History Heartwarming / PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians

7th Nov '16 8:42:38 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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--->'''Hermes:''' ''Try.'' If there's one thing I've learned in three-thousand years, it's that you don't give up on family.

to:

--->'''Hermes:''' ''Try.'' If there's one thing I've learned in three-thousand years, it's that you don't give up on family.family.
* Apollo assuming a disguise to aid the heroes on their quest in ''The Titan's Curse'', and going against Zeus's decree of no-contact in order to do so, all for the sake of helping them save Artemis. As he puts it, ''no one'' messes with his little sister and gets away with it!
17th Oct '16 6:18:31 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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--->''Hermes:''' ''Try.'' If there's one thing I've learned in three-thousand years, it's that you don't give up on family.

to:

--->''Hermes:''' --->'''Hermes:''' ''Try.'' If there's one thing I've learned in three-thousand years, it's that you don't give up on family.
17th Oct '16 6:18:13 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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* Hades agreeing, at Artemis's request, to aid her hunters who perished in the Battle of Manhattan, by streamlining their applications for Elysium.

to:

* Hades agreeing, at Artemis's request, to aid her hunters who perished in the Battle of Manhattan, by streamlining their applications for Elysium.Elysium.
* One noteworthy moment from the films: when the team encounters Hermes in ''Sea of Monsters'', he (true to the book) requests that they ask Luke to forgive him for the mistakes he's made, only for Percy to tell him that Luke is too far gone for any of that. Hermes's response?
--->''Hermes:''' ''Try.'' If there's one thing I've learned in three-thousand years, it's that you don't give up on family.
16th Oct '16 9:12:49 PM akanesarumara
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** He also never excuses the wrongdoings of any demigod or even god (not even the more questionable deeds of his father such as taking revenge on Minos by having his wife fall in love with the sacrificial bull) in both ''Percy Jackson's Greek Heroes'' and ''Percy Jackson's Greek Gods'', and at the end of Arachne's story, he asks, "What's the conclusion to draw? Many say it's to never even think you can be as good as a god and not to even try to outdo them but I think that's wrong. Arachne ''was'' that good."

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** He also never excuses the wrongdoings of any demigod (for example he says saying Hera caused Herakles' madness that made him kill his family is letting him off easy as he has a well-documented case of HairTriggerTemper and he killed a teacher in rage when he was 12) or even god (not even the more questionable deeds of his father such as taking revenge on Minos by having his wife fall in love with the sacrificial bull) bull or raping Demeter in horse-form) in both ''Percy Jackson's Greek Heroes'' and ''Percy Jackson's Greek Gods'', and at the end of Arachne's story, he asks, "What's the conclusion to draw? Many say it's to never even think you can be as good as a god and not to even try to outdo them but I think that's wrong. Arachne ''was'' that good."
20th Sep '16 11:53:38 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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* Similar to the above, Argos, the 100-eyed-giant is working at the camp. The same Argos who according to the mythology was tasked by Hera to forever guard her sacred grove, also known as the Garden of the Hesperides. The implication being that Hera, forever described as easy to anger and petty in her (rightful) jealousy, lent the best guardsman she could think of to guard demigods, including those who are the fruit of her husband's cheating.

to:

* Similar to the above, Argos, the 100-eyed-giant is working at the camp. The same Argos who according to the mythology was tasked by Hera to forever guard her sacred grove, also known as the Garden of the Hesperides. The implication being that Hera, forever described as easy to anger and petty in her (rightful) jealousy, lent the best guardsman she could think of to guard demigods, including those who are the fruit of her husband's cheating.cheating.
* Hades agreeing, at Artemis's request, to aid her hunters who perished in the Battle of Manhattan, by streamlining their applications for Elysium.
3rd Sep '16 5:05:37 AM akanesarumara
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** He also never excuses the wrongdoings of any demigod or even god (not even the more questionable deeds of his father such as taking revenge on Minos by having his wife fall in love with the sacrificial bull) in both ''Percy Jackson's Greek Heroes'' and ''Percy Jackson's Greek Gods''.

to:

** He also never excuses the wrongdoings of any demigod or even god (not even the more questionable deeds of his father such as taking revenge on Minos by having his wife fall in love with the sacrificial bull) in both ''Percy Jackson's Greek Heroes'' and ''Percy Jackson's Greek Gods''.Gods'', and at the end of Arachne's story, he asks, "What's the conclusion to draw? Many say it's to never even think you can be as good as a god and not to even try to outdo them but I think that's wrong. Arachne ''was'' that good."
3rd Sep '16 3:14:28 AM akanesarumara
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Added DiffLines:

** On the subject of Amphitrite, the thing that worried her about getting involved with Poseidon was not that she was afraid of being cheated on, but that she didn't want a man to lord over her and wanted to be able to do her own things and be her own person in marriage. When he finds this out, Poseidon happily and gladly agrees to respect her boundaries and the children they will have together and they went on to be one of the most well-adjusted couples.
21st Aug '16 3:23:35 AM akanesarumara
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* ''Percy Jackson's Greek Gods'' is a return to Percy's roots as a FirstPersonSmartass for the most part, but he also pauses frequently to directly address the reader about the ValuesDissonance present in the Greek myths. When Zeus forces himself on Kallisto by posing as her mistress, Artemis, Percy says that Kallisto kept quiet about it out of fear that it was her fault-- then informs the reader that it's ''never'' your fault if someone does that to you, and you should tell someone. He also makes a point out of Dionysus being the patron god of gender confusion, because it's something he has experience with, and goes on a brief AuthorTract about how the story of Pandora is used by men to justify blaming women for everything that's gone wrong in the world, '''but''' Pandora was explicitly '''set up by the gods''' to fail, literally '''designed''' by them to be unable to resist opening the box, and yet they're apparently blameless. As a primer to one of the great mythological traditions that is possibly going to be a child's first introduction to the Greek myths, it's really, really nice to see Percy (in reality, Riordan) going out of his way to encourage the reader and try to prevent them from internalizing some of the Greeks' less enlightened ideas.
* Snark and opinions aside, Percy mostly sticks to the ancient myths he's recounting in ''Percy Jackson's Greek Gods''. The only time he really goes on about a god's modern-day circumstances is when he talks about Amphritite, a Nereid and wife of Poseidon-- and Percy's stepmother. While Amphritite was rather cold when we glimpsed her in ''The Last Olympian'', Percy takes a moment to give her kudos for not taking out her issues with her husband on his innocent children, and says she doesn't give him a hard time for leaving his clothes on the floor and she even bakes him cookies-- which is "all you can ask of an immortal stepmother."

to:

* ''Percy Jackson's Greek Gods'' is a return to Percy's roots as a FirstPersonSmartass for the most part, but he also pauses frequently to directly address the reader about the ValuesDissonance present in the Greek myths. When Zeus forces himself on Kallisto by posing as her mistress, Artemis, Percy says that Kallisto kept quiet about it out of fear that it was her fault-- then informs the reader that it's ''never'' your fault if someone does that to you, and you should tell someone.someone, even adding that though he knows blaming Zeus is not the wisest choice he could make, he doesn't care of the big guy upstairs hears, "I call 'em like I see 'em". He also makes a point out of Dionysus being the patron god of gender confusion, because it's something he has experience with, and goes on a brief AuthorTract about how the story of Pandora is used by men to justify blaming women for everything that's gone wrong in the world, '''but''' Pandora was explicitly '''set up by the gods''' to fail, literally '''designed''' by them to be unable to resist opening the box, and yet they're apparently blameless. He also shows a great respect for female demigods in either of the myth-books, speaking highly of Otrera and Cyrene, and giving props to Psyche and her bravery ("Loads of people went to the Underworld with a big sword and an attitude. Hell, I went to the Underworld with a big sword and an attitude. But she had no sword or weapon of any kind, she was already tired from the previous trials, and seven months pregnant.") As a primer to one of the great mythological traditions that is possibly going to be a child's first introduction to the Greek myths, it's really, really nice to see Percy (in reality, Riordan) going out of his way to encourage the reader and try to prevent them from internalizing some of the Greeks' less enlightened ideas.
ideas.
** He also never excuses the wrongdoings of any demigod or even god (not even the more questionable deeds of his father such as taking revenge on Minos by having his wife fall in love with the sacrificial bull) in both ''Percy Jackson's Greek Heroes'' and ''Percy Jackson's Greek Gods''.
* Snark and opinions aside, Percy mostly sticks to the ancient myths he's recounting in ''Percy Jackson's Jacon's Greek Gods''. The only time he really goes on about a god's modern-day circumstances is when he talks about Amphritite, a Nereid and wife of Poseidon-- and Percy's stepmother. While Amphritite was rather cold when we glimpsed her in ''The Last Olympian'', Percy takes a moment to give her kudos for not taking out her issues with her husband on his innocent children, and says she doesn't give him a hard time for leaving his clothes on the floor and she even bakes him cookies-- which is "all you can ask of an immortal stepmother."
21st Aug '16 3:14:59 AM akanesarumara
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* To be completely honest, Percy’s relationship with his mother is completely this. There is nothing they don’t share and nothing they won’t to for each other

to:

* To be completely honest, Percy’s relationship with his mother is completely this. There is nothing they don’t share and nothing they won’t to for each otherother.
** For his part, Poseidon speaks in glowing terms of Sally, calling her a queen amongst mortals the likes of whom he hasn't met in a millenium, and Sally says Poseidon, who had a huge heart according to her own admission from earlier, offered her a castle under the sea with everything implied (adding "he thought he could erease all my problems with just one gesture of his hand.")
21st Aug '16 3:09:25 AM akanesarumara
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* It might not come to mind at first, but Zeus's actions after Thalia's sacrificial death for her friends show that there's more to him than just a stubborn and overly-ambitious ruler, not only by preserving her life in the form of a tree, but also by using her to power the monster-repelling barrier around Camp Half-Blood. In doing so, he's provided protection even for demigods whose mere existence he may not approve of, as well as sparing the other gods the loss he ended up suffering. It's a nice way of showing how deep, ''deep'' down, the guy's still not above things like empathy or reasonable sense.

to:

* It might not come to mind at first, but Zeus's actions after Thalia's sacrificial death for her friends show that there's more to him than just a stubborn and overly-ambitious ruler, not only by preserving her life in the form of a tree, but also by using her to power the monster-repelling barrier around Camp Half-Blood. In doing so, he's provided protection even for demigods whose mere existence he may not approve of, as well as sparing the other gods the loss he ended up suffering. It's a nice way of showing how deep, ''deep'' down, the guy's still not above things like empathy or reasonable sense.
* Similar to the above, Argos, the 100-eyed-giant is working at the camp. The same Argos who according to the mythology was tasked by Hera to forever guard her sacred grove, also known as the Garden of the Hesperides. The implication being that Hera, forever described as easy to anger and petty in her (rightful) jealousy, lent the best guardsman she could think of to guard demigods, including those who are the fruit of her husband's cheating.
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