History Headscratchers / Superman

11th Jul '16 7:27:21 AM MrDeath
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** The point is never to ''actually'' kill them. The point is to threaten them, so that the threat makes Superman comply. It's really not that difficult a concept to grasp -- Superman doesn't want his loved ones to die, but he's also too moral to kill the villain outright, so his loved ones are used as leverage.
11th Jul '16 6:40:05 AM CrypticMirror
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** If they were capable of making ''good'' decisions about their life they wouldn't be supervillains. Plus people like that are used to being able to threaten others by threatening their loved ones. Generally most people will comply if you threaten people they care about, its a pattern of thought born of force of habit. They just do not really realize just how powerful Superman really is. Plus Superman is a moral enough person to try and find a way to resolve things without snapping their neck (well, most of the time) or crushing their skull or giving into rage. He sees it as his calling to help everyone, even the bad guys.
10th Jul '16 11:50:15 PM SuperMagneto
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* Why do some human villains think threatening to kill Superman's friends and family is a bright idea? Let's say a mob boss kill Lois Lane and Martha Kent right in front of him, how does he know Superman won't crush his skull in a fit of rage? Okay, making a god-like man obey you by threatening his love ones is not a bad idea, but the villain would be screwed if he decides to pull the trigger.
10th Jul '16 4:08:03 AM erforce
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** In SupermanReturns, Lara asks, "Why Earth? They are primitives. Thousands of years behind us." Jor-El replies, "He will need that advantage. To survive he will need that and more. He will be odd. Different. [[{{Understatement}} But he will be]] [[SuperSpeed fast]]. [[NighInvulnerable Virtually invulnerable.]]"

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** In SupermanReturns, ''Film/SupermanReturns'', Lara asks, "Why Earth? They are primitives. Thousands of years behind us." Jor-El replies, "He will need that advantage. To survive he will need that and more. He will be odd. Different. [[{{Understatement}} But he will be]] [[SuperSpeed fast]]. [[NighInvulnerable Virtually invulnerable.]]"



* In Superman II, we find Lex Luthor in prison making license plates after the crime he attempted in Superman I. All well and good except for one little problem: '''HE THREATENED THE STATES OF CALIFORNIA AND NEW JERSEY WITH NUCLEAR WEAPONS!!!!''' At the risk of understating the matter, being threatened with nuclear annihilation isn't something people will easily forgive or forget, so I'm rather baffled that no one in either state was screaming at the feds to sit Lex down in Old Sparky and give him the juice.
** It's not clear how long it's been since I, but II could still have Luthor in the midst of his criminal trial. This makes particularly good sense after SupermanReturns, where we learn that Luthor is free because, without Superman's testimony, he was acquitted of his crimes. So in II, Lex is probably just in prison while the government tackles the insanely difficult problem of building a case against a guy whose crime was at least partially undone by time travel.

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* In Superman II, ''Film/SupermanII'', we find Lex Luthor in prison making license plates after the crime he attempted in Superman I. All well and good except for one little problem: '''HE THREATENED THE STATES OF CALIFORNIA AND NEW JERSEY WITH NUCLEAR WEAPONS!!!!''' At the risk of understating the matter, being threatened with nuclear annihilation isn't something people will easily forgive or forget, so I'm rather baffled that no one in either state was screaming at the feds to sit Lex down in Old Sparky and give him the juice.
** It's not clear how long it's been since I, but II could still have Luthor in the midst of his criminal trial. This makes particularly good sense after SupermanReturns, ''Film/SupermanReturns'', where we learn that Luthor is free because, without Superman's testimony, he was acquitted of his crimes. So in II, Lex is probably just in prison while the government tackles the insanely difficult problem of building a case against a guy whose crime was at least partially undone by time travel.
19th May '16 4:43:04 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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Longer answer: Superman deliberately cultivates the persona of Clark Kent as a major dork specifically to throw out the idea that he might be Superman. Just watch Brandon Routh as Kent, and your first overriding impression will be, "Dear gods, he's a friggin' ''dork''." Superman, by contrast, is the physical ideal of Man. Basically...could you see [[SavedByTheBell Screech]] as Superman? There have been incidents in the comic books where someone has thought about it. Hell, once, Luthor hired a private investigator who ''did'' conclude that Superman was Clark Kent. Luthor laughed it off because the idea was simply ridiculous that Superman, a PhysicalGod, would go around posing as that dork Kent.\\

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Longer answer: Superman deliberately cultivates the persona of Clark Kent as a major dork specifically to throw out the idea that he might be Superman. Just watch Brandon Routh as Kent, and your first overriding impression will be, "Dear gods, he's a friggin' ''dork''." Superman, by contrast, is the physical ideal of Man. Basically...could you see [[SavedByTheBell [[Series/SavedByTheBell Screech]] as Superman? There have been incidents in the comic books where someone has thought about it. Hell, once, Luthor hired a private investigator who ''did'' conclude that Superman was Clark Kent. Luthor laughed it off because the idea was simply ridiculous that Superman, a PhysicalGod, would go around posing as that dork Kent.\\
4th May '16 11:57:19 AM DaScarecrow
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** Don't forget that Lex doesn't even think that Superman has a SecretIdentity. In his mind someone as powerful as Superman would never lower themselves to being like ordinary humans.
4th May '16 11:46:26 AM DaScarecrow
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*** The Phantom Zone was used in lieu of a death penalty for Krypton, they considered it AFateWorseThanDeath. Makes sense they wouldn't see it as a viable survival option.
*** ''{{Series/Smallville}}'' had Jor-el send his lab assistant Raya there for survival and a key problem comes up. Namely that the Phantom Zone is a CrapsackWorld and there would be no way of returning without outside help, which a destroyed planet wouldn't be able to offer obviously.


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** Post-Crisis actually explains this. One Kryptonian took the whole the isolationist thing as far as he could and genetically altered all other Kryptonians so they would die if they left the planet. Superman survived because his father was able to remove that issue, which was only possible before his birth and not applicable to the rest of Krypton.
4th May '16 11:34:01 AM DaScarecrow
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*** Proximity most likely. Usually when he gets hit by red sunlight it's right in his face and as such that whole disrupt power release effect kicks in right away. When on a planet with a red sun he would be able to keep enough of a charge until his solar reserves run dry because the red sunlight is further away.
27th Mar '16 1:23:42 PM Sharlee
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** h) Krypton exploded thousands of Earth years ago, but it's far enough away that the ''light of the explosion'' didn't reach Earth until 1948. Luther is either clueless about the sheer magnitude of distances involved or is oversimplifying to avoid getting sidetracked with exposition re. the speed of light. Baby Kal-El only experienced 3 years' life during the trip because of relativistic speeds and/or the ship keeping him in stasis most of the way to conserve life-support resources.
27th Mar '16 1:16:42 PM Sharlee
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** Plus, he's just plain outnumbered. Three against one is bad odds. And while he's had more experience using his powers himself, confronting those same powers ''in other people'' is just as new of an experience to Clark as it is to the villains.

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** Plus, he's just plain outnumbered. Three against one is bad odds. And while he's had more experience using his powers himself, confronting those same powers ''in other people'' is just as new of an experience to Clark as it is to the villains.
villains. If anything, they might have a major edge in experience at super-vs-super combat, if the trio'd spent part of their off-camera time tussling ''each other'' to test what they can do.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.Superman