History Headscratchers / TheHuntForRedOctober

25th Jan '15 12:45:53 PM GuyIncog
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* In the movie, a warning light alerts the men in the control room when Loginov opens the missile tube hatch. Perhaps he felt it was better to at least use the element of surprise to cause confusion (and possibly take out one of his adversaries first, as he managed to do) rather than risk being taken by surprise himself when someone came forward to investigate why the hatch was open.
16th Jan '15 6:08:25 PM BanjoTCat
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

** The sailors are singing the Hymn of the Soviet Union, a very distinctive song for which I'm not aware there is an English version. In dialogue, the translation convention renders characters' words as English, but that would be very difficult to do with the Soviet national anthem and would lesson the impact of the scene.
22nd Sep '14 3:20:38 PM AFP
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Also, Borodin already has a missile control key -- his own, as he's one of the five separate officers it takes to approve a missile launch on a Soviet submarine in that era. So either way, ''someone'' would have to carry two keys if one of the five officers dies; the logical candidate to do that is, of course, the most senior officer.

to:

* Also, Borodin already has a missile control key -- his own, as he's one of the five separate officers it takes to approve a missile launch on a Soviet submarine in that era. So either way, ''someone'' would have to carry two keys if one of the five officers dies; the logical candidate to do that is, of course, the most senior officer.officer.
* And in any case, most [[TwoKeyedLock multi-key safety systems]] are designed so that one person cannot reach all of the keys at once to turn them, so one person having multiple keys would not represent a breakdown of the system anyways.
13th Sep '14 9:52:24 AM cliffc999
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* He might have been trying to kill everyone and return the submarine to Russia. When his first attempt failed, and he lost the element of surprise, he knew a second attempt was doomed to fail. So he tried the next best thing; prevent the submarine from falling into American hands.

to:

* He might have been trying to kill everyone and return the submarine to Russia. When his first attempt failed, and he lost the element of surprise, he knew a second attempt was doomed to fail. So he tried the next best thing; prevent the submarine from falling into American hands.
12th Sep '14 4:51:47 PM cliffc999
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

*** Heck, they could openly say to the crewman's face "Yes, we're speaking in a language you do not understand precisely because we do not want the enlisted men to know what we are talking about." It's not like that would be a ''surprising'' sentiment in the old Soviet navy.
12th Sep '14 4:49:28 PM cliffc999
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Also, Borodin already has a missile control key -- his own, as he's one of the five separate officers it takes to approve a missile launch. So either way, ''someone'' would have to carry two keys if one of the five officers dies; the logical candidate to do that is, of course, the most senior officer.

to:

* Also, Borodin already has a missile control key -- his own, as he's one of the five separate officers it takes to approve a missile launch.launch on a Soviet submarine in that era. So either way, ''someone'' would have to carry two keys if one of the five officers dies; the logical candidate to do that is, of course, the most senior officer.
12th Sep '14 4:49:05 PM cliffc999
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''Borodin:''' I note this, and will so enter it in the log.

to:

'''Borodin:''' I note this, and will so enter it in the log.log.
* Also, Borodin already has a missile control key -- his own, as he's one of the five separate officers it takes to approve a missile launch. So either way, ''someone'' would have to carry two keys if one of the five officers dies; the logical candidate to do that is, of course, the most senior officer.
12th Sep '14 4:47:09 PM cliffc999
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* It is specifically mentioned in-dialogue that Soviet naval regulations are that if the political officer dies while under way, the captain keeps both keys. Ramius is only doing what The Book requires him to do in such a situation; why should anyone find this suspicious?

to:

* It is specifically mentioned in-dialogue (in the book version, at least) that Soviet naval regulations are that if the political officer dies while under way, the captain keeps both keys. Ramius is only doing what The Book requires him to do in such a situation; why should anyone find this suspicious?suspicious? Dr. Petrov's objections to this only prove that Dr. Petrov doesn't know what he's talking about... which is not surprising, as he's a) a doctor, not a line officer and b) a politically-connected incompetent.
-->'''Ramius:''' Borodin, observe: I take the comrade political officer's missile control key from his neck, as per regulations.\\
'''Borodin:''' I note this, and will so enter it in the log.
12th Sep '14 4:45:06 PM cliffc999
Is there an issue? Send a Message


After killing Putin, Ramius keeps both missile keys, with Tim Curry and the GRU mole as witnesses. This would seem awfully suspicious, especially as he overrules Tim Curry's protests. As he specifically does not want to use the nuclear missiles, he does not have a reason to keep both keys. If someone else wanted to use his key, they would have to take it from him, and if they could do that, they could get the second key too. He could have easily given it to Borodin or Melekhin or any of the other officers. He could have even taken Tim Curry's suggestion, and handed it over, as he never needs to use the key, so it doesn't matter who has the second one, as long as he had one of them.

to:

After killing Putin, Ramius keeps both missile keys, with Tim Curry and the GRU mole as witnesses. This would seem awfully suspicious, especially as he overrules Tim Curry's protests. As he specifically does not want to use the nuclear missiles, he does not have a reason to keep both keys. If someone else wanted to use his key, they would have to take it from him, and if they could do that, they could get the second key too. He could have easily given it to Borodin or Melekhin or any of the other officers. He could have even taken Tim Curry's suggestion, and handed it over, as he never needs to use the key, so it doesn't matter who has the second one, as long as he had one of them.them.
* It is specifically mentioned in-dialogue that Soviet naval regulations are that if the political officer dies while under way, the captain keeps both keys. Ramius is only doing what The Book requires him to do in such a situation; why should anyone find this suspicious?
12th Sep '14 4:43:27 PM cliffc999
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* It's entirely possible that the officers actually ''are'' speaking in English; after all, they're already planning to defect to America, and senior military officers always have a built-in excuse for learning the language of their nation's primary opponent. And if any crewmember overhears them... he can't understand what they're saying, and its irrelevant who he reports the fact that the officers are speaking in English to because (as far as Ramius and his officers know) the only GRU man onboard the boat is already dead and they obviously don't intend to still be there by the time the crew makes it back to Russia. (Plus, of course, he can simply be told "Yes, we are practicing our English, so we can better monitor Western transmissions. This is your business ''how'', seaman?")
This list shows the last 10 events of 23. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.TheHuntForRedOctober