History IAmNotShazam / RealLife

30th Dec '15 4:11:14 AM woohookitty
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** Not even products are safe from this. In several cases, people tend to use the trademarked name of a well known product as a catch-all name for the same product made by other companies. For example, no matter who makes petroleum jelly, people will likely call it "Vaseline". The same goes for adhesive bandages, which are almost exclusively called "Band-Aids". And that generic box of toasted whole grain oat cereal that looks like Cheerios, but definitely isn't called that? Doesn't matter. ''They're still Cheerios!''
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** Not even products are safe from this. In several cases, people tend to use the trademarked name of a well known product as a catch-all name for the same product made by other companies. For example, no matter who makes petroleum jelly, people will likely call it "Vaseline". The same goes for adhesive bandages, which are almost exclusively called "Band-Aids". And that generic box of toasted whole grain oat cereal that looks like Cheerios, but definitely isn't called that? Doesn't matter. ''They're still Cheerios!''Cheerios!'' The term is referred to as a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generic_trademark generic trademark]].
21st Dec '15 8:54:30 AM Rytex
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* Sportscaster Sam Leitch once said of a victory by a Scottish football club named [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raith_Rovers Raith Rovers]] that the fans would be dancing in the streets of Raith. Only problem is, Raith isn't a settlement. ** The first stage-show based on Scottish football comedy series ''Only An Excuse'' featured two fans shouting abuse at the teams, including "Get back tae Raith!" ** Lampshaded when the Welsh football club TNS won the League of Wales and a sportscaster announced that fans would be dancing in the streets of TNS. TNS stood for Total Network Solutions at the time, the name of the club's sponsor, but was later backronymed for "The New Saints". * Speaking of football teams, their jerseys are often this to newer fans of the game. Football kits are more often than not sponsored by a particular company, and so they are allowed to basically put whatever they want to advertise on the front and center of the uniforms (for example, [[http://arsenaldirect.arsenal.com/content/ebiz/afc/invt/479302r/479302r-f_230.jpg Fly]] [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-wgliw6o6LHw/UZfjnLqEKaI/AAAAAAAASEc/0SB0xE1KqYs/s1600/PSG+13-14+Home+Kit.jpg Emirates]]) and the team sponsor is usually on the wearer's right breast, while the logo for the team itself is usually on the wearer's left breast. Many newcomers to the sport, particularly Americans (where in nearly all other team sports, direct advertising on jerseys is not allowed and so they would never see uniforms like this), have mistaken the kit sponsor for the actual team name.
12th Dec '15 4:46:19 PM TheInimitableECypher
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** Same with Mercedes, which is called after the daughter of one of the employes of Daimer-Benz.
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** Same with Mercedes, which is called after the daughter of one of the employes employees of Daimer-Benz.Daimler-Benz.
12th Dec '15 12:29:03 PM bwburke94
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** An episode of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' asked which company made the Bold 9000 smartphone. The correct [[InsistentTerminology question]] was not ''Blackberry'' as they said it was, but rather Canadian firm ''Research in Motion''. *** The company ''actually'' [[http://ca.blackberry.com/company.html renamed themselves]] to "[=BlackBerry=]" on January 30, 2013.
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** An episode of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' asked which company made the Bold 9000 smartphone. The correct [[InsistentTerminology question]] company was not ''Blackberry'' "[=BlackBerry=]" as they said it was, but rather Canadian firm ''Research "Research in Motion''. *** Motion". The company ''actually'' later [[http://ca.blackberry.com/company.html renamed themselves]] to "[=BlackBerry=]" on January 30, 2013.

** Software makers regularly do this. "AVAST Software", maker of the popular antivirus, was once called "ALWIL Software". "Diskeeper Corporation" started out as "Executive Software".
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** Software makers regularly do this. "AVAST "Avast Software", maker of the popular antivirus, was once called "ALWIL "Alwil Software". "Diskeeper Corporation" started out as "Executive Software".

** Back in the late 70's and early 80's, you didn't play Video Games, you played Atari - regardless if you had a Colicovision or Intellivision. *** Then it happened again from the mid 80's to the early 21st century, in which many parents would say their kids played "Nintendo", not Video Games. It didn't help that for most of the NES's life span, Nintendo refused to call it a Video Game console due to fear of another Video Game Crash.
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** Back in the late 70's and early 80's, you didn't play Video Games, you played Atari - regardless if you had a Colicovision Colecovision or Intellivision. *** Then it happened again from From the mid 80's mid-80s to the early 21st century, in which many parents would say their kids played "Nintendo", not Video Games. the same went for Nintendo. It didn't help that for most of the NES's life span, Nintendo refused to call it a Video Game video game console due to fear of another Video Game Crash.a repeat of the 1983 crash.

** Lampshaded when the Welsh football club TNS won the League of Wales and a sportscaster announced that fans would be dancing in the streets of TNS. TNS is Total Network Solutions, the name of the club's sponsor. *** Or was - in a strange smashing-up-then-reconstituting of this trope, when the sponsorship deal ended the club obviously couldn't keep the name, but as it had moved from its former home of Llansantffraid it could no longer revert to that name either so had to create a brand new one for itself. The, erm, solution? Take the ex-Llansantffraid's nickname of 'the Saints' ('sant' being Welsh for 'saint') and by a logical and convenient extension rebrand yourself as The New Saints - different name, same initials. So they are not in a place called TNS and they are no longer sponsored by TNS, but they are still TNS... It's not yet known whether their 2009-10 season title-winning performance provoked any commentary along the lines of "They'll be dancing in the streets of New Saints".

* Speaking of football teams, their jerseys are often this to newer fans of the game. Football kits are more often than not sponsored by a particular company, and so they are allowed to basically put whatever they want to advertise on the front and center of the uniforms (for example, [[http://arsenaldirect.arsenal.com/content/ebiz/afc/invt/479302r/479302r-f_230.jpg Fly]] [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-wgliw6o6LHw/UZfjnLqEKaI/AAAAAAAASEc/0SB0xE1KqYs/s1600/PSG+13-14+Home+Kit.jpg Emirates]]) and the team sponsor is usually on the wearer's right breast, while the logo for the team itself is usually on the wearer's left breast. Many newcomers to the sport, particularly Americans (where in nearly all team sports, save for MLS, direct advertising on jerseys is not allowed and so they would never see uniforms like this), have mistaken the kit sponsor for the actual team name.
to:
** Lampshaded when the Welsh football club TNS won the League of Wales and a sportscaster announced that fans would be dancing in the streets of TNS. TNS stood for Total Network Solutions at the time, the name of the club's sponsor, but was later backronymed for "The New Saints". * Speaking of football teams, their jerseys are often this to newer fans of the game. Football kits are more often than not sponsored by a particular company, and so they are allowed to basically put whatever they want to advertise on the front and center of the uniforms (for example, [[http://arsenaldirect.arsenal.com/content/ebiz/afc/invt/479302r/479302r-f_230.jpg Fly]] [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-wgliw6o6LHw/UZfjnLqEKaI/AAAAAAAASEc/0SB0xE1KqYs/s1600/PSG+13-14+Home+Kit.jpg Emirates]]) and the team sponsor is usually on the wearer's right breast, while the logo for the team itself is usually on the wearer's left breast. Many newcomers to the sport, particularly Americans (where in nearly all other team sports, save for MLS, direct advertising on jerseys is not allowed and so they would never see uniforms like this), have mistaken the kit sponsor for the actual team name.

* Strictly speaking, Big Ben is the name of the bell that strikes the hour in the [[strike:Great Clock at Westminster]] Elizabeth Tower[[labelnote:*]]Renamed in 2012, partly to honour Queen Elizabeth Ⅱís sixtieth year on the throne and partly to put and end to the confusion over what the tower is called.[[/labelnote]], rather than the clock itself or its clock tower.
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* Strictly speaking, Big Ben is the name of the bell that strikes the hour in the [[strike:Great Clock at Westminster]] Elizabeth Tower[[labelnote:*]]Renamed from the "Clock Tower" in 2012, partly to honour Queen Elizabeth Ⅱís sixtieth year on the throne and partly to put and end to the confusion over what the tower is called.[[/labelnote]], rather than the clock itself or its clock tower.

* Inversion: In the 19th century a Russian delegation climbed aboard a train on what was a new British railway network (Southern Railways, to be specific) and one of the delegation looked out of the window, seeing a facility where passengers could board and alight trains and saw a sign reading [[http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/stations/vxh/details.html "VAUXHALL".]] Consequently, when introducing a railway network to their country the word was used for such a facility. To this day the Russian word for railway station has been vauxhall. ** This one is an urban myth - there was no station by that name when the word first appeared in Russian (the nearest was Nine Elms, which was a terminus). "Vauxhall" at that time was best known as a pleasure garden, and may have been used to refer to pleasure gardens in general.

** Furthermore, "Jesus" is the Greek translation of the name "Joshua"; hence Joseph and Mary's son should technically be called "Christ Joshua".

* I ''dare'' you to find someone named Real Life or The Real World. ** [[http://www.peoplesmart.com/psp.aspx?_act=resultswp&search=name&cam=354&utm_source=wp&utm_medium=wp&utm_campaign=name&utm_content=spot01&utm_term=3540102&id=3540102&firstname=Real&lastname=Life&city=Jasper&state=TX&pid=183279192256&dpt=1&pfn=Real&pln=Life&pc=Jasper&ps=TX Challenge accepted.]]

* Nintendo is the name of the company, not any of the consoles it created. Ditto for Atari and Sega. Similarly, you don't play "Nintendo", you play the games on the consoles, many of which are developed and/or published by Nintendo itself (as well as many other companies). ** [[Wiki/TVTropes This very wiki]] [[NintendoHard irritated at least two readers with this]].

** This tends to cause frustration for students and alumni from the other UW schools such as UW-Stevens Point (UWSP) or UW-Whitewater (UWW) when applying for jobs out of state who often end having to explain the naming convention. This is particularly a problem for UW-Milwaukee which also shares the UWM initials with Madison (although the Madison campus is usually referred to only as UW with no qualifiers). This has led some to casually refer to the university by a technically incorrect name, University of Milwaukee, in the hope of avoiding confusion. ** The State University of New York (SUNY) system is similar. Particularly irritating is confusion between the State University of New York at Buffalo (better known as University at Buffalo) and the State University of New York College at Buffalo (better known as Buffalo State College). But few people would say that they graduated from SUNY, only that they graduated from a SUNY school.
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** This tends to cause frustration for students and alumni from the other UW schools such as UW-Stevens Point (UWSP) or UW-Whitewater (UWW) when applying for jobs out of state who often end having to explain the naming convention. This is particularly a problem for UW-Milwaukee which also shares the UWM initials with Madison (although the Madison campus is usually referred to only as UW with no qualifiers). This has led some to casually refer to the university by a technically incorrect name, University as "University of Milwaukee, Milwaukee" in the hope of avoiding confusion. ** The State University of New York (SUNY) system is similar. Particularly irritating is confusion between the State University of New York at Buffalo (better known as (usually shortened to University at Buffalo) and the State University of New York College at Buffalo (better known as Buffalo State College). But few people would say that they graduated from SUNY, only that they graduated from a SUNY school.
2nd Nov '15 1:25:17 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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* Jokingly invoked by Creator/NormMacDonald in one of his appearances on ''Series/LateNight'' with Creator/ConanOBrien. He talks about having a stimulating conversation with a complete stranger who he met on a recent airplane flight, and learning several interesting facts along the way. One fact was that the spaceship from ''Series/StarTrek'' was actually called "The ''Enterprise''"; [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} before that, he had always assumed that it was called "The]] ''[[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} Star Trek]]''[[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} ."]]
11th Jul '15 6:40:11 PM brtd
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* And then there's the [[http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7899171.stm story]] of Ireland's worst driver, the mysterious Polish serial-speedster and parking offender mr. Prawo Jazdy. The Irish police stopped and fined him on numerous occasions, but he constantly managed to evade justice by giving the police a different address every time. Eventually, after more than 50 incidents involving the elusive Prawo Jazdy, someone in the police-force asked their colleagues a somewhat embarrassing question: ''What is the Polish word for "Driver's License"?''
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* And then there's the [[http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7899171.stm story]] of Ireland's worst driver, the mysterious Polish serial-speedster and parking offender mr.Mr. Prawo Jazdy. The Irish police stopped and fined him on numerous occasions, but he constantly managed to evade justice by giving the police a different address every time. Eventually, after more than 50 incidents involving the elusive Prawo Jazdy, someone in the police-force asked their colleagues a somewhat embarrassing question: ''What is the Polish word for "Driver's License"?''

* An interesting example is "Ruby Ridge", what many believe to be the site of the famous 1992 standoff in Idaho between Randy Weaver and federal agents, many believe it refers to a town or site named Ruby Ridge. In fact no place was ever referred to as such prior to the incident. The incident occurred at a previously unnamed location that sat between Ruby Creek and Caribou Ridge. "Ruby Ridge" was a media coined portmanteau that eventually caught on.
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* An interesting example is "Ruby Ridge", what many believe to be the site of the famous 1992 standoff in Idaho between Randy Weaver and federal agents, many agents is commonly referred to, most believe it refers to a town or site named Ruby Ridge. In fact no place was ever referred to as such prior to the incident. The incident occurred at a previously unnamed location that sat between Ruby Creek and Caribou Ridge. "Ruby Ridge" was a media coined portmanteau that eventually caught on.
11th Jul '15 3:17:13 PM brtd
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to:
* An interesting example is "Ruby Ridge", what many believe to be the site of the famous 1992 standoff in Idaho between Randy Weaver and federal agents, many believe it refers to a town or site named Ruby Ridge. In fact no place was ever referred to as such prior to the incident. The incident occurred at a previously unnamed location that sat between Ruby Creek and Caribou Ridge. "Ruby Ridge" was a media coined portmanteau that eventually caught on.
9th Jul '15 6:29:51 AM megajake
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* The founder of "Wendy's" was Dave Thomas. "Wendy" refers to his daughter, who was ''mentioned'' often in commercials by Thomas, but didn't actually start appearing in the commercials until 2011 - at about the same time as a [[SexSells cute red-headed twenty-something]] in braids ''also'' started to appear as "Wendy" in other commercials. Then there is the ''cartoon'' Wendy: the ''PippiLongstocking'' type who appears on the logo, and eventually became an animated mascot much like Ronald [=McDonald=]. Very confusing.
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* The founder of "Wendy's" was Dave Thomas. "Wendy" refers to his daughter, daughter [[note]]extra example here in that her name is actually Melinda. Wendy is her nickname[[/note]], who was ''mentioned'' often in commercials by Thomas, but didn't actually start appearing in the commercials until 2011 - at about the same time as a [[SexSells cute red-headed twenty-something]] in braids ''also'' started to appear as "Wendy" [[note]]yet another example here in that the character's actual name is "Red", not Wendy[[/note]] in other commercials. Then there is the ''cartoon'' Wendy: the ''PippiLongstocking'' type who appears on the logo, and eventually became an animated mascot much like Ronald [=McDonald=]. Very confusing.
3rd Jul '15 4:21:48 PM Kid
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* Also "for the record", "Christ" is the Greek-derived word for "anointed" (how you show someone is a king, prophet or [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot both]]). The Aramaic[=/=]Hebrew-sourced version being, of course "[[MessianicArchetype Messiah]]". In either case, "Christ" is '''''NOT''''' Jesus' last name. He probably didn't have one- most people at the time either didn't need one, or if they did it wasn't fixed: he'd just be '...the carpenter' '...from Nazareth', '...the preacher', depending on the circumstances.
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* Also "for the record", "Christ" is the Greek-derived word for "anointed" (how you show someone is a king, prophet or [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot both]]). The Aramaic[=/=]Hebrew-sourced version being, of course "[[MessianicArchetype Messiah]]". In either case, "Christ" is '''''NOT''''' Jesus' last name. He probably didn't have one- most one--most people at the time either didn't need one, or if they did it wasn't fixed: he'd just be '...the carpenter' '...from Nazareth', '...the preacher', depending on the circumstances.
3rd Jul '15 10:37:36 AM Kid
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** Once upon a time, Pentax cameras (named for the roof pentaprism viewfinder they used) were produced and sold by Asahi Optical Company, Ltd, as one of several lines of cameras the company sold. They proved so popular, that the company renamed themselves Pentax. Additionally, the cameras' popularity caused the lens mount they used, the M42 lens mount, to be known as the "Pentax Screwmount" in the US. Similarly, the same lensmount was known in Japan as the "Praktika thread mount", after a brand of East German cameras that used them. The lensmount in question was actually designed and first used by VEB Zeiss Ikon[[note]]based at the time in Soviet-occupied Germany, before they changed their name to Pentacon under pressure from Zeiss Ikon, a similarly named firm in the US Zone of Occupied Germany. Germany copyrights were presumably a complicated issue in the early Cold War years.[[/note]] for the Contax S, the first camera to use the roof pentaprism viewfinders that Pentax would take its name from.
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** Once upon a time, Pentax cameras (named for the roof pentaprism viewfinder they used) were produced and sold by Asahi Optical Company, Ltd, as one of several lines of cameras the company sold. They proved so popular, popular that the company renamed themselves Pentax. Additionally, the cameras' popularity caused the lens mount they used, the M42 lens mount, to be known as the "Pentax Screwmount" in the US. Similarly, the same lensmount was known in Japan as the "Praktika thread mount", after a brand of East German cameras that used them. The lensmount in question was actually designed and first used by VEB Zeiss Ikon[[note]]based at the time in Soviet-occupied Germany, before they changed their name to Pentacon under pressure from Zeiss Ikon, a similarly named firm in the US Zone of Occupied Germany. Germany copyrights were presumably a complicated issue in the early Cold War years.[[/note]] for the Contax S, the first camera to use the roof pentaprism viewfinders that Pentax would take its name from.
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