History IdiotPlot / LiveActionTV

28th Dec '17 10:02:28 AM ShorinBJ
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** The episode "The Perfect Mate" is one long idiot plot. Where to begin: Picard takes cargo onto the Enterprise without knowing exactly what it is. When told it is irreplaceable, he has zero people guarding the cargo bay or the object within. When Ferengi are rescued and placed on board the Enterprise, Worf doesn't place one person outside their quarters, nor do anything to prevent the Ferengi from harassing the Kriosian ambassador. Ferengi predictably try to steal the Kriosian cargo, causing the containment to fail. When it is discovered that the Kriosian ambassador is transporting a bride for an enemy planet, in order to seal a peace treaty, Picard is incensed, and insinuates that had he known that the cargo were a person, he would have never allowed this transfer. At this point, ''half the damn episode'' could have been avoided if Picard had done his homework on the people he was helping to broker a treaty for, and Worf had had even one person standing guard over either the cargo or the Ferengi. Bride gets out, and is basically a sex magnet for every male on the ship. Dr. Crusher is incensed that the bride is being confined to her quarters, although it is pretty much explicitly stated that if she goes near any male in her present condition, every male in the vicinity will literally proceed to jump her bones. At no point does Dr. Crusher offer to put the bride back into medical stasis, or even attempt to concoct something to suppress her pheromones to allow her to walk around freely, things we know Dr. Crusher is capable of. So Picard gives her leeway to move around the ship, with Data as her chaperon. Where does Data take this bride, who men would literally rip themselves to pieces for? A tour of some of the ship's more esoteric, out of the way facilities (such as the warp engines or utility systems), or the Holodeck? No: 10-fucking-Forward, the ship's bar. It never occurs to Data that it might be a bad idea to take a sex magnet who literally drives men mad with lust, to a locale full of men, filled with alcohol (fake or not), many of whom are there for the express purpose of hooking up. The guard now at the Ferengi door allows the Kriosian ambassador to meet unsupervised with the two Ferengi, allowing them to knock the ambassador out, thus adding an extra 20 minutes to the plot when Picard has to stand in for the ambassador at the negotiations and deal with the irresistible bride without the ambassador as a buffer between them. The entire episode only works because ''none of the crew do any of the things that it is their '''JOB''' to do'', and have been seen doing in previous and later episodes.

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** The episode "The Perfect Mate" is one long idiot plot. Where to begin: Picard takes cargo onto the Enterprise without knowing exactly what it is. When told it is irreplaceable, he has zero people guarding the cargo bay or the object within. When Ferengi are rescued and placed on board the Enterprise, Worf doesn't place one person outside their quarters, nor do anything to prevent the Ferengi from harassing the Kriosian ambassador. Ferengi predictably try to steal the Kriosian cargo, causing the containment to fail. When it is discovered that the Kriosian ambassador is transporting a bride for an enemy planet, in order to seal a peace treaty, Picard is incensed, and insinuates that had he known that the cargo were a person, he would have never allowed this transfer. At this point, ''half the damn episode'' could have been avoided if Picard had done his homework on the people he was helping to broker a treaty for, and Worf had had even one person standing guard over either the cargo or the Ferengi. Bride gets out, and is basically a sex magnet for every male on the ship. Dr. Crusher is incensed that the bride is being confined to her quarters, although it is pretty much explicitly stated that if she goes near any male in her present condition, every male in the vicinity will literally proceed to jump her bones. At no point does Dr. Crusher offer to put the bride back into medical stasis, or even attempt to concoct something to suppress her pheromones to allow her to walk around freely, things we know Dr. Crusher is capable of. So Picard gives her leeway to move around the ship, with Data as her chaperon.chaperone. Where does Data take this bride, who men would literally rip themselves to pieces for? A tour of some of the ship's more esoteric, out of the way facilities (such as the warp engines or utility systems), or the Holodeck? No: 10-fucking-Forward, the ship's bar. It never occurs to Data that it might be a bad idea to take a sex magnet who literally drives men mad with lust, to a locale full of men, filled with alcohol (fake or not), many of whom are there for the express purpose of hooking up. The guard now at the Ferengi door allows the Kriosian ambassador to meet unsupervised with the two Ferengi, allowing them to knock the ambassador out, thus adding an extra 20 minutes to the plot when Picard has to stand in for the ambassador at the negotiations and deal with the irresistible bride without the ambassador as a buffer between them. The entire episode only works because ''none of the crew do any of the things that it is their '''JOB''' to do'', and have been seen doing in previous and later episodes.



** The Charming's past with Maleficent. It turns out that when Emma was conceived, Snow and Charming learned that Emma might end up becoming a villain. The Charmings decide use a magical means of removing the darkness in Emma completely which requires someone to take that darkness; they choose Maleficent's unborn child who is then sent to The Land Without Magic. The possibility of stopping Emma from becoming a villain by raising her properly, like parents are supposed to do, is never brought up. The present day half of this storyline is not much better; instead of confessing what happened, Snow and Charming keep it to themselves and make everything worse to the point that when they do confess Emma spends the rest of the season not trusting them.

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** The Charming's Charmings' past with Maleficent. It turns out that when Emma was conceived, Snow and Charming learned that Emma might end up becoming a villain. The Charmings decide use a magical means of removing the darkness in Emma completely which requires someone to take that darkness; they choose Maleficent's unborn child who is then sent to The Land Without Magic. The possibility of stopping Emma from becoming a villain by raising her properly, like parents are supposed to do, is never brought up. The present day half of this storyline is not much better; instead of confessing what happened, Snow and Charming keep it to themselves and make everything worse to the point that when they do confess Emma spends the rest of the season not trusting them.
27th Dec '17 7:54:38 AM PiDa
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius The Brain of Morbius]]". The plot concerns Solon, a MadScientist who wants to [[BrainTransplant transplant the brain of a Time Lord war criminal]] into a new body. Not having a complete body to use (save for his servant), he makes a patchwork body out of bits of various aliens that have been killed in spaceship crashes on the planet, but can't find a head big enough. Then, the Doctor, another Time Lord, shows up. Solon decides to use the Doctor's 'magnificent' head as the final piece of his makeshift monstrosity. So why didn't he just empty out the Doctor's brain and put Morbius in the Doctor's body? This PlotHole was big enough that Creator/TerranceDicks wanted his name taken off the script, and is helpfully pointed out by the DVD subtitles (which suggest that Solon is 'caught up in the blindness of someone struggling to assemble a flatpack piece of furniture'). It's also possible that Solon just really likes doing horrible things with bodies and a straight brain switch wouldn't be horrible enough.

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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius The Brain of Morbius]]". The plot concerns Solon, a MadScientist who wants to [[BrainTransplant transplant the brain of a Time Lord war criminal]] into a new body. Not having a complete body to use (save for his servant), he makes a patchwork body out of bits of various aliens that have been killed in spaceship crashes on the planet, but can't find a head big enough. Then, the Doctor, another Time Lord, shows up. Solon decides to use the Doctor's 'magnificent' head as the final piece of his makeshift monstrosity. So why didn't he just empty out the Doctor's brain and put Morbius in the Doctor's body? This PlotHole was big enough that Creator/TerranceDicks wanted his name taken off the script, and is helpfully pointed out by the DVD subtitles (which suggest that Solon is 'caught up in the blindness of someone struggling to assemble a flatpack piece of furniture'). It's This is also possible that addressed in the script - Morbius is annoyed at how long it has taken Solon just really likes doing horrible things with bodies to get to the stage where he can start rebuilding him, in particular how Solon seems to have got derailed on the way on research, and a straight brain switch wouldn't accuses Solon of 'wanting to be horrible enough.the creator of Morbius rather than his servant'. Solon doesn't have a good response.
12th Dec '17 4:30:25 PM thatsnumberwang
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Added DiffLines:

*** For those of you who are not familiar with the classic series, what makes this whole plot unforgivable is that the Third Doctor lived on Earth for nearly his whole regeneration. And we are not talking about some faraway land in the year 1000 or something, this was Britain in the 1970s. For him to have never heard of football or to be this naive about basic human interaction is insane.
12th Dec '17 3:20:23 PM 309216364
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** In the series finale, Barry actually manages to capture Zoom, and [[UpToEleven even though he's already been in this exact situation,]] he doesn't take Zoom to the Pipeline, instead gloating first. This leads to [[spoiler: Zoom killing Henry, which in turn leads to Flashpoint, which in turn leads to basically all the problems of Series 3]].
24th Nov '17 2:26:41 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' suffers from IdiotPlot most evidently in the Dornish arc of its fifth season. Jaime and Cersei's daughter, Myrcella, is currently in Dorne, and they've been sent a threatening message about her. So, Jaime - one of the most recognizable men in the Seven Kingdoms, by the way - decides to go and rescue her and bring her back home. With only ''one man,'' Bronn, to help him. Much idiocy ensues, including his trying to carry out the aforementioned rescue in broad daylight ''in front of Myrcella's fiancee.'' And after all that, [[spoiler: Myrcella dies ''anyway'' because she allowed Ellaria Sand, who had already plotted her murder - ''of which Myrcella is well aware'' - to kiss her on the mouth, and naturally Ellaria was wearing poisoned lipstick. Ellaria's plot is also incredibly stupid; she's so upset about the Prince not seeking revenge for the deaths of members of house Martell that she... exterminates house Martell.]]
** Season seven, however, tops it. Basically, the entire setup for season eight depends on Jon Snow's harebrained scheme to [[spoiler: kidnap a wight]]. Without that, the season finale would have ended with [[spoiler: the entire undead army staring at the Wall going, "Yup. That's a wall. Hey, Graarrrrgh, take a photo of me with the wall. So... now what?"]]

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' ''Series/GameOfThrones''
** The show
suffers from IdiotPlot most evidently in the Dornish arc of its fifth season. Jaime and Cersei's daughter, Myrcella, is currently in Dorne, and they've been sent a threatening message about her. So, Jaime - one of the most recognizable men in the Seven Kingdoms, by the way - decides to go and rescue her and bring her back home. With only ''one man,'' Bronn, to help him. Much idiocy ensues, including his trying to carry out the aforementioned rescue in broad daylight ''in front of Myrcella's fiancee.'' And after all that, [[spoiler: Myrcella dies ''anyway'' because she allowed Ellaria Sand, who had already plotted her murder - ''of which Myrcella is well aware'' - to kiss her on the mouth, and naturally Ellaria was wearing poisoned lipstick. Ellaria's plot is also incredibly stupid; she's so upset about the Prince not seeking revenge for the deaths of members of house Martell that she... exterminates house Martell.]]
** Season seven, however, tops it. Basically, the entire setup for season eight depends on Jon Snow's harebrained scheme to [[spoiler: kidnap a wight]]. wight, which [[NiceJobBreakingItHero inadvertently gave the Night King the means to destroy the Wall]].]] Without that, the season finale would have ended with [[spoiler: the entire undead army staring at the Wall going, "Yup. That's a wall. Hey, Graarrrrgh, take a photo of me with the wall. So... now what?"]]
22nd Nov '17 8:35:09 AM kmf_1974
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** Of course, the whole latter half of Season 2 is dependent on the gypsies who gave Angel his soul as a punishment deciding that if he becomes happy and stops being punished... ''he'll lose his soul and turn back into a psychotic killer with ambitions to destroy the world''. Which not only ''guarantees'' he won't be being punished anymore, it's also kind of, um, dangerous. Okay, maybe they didn't have that much control over how the curse worked, but they don't explain the rules to Angel, simply sending Jenny to keep an eye on him without bothering to tell her how the curse can be broken, and have her make a half-hearted attempt to keep Angel and Buffy apart. You'd think explaining to Angel how his soul could be lost again would fit perfectly with their vengeance, since he'd then make sure to never be happy.

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** Of course, the whole latter half of Season 2 is dependent on the gypsies who gave Angel his soul as a punishment deciding that if he becomes happy and stops being punished... ''he'll lose his soul and turn back into a psychotic killer with ambitions to destroy the world''. Which not only ''guarantees'' he won't be being punished anymore, it's also kind of, um, dangerous. Okay, maybe they didn't have that much control over how the curse worked, but they don't explain the rules to Angel, simply sending Jenny to keep an eye on him without bothering to tell her how the curse can be broken, and have her make a half-hearted attempt to keep Angel and Buffy apart. You'd think explaining to Angel how his soul could be lost again would fit perfectly with their vengeance, since he'd then make sure to never be happy.happy (not to mention that anytime he lost his soul and his friends would put it back, they did the EXACT SAME WAY instead of just putting it in to stay without any loophole).
6th Nov '17 7:43:05 AM MasterFuzzy
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E2DoctorWhoAndTheSilurians Doctor Who and the Silurians]]" involves a sequence where the Doctor realises the Silurians have infected the potholers with a bacterial weapon, and informs Masters (an infectee) that he's very sick. Masters, despite the foul blisters on his arms, then announces he's going to London and no-one makes any efforts to stop him, not even the Doctor. Two episodes later, after Masters had got to London and spread the Silurian plague throughout the tube system, with chaos and people dropping dead in the streets, the Doctor even moons over the fact that if he'd just established a quarantine, everything would have been fine. The Silurians themselves spend most of the story convinced the humans are going to kill them despite the Doctor's best efforts to persuade them that they won't, and the humans spend most of the story convinced the Silurians are going to kill them despite the Doctor's best efforts to persuade them that they won't, and the Doctor spends most of the story convinced the two sides aren't going to kill each other even though they obviously are. The Brigadier purposefully defies the Doctor's orders and blows the Silurians up at the end out of sheer racism, and still the Doctor [[EasilyForgiven bothers showing up for work the next morning]].

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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E2DoctorWhoAndTheSilurians Doctor Who and the Silurians]]" involves a sequence where the Doctor realises the Silurians have infected the potholers with a bacterial weapon, and informs Masters (an infectee) that he's very sick. Masters, despite the foul blisters on his arms, then announces he's going to London and no-one makes any efforts to stop him, not even the Doctor. Two episodes later, after Masters had got to London and spread the Silurian plague throughout the tube system, with chaos and people dropping dead in the streets, the Doctor even moons over the fact that if he'd just established a quarantine, everything would have been fine. The Silurians themselves spend most of the story convinced the humans are going to kill them despite the Doctor's best efforts to persuade them that they won't, and the humans spend most of the story convinced the Silurians are going to kill them despite the Doctor's best efforts to persuade them that they won't, and the Doctor spends most of the story convinced the two sides aren't going to kill each other even though they obviously are. The Brigadier purposefully defies the Doctor's orders and blows the Silurians up at the end out of sheer racism, end, and still the Doctor [[EasilyForgiven bothers showing up for work the next morning]].morning]]. Though he did commit genocide, later materials show that he felt that it was justified-they were, after all, attempting to destroy the Earth.



** In the series finale, Barry actually manages to capture Zoom, and [[UpToEleven even though he's already been in this exact situation,]] he doesn't take Zoom to the Pipeline, instead gloating first. This leads to [[spoiler: Zoom killing Henry, which in turn leads to Flashpoint, which in turn leads to basically all the problems of Series 3]].



* In ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'', the episode "For The Girl Who Has Everything". After Supergirl is incapacitated, Hank shapeshifts into her and goes to work for her because "Kara never takes sick days." His utterly abysmal impersonation of her nearly ends with Kat firing "Kara" and does significant damage to their relationship. It would have been trivially easy for him to simply call in sick and have the DEA fake a doctor's note if necessary stating that she'd come down with food poisoning or some other temporary condition that would have justified not showing up for work.

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* In ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'', the episode "For The Girl Who Has Everything". After Supergirl is incapacitated, Hank shapeshifts into her and goes to work for her because "Kara never takes sick days." His utterly abysmal impersonation of her nearly ends with Kat firing "Kara" and does significant damage to their relationship. It would have been trivially easy for him to simply call in sick and have the DEA DEO fake a doctor's note if necessary stating that she'd come down with food poisoning or some other temporary condition that would have justified not showing up for work.
22nd Oct '17 7:11:57 AM Brainiac0982
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* In ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'', the episode "For The Girl Who Has Everything". After Supergirl is incapacitated, Hank shapeshifts into her and goes to work for her because "Kara never takes sick days." His utterly abysmal impersonation of her nearly ends with Kat firing "Kara" and does significant damage to their relationship. It would have been trivially easy for him to simply call in sick and have the DEA fake a doctor's note if necessary stating that she'd come down with food poisoning or some other temporary condition that would have justified not showing up for work.

to:

* In ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'', ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'', the episode "For The Girl Who Has Everything". After Supergirl is incapacitated, Hank shapeshifts into her and goes to work for her because "Kara never takes sick days." His utterly abysmal impersonation of her nearly ends with Kat firing "Kara" and does significant damage to their relationship. It would have been trivially easy for him to simply call in sick and have the DEA fake a doctor's note if necessary stating that she'd come down with food poisoning or some other temporary condition that would have justified not showing up for work.
5th Oct '17 9:41:49 PM CodyTheHeadlessBoy
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* ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'', like many sitcoms, had numerous episodes that would have been resolved in under a minute had someone decided to tell a slightly uncomfortable truth rather than try to spare someone's feelings. "Dinner at Eight" is probably the worst offender, when Andy was 'forced' to eat three spaghetti dinners in one night and be blamed for being late to one of them, when all he had to do was admit he didn't get a telephone message. Or call when he did get the message and say he was going to be late. Or if the host had called and made sure he had gotten the message. Or the host called when he didn't arrive and ask what had delayed him.

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* ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'', like many sitcoms, had numerous episodes that would have been resolved in under a minute had someone decided to tell a slightly uncomfortable truth rather than try to spare someone's feelings. "Dinner at Eight" is probably the worst offender, when Andy was 'forced' to eat three spaghetti dinners in one night and be blamed for being late to one of them, when all he had to do was admit he didn't get a telephone message. Or call when he did get the message and say he was going to be late. Or if the host had called and made sure he had gotten the message. Or the host called when he didn't arrive and ask what had delayed him. Or put simply he could have told the other two he already had plans that night rather than accepting every invitation that comes his way.
15th Sep '17 8:34:50 PM IllustriousAsinine
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* ''Series/SeventhHeaven'': the episode "Who Knew?". At the start of the episode, Matt, the eldest son of the family, gets a joint from a friend at school. Matt doesn't really want it, but still holds on to it for some reason. When he comes home, it falls out of his pocket and his father, after finding the joint, goes on a witch hunt against his children (all of them, even the six-year-old). Matt later confesses to his family that it was his, and eventually the episode ends with an {{Anvilicious}} {{Aesop}} about [[DrugsAreBad drugs being bad]]. The plot easily could've been averted if Matt, [[InformedAbility who is frequently considered by his family to be the responsible one of the bunch]], had used common sense and threw the joint away. Even more egregious, considering this show has numerous VerySpecialEpisodes about drugs being bad, almost always delivered by Matt's parents.

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* ''Series/SeventhHeaven'': the episode "Who Knew?". At the start of the episode, Matt, the eldest son of the family, gets a joint from a friend at school. Matt doesn't really want it, but still holds on to it for some reason. When he comes home, it falls out of his pocket and his father, after finding the joint, goes on a witch hunt against his children (all of them, even the six-year-old). Matt later confesses to his family that it was his, and eventually the episode ends with an {{Anvilicious}} {{Aesop}} about [[DrugsAreBad drugs being bad]]. The plot easily could've been averted if Matt, [[InformedAbility who is frequently considered by his family to be the responsible one of the bunch]], had used common sense and threw the joint away. Even more egregious, considering this show has numerous VerySpecialEpisodes VerySpecialEpisode about drugs being bad, almost always delivered by Matt's parents.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=IdiotPlot.LiveActionTV