History IdiotPlot / LiveActionTV

13th Sep '16 1:56:21 PM MGD107
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* The entire ''premise'' of ''Series/IDreamOfJeannie''. Major Nelson wears the IdiotBall around his neck for the first five seasons. [[SarcasmMode Because marrying a girl you just met, let alone one you]] ''[[SarcasmMode found inside of a bottle]]'', [[SarcasmMode without getting to know them first is always a great idea.]]
9th Sep '16 3:06:09 PM Rowdycmoore
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** [[spoiler:Aaron Echolls]] getting acquitted of the murder near the end of season two only happens because of so many stupid mistakes on the part of multiple people: 1. Logan destroying the evidence tapes proving [[Spolier:Aaron and Lily were having an affair]] just to keep Lily's reputation from being possibly besmirched in court, 2. Veronica helping Duncan flee the country with his kidnapped illegitimate child, thus giving the defense a chance to throw suspicion back on Duncan as the real culprit with Veronica as a possible accomplice; this was even LAMPSHADED by Lucy Lawless' federal agent character saying Veronica's decisions would come back to haunt her, and 3. The judge AND prosecutor failing to know that [[Spoiler:Aaron's]] lawyer publicly revealing Veronica's medical records was a felony and inadmissible evidence (though that is more likely a huge CriticalResearchFailure on the writer's part). All just to have a reason for [[Spoiler: Duncan to have Aaron murdered as "real justice"]].

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** [[spoiler:Aaron Echolls]] getting acquitted of the murder near the end of season two only happens because of so many stupid mistakes on the part of multiple people: 1. Logan destroying the evidence tapes proving [[Spolier:Aaron [[spoiler:Aaron and Lily were having an affair]] just to keep Lily's reputation from being possibly besmirched in court, 2. Veronica helping Duncan flee the country with his kidnapped illegitimate child, thus giving the defense a chance to throw suspicion back on Duncan as the real culprit with Veronica as a possible accomplice; this was even LAMPSHADED by Lucy Lawless' federal agent character saying Veronica's decisions would come back to haunt her, and 3. The judge AND prosecutor failing to know that [[Spoiler:Aaron's]] [[spoiler:Aaron's]] lawyer publicly revealing Veronica's medical records was a felony and inadmissible evidence (though that is more likely a huge CriticalResearchFailure on the writer's part). All just to have a reason for [[Spoiler: [[spoiler: Duncan to have Aaron murdered as "real justice"]].
9th Sep '16 3:03:57 PM Rowdycmoore
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** [[spoiler:Aaron Echolls]] getting acquitted of the murder near the end of season two only happens because of so many stupid mistakes on the part of multiple people: 1. Logan destroying the evidence tapes proving [[Spolier:Aaron and Lily were having an affair]] just to keep Lily's reputation from being possibly besmirched in court, 2. Veronica helping Duncan flee the country with his kidnapped illegitimate child, thus giving the defense a chance to throw suspicion back on Duncan as the real culprit with Veronica as a possible accomplice; this was even LAMPSHADED by Lucy Lawless' federal agent character saying Veronica's decisions would come back to haunt her, and 3. The judge AND prosecutor failing to know that [[Spoiler:Aaron's]] lawyer publicly revealing Veronica's medical records was a felony and inadmissible evidence (though that is more likely a huge CriticalResearchFailure on the writer's part). All just to have a reason for [[Spoiler: Duncan to have Aaron murdered as "real justice"]].
9th Sep '16 1:03:14 AM SwimToTheMoon
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** Speaking of which, as [[https://www.youtube.com/shared?ci=gzHVFzdvbx4 this video]] points out, neither of the Tenth Doctor's regenerations, or hell, while we're at it, any of his entire tenure would have happened if not for his going back to the 18th Century Scotland and pissing off Queen Victoria, causing her to banish him ffrom the land and create Torchwood.
23rd Aug '16 3:15:53 AM ShorinBJ
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*** Charles is not innocent, either. When he needs time off work to do the work for the widow, he tells his boss, Mr. Hansen that he needs to take some time off to take care of some things. Hansen is trustworthy. Charles could have said, "I'm going to do some work to earn a surprise gift for my wife." Instead, he's mysterious, which doesn't help when Carline starts asking about Charles. Charles also tells a series of white lies that make him sound like he's up to something.

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*** Charles is not innocent, either. When he needs time off work to do the work for the widow, he tells his boss, Mr. Hansen that he needs to take some time off to take care of some things. Hansen is trustworthy. Charles could have said, "I'm going to do some work to earn a surprise gift for my wife." Instead, he's mysterious, which doesn't help when Carline Caroline starts asking about Charles. Charles also tells a series of white lies that make him sound like he's up to something.
23rd Aug '16 3:10:10 AM ShorinBJ
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** In a season 5 episode, the titular heroine goes on a vision quest in the desert. Meanwhile, Spike has ordered a robot replica of her to use as a sex toy. Buffy's friends stumble upon said robot and cannot figure out that the eternally cheerful vapid robot having sex with Spike is, well, a robot, and not their friend. All the wacky hilarity that ensues depends on Buffy's best friends not being able to figure out the difference between her and a robot, even though a few episodes earlier, it took them all of five minutes to detect that a woman they had never met before was the same kind of bot.

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** In a season 5 episode, the titular heroine goes on a vision quest in the desert. Meanwhile, Spike has ordered a robot replica of her to use as a sex toy. Buffy's friends stumble upon said robot and cannot figure out that the eternally cheerful vapid robot having sex with Spike is, well, a robot, and not their friend. All the wacky hilarity that ensues depends on Buffy's best friends not being able to figure out the difference between her and a robot, even though a few episodes earlier, it took them all of five minutes to detect that a woman they had never met before was the same kind of bot. Buffy lampshades this, expressing incredulity that her friends couldn't tell the difference.



** Of course, the whole latter half of Season 2 is dependent on the gypsies who gave Angel his soul as a punishment deciding that if he becomes happy and stops being punished... ''he'll lose his soul and turn back into a psychotic killer with ambitions to destroy the world''. Which not only ''guarantees'' he won't be being punished anymore, it's also kind of, um, dangerous. They don't explain the rules to Angel but simply send Jenny to keep an eye on him, without bothering to tell her how the curse can be broken, and have her make a half-hearted attempt to keep Angel and Buffy apart. You'd think explaining to Angel how his soul could be lost again would fit perfectly with their vengeance, since he'd then make sure to never be happy.

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** Of course, the whole latter half of Season 2 is dependent on the gypsies who gave Angel his soul as a punishment deciding that if he becomes happy and stops being punished... ''he'll lose his soul and turn back into a psychotic killer with ambitions to destroy the world''. Which not only ''guarantees'' he won't be being punished anymore, it's also kind of, um, dangerous. They Okay, maybe they didn't have that much control over how the curse worked, but they don't explain the rules to Angel but Angel, simply send sending Jenny to keep an eye on him, him without bothering to tell her how the curse can be broken, and have her make a half-hearted attempt to keep Angel and Buffy apart. You'd think explaining to Angel how his soul could be lost again would fit perfectly with their vengeance, since he'd then make sure to never be happy.
20th Aug '16 3:59:30 PM HamburgerTime
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* In the ''Series/ColdCase'' episode "Time to Crime," a tween boy wishes to kill the scummy ArmsDealer his mother is having an affair with. To accomplish this, he buys the murder weapon from the selfsame arms dealer, and despite having the perfect opportunity right then and there, lets the guy live. Later that night he goes to a crowded park where the guy hangs out with his fellow lowlives, fires randomly into said park, and hits not the arms dealer, but ''his own sister''.
25th Jul '16 10:46:39 PM Vir
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* {{Series/Supernatural}} Season 7 features a painfully boring story arc that culminates with the villains' plan being revealed and turning out to be an Idiot Plot: the shape-shifting primordial beasts who are the villains that season, the Leviathans, have disguised themselves as businessmen (y'know, so the writers can get in some rather loud and un-nuanced [[StrawCharacter Strawman Political]] lines throughout the season) and take over some sort of food company and reveal that their master plan is to fill all the coffee creamers that their company manufactures with some sort of magical additive that kills people who [[BeautyEqualsGoodness are skinny and smart]] so that they can eat everyone else. [[FridgeLogic It apparently never occurs to the Leviathans that people just might notice that the coffee creamers from this ONE particular company are instantly killing people (the effect is demonstrated to be instantaneous) and that a ban/boycott/spontaneous public avoidance of the product would logically occur thereafter.]] It's really disappointing too, because up until Season 7 ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' had garnered a well-deserved reputation as one of the most smartly-written shows on TV. But apparently, [[WriterOnBoard the writers just ''had'' to write this ill-planned plot to score some cheap shots and grind a political axe.]]
** The episode [[Recap/SupernaturalS04E03InTheBeginning In The Beginning]] involves Dean traveling back in time to try to kill Azazel. Conveniently he forgets several key facts in order to make the plot work. He forgets you can summon demons (his father previously summoned Azazel, and in the previous episode they summoned Castiel). He also forgets you can trap demons with devil's traps, salt, iron. All so that history can remain unchanged. All it took was his IQ dropping 30 points.
** The episode ''Dark Dynasty'', however, takes the cake for being probably the biggest idiot plot in Supernatural ''history''. The last part of the episode in which [[spoiler:Charlie dies]] required so much incompetence that ''multiple'' actors and crew people have come forward to say that they argued that it made no sense and tried to offer up alternatives. In short, all the stupid things that had to happen for it to play out as it did:

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* {{Series/Supernatural}} Season ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' season 7 features a painfully boring story arc that culminates with the villains' plan being revealed and turning out to be an Idiot Plot: the shape-shifting primordial beasts who are the villains that season, the Leviathans, have disguised themselves as businessmen (y'know, so the writers can get in some rather loud and un-nuanced [[StrawCharacter Strawman Political]] lines throughout the season) and take over some sort of food company and reveal that their master plan is to fill all the coffee creamers that their company manufactures with some sort of magical additive that kills people who [[BeautyEqualsGoodness are skinny and smart]] so that they can eat everyone else. [[FridgeLogic It apparently never occurs to the Leviathans that people just might notice that the coffee creamers from this ONE particular company are instantly killing people (the effect is demonstrated to be instantaneous) and that a ban/boycott/spontaneous public avoidance of the product would logically occur thereafter.]] It's really disappointing too, because up until Season season 7 ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' ''Supernatural'' had garnered a well-deserved reputation as one of the most smartly-written shows on TV. But apparently, [[WriterOnBoard the writers just ''had'' to write this ill-planned plot to score some cheap shots and grind a political axe.]]
** The episode [[Recap/SupernaturalS04E03InTheBeginning "[[Recap/SupernaturalS04E03InTheBeginning In The Beginning]] the Beginning]]" involves Dean traveling back in time to try to kill Azazel. Conveniently he forgets several key facts in order to make the plot work. He forgets you can summon demons (his father previously summoned Azazel, and in the previous episode they summoned Castiel). He also forgets you can trap demons with devil's traps, salt, iron. All so that history can remain unchanged. All it took was his IQ dropping 30 points.
** The episode ''Dark Dynasty'', "Dark Dynasty", however, takes the cake for being probably the biggest idiot plot in Supernatural ''history''.''Supernatural'' history. The last part of the episode in which [[spoiler:Charlie dies]] required so much incompetence that ''multiple'' actors and crew people have come forward to say that they argued that it made no sense and tried to offer up alternatives. In short, all the stupid things that had to happen for it to play out as it did:



* In one episode of the german Christmas show Beutolomäus the evil Piet Piestig wants to cancel Christmas, so he writes a letter to Santa asking that he cancels Christmas as his present. Santa actually considers this because he has to fulfill every child's wish, disregarding that considering Piets wish would mean he would have to disregard every single child on earth apart from him. Santa dismisses Beutolomäus´ advise that it would be a stupid idea with serious remarks that he can´t ignore a child's wish (even though he would have to ignore all wishes of other children and his ignorance is the reason the villain wants to cancel Christmas in the first place). The evil plan only failed because a friend of Beutolomäus saw that it was a grown man writing this letter with an expensive pen, which also disregards the idea that maybe parents write their children's letters.
* ''{{Series/Sherlock}}'': [[spoiler: Moriarty's]] plot to completely discredit Sherlock in ''The Reichenbach Fall'' is based on two things: Sherlock acting suspicious, and [[spoiler: everyone in Scotland Yard conveniently forgetting about massive piles of evidence proving Sherlock couldn't have committed any of the crimes he's been framed for.]] Somewhat {{Justified}} in that [[spoiler: Moriarty]] probably had about [[CrazyPrepared ten different plans]] for Sherlock's downfall [[spoiler: (Richard Brook alone could've anchored an entire downfall plot)]], and the IdiotPlot was the one that happened to work best.

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* In one episode of the german German Christmas show Beutolomäus ''Beutolomäus'' the evil Piet Piestig wants to cancel Christmas, so he writes a letter to Santa asking that he cancels Christmas as his present. Santa actually considers this because he has to fulfill every child's wish, disregarding that considering Piets wish would mean he would have to disregard every single child on earth apart from him. Santa dismisses Beutolomäus´ advise that it would be a stupid idea with serious remarks that he can´t ignore a child's wish (even though he would have to ignore all wishes of other children and his ignorance is the reason the villain wants to cancel Christmas in the first place). The evil plan only failed because a friend of Beutolomäus saw that it was a grown man writing this letter with an expensive pen, which also disregards the idea that maybe parents write their children's letters.
* ''{{Series/Sherlock}}'': ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'': [[spoiler: Moriarty's]] plot to completely discredit Sherlock in ''The Reichenbach Fall'' is based on two things: Sherlock acting suspicious, and [[spoiler: everyone in Scotland Yard conveniently forgetting about massive piles of evidence proving Sherlock couldn't have committed any of the crimes he's been framed for.]] Somewhat {{Justified}} in that [[spoiler: Moriarty]] probably had about [[CrazyPrepared ten different plans]] for Sherlock's downfall [[spoiler: (Richard Brook alone could've anchored an entire downfall plot)]], and the IdiotPlot was the one that happened to work best.



* A season 7 episode of ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' has Marshall fretting about his employers seeing an embarrassing video of him on the internet (on an obvious Youtube {{Expy}}). So he goes to the guy who put the video up and begs him to take it down, having to jump through all sorts of hoops to get him to do so. This is ignoring the fact that pretty much all social media and video sharing websites have the option to report content as offensive. Marshall could have easily gotten the video taken down if he'd taken the time to actually notice the "Flag as Spam or Abuse" icon on the website.

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* A season 7 episode of ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' has Marshall fretting about his employers seeing an embarrassing video of him on the internet (on an obvious Youtube [=YouTube=] {{Expy}}). So he goes to the guy who put the video up and begs him to take it down, having to jump through all sorts of hoops to get him to do so. This is ignoring the fact that pretty much all social media and video sharing websites have the option to report content as offensive. Marshall could have easily gotten the video taken down if he'd taken the time to actually notice the "Flag as Spam or Abuse" icon on the website.



** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E4TheGirlInTheFireplace "The Girl in the Fireplace"]], the Doctor's solution to clockwork droids attacking Madame De Pompadour is to ride a horse through one of the time windows, breaking the connection to the ship in the future. He then engages in TalkingTheMonsterToDeath. However he is left trapped thousands of years from his companions and the TARDIS and it is only some flimsy writing that lets him get back. It doesn't occurred to him to find some other way to disrupt the time window (if smashing them can break them then it shouldn't be too difficult). This could be justified by him wanting to convince the droids to shut down but couldn't he have used the TARDIS to get there? Even if he doesn't want the droids to know about the TARDIS he could just materialise in another room a few minutes before the connection is broken. DavidTennant actually pointed this out during recording and a line about not being able to use the TARDIS because they're part of events was hastily inserted, even though this is never a problem in any other story.

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** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E4TheGirlInTheFireplace "The Girl in the Fireplace"]], the Doctor's solution to clockwork droids attacking Madame De Pompadour is to ride a horse through one of the time windows, breaking the connection to the ship in the future. He then engages in TalkingTheMonsterToDeath. However he is left trapped thousands of years from his companions and the TARDIS and it is only some flimsy writing that lets him get back. It doesn't occurred to him to find some other way to disrupt the time window (if smashing them can break them then it shouldn't be too difficult). This could be justified by him wanting to convince the droids to shut down but couldn't he have used the TARDIS to get there? Even if he doesn't want the droids to know about the TARDIS he could just materialise in another room a few minutes before the connection is broken. DavidTennant Creator/DavidTennant actually pointed this out during recording and a line about not being able to use the TARDIS because they're part of events was hastily inserted, even though this is never a problem in any other story.
25th Jul '16 10:43:01 PM Vir
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* ''LazyTown'':

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* ''LazyTown'':''Series/LazyTown'':



** Then there's the episode 'Double Trouble' where Robbie impersonates the mayor, and once again everyone falls for it, despite the fact that Robbie looks nothing like the mayor (for one thing, Robbie isn't a puppet).
* The ''Series/{{MASH}}'' episode, “Operation Noselift” has Private Baker convincing the doctors to arrange a nose job for him. Cosmetic surgery is against regulations. If Houlihan and Burns find out, everyone will be in trouble, so they have to concoct a plan to keep them from finding out. Instead of pretending Private Baker breaks his nose and needs surgery, they come up with a more complex and unnecessary plan. Private Baker is seen leaving the base on a two-day pass, then sneaks back to get the operation. Meanwhile, Father Mulcahy pretends to break Radar's nose with a baseball, all in front of Burns and Houlihan. Radar is rushed into the OR, the plastic surgeon arrives, Radar swaps out with Baker. The doctor performs the operation. Afterward, Burns sees Radar and questions him because his nose is fine. Burns realizes something is up and says he's going to get everyone in trouble, but just about everyone in camp is wearing a bandage on their noses, making it impossible to tell who had had the surgery. The problem with this is that it was completely unnecessary in the first place. They could have pretended Baker got hit with the baseball instead and that would be the end of the problem. This, however, wouldn't have given them so many opportunities to mess with Burns.

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** Then there's the episode 'Double Trouble' "Double Trouble" where Robbie impersonates the mayor, and once again everyone falls for it, despite the fact that Robbie looks nothing like the mayor (for one thing, Robbie isn't a puppet).
* The ''Series/{{MASH}}'' episode, “Operation Noselift” "Operation Noselift" has Private Baker convincing the doctors to arrange a nose job for him. Cosmetic surgery is against regulations. If Houlihan and Burns find out, everyone will be in trouble, so they have to concoct a plan to keep them from finding out. Instead of pretending Private Baker breaks his nose and needs surgery, they come up with a more complex and unnecessary plan. Private Baker is seen leaving the base on a two-day pass, then sneaks back to get the operation. Meanwhile, Father Mulcahy pretends to break Radar's nose with a baseball, all in front of Burns and Houlihan. Radar is rushed into the OR, the plastic surgeon arrives, Radar swaps out with Baker. The doctor performs the operation. Afterward, Burns sees Radar and questions him because his nose is fine. Burns realizes something is up and says he's going to get everyone in trouble, but just about everyone in camp is wearing a bandage on their noses, making it impossible to tell who had had the surgery. The problem with this is that it was completely unnecessary in the first place. They could have pretended Baker got hit with the baseball instead and that would be the end of the problem. This, however, wouldn't have given them so many opportunities to mess with Burns.
25th Jul '16 10:42:43 PM Vir
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** No-one ever realises the person causing trouble in every episode is just Robbie Rotten in a silly outfit. This is especially hilarious because his cover is blown at the end of EVERY episode, yet the townspeople will ''still'' fall for his PaperThinDisguise in the next episode.

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** No-one ever realises realizes the person causing trouble in every episode is just Robbie Rotten in a silly outfit. This is especially hilarious because his cover is blown at the end of EVERY episode, yet the townspeople will ''still'' fall for his PaperThinDisguise in the next episode.
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