History IdiotPlot / LiveActionTV

16th Mar '17 1:44:51 AM camipco
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*** There also exists a lucrative black market in daemon parts. Buffy kills daemons all the time.
*** She also just defeated Glory, selling her wardrobe alone would pay off the mortgage.
15th Mar '17 6:42:12 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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*** [[spoiler:And all of this is all the worse because Charlie is the most GenreSavvy character in the show - if anyone should know better than to go off on her own with no weapons or back-up, it's her.]]
16th Jan '17 8:29:48 PM Laina
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*** Many problems could have been solved if Buffy had moved into an apartment with Dawn, but what would Willow and Tara do without the free rent then? (This troper is very, very bitter about this.)
1st Jan '17 4:24:20 PM Gravityman
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* In ''Series/TheWalkingDead'', the latter half of the fourth season is fueled by the stupidity of the Alexandria residents, who nearly get themselves all killed multiple times over due to easily-solved problems.

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* In ''Series/TheWalkingDead'', the latter half of the fourth fifth season is fueled by the stupidity of the Alexandria residents, who nearly get themselves all killed multiple times over due to easily-solved problems.
1st Jan '17 3:29:40 PM Gravityman
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** "I Shot an Arrow into the Air". A rocket carrying four astronauts crash lands in a desert landscape that happens to have atmospheric and solar conditions exactly the same as Earth. Instead of making the reasonable (and as it turns out, correct) assumption that they just crashed in a desert on Earth, they instead assume that they crashed on an asteroid that just happens to be exactly like Earth. So instead of waiting for a few hours or days for rescue to come, they assume they'll be stranded for months or years, leading them to go crazy and start killing each other over their water.
22nd Dec '16 2:54:27 AM MrThorfan64
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E1SpearheadFromSpace Spearhead from Space]]" involves a sequence where the Doctor realises the Silurians have infected the potholers with a bacterial weapon, and informs Masters (an infectee) that he's very sick. Masters, despite the foul blisters on his arms, then announces he's going to London and no-one makes any efforts to stop him, not even the Doctor. Two episodes later, after Masters had got to London and spread the Silurian plague throughout the tube system, with chaos and people dropping dead in the streets, the Doctor even moons over the fact that if he'd just established a quarantine, everything would have been fine. The Silurians themselves spend most of the story convinced the humans are going to kill them despite the Doctor's best efforts to persuade them that they won't, and the humans spend most of the story convinced the Silurians are going to kill them despite the Doctor's best efforts to persuade them that they won't, and the Doctor spends most of the story convinced the two sides aren't going to kill each other even though they obviously are. The Brigadier purposefully defies the Doctor's orders and blows the Silurians up at the end out of sheer racism, and still the Doctor [[EasilyForgiven bothers showing up for work the next morning]].

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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E1SpearheadFromSpace Spearhead from Space]]" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E2DoctorWhoAndTheSilurians Doctor Who and the Silurians]]" involves a sequence where the Doctor realises the Silurians have infected the potholers with a bacterial weapon, and informs Masters (an infectee) that he's very sick. Masters, despite the foul blisters on his arms, then announces he's going to London and no-one makes any efforts to stop him, not even the Doctor. Two episodes later, after Masters had got to London and spread the Silurian plague throughout the tube system, with chaos and people dropping dead in the streets, the Doctor even moons over the fact that if he'd just established a quarantine, everything would have been fine. The Silurians themselves spend most of the story convinced the humans are going to kill them despite the Doctor's best efforts to persuade them that they won't, and the humans spend most of the story convinced the Silurians are going to kill them despite the Doctor's best efforts to persuade them that they won't, and the Doctor spends most of the story convinced the two sides aren't going to kill each other even though they obviously are. The Brigadier purposefully defies the Doctor's orders and blows the Silurians up at the end out of sheer racism, and still the Doctor [[EasilyForgiven bothers showing up for work the next morning]].



** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E4TheGirlInTheFireplace "The Girl in the Fireplace"]], the Doctor's solution to clockwork droids attacking Madame De Pompadour is to ride a horse through one of the time windows, breaking the connection to the ship in the future. He then engages in TalkingTheMonsterToDeath. However he is left trapped thousands of years from his companions and the TARDIS and it is only some flimsy writing that lets him get back. It doesn't occurred to him to find some other way to disrupt the time window (if smashing them can break them then it shouldn't be too difficult). This could be justified by him wanting to convince the droids to shut down but couldn't he have used the TARDIS to get there? Even if he doesn't want the droids to know about the TARDIS he could just materialise in another room a few minutes before the connection is broken. Creator/DavidTennant actually pointed this out during recording and a line about not being able to use the TARDIS because they're part of events was hastily inserted, even though this is never a problem in any other story.

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** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E4TheGirlInTheFireplace "The Girl in the Fireplace"]], the Doctor's solution to clockwork droids attacking Madame De Pompadour is to ride a horse through one of the time windows, breaking the connection to the ship in the future. He then engages in TalkingTheMonsterToDeath. However he is left trapped thousands of years from his companions and the TARDIS and it is only some flimsy writing that lets him get back. It doesn't occurred occur to him to find some other way to disrupt the time window (if smashing them can break them then it shouldn't be too difficult). This could be justified by him wanting to convince the droids to shut down but couldn't he have used the TARDIS to get there? Even if he doesn't want the droids to know about the TARDIS he could just materialise in another room a few minutes before the connection is broken. Creator/DavidTennant actually pointed this out during recording and a line about not being able to use the TARDIS because they're part of events was hastily inserted, even though this is never a problem in any other story.
18th Dec '16 12:45:10 PM mario0987
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** The tenure of Steven Moffat as showrunner repeatedly has plots that are resolved by changing time or using TrickedOutTime. This makes any episode where this does not happen come across as one of these. Special mention goes to "The Angels Take Manhattan". Here, changing time is used to resolve the plot right before it is ignored for a CruelTwistEnding with a HandWave as to why we are ignoring something that happened three minutes ago.

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** The tenure of Steven Moffat as showrunner repeatedly has plots that are resolved by changing time or using TrickedOutTime. This makes any episode where this does not happen happen, even though it could help solve the plot, come across as one of these. Special mention goes to "The Angels Take Manhattan". Here, changing time is used to resolve the plot right before it is ignored for a CruelTwistEnding with a HandWave as to why we are ignoring something that happened three minutes ago.



* Let's be honest: You could play the "Stupid! You so stupid!" line from UHF for about half of the decisions characters on OnceUponATime make. At least they're consistent in their style of bad decisions, like Regina constantly cutting her nose off to spite her face, all of Charming's plans having a critical flaw, Emma forgetting to actually ''use'' her lie-detecting, Grumpy's constant rabble-rousing, etc.

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* Let's be honest: You could play the "Stupid! You so stupid!" line from UHF for about The second half of the decisions characters on OnceUponATime make. At least they're consistent Season 4 in their style of bad decisions, like Series/OnceUponATime:
**
Regina constantly cutting trying to find out who the author of Henry's storybook is under the belief that they are responsible for her nose off to spite her face, all suffering. There has been no indication that the book is prophetic or that the person who wrote it is capable of such a thing. While it does turn out that she is right, this comes across more as a lucky guess than anything else.
** The
Charming's plans having a critical flaw, past with Maleficent. It turns out that when Emma forgetting was conceived, Snow and Charming learned that Emma might end up becoming a villain. The Charmings decide use a magical means of removing the darkness in Emma completely which requires someone to actually ''use'' take that darkness; they choose Maleficent's unborn child who is then sent to The Land Without Magic. The possibility of stopping Emma from becoming a villain by raising her lie-detecting, Grumpy's constant rabble-rousing, etc.properly, like parents are supposed to do, is never brought up. The present day half of this storyline is not much better; instead of confessing what happened, Snow and Charming keep it to themselves and make everything worse to the point that when they do confess Emma spends the rest of the season not trusting them. Really the entire plot comes across as CharacterDerailment.
10th Dec '16 8:21:34 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/{{Deadwood}}'': The first season and a half of this two-season series show that just about everyone in this WorldOfBadass, no matter how big or small their hidden [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold heart of gold]], is willing to be just as [[ShootTheDog ruthless and pragmatic as they need to be]] to protect their own, and that Al Swearengen is one of the most ruthless, most pragmatic, [[BuffySpeak dog-shootingest]] of the bunch and also the only one capable of bringing all the movers and shakers of the town together for a common cause. Then [[BigBad Hearst]] shows up and everyone's {{Badass}}, proactive traits are buried in an egregious application of the WorfEffect. Their big plan for dealing with this existential threat to their way of life? To write a StronglyWordedLetter to the editor of the local newspaper and then send someone to a neighboring town to see about maybe hiring some guns, but then not do it in time to accomplish anything.

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* ''Series/{{Deadwood}}'': The first season and a half of this two-season series show that just about everyone in this WorldOfBadass, no matter how big or small their hidden [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold heart of gold]], is willing to be just as [[ShootTheDog ruthless and pragmatic as they need to be]] to protect their own, and that Al Swearengen is one of the most ruthless, most pragmatic, [[BuffySpeak dog-shootingest]] of the bunch and also the only one capable of bringing all the movers and shakers of the town together for a common cause. Then [[BigBad Hearst]] shows up and everyone's {{Badass}}, badass, proactive traits are buried in an egregious application of the WorfEffect. Their big plan for dealing with this existential threat to their way of life? To write a StronglyWordedLetter to the editor of the local newspaper and then send someone to a neighboring town to see about maybe hiring some guns, but then not do it in time to accomplish anything.
7th Dec '16 6:20:52 AM DisillusionedColony
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*** Following that other crewmen join in, accusing the computer-generated hologram with a cardassian exterior and personality of war crimes committed by the real guy it just so happens to look like, and demanding its destrction.

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*** Following that other crewmen join in, accusing the computer-generated hologram with a cardassian exterior and personality of war crimes committed by the real guy it just so happens to look like, and demanding its destrction.destruction.



Finally The Doctor, after successfully removing the parasite from B'Elanna thanks to the consultant's help, instead of proposing a new and inmproved Emergency Medical Consultant that doesn't look like a war criminal or inexplicably defend war crimes, simply deletes the program and drops the idea.

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*** Finally The Doctor, after successfully removing the parasite from B'Elanna thanks to the consultant's help, instead of proposing a new and inmproved Emergency Medical Consultant that doesn't look like a war criminal or inexplicably defend war crimes, simply deletes the program and drops the idea.
7th Dec '16 6:18:39 AM DisillusionedColony
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** Season 5 gives us "Nothing Human". In the episode The Doctor [[DrWho (not that one)]] has to remove an alien parasite from B'Elanna Torres, but he doesn't know how, so they decide to create a new Medical Consultant Program, which is basically a new EMH, and fill it with all their exobiology database. So far so good. But as soon as they have to decide something as simple as the hologram's appearance and imprinted personality, everyone suddenly turns into an idiot.

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** Season 5 gives us "Nothing Human". In the episode The Doctor [[DrWho [[DoctorWho (not that one)]] has to remove an alien parasite from B'Elanna Torres, but he doesn't know how, so they decide to create a new Medical Consultant Program, which is basically a new EMH, and fill it with all their exobiology database. So far so good. But as soon as they have to decide something as simple as the hologram's appearance and imprinted personality, everyone suddenly turns into an idiot.
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