History Headscratchers / ThePiratesOfPenzance

7th Dec '15 10:53:01 AM Kuruni
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*** This troper is reminded of a quote stating that there is something in the British character that allows them to convince themselves that its 20° warmer than it really is. Since this troper lives in UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}, that's not too hard to believe.



*** This troper happily confesses to being one of them; their weakest is surely Utopia Limited; a half-decent bit of satire in search of a good plot, with pretty poor dialogue and rather too much of the most awful music Sullivan ever wrote to boot (I speak as a sincere and genuine fan). By the way, for those who may be interested, the G&S show in three Acts (or two and a prologue in its original form) in Princess Ida.
27th Jun '15 11:47:38 AM rememberthehood1941
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** Because it's pretty fun to perform? This troper has seen a couple of productions of ''Pirates'' and both times the actors were clearly having a blast.
13th Mar '14 6:05:41 PM Aiguille
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*** This troper is reminded of a quote stating that there is something in the British character that allows them to convince themselves that its 20° warmer than it really is. Since this troper lives in {{Chicago}}, that's not too hard to believe.

to:

*** This troper is reminded of a quote stating that there is something in the British character that allows them to convince themselves that its 20° warmer than it really is. Since this troper lives in {{Chicago}}, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}, that's not too hard to believe.
27th Oct '13 1:10:07 AM LordGro
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** Technically, the show starts a year after his fifth birthday, hence all of act II. I'd just chalk this up to GilbertAndSullivan not being sticklers for detail.

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** Technically, the show starts a year after his fifth birthday, hence all of act II. I'd just chalk this up to GilbertAndSullivan Creator/GilbertAndSullivan not being sticklers for detail.



** No, it's not. 'The Grand Duke', which was the last collaborative work of Gilbert & Sullivan, could be considered the 'weakest', due in large part to it's overly-complex storyline, repetitiveness and length (it's three acts, which is longer than any other G&S production). It's rarely performed, even by professional or amateur theater groups.

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** No, it's not. 'The ''The Grand Duke', Duke'', which was the last collaborative work of Gilbert & Sullivan, could be considered the 'weakest', due in large part to it's overly-complex storyline, repetitiveness and length (it's three acts, which is longer than any other G&S production). It's rarely performed, even by professional or amateur theater groups.



*** Well, The Mikado is the most played of the Savoy operas...but regardless of that, Pirates is so popular because the music is timeless--but more importantly, so is the humor. Watch the 198...3?...film to understand. It's ''still'' funny. The Mikado was full of more topical humor, and was a political commentary of the time. Pirates is more accessible.
*** The Pirates add a lot. Basically, the way it works is this: G&S got some fame with ''The Sorcerer'' and then hit the monumental big-time with ''Pinafore''. Riding high on their fame (and frustrated with the lack of royalties they were receiving from "pirated" productions of ''Pinafore'', they wrote ''Pirates'' on a wave of creativity to gently satirize the situation, and then simultaneously premiered it in New York and London to avoid a similar issue with copyright. ''Pirates'' then became a smash hit of about the same degree as ''Pinafore''. Then came a period of lesser successes, until ''Princess Ida'' flopped, being too long (during a London heat-wave) and being seen as repetitive. After some squabbling, some pressure from D'Oyly Carte (and his wife, Helen, who doesn't get the credit she deserves) and Gilbert putting aside a libretto draft Sullivan deemed unacceptable, they put together ''The Mikado'', which is actually their biggest and most-performed hit. Their next collaboration, ''Ruddigore'', received mixed reviews and deterioration followed. So we're left with the "Big Three," of which ''Pirates'' is simply the most fun. ''Pinafore'' and ''Mikado'' are solved through legal machinations, while ''Pirates'' is bald-facedly ludicrous and rollicking. And also contains numbers like "Hail Poetry" and "The Major-General's Song." Really, the only G&S operetta to gain significant ground in popularity along the way has been ''Ruddigore'', though that is still not nearly as often reprised as the Big Three.
*** Though Yeoman of the Guard is also frequently performed.

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*** Well, The Mikado ''The Mikado'' is the most played of the Savoy operas...but regardless of that, Pirates is so popular because the music is timeless--but more importantly, so is the humor. Watch the 198...3?...film to understand. It's ''still'' funny. The Mikado ''The Mikado'' was full of more topical humor, and was a political commentary of the time. Pirates is more accessible.
*** The Pirates ''Pirates'' add a lot. Basically, the way it works is this: G&S got some fame with ''The Sorcerer'' and then hit the monumental big-time with ''Pinafore''. Riding high on their fame (and frustrated with the lack of royalties they were receiving from "pirated" productions of ''Pinafore'', they wrote ''Pirates'' on a wave of creativity to gently satirize the situation, and then simultaneously premiered it in New York and London to avoid a similar issue with copyright. ''Pirates'' then became a smash hit of about the same degree as ''Pinafore''. Then came a period of lesser successes, until ''Princess Ida'' flopped, being too long (during a London heat-wave) and being seen as repetitive. After some squabbling, some pressure from D'Oyly Carte (and his wife, Helen, who doesn't get the credit she deserves) and Gilbert putting aside a libretto draft Sullivan deemed unacceptable, they put together ''The Mikado'', which is actually their biggest and most-performed hit. Their next collaboration, ''Ruddigore'', received mixed reviews and deterioration followed. So we're left with the "Big Three," of which ''Pirates'' is simply the most fun. ''Pinafore'' and ''Mikado'' are solved through legal machinations, while ''Pirates'' is bald-facedly ludicrous and rollicking. And also contains numbers like "Hail Poetry" and "The Major-General's Song." Really, the only G&S operetta to gain significant ground in popularity along the way has been ''Ruddigore'', though that is still not nearly as often reprised as the Big Three.
*** Though Yeoman ''Yeomen of the Guard Guard'' is also frequently performed.
1st Aug '13 12:55:39 AM TobuIshi
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*** The recent Seattle-based production transplanted the action to Victorian British Columbia, which deftly explains the proximity of the rocky mountains, the river, and the beach...but makes the girls' eagerness to "paddle" in the freezing spring runoff even more inexplicable.
12th May '13 11:10:48 AM Kalmbach
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** Perhaps it's a hidden TakeThat against the House of Lords, that if they went away, nobody would really notice.
12th May '13 11:09:44 AM Kalmbach
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** Most performances interpret "Half-past eleven" as being in the morning. Seeing as Frederic apparently didn't know when his birthday was, it stands to reason that they wouldn't have been that precise about the end of his services.



** Most performances interpret "Half-past eleven" as being in the morning. Seeing as Frederic apparently didn't know when his birthday was, it stands to reason that they wouldn't have been that precise about the end of his services.

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** Most performances interpret "Half-past eleven" as being *** This troper is reminded of a quote stating that there is something in the morning. Seeing as Frederic apparently didn't know when his birthday was, it stands to reason British character that they wouldn't have been allows them to convince themselves that precise about the end of his services.its 20° warmer than it really is. Since this troper lives in {{Chicago}}, that's not too hard to believe.



** ''Clearly.''
** From a technical aspect, at least, this is one of the best examples of Sullivan's skill in setting English text to music. That, and his brilliant use of counterpoint, twice, in "How Beautifully Blue the Sky" and "When the Foeman Bears His Steel." Even more impressive is that in both cases, the two tunes set against one another are in different time signatures. There is a very good reason he is called Sir Arthur.

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** [[DeadpanSnarker ''Clearly.''
'']]
** From a technical aspect, at least, this is one of the best examples of Sullivan's skill in setting English text to music. That, and his brilliant use of counterpoint, twice, in "How Beautifully Blue the Sky" and "When the Foeman Bears His Steel." Steel", which is [[UpToEleven triple counterpoint]], two solos and a three-part chorus. Even more impressive is that in both cases, the two tunes set against one another are in different time signatures. There is a very good reason he is called Sir Arthur.
25th Sep '12 3:35:29 PM ImperatordeElysium
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** Though Yeoman of the Guard is also frequently performed.

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** *** Though Yeoman of the Guard is also frequently performed.
25th Sep '12 3:35:05 PM ImperatordeElysium
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** Though Yeoman of the Guard is also frequently performed.
19th Jun '12 11:57:59 PM SeptimusHeap
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** ''[[YourMileageMayVary Clearly.]]''

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** ''[[YourMileageMayVary Clearly.]]''''Clearly.''



*** [[YourMileageMayVary Surprisingly many people like The Grand Duke.]] And it's in two acts.

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*** [[YourMileageMayVary Surprisingly many people like The Grand Duke.]] Duke. And it's in two acts.
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