History HonorBeforeReason / VideoGames

14th Aug '16 10:18:42 AM nombretomado
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* In ''DissidiaFinalFantasy'', [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII The Onion Knight]] learns this as AnAesop, as, though it went against his otherwise perfectly rational motto of not taking on any foe he wasn't confident about, he found he had to fight on regardless if it meant [[DistressedDamsel rescuing]] [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI Terra]].

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* In ''DissidiaFinalFantasy'', ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'', [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII The Onion Knight]] learns this as AnAesop, as, though it went against his otherwise perfectly rational motto of not taking on any foe he wasn't confident about, he found he had to fight on regardless if it meant [[DistressedDamsel rescuing]] [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI Terra]].
11th Aug '16 7:42:24 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The Elites in the ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series definitely fall under this trope. It's noted that during the Human-Covenant War, even regular Elites would fight hand-to-hand and die rather than pick up fully-loaded human weapons at their feet. That said, it's shown in post-''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' that the Elites are starting to become a lot more pragmatic after the fall of the original Covenant; even anti-human Elites are ever more willing use human weapons if the situation calls for it (they seem to favor nukes).

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* The Elites in the ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series definitely fall under this trope. It's noted that during the Human-Covenant War, even regular Elites would fight hand-to-hand and die rather than pick up fully-loaded human weapons at their feet. That said, it's been shown in post-''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' media that the Elites are starting to become a lot more pragmatic after the fall of the original Covenant; even anti-human Elites are ever more willing use human weapons if the situation calls for it (they seem to favor nukes).
11th Aug '16 7:42:05 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The elites in the ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series definitely fall under this trope. In one book, the Chief noted that even regular soldiers would fight hand-to-hand and die rather than pick up fully-loaded human weapons at their feet. The high-ranking zealots take it further, '''''especially''''' in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}''. The [[WordofGod Word of God]] at the time was that these officers had a honour code that prohibited them from using ranged weapons, and entering vehicles is considered cowardice. As a result, they end up being less dangerous than their gun-wielding subordinates, since they just run at you with a sword. When you do get one as an ally, [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything giving him a gun will just result in him running up to enemies and bludgeoning them with it, and he will stubbornly refuse to enter any vehicle]].
** Of course they're still more dangerous than their subordinates because they're ten foot aliens with cloaking devices, energy shields and an one-hit kill weapon. On heroic, which is as close to realistic difficulty, unless if several marines focus fire on the single zealot, he ''will'' reach lunging distance before his shields drop and he ''will'' annihilate the group of marines by himself.

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* The elites Elites in the ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series definitely fall under this trope. In one book, the Chief It's noted that during the Human-Covenant War, even regular soldiers Elites would fight hand-to-hand and die rather than pick up fully-loaded human weapons at their feet. That said, it's shown in post-''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' that the Elites are starting to become a lot more pragmatic after the fall of the original Covenant; even anti-human Elites are ever more willing use human weapons if the situation calls for it (they seem to favor nukes).
**
The high-ranking zealots Zealots take it further, '''''especially''''' this '''especially''' far in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}''. The [[WordofGod Word of God]] at the time was that these officers had a honour code that prohibited them from using ranged weapons, and entering vehicles is considered cowardice. As a result, they end up being less dangerous than their gun-wielding subordinates, since they just run at you with a sword. When you do get one as an ally, [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything giving him a gun will just result in him running up to enemies and bludgeoning them with it, and he will stubbornly refuse to enter any vehicle]].
**
vehicle]]. Of course course, they're still more dangerous than their subordinates because they're ten 8 foot aliens with cloaking devices, energy shields and an a one-hit kill weapon. On heroic, weapon; on Heroic, which is as close to realistic difficulty, unless if several marines focus fire on the a single zealot, Zealot, he ''will'' reach lunging distance before his shields drop and he ''will'' annihilate the group of marines by himself.himself.
** Additionally, the Elites' taboo against shedding blood outside of battle means that many of them would rather die than see a doctor. ''VideoGame/Halo5Guardians'' shows that even the Arbiter still has some trouble getting his subordinates in the Swords of Sanghelios to seek medical attention, though it seems he's starting to make headway.
1st Jul '16 4:49:13 PM ScorpiusOB1
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* The Yehat in ''StarControl''. In the second game you'll find they, formerly members of the Alliance of Free Stars as humans were, became BattleThralls as their Queen prefered to surrender to the Ur-Quan rather than being the first ruler in the dinasty's two thousand years to lose a battle. Their oath of loyalty to her means that, as much as [[ApologeticAttacker they dislike it]] they'll attack you [[spoiler: at least until you bring them an [[UpliftedSpecies Shofixti]], what will cause a civil war between those loyal to the Queen and those who think she acted dishonourably.]]
5th Jun '16 10:02:46 AM Steven
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* A mission ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'' has you sneaking aboard a large ship to free some Vietnamese hostages and then taking out the ringleader of the kidnappers. The player prior to the infiltration loses all of their weapons in a helicopter crash and when they confront the ringleader, he gives the player a sword so that the two of them can have an honorable fight to the death. However, nothing stops the player from swimming ashore and running to the nearest gun store to restock on weapons and going back to the mission area to blast the boss full of holes.
4th Mar '16 2:33:08 PM CyberTiger88
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* The postgame of ''VideoGame/PokemonSuperMysteryDungeon'' has this where [[spoiler: the player finds Mew asleep at the end of Purifying Cave. However, when Mew is approached, who should stop the player but Nuzleaf and the Beheeyem. They tell the player to stay back, as Mew is said to have some parts of Dark Matter left. As Mew glows, the player questions if they accept this... And that is when the player outright '''refuses''' to accept Mew's fate; the player does not want to say goodbye for the second time, and the player just does not care a bit if they bring back Dark Matter by bringing the partner back because the player can just fight it again. Then, the scarves the player and partner have are sacrificed to bring the partner back, and Mew tells the player that it is because of the player's wish that the partner came back. It turns out to be a setup masterminded by Ampharos to lure the player into the Purifying Cave to bring the partner back, and Nuzleaf and the Beheeyem got the chance to redeem themselves and succeeded.]]
9th Feb '16 7:40:55 AM GunarmDyne
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* ''VideoGame/AlphadiaGenesis'': Walter, a knight from a neighboring kingdom who lost to TheHero, Fray, in a battle tournament, demands a rematch when they meet up again a year later and wants it ''now''! Never mind that they meet up in a crowded tavern and drawing his sword in the midst of civilians while on an official mission for his king would have tarnished his honor far more than a fair loss.
3rd Feb '16 12:39:57 PM ThemJohns
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* The Half-Zatoichi in ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' is a katana wielded by the Demoman and the Soldier. It is Honorbound, meaning that once you draw it, you can't switch to another weapon until you get a kill with it, but getting a kill with it gets you back all your health points.

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* The Half-Zatoichi in ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' is a katana wielded by the Demoman and the Soldier. It is Honorbound, meaning that once you draw it, sheathing it without drawing blood will hurt you, but you can't switch to another weapon until regain a large amount of health when you get a kill with it, but getting a kill with it gets you back all your health points.it.
29th Jan '16 1:29:42 AM jormis29
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* In the ''{{Warcraft}}'' book ''[[WarcraftExpandedUniverse Of Blood and Honor]]'', the human paladin Tirion Fordring is an extremely honourable guy, saving an elderly man from a race which pretty much all of humanity was still recovering from having being nearly crushed by at the time. Doing so saw him exiled for treachery and his wife refusing to take herself and their son into the ruin he made for himself. His magical powers were supposed to have been taken from him, though due to nature of his use of them, it is assumed that they were granted by moral righteousness -- which has since been debated and argued about in true nature, due to ''WorldOfWarcraft''.

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* In the ''{{Warcraft}}'' ''Franchise/WarcraftExpandedUniverse'' book ''[[WarcraftExpandedUniverse Of Blood and Honor]]'', ''Literature/OfBloodAndHonor'', the human paladin Tirion Fordring is an extremely honourable guy, saving an elderly man from a race which pretty much all of humanity was still recovering from having being nearly crushed by at the time. Doing so saw him exiled for treachery and his wife refusing to take herself and their son into the ruin he made for himself. His magical powers were supposed to have been taken from him, though due to nature of his use of them, it is assumed that they were granted by moral righteousness -- which has since been debated and argued about in true nature, due to ''WorldOfWarcraft''.''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft''.
21st Jan '16 2:47:26 PM Adam43
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* The postgame of ''VideoGame/PokemonSuperMysteryDungeon'' has this where [[spoiler: the player finds Mew asleep at the end of Purifying Cave. However, when Mew is approached, who should stop the player but Nuzleaf and the Beheeyem. They tell the player to stay back, as Mew is said to have some parts of Dark Matter left. As Mew glows, the player questions if they accept this... And that is when the player outright '''refuses''' to accept Mew's fate; the player does not want to say goodbye for the second time, and the player just does not care a bit if they bring back Dark Matter by bringing the partner back because the player can just fight it again. Then, the scarves the player and partner have are sacrificed to bring the partner back, and Mew tells the player that it is because of the player's wish that the partner came back. It turns out to be a setup masterminded by Ampharos to lure the player into the Purifying Cave to bring the partner back, and Nuzleaf and the Beheeyem got the chance to redeem themselves and succeeded.]]
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