History Horrible / Theater

1st Jan '17 8:16:32 PM Willbyr
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16th Nov '16 4:39:03 AM Gimere
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Theater is a hard art form to pull off. If done well, it comes off as enjoyable and masterfully done. Then there's the examples which wouldn't meet the standards of the least competent high schools, and are of such bad quality that you'd think they were made by the main characters of ''Film/TheProducers'' as an intentional flop to cash in on a money-making scheme.

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Theater is a hard art form to pull off. If done well, it comes off as enjoyable and masterfully done. Then there's the examples which wouldn't meet the standards of the least competent high schools, and are of such bad quality that you'd think they were made by the main characters of ''Film/TheProducers'' had created them as an [[SpringtimeForHitler intentional flop flops to cash in on a money-making scheme.
schemes]].
22nd Oct '16 9:53:28 AM dsneybuf
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* The first version of ''Theatre/SpiderManTurnOffTheDark''. The second version of the show opened to a lukewarm reception in mid-2011 and fits on the [[SoBadItsGood other end of the spectrum]]. The original version, which went into previews in the fall of 2010, suffered from severe bouts of AdaptationDisplacement and CriticalResearchFailure, glacial pacing, craptacular music, and terrifyingly wooden acting. It also had a most cringeworthy example of a Greek chorus: a "geek chorus" of teenagers writing a comic book. Audiences routinely condemned it and it didn't fare much better with critics who chose not to wait for the constantly postponed official opening and instead reviewed it during this preview period. The majority of the previews also had massive technical issues (one incident caught on video involved Spider Man's wire harness breaking and the performer falling a considerable height). Director Julie Taymor was fired and songwriters Bono & The Edge threatened to disown it unless it was retooled considerably. The result was much better received by audiences. Critics still hated it, but not as much, and it garnered a small fanbase before closing in January 2014.

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* The first version of ''Theatre/SpiderManTurnOffTheDark''. The second version of the show opened to a lukewarm reception in mid-2011 and fits on the [[SoBadItsGood other end of the spectrum]]. The original version, which went into previews in the fall of 2010, suffered from severe bouts of AdaptationDisplacement AdaptationDecay and CriticalResearchFailure, glacial pacing, craptacular music, and terrifyingly wooden acting. It also had a most cringeworthy example of a Greek chorus: a "geek chorus" of teenagers writing a comic book. Audiences routinely condemned it and it didn't fare much better with critics who chose not to wait for the constantly postponed official opening and instead reviewed it during this preview period. The majority of the previews also had massive technical issues (one incident caught on video involved Spider Man's wire harness breaking and the performer falling a considerable height). Director Julie Taymor was fired and songwriters Bono & The Edge threatened to disown it unless it was retooled considerably. The result was much better received by audiences. Critics still hated it, but not as much, and it garnered a small fanbase before closing in January 2014.
15th Oct '16 11:25:03 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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What truly pushed it over the edge, however, was how it dove into material that could be deemed ridden with UnfortunateImplications if one thought the writers had the subtlety to "imply" anything. It included: Superman getting hit with "pixie dust" and turning into a CampGay stereotype, making Bill and Ted uncomfortable before he leaves the stage to submit to the whims of a similarly fey Creator/GeorgeTakei; [[UsefulNotes/NorthKorea Kim Jong-un]] [[AsianSpeekeeEngrish mixing up his "L"s and "R"s]]; [[Film/AnchormanTheLegendOfRonBurgundy Ron Burgundy]] making comparisons between Munchkin Land, "a very colorful place full of lots of unemployed people who barely speak English," and Van Nuys; and the strong implication that WesternAnimation/WreckItRalph is [[BlackComedyRape going to rape]] an unconscious Music/NickiMinaj. ''Vice'' magazine [[http://www.vice.com/read/the-bill-and-ted-show-at-universal-studios-is-super-homophobic-and-also-racist-and-terrible wrote a scathing article about the production]], and coincidentally enough, [[http://www.avclub.com/articles/universal-studios-shuts-down-bill-and-ted-show-aft,104691/ Universal decided to pull the show a few days later.]] While the Orlando park continues to host its own version of the ''Bill & Ted'' show, it has [[FranchiseKiller never returned to the Hollywood park since]].

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What truly pushed it over the edge, however, was how it dove into material that could be deemed ridden with UnfortunateImplications if one thought the writers had the subtlety to "imply" anything. It included: Superman getting hit with "pixie dust" and turning into a CampGay stereotype, making Bill and Ted uncomfortable before he leaves the stage to submit to the whims of a similarly fey Creator/GeorgeTakei; [[UsefulNotes/NorthKorea Kim Jong-un]] [[AsianSpeekeeEngrish mixing up his "L"s and "R"s]]; [[Film/AnchormanTheLegendOfRonBurgundy Ron Burgundy]] making comparisons between Munchkin Land, "a very colorful place full of lots of unemployed people who barely speak English," and Van Nuys; Nuys (a working-class, mostly Hispanic neighborhood in the San Fernando Valley); and the strong implication that WesternAnimation/WreckItRalph is [[BlackComedyRape going to rape]] an unconscious Music/NickiMinaj. ''Vice'' magazine [[http://www.vice.com/read/the-bill-and-ted-show-at-universal-studios-is-super-homophobic-and-also-racist-and-terrible wrote a scathing article about the production]], and coincidentally enough, [[http://www.avclub.com/articles/universal-studios-shuts-down-bill-and-ted-show-aft,104691/ Universal decided to pull the show a few days later.]] While the Orlando park continues to host its own version of the ''Bill & Ted'' show, it has [[FranchiseKiller never returned to the Hollywood park since]].
15th Oct '16 11:22:29 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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What truly pushed it over the edge, however, was how it dove into material that could be deemed ridden with UnfortunateImplications if one thought the writers had the subtlety to "imply" anything. It included: Superman getting hit with "pixie dust" and turning into a CampGay stereotype, making Bill and Ted uncomfortable before he leaves the stage to submit to the whims of a similarly fey Creator/GeorgeTakei; [[UsefulNotes/NorthKorea Kim Jong-un]] [[AsianSpeekeeEngrish mixing up his "L"s and "R"s]]; [[Film/AnchormanTheLegendOfRonBurgundy Ron Burgundy]] making comparisons between Munchkin Land, "a very colorful place full of lots of unemployed people who barely speak English," and Van Nuys; and the strong implication that WesternAnimation/WreckItRalph is [[BlackComedyRape going to rape]] an unconscious Music/NickiMinaj. ''Vice'' magazine [[http://www.vice.com/read/the-bill-and-ted-show-at-universal-studios-is-super-homophobic-and-also-racist-and-terrible wrote a scathing article about the production]], and coincidentally enough, [[http://www.avclub.com/articles/universal-studios-shuts-down-bill-and-ted-show-aft,104691/ Universal decided to pull the show a few days later.]] The ''Bill & Ted'' show for the following year's HHN Hollywood event was likewise canceled[[note]]Though, again, it went on as usual in Orlando[[/note]].

to:

What truly pushed it over the edge, however, was how it dove into material that could be deemed ridden with UnfortunateImplications if one thought the writers had the subtlety to "imply" anything. It included: Superman getting hit with "pixie dust" and turning into a CampGay stereotype, making Bill and Ted uncomfortable before he leaves the stage to submit to the whims of a similarly fey Creator/GeorgeTakei; [[UsefulNotes/NorthKorea Kim Jong-un]] [[AsianSpeekeeEngrish mixing up his "L"s and "R"s]]; [[Film/AnchormanTheLegendOfRonBurgundy Ron Burgundy]] making comparisons between Munchkin Land, "a very colorful place full of lots of unemployed people who barely speak English," and Van Nuys; and the strong implication that WesternAnimation/WreckItRalph is [[BlackComedyRape going to rape]] an unconscious Music/NickiMinaj. ''Vice'' magazine [[http://www.vice.com/read/the-bill-and-ted-show-at-universal-studios-is-super-homophobic-and-also-racist-and-terrible wrote a scathing article about the production]], and coincidentally enough, [[http://www.avclub.com/articles/universal-studios-shuts-down-bill-and-ted-show-aft,104691/ Universal decided to pull the show a few days later.]] The While the Orlando park continues to host its own version of the ''Bill & Ted'' show for show, it has [[FranchiseKiller never returned to the following year's HHN Hollywood event was likewise canceled[[note]]Though, again, it went on as usual in Orlando[[/note]].park since]].
15th Oct '16 11:17:00 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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* The original 1988 production of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}: The Musical'', based on Creator/StephenKing's breakout hit novel and its 1976 film adaptation, was at the time one of the most expensive productions in Broadway history, costing over $8 million. That money clearly didn't buy quality, as it was met with boos on opening night and scathing reviews. As explained in [[http://www.theawl.com/2010/07/understudies-carrie-the-worst-musical-ever this article]], it was a mess of bad music, [[WTHCostumingDepartment garish costume choices]], SpecialEffectFailure, and Carrie's powers being given barely any explanation. It closed after only sixteen previews and five performances, making it among the most notorious flops in Broadway history. It was bad enough that it was seen for years as the benchmark for a truly Horrible musical; a book written in 1992 about Broadway disasters was titled ''Not Since Carrie''.

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* The original 1988 production of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}: The Musical'', based on Creator/StephenKing's breakout hit novel and [[Film/{{Carrie 1976}} its 1976 film adaptation, adaptation]], was at the time one of the most expensive productions in Broadway history, costing over $8 million. That money clearly didn't buy quality, as it was met with boos on opening night and scathing reviews. As explained in [[http://www.theawl.com/2010/07/understudies-carrie-the-worst-musical-ever this article]], it was a mess of bad music, [[WTHCostumingDepartment garish costume choices]], SpecialEffectFailure, and Carrie's powers being given barely any explanation. It closed after only sixteen previews and five performances, making it among the most notorious flops in Broadway history. It was bad enough that it was seen for years as the benchmark for a truly Horrible musical; a book written in 1992 about Broadway disasters was titled ''Not Since Carrie''.
8th Sep '16 4:56:59 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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8th Sep '16 4:44:42 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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Despite universally bad reviews, the sisters firmly believed that the fault was neither in their stars nor themselves, but in their detractors, whom the sisters thought could not appreciate wholesome entertainment. In 1896, Willie Hammerstein, son of Oscar the First and father of [[Creator/RodgersAndHammerstein Oscar the Second]], booked the sisters to play his new Olympia Music Hall in New York City, which was not doing well due to poor location. According to ''Variety'', he did so because he reasoned that if he couldn't draw crowds with the best acts, he would try his luck with the worst. For several weeks, the Cherry Sisters played to packed houses. They continued to ignore bad reviews (which now included ''The New York Times'') and thrown objects, declaring that if so many people came to see them they must be the best act in the country.\\

to:

Despite universally bad reviews, the sisters firmly believed that the fault was neither in their stars nor themselves, but in their detractors, whom the sisters thought could not appreciate wholesome entertainment. In 1896, Willie Hammerstein, son of Oscar the First and father of [[Creator/RodgersAndHammerstein Oscar the Second]], booked the sisters to play his new Olympia Music Hall in New York City, which was not doing well due to poor location. According to ''Variety'', he did so because he reasoned that if he couldn't draw crowds with the best acts, he would try his luck with the worst. For It worked: for several weeks, the Cherry Sisters [[BileFascination played to packed houses. houses]]. They continued to ignore bad reviews (which now included ''The New York Times'') Times'', who called them the "Four Freaks from Iowa") and thrown objects, declaring that if so many people came to see them they must be the best act in the country.\\



After this engagement, the sisters returned to Iowa and to savage audiences and reviewers alike. After newspapers all over Iowa reprinted a particularly nasty item from the ''Odebolt Chronicle'' in 1898 which began by describing the Cherry Sisters' physical appearance in unflattering terms, the sisters sued that paper and the ''Des Moines Register'' for libel. The trial included a performance of the act, and judgment was given in favor of the defending newspapers. Undaunted, the sisters appealed, and on May 28, 1901, the Iowa Supreme Court delivered a stinging rebuke to the sisters. This ruling is cited to this day as a major precedent in cases involving theatrical and other critics. Despite losing their suit, the Cherries continued to perform until one of them suddenly died in 1903. ''Variety'' described them as "the worst act in America". None of the sisters married or had children, and the only sound recording of one of the sisters vanished decades ago. For the next fifty years, vaudevillians and others would describe a bad act as "a road company of the Cherry Sisters".

to:

After this engagement, the sisters returned to Iowa and to savage audiences and reviewers alike. After newspapers all over Iowa reprinted a particularly nasty item from the ''Odebolt Chronicle'' in 1898 which began by describing the Cherry Sisters' physical appearance in unflattering terms, the sisters sued that paper and the ''Des Moines Register'' for libel. [[note]](This wasn't the first time the sisters sued a newspaper for libel; they previously sued the editor of the ''Cedar Rapids Gazette'' in 1893 for publishing yet another negative review of the act, even after he retracted it at their request. His suggestion that [[LetsSeeYouDoBetter they write the article themselves]] presumably didn't go over well.)[[/note]] The trial included a performance of the act, and judgment was given in favor of the defending newspapers. Undaunted, the sisters appealed, and on May 28, 1901, the Iowa Supreme Court delivered a stinging rebuke to the sisters. This ruling is cited to this day as a major precedent in cases involving theatrical and other critics. Despite losing their suit, the Cherries continued to perform until one of them suddenly died in 1903. ''Variety'' described them as "the worst act in America". None of the sisters married or had children, and the only sound recording of one of the sisters vanished decades ago. For the next fifty years, vaudevillians and others would describe a bad act as "a road company of the Cherry Sisters".
8th Sep '16 4:27:56 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* Possibly the worst act in the history of show business was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherry_Sisters Cherry Sisters]], who created a routine of morality skits and songs intended to be variously patriotic and uplifting, called "Something Good, Something Sad". The sad part, to which the sisters were oblivious, is they had no talent whatsoever. While their neighbors in Marion, Iowa, received them politely, the rest of Iowa and the Midwest thought otherwise, and hurled voluminous amounts of rotten produce and eggs, plus the occasional hard object, at the sisters. After one of them was sprayed in the face with a fire extinguisher, theater managers interposed a wire mesh curtain between the Cherries and their audience. Despite universally bad reviews, the sisters firmly believed that the fault was neither in their stars nor themselves, but in their detractors, whom the sisters thought could not appreciate wholesome entertainment. In 1896, Oscar Hammerstein I booked the sisters to play his new Olympia Music Hall in New York City, which was not doing well due to poor location. According to ''Variety'', he did so because he reasoned that if he couldn't draw crowds with the best acts, he would try his luck with the worst. For several weeks, the Cherry Sisters played to packed houses. They continued to ignore bad reviews (which now included ''The New York Times'') and thrown objects, declaring that if so many people came to see them they must be the best act in the country. After this engagement, the sisters returned to Iowa and to savage audiences and reviewers alike. After newspapers all over Iowa reprinted a particularly nasty item from the ''Odebolt Chronicle'' in 1898 which began by describing the Cherry Sisters' physical appearance in unflattering terms, the sisters sued that paper and the ''Des Moines Register'' for libel. The trial included a performance of the act, and judgment was given in favor of the defending newspapers. Undaunted, the sisters appealed, and on May 28, 1901, the Iowa Supreme Court delivered a stinging rebuke to the sisters. This ruling is cited to this day as a major precedent in cases involving theatrical and other critics. Despite losing their suit, the Cherries continued to perform until one of them suddenly died in 1903. ''Variety'' described them as "the worst act in America". None of the sisters married or had children, and the only sound recording of one of the sisters vanished decades ago. For the next fifty years, vaudevillians and others would describe a bad act as "a road company of the Cherry Sisters".

to:

* Possibly the worst act in the history of show business was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherry_Sisters Cherry Sisters]], who created a routine of morality skits and songs intended to be variously patriotic and uplifting, called "Something Good, Something Sad". The sad part, to which the sisters were oblivious, is they had no talent whatsoever. While their neighbors in Marion, Iowa, received them politely, the rest of Iowa and the Midwest thought otherwise, and hurled voluminous amounts of rotten produce and eggs, plus the occasional hard object, at the sisters. After one of them was sprayed in the face with a fire extinguisher, theater managers interposed a wire mesh curtain between the Cherries and their audience. \\
\\
Despite universally bad reviews, the sisters firmly believed that the fault was neither in their stars nor themselves, but in their detractors, whom the sisters thought could not appreciate wholesome entertainment. In 1896, Willie Hammerstein, son of Oscar Hammerstein I the First and father of [[Creator/RodgersAndHammerstein Oscar the Second]], booked the sisters to play his new Olympia Music Hall in New York City, which was not doing well due to poor location. According to ''Variety'', he did so because he reasoned that if he couldn't draw crowds with the best acts, he would try his luck with the worst. For several weeks, the Cherry Sisters played to packed houses. They continued to ignore bad reviews (which now included ''The New York Times'') and thrown objects, declaring that if so many people came to see them they must be the best act in the country. \\
\\
After this engagement, the sisters returned to Iowa and to savage audiences and reviewers alike. After newspapers all over Iowa reprinted a particularly nasty item from the ''Odebolt Chronicle'' in 1898 which began by describing the Cherry Sisters' physical appearance in unflattering terms, the sisters sued that paper and the ''Des Moines Register'' for libel. The trial included a performance of the act, and judgment was given in favor of the defending newspapers. Undaunted, the sisters appealed, and on May 28, 1901, the Iowa Supreme Court delivered a stinging rebuke to the sisters. This ruling is cited to this day as a major precedent in cases involving theatrical and other critics. Despite losing their suit, the Cherries continued to perform until one of them suddenly died in 1903. ''Variety'' described them as "the worst act in America". None of the sisters married or had children, and the only sound recording of one of the sisters vanished decades ago. For the next fifty years, vaudevillians and others would describe a bad act as "a road company of the Cherry Sisters".
8th Jul '15 6:42:35 PM SwimToTheMoon
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** The current version of ''Theatre/CrissAngelBelieve''. The first version was poorly received, but it has its fans. In 2010, he dropped the acrobatics and storyline, and reduced it to a lame-ass stand-up comedy show with one dance act and lame tricks that can be seen at an elementary school talent show -- doves appear from his jacket and so forth. Worse, there's ''still'' a hideous amount of SpecialEffectsFailure (wire harnesses visible, trapdoors obvious), and he often makes racist remarks and embarrasses people in the audience (but not in the traditional Cirque way, where the poor bastard still has fun regardless). It's baffling that it bears the Cirque namesake now; it only continues to run because of the 10-year contract Angel signed with the Luxor resort.
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