of Gotham's most dangerous villains and essentially killing them all as planned by Ra's Al Ghul and Hugo Strange]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=IdiotPlot.VideoGames