History HoistByHisOwnPetard / MythologyAndReligion

17th Feb '16 11:52:32 AM ThePocket
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* OlderThanFeudalism: In [[Literature/TheBible the Biblical Book of Esther]], corrupt Persian minister Haman is hung on the gallows he built for his rival Mordechai, who also happened to be Queen Esther's uncle and caretaker.

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* OlderThanFeudalism: In [[Literature/TheBible the Biblical Book of Esther]], corrupt Persian minister Haman plots to have his rival Mordecai executed, along with the entire Hebrew people out of spite. When it is hung revealed that Queen Esther is herself a Hebrew, and that the order would have led to her execution as well, he is hanged on the gallows very gallows[[note]]though more recent translations interpret the "gallows" as a pike for impaling people, which seems more likely given the time period[[/note]] he had built for Mordecai as punishment for his rival Mordechai, who also happened to be Queen Esther's uncle and caretaker.treachery.
23rd Aug '15 9:12:58 AM upupandaway42
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*** Epidaurus, who would beat people to death with his club.

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*** Epidaurus, Periphetes, who would beat people to death with his club.
3rd May '15 11:48:00 PM nombretomado
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* ClassicalMythology:

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* ClassicalMythology:Myth/ClassicalMythology:



* In NorseMythology, Loki is being chased by the Aesir. He shapeshifts into a fish and hides in a river, but on the bank of the river is the fishing net he invented. The gods use the net to capture him.

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* In NorseMythology, Myth/NorseMythology, Loki is being chased by the Aesir. He shapeshifts into a fish and hides in a river, but on the bank of the river is the fishing net he invented. The gods use the net to capture him.
5th Feb '15 6:46:46 PM Xihirli
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Added DiffLines:

* A bigger version. If you believe that the Dragon in Revelation, Satan from Job, and the Serpent from Genesis are all the same being, then the fact that humans later judge the angels, sending the evil ones (demons and Satan) to hell and allowing the rest to remain with God, is this. Because if the Serpent had never tricked mankind into eating the fruit of knowledge of good and evil, we never would have been able to judge the Dragon.
11th Dec '14 11:45:45 AM THEBATHEAD
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Added DiffLines:

One major point of MythologyAndReligion is that humans' own feeble devices are often [[HoistByHisOwnPetard their own downfall]], and that they should simply put their faith in the gods.
23rd Apr '14 4:13:19 PM Willbyr
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** The Greeks obviously loved this trope.
* In [[NorseMythology Norse Mythology,]] Loki is being chased by the Aesir. He shapeshifts into a fish and hides in a river, but on the bank of the river is the fishing net he invented. The gods use the net to capture him.
* In Estonian mythology, [[spoiler:the hero Kalevipoeg is killed by his own TalkingSword as revenge for the son of the blacksmith who made it that Kalevipoeg killed in a drunken fight.]] See ''{{Literature/Kalevipoeg}}''.

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** The Greeks obviously loved this trope.
* In [[NorseMythology Norse Mythology,]] NorseMythology, Loki is being chased by the Aesir. He shapeshifts into a fish and hides in a river, but on the bank of the river is the fishing net he invented. The gods use the net to capture him.
* In Estonian mythology, [[spoiler:the hero Kalevipoeg is killed by his own TalkingSword as revenge for the son of the blacksmith who made it that Kalevipoeg killed in a drunken fight.]] See ''{{Literature/Kalevipoeg}}''.''Literature/{{Kalevipoeg}}''.

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25th Nov '13 4:28:29 PM Vismutti
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* In [[NorseMythology Norse Mythology,]] Loki is being chased by the Aesir. He shapeshifts into a fish and hides in a river, but on the bank of the river is the fishing net he invented. The gods use the net to capture him.

to:

* In [[NorseMythology Norse Mythology,]] Loki is being chased by the Aesir. He shapeshifts into a fish and hides in a river, but on the bank of the river is the fishing net he invented. The gods use the net to capture him.him.
* In Estonian mythology, [[spoiler:the hero Kalevipoeg is killed by his own TalkingSword as revenge for the son of the blacksmith who made it that Kalevipoeg killed in a drunken fight.]] See ''{{Literature/Kalevipoeg}}''.
23rd Oct '13 3:48:34 AM maedar
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** Heracles' own death was an ironic version of this (and a rare case of it happening to a hero). Soon after marrying his third wife, Deianira, a lecherous centaur named Nessus offered to carry her across a river, but attempted to rape her once they got to the opposite shore; the hero heard her cries for help, and shot the creature with an arrow (envenomed with the blood of the Lernaean Hydra's blood) from the opposite shore, mortally wounding him. As he lay dying, Nessus plotted revenge. He feigned regret for what he had done, and told Deianira to gather his blood, saying it would act as a love potion in case her husband was ever unfaithful to her. Later, when Deianira suspected - falsely, alas - that her husband was trying to woo Iole (the daughter of Eurytus, who Heracles had once earned the right to marry - it didn't work out) she used the supposed love potion, smearing it on his garment. It became clear when he put it on that what Nessus had claimed was a [[BlatantLies Blatant Lie]]; the Hydra's blood still tainted ''his'' blood, and it nearly burned him alive, causing him horrible pain until he decided to die nobly by leaping on a funeral pyre of oak branches. (Poor Deianira realized her error and tried to warn him, but it was too late, and [[DrivenToSuicide she hanged herself out of grief.]] But there was consolation; Heracles [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence was taken to Mount Olympus by Zeus]] as a final reward for his life of heroism.)

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** Heracles' own death was an ironic version of this (and a rare case of it happening to a hero). Soon after marrying his third wife, Deianira, a lecherous centaur named Nessus offered to carry her across a river, but attempted to rape her once they got to the opposite shore; the hero heard her cries for help, and shot the creature with an arrow (envenomed with the blood of the Lernaean Hydra's blood) Hydra) from the opposite shore, mortally wounding him. As he lay dying, Nessus plotted revenge. He feigned regret for what he had done, and told Deianira to gather his blood, saying it would act as a love potion in case her husband was ever unfaithful to her. Later, when Deianira suspected - falsely, alas - that her husband was trying to woo Iole (the daughter of Eurytus, who Heracles had once earned the right to marry - it didn't work out) she used the supposed love potion, smearing it on his garment. It became clear when he put it on that what Nessus had claimed was a [[BlatantLies Blatant Lie]]; the Hydra's blood still tainted ''his'' blood, and it nearly burned him alive, causing him horrible pain until he decided to die nobly by leaping on a funeral pyre of oak branches. (Poor Deianira realized her error and tried to warn him, but it was too late, and [[DrivenToSuicide she hanged herself out of grief.]] But there was consolation; Heracles [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence was taken to Mount Olympus by Zeus]] as a final reward for his life of heroism.)
24th Sep '13 5:07:01 AM maedar
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** Heracles' own death was an ironic version of this (and a rare case of it happening to a hero). Soon after marrying his third wife, Deianira, a lecherous centaur named Nessus offered to carry her across a river, but attempted to rape her once they got to the opposite shore; the hero heard her cries for help, and shot the creature with an arrow (envenomed with the blood of the Lernaean Hydra's blood), mortally wounding him. As he lay dying, Nessus plotted revenge. He feigned regret for what he had done, and told Deianira to gather his blood, saying it would act as a love potion in case her husband was ever unfaithful to her. Later, when Deianira suspected - falsely, alas - that her husband was trying to woo Iole (the daughter of Eurytus, who Heracles had once earned the right to marry - it didn't work out) she used the supposed love potion, smearing it his garment. It became clear when he put it on that what Nessus had claimed was a [[BlatantLies Blatant Lie]]; the Hydra's blood still tainted ''his'' blood, and it nearly burned him alive, causing him horrible pain until he decided to die nobly by funeral pyre of oak branches. (Poor Deianira realized her error and tried to warn him, but it was too late, and [[DrivenToSuicide she hanged herself out of grief.]] But there was consolation; Heracles [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence was taken to Mount Olympus by Zeus]] as a final reward for his life of heroism.)

to:

** Heracles' own death was an ironic version of this (and a rare case of it happening to a hero). Soon after marrying his third wife, Deianira, a lecherous centaur named Nessus offered to carry her across a river, but attempted to rape her once they got to the opposite shore; the hero heard her cries for help, and shot the creature with an arrow (envenomed with the blood of the Lernaean Hydra's blood), blood) from the opposite shore, mortally wounding him. As he lay dying, Nessus plotted revenge. He feigned regret for what he had done, and told Deianira to gather his blood, saying it would act as a love potion in case her husband was ever unfaithful to her. Later, when Deianira suspected - falsely, alas - that her husband was trying to woo Iole (the daughter of Eurytus, who Heracles had once earned the right to marry - it didn't work out) she used the supposed love potion, smearing it on his garment. It became clear when he put it on that what Nessus had claimed was a [[BlatantLies Blatant Lie]]; the Hydra's blood still tainted ''his'' blood, and it nearly burned him alive, causing him horrible pain until he decided to die nobly by leaping on a funeral pyre of oak branches. (Poor Deianira realized her error and tried to warn him, but it was too late, and [[DrivenToSuicide she hanged herself out of grief.]] But there was consolation; Heracles [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence was taken to Mount Olympus by Zeus]] as a final reward for his life of heroism.)
23rd Sep '13 11:50:41 PM Wyvern76
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** Medusa also gets defeated this way in various versions of her myth; Getting turned to stone by her own gaze via mirror or somesuch. The ones where her eyes merely get stabbed are closer to DeathByIrony.
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