History Headscratchers / StargateSG1

19th May '16 12:59:53 PM girlyboy
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** The disassembly/transport/reassembly approach does ''not'' necessarily avoid the issues of death and personal identity invoked by Star Trek -- type teleporters. Yes, you could argue that the "same" particles/energy/whatever that you were originally composed of is making the trip, and that thus your identity is preserved. But is this really significant? Would it actually make any difference to your identity if, while the gate was re-assembling you, some atoms that ''weren't'' part of your original self found their way into your structure? You'd have no way of knowing the difference, as long as they were the same kind of atoms, and fitted into your body in the same way. Imagine it as a thought experiment -- suppose someone just took you apart into a pile of atoms, doesn't matter how, and then somehow put those atoms back together again using a very accurate instructions manual. Would you still be "you" after this re-assembly? Now suppose that instead of reassembling those same atoms into your original self, they used a ''new'' pile of atoms that still had all the exact elements and isotopes needed in the same proportions, but that never formed a part of your body before. They assemble these new atoms into a new "you" using the same "instruction manual." Would you still be yourself after this? Does it make sense for the answer to be "yes" in the first case, but "no" in the second? After all, how would you, or anyone, know the difference? It's not like your original atoms have your name on them somewhere -- a carbon atom is a carbon atom. Assuming all the "new" atoms were of the right type, and put together the right way, would the new "you" be effectively different from the old? So, the answer must either be "yes, you're the same person" in both cases, or "no, you are not the same person" in both cases. Either the Stargate has the same problems as the Star Trek teleporter, or neither has an issue.
28th Feb '16 1:41:48 PM J-House
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** Why did the SGC or Area 51 pull the power supply from a staff weapon and adapt it into an assult rifle?

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** Why did didn't the SGC or Area 51 pull the power supply from a staff weapon and adapt it into an assult rifle?
28th Feb '16 1:41:12 PM J-House
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** Why did the SGC or Area 51 pull the power supply from a staff weapon and adapt it into an assult rifle?
22nd Feb '16 10:29:00 PM harlbior
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** If we were to assume the number of chevrons locked for an appropriate address were between 1 and 9, that would be 61,191,108,557,860 possible permutations of symbols without repeats and and 169,681,401,296,978 permutations of symbols with repeats. That's a lot of choices. [[note]] This is based on adding the number of permutations possible for choices between 1 and 9 out of 38 different symbols. Look [[https://www.mathsisfun.com/combinatorics/combinations-permutations.html here]] for some details.[[/note]].

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** If we were to assume the number of chevrons locked for an appropriate address were between 1 and 9, that would be 61,191,108,557,860 79,460,340,751,779 possible permutations of symbols glyphs without repeats and and 169,681,401,296,978 214,221,212,768,199 permutations of symbols glyphs with repeats. That's a lot of choices. [[note]] This is based on adding the number of permutations possible for choices between 1 and 9 out of 38 39 different symbols. Look [[https://www.mathsisfun.com/combinatorics/combinations-permutations.html here]] for some details.[[/note]].
22nd Feb '16 9:17:31 PM harlbior
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** In addition, Earth has a lot of production and research facilities already in place. It's easier to ship things such as food and supplies to Cheyenne Mountain rather than send regular shipments of supplies through the Stargate.
22nd Feb '16 8:46:22 PM harlbior
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** That's a good point. Anyone and his mother can activate a Stargate that's connected to a DHD so long as they know at least one valid address. But with the SGC's computerized system the Stargate can ''only'' be activated from one place: the gate control room. With this setup the SGC has much greater control over how, when, and why the Stargate can be activated and who can do so. They can install any number of security measures, such as identity scanners or password programs, making it next to impossible for anyone to activate the gate without official permission (or at least not without someone finding out about it). And when you have dudes like the [[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Reetou Reetou]] and the [[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stragoth Stragoth]] running around, preventing unauthorized gate activations is a top priority.

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** That's a good point. Anyone and his mother can activate a Stargate that's connected to a DHD so long as they know at least one valid address. But with the SGC's computerized system the Stargate can ''only'' be activated from one place: the gate control room. With this setup the SGC has much greater control over how, when, and why the Stargate can be activated and who can do so. They can install any number of security measures, such as identity scanners or password programs, making it next to impossible for anyone to activate the gate without official permission (or at least not without someone finding out about it). And when you have dudes like the [[http://Stargate.[[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Reetou Reetou]] and the [[http://Stargate.[[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stragoth Stragoth]] running around, preventing unauthorized gate activations is a top priority.



** They sometimes use alternate names. Notably, in [[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/The_Curse The Curse]] Osiris asks Daniel where his (her?) brother Setesh (Seth) was.

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** They sometimes use alternate names. Notably, in [[http://Stargate.[[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/The_Curse The Curse]] Osiris asks Daniel where his (her?) brother Setesh (Seth) was.



** Having done a bit of research (watching and looking at pictures on the interwebs) I looked at the gate and had a FridgeBrilliance moment regarding the gates and their theoretical limitations on combinations (and why it took them 15 years to figure it out). Look at this render [[http://images.wikia.com/Stargate/images/8/82/Stargate_Render.png of a Stargate]] (it is nearly identical to the gate on the show). It looks to me like there is no one way up. Now if we do some extrapolation on things that have never been confirmed or denied on the show, what if EACH of the 9 chevrons CAN be a locking mechanism for a symbol. Now combine that with the potential of them also being able to be locked in any order... you have potentially millions or billions of possible codes that a gate could dial! Not just 38 galaxies, based on the 38 symbols, but taking those symbols and locking them in different places and in different orders and combined with the 9 potential symbols to lock in... the possibilities become insane for how many ways a gate could be dialed. In fact, if it were a possibility, then it is probably more of a miracle that they figured it out in ONLY 15 years.

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** Having done a bit of research (watching and looking at pictures on the interwebs) I looked at the gate and had a FridgeBrilliance moment regarding the gates and their theoretical limitations on combinations (and why it took them 15 years to figure it out). Look at this render [[http://images.wikia.com/Stargate/images/8/82/Stargate_Render.com/stargate/images/8/82/Stargate_Render.png of a Stargate]] (it is nearly identical to the gate on the show). It looks to me like there is no one way up. Now if we do some extrapolation on things that have never been confirmed or denied on the show, what if EACH of the 9 chevrons CAN be a locking mechanism for a symbol. Now combine that with the potential of them also being able to be locked in any order... you have potentially millions or billions of possible codes that a gate could dial! Not just 38 galaxies, based on the 38 symbols, but taking those symbols and locking them in different places and in different orders and combined with the 9 potential symbols to lock in... the possibilities become insane for how many ways a gate could be dialed. In fact, if it were a possibility, then it is probably more of a miracle that they figured it out in ONLY 15 years.



** This was probably just a production error -- they didn't bother to modify the main prop. And I only remember two episodes in which it was seen: "Window of Opportunity" and "Watergate". The DHD in "Solitudes" shows a [[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Image:0eb.svg different symbol]]. Since it was Earth's original Stargate, it's logical to assume that the symbol is Earth's original POO.

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** This was probably just a production error -- they didn't bother to modify the main prop. And I only remember two episodes in which it was seen: "Window of Opportunity" and "Watergate". The DHD in "Solitudes" shows a [[http://Stargate.[[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Image:0eb.svg different symbol]]. Since it was Earth's original Stargate, it's logical to assume that the symbol is Earth's original POO.



** I don't know if this is canon or not, but according to the [[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Book_of_Origin Stargate Wiki]], when the Ori first wrote the Book of Origin their intent was to pose as ''benevolent'' gods. As they became more and more corrupted by power they allowed (or perhaps encouraged) the Priors to twist the stories and verses to suit their needs.

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** I don't know if this is canon or not, but according to the [[http://Stargate.[[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Book_of_Origin Stargate Wiki]], when the Ori first wrote the Book of Origin their intent was to pose as ''benevolent'' gods. As they became more and more corrupted by power they allowed (or perhaps encouraged) the Priors to twist the stories and verses to suit their needs.



** Maybe they keep names. Maybe their databse goes like this: Code(Pxx-xxx)-(Adress)-(Native name)-(Explored?)-(Owner)-(Notes). So, when you search for [[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Langara Langara]], you get all the data, like ([=P2S=]-4C3)-(symbols)-(Langara)-(Yes)-(Langarans)-(Has Naquadria). It's like a library!

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** Maybe they keep names. Maybe their databse goes like this: Code(Pxx-xxx)-(Adress)-(Native name)-(Explored?)-(Owner)-(Notes). So, when you search for [[http://Stargate.[[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Langara Langara]], you get all the data, like ([=P2S=]-4C3)-(symbols)-(Langara)-(Yes)-(Langarans)-(Has Naquadria). It's like a library!



** In answer to the original question, the Army actually ''is'' involved by the late seasons. [[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/SG_team According to the Stargate wiki]], SG-25 is an Army unit that has the same role as the Marine units: combat support. At one point they were also deployed for surveillance of Ori troops ("Uninvited").

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** In answer to the original question, the Army actually ''is'' involved by the late seasons. [[http://Stargate.[[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/SG_team According to the Stargate wiki]], SG-25 is an Army unit that has the same role as the Marine units: combat support. At one point they were also deployed for surveillance of Ori troops ("Uninvited").



[[http://Stargate-sg1-solutions.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/teamthroughgate.jpg Look at this]]. Where the ramp is, it's ''just'' wide enough for four people, standing shoulder-to-shoulder, to walk through the gate at once. Tanks, as I understand it, are rather wider than that.

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[[http://Stargate-sg1-solutions.[[http://stargate-sg1-solutions.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/teamthroughgate.jpg Look at this]]. Where the ramp is, it's ''just'' wide enough for four people, standing shoulder-to-shoulder, to walk through the gate at once. Tanks, as I understand it, are rather wider than that.



** At least wide enough for the gate, either 4.6m (http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate) or 6.7m (http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate).

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** At least wide enough for the gate, either 4.6m (http://Stargate.(http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate) or 6.7m (http://Stargate.(http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate).



** ''[[http://screenshots.filesnetwork.com/98/potd/1131388994_59.jpg Prometheus]]'' & ''[[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/File:Daedalus_Schematic.jpg Daedalus]]'' schematics.

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** ''[[http://screenshots.filesnetwork.com/98/potd/1131388994_59.jpg Prometheus]]'' & ''[[http://Stargate.''[[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/File:Daedalus_Schematic.jpg Daedalus]]'' schematics.
22nd Feb '16 7:34:07 AM harlbior
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* Why didn't the Tok'Ra use cloning? They're so worried about their numbers, but both the Tau'ri and the Asgard have access to viable cloning technology, and at least in the case of the Tau'ri have successfully cloned symbiotes before. They clone the Tok'ra and use the free Jaffa who don't want to switch to Tretonin as the new incubators. Two birds, one stone.

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* Why didn't the Tok'Ra Tok'ra use cloning? They're so worried about their numbers, but both the Tau'ri and the Asgard have access to viable cloning technology, and at least in the case of the Tau'ri have successfully cloned symbiotes before. They clone the Tok'ra and use the free Jaffa who don't want to switch to Tretonin as the new incubators. Two birds, one stone.



** Yeah, but surely, with all their technology, teh Tok'Ra could use cloning combined with genetic tweaking to create genetic diversity. Also, the Asgard cloning degredation happened after many iterations, because they weren't cloning from original DNA, they were cloning from clones from clones.

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** Yeah, but surely, with all their technology, teh Tok'Ra the Tok'ra could use cloning combined with genetic tweaking to create genetic diversity. Also, the Asgard cloning degredation happened after many iterations, because they weren't cloning from original DNA, they were cloning from clones from clones.



** The guy they used to play Ra in Continuum is the same actor who played Ra in the season 8 episode Mobius. Just like O'Niell and Jackson have different actors for the TV series, so does Ra.

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** The guy they used to play Ra in Continuum is the same actor who played Ra in the season 8 episode Mobius. Moebius. Just like O'Niell O'Neill and Jackson have different actors for the TV series, so does Ra.



* I have just one main thing which REALLY bugs me... Why does the whole universe speak English?! Or rather, why does most of it? The first movie, and the pilot of the series had the alien planets speaking their own languages, a bastardization of the original language used by the transplanted slaves in each case... But apart from the odd occasion where the alien race turned out to be not *quite* human (or as different as the unas - and not even for all of those!), it seems like the writers just forgot about this limitation. Now I get that it was done to make the ease of storytelling better IRL, but why was no explanation given in-universe? Daniel doesn't even comment how handy it is to have someone like himself who can speak something like 8 languages come along with the team...to worlds where everyone natively speaks the only language the entire team understands. My own canon has always been that the SGC found the 'translator' switch after the first few episodes and flipped it, so that the gate travel pops you out the other side with the capability to understand (and be understood by) the natives, but then this doesn't explain when they get to a new planet by ship...

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* I have just one main thing which REALLY bugs me... Why does the whole universe speak English?! Or rather, why does most of it? The first movie, and the pilot of the series had the alien planets speaking their own languages, a bastardization of the original language used by the transplanted slaves in each case... But apart from the odd occasion where the alien race turned out to be not *quite* human (or as different as the unas Unas - and not even for all of those!), it seems like the writers just forgot about this limitation. Now I get that it was done to make the ease of storytelling better IRL, but why was no explanation given in-universe? Daniel doesn't even comment how handy it is to have someone like himself who can speak something like 8 languages come along with the team...to worlds where everyone natively speaks the only language the entire team understands. My own canon has always been that the SGC found the 'translator' switch after the first few episodes and flipped it, so that the gate travel pops you out the other side with the capability to understand (and be understood by) the natives, but then this doesn't explain when they get to a new planet by ship...



** Let's back up a little bit. Everyone seems to forget that although the Asgard shields are readily available for Tauri ships, it is relatively easy for very intelligent scientists to use the technology and understand it, human technological evolution has been ''vastly'' accelerated by the stargate and the Asgard alliance. It would have taken many ''many'' thousands of years for humans to come up with equivalent technology on their own. Now, we know the Ancients ''started'' life in the Milky Way galaxy, coming from a different galaxy altogether at already a very high state of development, while the Asgard on the other hand, seem to have evolved from within their own galaxy and were awed enough by the Altarens that ''they'' called them an 'ancient' race. So already we can safely assume that the Ancients are far older than the Asgard. The Altarens were refugees who came to this galaxy and tried to keep a low profile. Their alliance with the Asgard, the Nox and the Ferlings was about knowledge and understanding. We know this from the meeting place where Earnest was trapped for a good half a century. Considering what we know from the characters of the Nox, Asgard and the limited benevolence of the Altarens, we can probably conclude that the Alliance was a communal sharing and search for enlightenment. Although a certain technological level was most likely required to be treated on equal footing, technology was most likely not the focus. And considering the peaceful nature of the Nox, they would not be involved in an Alliance where weapons technology was being shared. But all of that in perspective, think of this: the Ancient and Ori ships were the product of a race who were so old that they had biologically evolved to the point where they could Ascend. And the Asgard beam weapons - as seen at the end of season 10 - could wipe out an Ori ship with 1 barrage. I'd say that's a pretty good indication of how technologically evolved the Asgard were.

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** Let's back up a little bit. Everyone seems to forget that although the Asgard shields are readily available for Tauri ships, it is relatively easy for very intelligent scientists to use the technology and understand it, human technological evolution has been ''vastly'' accelerated by the stargate Stargate and the Asgard alliance. It would have taken many ''many'' thousands of years for humans to come up with equivalent technology on their own. Now, we know the Ancients ''started'' life in the Milky Way galaxy, coming from a different galaxy altogether at already a very high state of development, while the Asgard on the other hand, seem to have evolved from within their own galaxy and were awed enough by the Altarens that ''they'' called them an 'ancient' race. So already we can safely assume that the Ancients are far older than the Asgard. The Altarens were refugees who came to this galaxy and tried to keep a low profile. Their alliance with the Asgard, the Nox and the Ferlings was about knowledge and understanding. We know this from the meeting place where Earnest was trapped for a good half a century. Considering what we know from the characters of the Nox, Asgard and the limited benevolence of the Altarens, we can probably conclude that the Alliance was a communal sharing and search for enlightenment. Although a certain technological level was most likely required to be treated on equal footing, technology was most likely not the focus. And considering the peaceful nature of the Nox, they would not be involved in an Alliance where weapons technology was being shared. But all of that in perspective, think of this: the Ancient and Ori ships were the product of a race who were so old that they had biologically evolved to the point where they could Ascend. And the Asgard beam weapons - as seen at the end of season 10 - could wipe out an Ori ship with 1 barrage. I'd say that's a pretty good indication of how technologically evolved the Asgard were.



** The "one chevron" difference makes sense if you remember that the intersection point could vary because it might not be between the two stars that are points. Bear with me a second. If you imagine a space, say the room you're in right now. Use 4 symbols to establish a point on the wall to your right. Now put a 5th symbol in the "bottom left back" corner of the room. Now assuming the stargate use some kind of "tolerance" to snap to a destination gate and two gates close together. You could place that 6th point anywhere in room to get a very precise intersection.

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** The "one chevron" difference makes sense if you remember that the intersection point could vary because it might not be between the two stars that are points. Bear with me a second. If you imagine a space, say the room you're in right now. Use 4 symbols to establish a point on the wall to your right. Now put a 5th symbol in the "bottom left back" corner of the room. Now assuming the stargate Stargate use some kind of "tolerance" to snap to a destination gate and two gates close together. You could place that 6th point anywhere in room to get a very precise intersection.



** It transports the person through Hyperspace to the other gate -- transport isn't instantaneous: it takes a couple fractions of a seconds to send the matter to another stargate in the same galaxy.

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** It transports the person through Hyperspace to the other gate -- transport isn't instantaneous: it takes a couple fractions of a seconds to send the matter to another stargate Stargate in the same galaxy.



** The whole "Stargate is a kind of transporter" thing has some other problems. We've been told that ''wormholes'' (not specifically ''stargates'') are one-way for matter, but bidirectional for energy. But if a Stargate works, as it is implied, by converting matter into energy, transmitting it, then reconstructing it on the other end, the reasons for it only going one way break down. We can of course, come up with other reasons for this (That it's a property of the gate mechanism, not the wormhole, or that the "bandwidth" is asymmetric: if there's not enough bandwidth for a radio signal, you get some static. With matter, you arrive without your kidneys) but they don't jive with the on-screen explanations.

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** The whole "Stargate is a kind of transporter" thing has some other problems. We've been told that ''wormholes'' (not specifically ''stargates'') ''Stargates'') are one-way for matter, but bidirectional for energy. But if a Stargate works, as it is implied, by converting matter into energy, transmitting it, then reconstructing it on the other end, the reasons for it only going one way break down. We can of course, come up with other reasons for this (That it's a property of the gate mechanism, not the wormhole, or that the "bandwidth" is asymmetric: if there's not enough bandwidth for a radio signal, you get some static. With matter, you arrive without your kidneys) but they don't jive with the on-screen explanations.



** It would be impossible to create a wormhole to transport a person in one piece (more energy then there is in the entire universe). A stargate creates a very small, stable wormhole (a feat in and of itself) and then the gate identifies the position of every particle in your body, breaks it down, transports it through the wormhole and then reconstructs the person on the other side, including the masses momentum. Electromagnetic radiation is immune to the one way restriction, most likely because the gates can only handle deconstruction/construction in one direction but electromagnetic radiation is already subatomic particles.

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** It would be impossible to create a wormhole to transport a person in one piece (more energy then there is in the entire universe). A stargate Stargate creates a very small, stable wormhole (a feat in and of itself) and then the gate identifies the position of every particle in your body, breaks it down, transports it through the wormhole and then reconstructs the person on the other side, including the masses momentum. Electromagnetic radiation is immune to the one way restriction, most likely because the gates can only handle deconstruction/construction in one direction but electromagnetic radiation is already subatomic particles.



** When you are transported through the stargate, the event horizon of the wormhole on one side allows the gate to disassemble you, whereupon you are essentially converted to energy that ''travels'' through subspace to the other gate, where the buffer stores the energy that you are made of and reassembles you on the other side of the gate's event horizon. Your consciousness is hence ''transferred''through subspace. You are in fact traveling from 1 gate to another, however you are just disassembled in the process. It isn't a copy of your mental state but the ''actual energy'' your consciousness is composed of. The reason why the buffer in the gates is necessary is so your entire being - so to speak - can be collected and that energy is converted back to matter. This is how the gate is shown to be working in SG-1 (I haven't watched Atlantis or Universe so I can't speak for those series).

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** When you are transported through the stargate, Stargate, the event horizon of the wormhole on one side allows the gate to disassemble you, whereupon you are essentially converted to energy that ''travels'' through subspace to the other gate, where the buffer stores the energy that you are made of and reassembles you on the other side of the gate's event horizon. Your consciousness is hence ''transferred''through subspace. You are in fact traveling from 1 gate to another, however you are just disassembled in the process. It isn't a copy of your mental state but the ''actual energy'' your consciousness is composed of. The reason why the buffer in the gates is necessary is so your entire being - so to speak - can be collected and that energy is converted back to matter. This is how the gate is shown to be working in SG-1 (I haven't watched Atlantis or Universe so I can't speak for those series).



** That's a good point. Anyone and his mother can activate a Stargate that's connected to a DHD so long as they know at least one valid address. But with the SGC's computerized system the Stargate can ''only'' be activated from one place: the gate control room. With this setup the SGC has much greater control over how, when, and why the stargate can be activated and who can do so. They can install any number of security measures, such as identity scanners or password programs, making it next to impossible for anyone to activate the gate without official permission (or at least not without someone finding out about it). And when you have dudes like the [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Reetou Reetou]] and the [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stragoth Stragoth]] running around, preventing unauthorized gate activations is a top priority.
** Another advantage: efficiency. The [[MacGyvering MacGyver'ed]] DHD may dial slower than a regular DHD but it also does it ''automatically'', meaning you can just log into the computer, select "dial Abydos", and let it run. You don't have to worry about "wrong numbers" (so to speak) like you would if you had to use a DHD to dial the gate up by hand (and considering how much it costs just to turn the gate on, the SGC would definitely want to make sure the address is dialled right the first time). Also, exploring the galaxy via stargate means keeping a database of '''every single world you've ever visited or plan to visit'''. No one human has the mental capacity to memorize each and every one of those addresses, so having a digital database of every single gate address to select from every time you dial up the gate would be invaluable.

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** That's a good point. Anyone and his mother can activate a Stargate that's connected to a DHD so long as they know at least one valid address. But with the SGC's computerized system the Stargate can ''only'' be activated from one place: the gate control room. With this setup the SGC has much greater control over how, when, and why the stargate Stargate can be activated and who can do so. They can install any number of security measures, such as identity scanners or password programs, making it next to impossible for anyone to activate the gate without official permission (or at least not without someone finding out about it). And when you have dudes like the [[http://stargate.[[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Reetou Reetou]] and the [[http://stargate.[[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stragoth Stragoth]] running around, preventing unauthorized gate activations is a top priority.
** Another advantage: efficiency. The [[MacGyvering MacGyver'ed]] DHD may dial slower than a regular DHD but it also does it ''automatically'', meaning you can just log into the computer, select "dial Abydos", and let it run. You don't have to worry about "wrong numbers" (so to speak) like you would if you had to use a DHD to dial the gate up by hand (and considering how much it costs just to turn the gate on, the SGC would definitely want to make sure the address is dialled right the first time). Also, exploring the galaxy via stargate Stargate means keeping a database of '''every single world you've ever visited or plan to visit'''. No one human has the mental capacity to memorize each and every one of those addresses, so having a digital database of every single gate address to select from every time you dial up the gate would be invaluable.



** They sometimes use alternate names. Notably, in [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/The_Curse The Curse]] Osiris asks Daniel where his (her?) brother Setesh (Seth) was.

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** They sometimes use alternate names. Notably, in [[http://stargate.[[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/The_Curse The Curse]] Osiris asks Daniel where his (her?) brother Setesh (Seth) was.



** Yes, in "Watergate" it is outright stated that surface tension prevents things that aren't trying to get through the gate from getting through. Thus, dialling out from a stargate submerged in water doesn't flood the other end.
* What would happen if you establish a wormhole between two stargates, then stick one gate halfway into the other?

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** Yes, in "Watergate" it is outright stated that surface tension prevents things that aren't trying to get through the gate from getting through. Thus, dialling out from a stargate Stargate submerged in water doesn't flood the other end.
* What would happen if you establish a wormhole between two stargates, Stargates, then stick one gate halfway into the other?



** A possible explanation for how they discovered the order is that when the SG-1 dialled the stargate in 1969, there was a security camera watching. They would have seen the chevrons lighting up (And the order in which they did so), but the video quality might have been low enough that they couldn't make out details (Like which symbols were dialed).

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** A possible explanation for how they discovered the order is that when the SG-1 dialled the stargate Stargate in 1969, there was a security camera watching. They would have seen the chevrons lighting up (And the order in which they did so), but the video quality might have been low enough that they couldn't make out details (Like which symbols were dialed).



** It's been established that the stargate's Unobtainium acts as a sort of capacitor for all sorts of energy. Basically they just had to throw any form of energy at it and wait until fully charged. Of course, as they didn't know that at first and as they surely didn't want to fry the supposedly delicate alien tech, they might have been wary to attempt a direct linkup to the nearest nuclear reactor...

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** It's been established that the stargate's Stargate's Unobtainium acts as a sort of capacitor for all sorts of energy. Basically they just had to throw any form of energy at it and wait until fully charged. Of course, as they didn't know that at first and as they surely didn't want to fry the supposedly delicate alien tech, they might have been wary to attempt a direct linkup to the nearest nuclear reactor...



** Having done a bit of research (watching and looking at pictures on the interwebs) I looked at the gate and had a FridgeBrilliance moment regarding the gates and their theoretical limitations on combinations (and why it took them 15 years to figure it out). Look at this render [[http://images.wikia.com/stargate/images/8/82/Stargate_Render.png of a stargate]] (it is nearly identical to the gate on the show). It looks to me like there is no one way up. Now if we do some extrapolation on things that have never been confirmed or denied on the show, what if EACH of the 9 chevrons CAN be a locking mechanism for a symbol. Now combine that with the potential of them also being able to be locked in any order... you have potentially millions or billions of possible codes that a gate could dial! Not just 38 galaxies, based on the 38 symbols, but taking those symbols and locking them in different places and in different orders and combined with the 9 potential symbols to lock in... the possibilities become insane for how many ways a gate could be dialed. In fact, if it were a possibility, then it is probably more of a miracle that they figured it out in ONLY 15 years.

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** Having done a bit of research (watching and looking at pictures on the interwebs) I looked at the gate and had a FridgeBrilliance moment regarding the gates and their theoretical limitations on combinations (and why it took them 15 years to figure it out). Look at this render [[http://images.wikia.com/stargate/images/8/82/Stargate_Render.com/Stargate/images/8/82/Stargate_Render.png of a stargate]] Stargate]] (it is nearly identical to the gate on the show). It looks to me like there is no one way up. Now if we do some extrapolation on things that have never been confirmed or denied on the show, what if EACH of the 9 chevrons CAN be a locking mechanism for a symbol. Now combine that with the potential of them also being able to be locked in any order... you have potentially millions or billions of possible codes that a gate could dial! Not just 38 galaxies, based on the 38 symbols, but taking those symbols and locking them in different places and in different orders and combined with the 9 potential symbols to lock in... the possibilities become insane for how many ways a gate could be dialed. In fact, if it were a possibility, then it is probably more of a miracle that they figured it out in ONLY 15 years.



* There's also the matter of accidentally blowing the stargate up were you to feed it too much or the wrong type of energy, sure in a life or death situation they might in a pinch, hook it up to a lightning conductor and hope for the best, but for day-to-day use by the military they might not want to risk destroying the planet. The DHD, regulates the power-flow to the gate, presumably when the military built their computer they had to build this bit too

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* There's also the matter of accidentally blowing the stargate Stargate up were you to feed it too much or the wrong type of energy, sure in a life or death situation they might in a pinch, hook it up to a lightning conductor and hope for the best, but for day-to-day use by the military they might not want to risk destroying the planet. The DHD, regulates the power-flow to the gate, presumably when the military built their computer they had to build this bit too



** Any Stargate can be a space gate. Remember when they attached an external power supply to the gate, dialed it, and chucked it out the cargo bay into the black hole? We already know that naquadah is practically indestructible, why wouldn't it work in space?

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** Any Stargate can be a space gate. Remember when they attached an external power supply to the gate, dialed it, and chucked it out the cargo bay into the black hole? We already know that naquadah Naquadah is practically indestructible, why wouldn't it work in space?



** The original iris was made of Titanium (outright said so in "Children of the Gods) which would suit this purpose just fine as it is stronger than steel at half the weight. The second iris (installed after the original was destroyed when they dialed into a black hole) was made of Trinium which is hundreds of times stronger than even that. Although there wouldn't be any traveler puree as the iris prevents any matter sent through the stargate from reintegrating at all.

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** The original iris was made of Titanium (outright said so in "Children of the Gods) which would suit this purpose just fine as it is stronger than steel at half the weight. The second iris (installed after the original was destroyed when they dialed into a black hole) was made of Trinium which is hundreds of times stronger than even that. Although there wouldn't be any traveler puree as the iris prevents any matter sent through the stargate Stargate from reintegrating at all.



** They did manage to duplicate the effects of Sokar's weapon on Earth when O'Neill was trapped on an alien planet when the local stargate was buried after an explosion (which made him believe it was destroyed). It took them several months, and it doesn't specify whether alien technology was used, but if the people at SGC can accomplish that, you'd think that it wouldn't be difficult for Goa'uld to do the same.

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** They did manage to duplicate the effects of Sokar's weapon on Earth when O'Neill was trapped on an alien planet when the local stargate Stargate was buried after an explosion (which made him believe it was destroyed). It took them several months, and it doesn't specify whether alien technology was used, but if the people at SGC can accomplish that, you'd think that it wouldn't be difficult for Goa'uld to do the same.



** This was probably just a production error -- they didn't bother to modify the main prop. And I only remember two episodes in which it was seen: "Window of Opportunity" and "Watergate". The DHD in "Solitudes" shows a [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Image:0eb.svg different symbol]]. Since it was Earth's original Stargate, it's logical to assume that the symbol is Earth's original POO.

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** This was probably just a production error -- they didn't bother to modify the main prop. And I only remember two episodes in which it was seen: "Window of Opportunity" and "Watergate". The DHD in "Solitudes" shows a [[http://stargate.[[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Image:0eb.svg different symbol]]. Since it was Earth's original Stargate, it's logical to assume that the symbol is Earth's original POO.



** Perhaps 'At' is just the standard Point of Origin symbol, and only planets that were of particular importance to the Ancients had specific ones. Maybe that's the real reason that the vast majority of the other stargates have the 'At' symbol on them - it's not that the prop department only had two mock-up gates (one of which was permanently on-set), it's that this just happens to be the placeholder symbol until the Ancients wanted to give it a planet-specific one.

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** Perhaps 'At' is just the standard Point of Origin symbol, and only planets that were of particular importance to the Ancients had specific ones. Maybe that's the real reason that the vast majority of the other stargates Stargates have the 'At' symbol on them - it's not that the prop department only had two mock-up gates (one of which was permanently on-set), it's that this just happens to be the placeholder symbol until the Ancients wanted to give it a planet-specific one.



** Naquadah is stated to be a super-heavy element. It's located in a still hypothetical in the real world island of stability that's speculated to exist in atomic numbers higher than known elements in the periodic table. If such a thing exists in reality, it is *probably* radioactive, but in the way that bismuth is. Bismuth-209 was long thought to be stable, but presumed to be radioactive on theoretical grounds. It was finally proven mathematically to be radioactive, but its half life is 10 billion times the age of the universe. Naquadah is most likely the same - technically radioactive, but decays so slowly that it's safe to deal with as if it were stable. *Naquadria* on the other hand, is a highly unstable radioactive isotope of naquadah (probably with an extra neutron or two).

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** Naquadah is stated to be a super-heavy element. It's located in a still hypothetical in the real world island of stability that's speculated to exist in atomic numbers higher than known elements in the periodic table. If such a thing exists in reality, it is *probably* radioactive, but in the way that bismuth is. Bismuth-209 was long thought to be stable, but presumed to be radioactive on theoretical grounds. It was finally proven mathematically to be radioactive, but its half life is 10 billion times the age of the universe. Naquadah is most likely the same - technically radioactive, but decays so slowly that it's safe to deal with as if it were stable. *Naquadria* on the other hand, is a highly unstable radioactive isotope of naquadah Naquadah (probably with an extra neutron or two).



** Maybe Naquadah is like nitroglycerin. It's naturally unstable, more effective when properly mixed, but can also be mixed to form stable compounds such as dynamite. And like nitroglycerin, it's safe to have in your body in small quantities (Carter and O'Neill have naquadah in their blood because of the symbiotes).

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** Maybe Naquadah is like nitroglycerin. It's naturally unstable, more effective when properly mixed, but can also be mixed to form stable compounds such as dynamite. And like nitroglycerin, it's safe to have in your body in small quantities (Carter and O'Neill have naquadah Naquadah in their blood because of the symbiotes).



** Ruled out by Orlin's 'toaster' stargate in ''Ascension''. The ''Universe' Stargates also appear to have a much more machine-like structure, and are very easily damaged.

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** Ruled out by Orlin's 'toaster' stargate Stargate in ''Ascension''. The ''Universe' Stargates also appear to have a much more machine-like structure, and are very easily damaged.



* What the hell happens when something goes through the other side of a stargate. think about it. we only ever see things going through one side of the stargate. i'm guessing that something that gets shoved through doesn;t just go to the other side of the receiving stargate, since the iris of the earth gate only covers one side (when the iris is closed and the gate active, you can see the shimmer pattern projected onto the wall behind the gate.) but that still leaves a question. does it just pass through unhindered? (could have some really freaky effects if something is going in the correct side.) does it get vaporized, what?!

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* What the hell happens when something goes through the other side of a stargate.Stargate. think about it. we only ever see things going through one side of the stargate. Stargate. i'm guessing that something that gets shoved through doesn;t just go to the other side of the receiving stargate, Stargate, since the iris of the earth gate only covers one side (when the iris is closed and the gate active, you can see the shimmer pattern projected onto the wall behind the gate.) but that still leaves a question. does it just pass through unhindered? (could have some really freaky effects if something is going in the correct side.) does it get vaporized, what?!



** That would be a massive amount of energy, 100lbs of person, rock, whatever, equals 45,359.237 grams of matter converted to energy. For comparison the bomb dropped on Hiroshima converted about 3 grams of matter to energy. The phrase EarthShatteringKaboom ceases to be meaningful. How much ice did the kawoosh in Continuum shave off of the hull breach in the Achille's? 400, 500lbs? Safe to say the gate would have plenty of power. To wit, the Mark IX bomb is said to be multi-gigaton. Okay, a gigaton is 4.184×10^18 joules of energy. Let's say it's a 5 gigaton blast(209,200,000,000 joules). Matter releases 9×10^16 J/kg of energy. If we assume the gate vaporized an even 400lbs (181.436948 kilograms) the gate would of had to absorb 16,329,325,300,000,000,000 joules. Now I'm no expert, but uh, one of those numbers is waaay bigger than the other. The stargate would of had to absorb orders of magnitude more energy than their "Gatebuster" bomb put out. Think of the two schmucks who vaporized themselves when SG-1 was trapped in that prison cave. Bet they had a combined weight over 400lbs.

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** That would be a massive amount of energy, 100lbs of person, rock, whatever, equals 45,359.237 grams of matter converted to energy. For comparison the bomb dropped on Hiroshima converted about 3 grams of matter to energy. The phrase EarthShatteringKaboom ceases to be meaningful. How much ice did the kawoosh in Continuum shave off of the hull breach in the Achille's? 400, 500lbs? Safe to say the gate would have plenty of power. To wit, the Mark IX bomb is said to be multi-gigaton. Okay, a gigaton is 4.184×10^18 joules of energy. Let's say it's a 5 gigaton blast(209,200,000,000 joules). Matter releases 9×10^16 J/kg of energy. If we assume the gate vaporized an even 400lbs (181.436948 kilograms) the gate would of had to absorb 16,329,325,300,000,000,000 joules. Now I'm no expert, but uh, one of those numbers is waaay bigger than the other. The stargate Stargate would of had to absorb orders of magnitude more energy than their "Gatebuster" bomb put out. Think of the two schmucks who vaporized themselves when SG-1 was trapped in that prison cave. Bet they had a combined weight over 400lbs.



** Rings ... what about the gates? Nine out of ten Goa'uld just left their planet's stargate sit somewhere unguarded. Which seemed stupid for reasons of both security and accessibility.

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** Rings ... what about the gates? Nine out of ten Goa'uld just left their planet's stargate Stargate sit somewhere unguarded. Which seemed stupid for reasons of both security and accessibility.



* I haven't finished watching the series yet, but how does the Free Jaffa Nation get their goa'uld symbiotes? As far as I know, free or not, symbiotes are still necessary for Jaffa to live, aren't they? Does that mean they breed or enslave goa'uld young for use as immune systems (which doesn't sound so nice, bad guys or not bad guys), or do they have an alternative? Is it ever explicitly stated in the series?

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* I haven't finished watching the series yet, but how does the Free Jaffa Nation get their goa'uld Goa'uld symbiotes? As far as I know, free or not, symbiotes are still necessary for Jaffa to live, aren't they? Does that mean they breed or enslave goa'uld Goa'uld young for use as immune systems (which doesn't sound so nice, bad guys or not bad guys), or do they have an alternative? Is it ever explicitly stated in the series?



** "Ground goa'uld" was just what O'Neill called it. They didn't ''literally'' get it by grinding up symbiotes, but by extracting and then modifying the chemicals the symbiotes release. Since the Tok'ra ''are'' symbiotes, it's probably easier for them to get said chemicals.
** Tretonin works on 90% of the Jaffa population. For the rest I'm sure they do breed goa'uld specifically for use as Jaffa symbiotes. Teal'c boasted to Apophis that he would do just that way back when the SGC held a dying Apophis as a POW.

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** "Ground goa'uld" Goa'uld" was just what O'Neill called it. They didn't ''literally'' get it by grinding up symbiotes, but by extracting and then modifying the chemicals the symbiotes release. Since the Tok'ra ''are'' symbiotes, it's probably easier for them to get said chemicals.
** Tretonin works on 90% of the Jaffa population. For the rest I'm sure they do breed goa'uld Goa'uld specifically for use as Jaffa symbiotes. Teal'c boasted to Apophis that he would do just that way back when the SGC held a dying Apophis as a POW.



** Yes but there are a million things that could happen that would have kept Jonas on the team, but not ONE of the teams has him? Really? And I know we don't see all of the teams, but some of the ones we do see have some weird stuff (an Asgard, Martuf, a Carter who appears to be the one from Mobius, and a team with the upgrades armbands) but not something that should be relatively common in the multiverse? and If Jonas was on one of the teams we would have seen him since a good number of fans have been complaining for years that he has never been brought back (or even mentioned since the beginning of season 8 even in places where it would make sense to.)

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** Yes but there are a million things that could happen that would have kept Jonas on the team, but not ONE of the teams has him? Really? And I know we don't see all of the teams, but some of the ones we do see have some weird stuff (an Asgard, Martuf, a Carter who appears to be the one from Mobius, Moebius, and a team with the upgrades armbands) but not something that should be relatively common in the multiverse? and If Jonas was on one of the teams we would have seen him since a good number of fans have been complaining for years that he has never been brought back (or even mentioned since the beginning of season 8 even in places where it would make sense to.)



* Why don't the stargates have any warning as to where the kawoosh will go to (such as the STAY CLEAR banner on earths gate.) These things are dangerous and you're not bothering to tell people how far away they should be to avoid it? shame on you, Ancients, shame on you.

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* Why don't the stargates Stargates have any warning as to where the kawoosh will go to (such as the STAY CLEAR banner on earths gate.) These things are dangerous and you're not bothering to tell people how far away they should be to avoid it? shame on you, Ancients, shame on you.



** Goa'uld don't take dna from the host species to make them viable (later we see goa'uld jump from Unas to humans just fine), Jaffa aren't humans who are altered by queens (they're genetically engineered that way as was stated before and after Hathor), if the Goa'uld had this drug the whole time, why not use the drug to easily enslave all the planets you want? I could go on but I think the point is made.

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** Goa'uld don't take dna from the host species to make them viable (later we see goa'uld Goa'uld jump from Unas to humans just fine), Jaffa aren't humans who are altered by queens (they're genetically engineered that way as was stated before and after Hathor), if the Goa'uld had this drug the whole time, why not use the drug to easily enslave all the planets you want? I could go on but I think the point is made.



** It's completely consistent with how time travel had been treated before. When they stopped Ba'al, the new timeline created from that over wrote the old one where he succeeded. Just like when he succeeded it over wrote the one where he never went back. Just like in "Mobius" when fiddling in ancient egypt overwrote their timeline with the one with no stargate, just like in 2010 where sending a note back caused that timeline to be over written. I'm not sure where your problem is.
** There was a big difference with Continuum's time travel--they could *see* the effects of Ba'al's time travel happening. If someone changes the past, you don't notice people disappearing, the timeline just gets overwritten. The best [[Fanon]] explanation I can make is that they had the same time frame to notice and travel on their own as when Ba'al had his original stargate travel to the past occurring, but would anyone everywhere in the galaxy using a stargate have been "saved" from the changing timestream?

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** It's completely consistent with how time travel had been treated before. When they stopped Ba'al, the new timeline created from that over wrote the old one where he succeeded. Just like when he succeeded it over wrote the one where he never went back. Just like in "Mobius" "Moebius" when fiddling in ancient egypt overwrote their timeline with the one with no stargate, Stargate, just like in 2010 where sending a note back caused that timeline to be over written. I'm not sure where your problem is.
** There was a big difference with Continuum's time travel--they could *see* the effects of Ba'al's time travel happening. If someone changes the past, you don't notice people disappearing, the timeline just gets overwritten. The best [[Fanon]] explanation I can make is that they had the same time frame to notice and travel on their own as when Ba'al had his original stargate Stargate travel to the past occurring, but would anyone everywhere in the galaxy using a stargate Stargate have been "saved" from the changing timestream?



** The most popular theory is that the didn't go backwards, they redialed the gate. It's not a continuous shot and the Goa'uld are known to have stargate powering devices and the knowledge/capability to manually dial, so it's not impossible to imagine that they simple stepped through, went off to grab the person, shut the gate off, dialed back, then went back through.

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** The most popular theory is that the didn't go backwards, they redialed the gate. It's not a continuous shot and the Goa'uld are known to have stargate Stargate powering devices and the knowledge/capability to manually dial, so it's not impossible to imagine that they simple stepped through, went off to grab the person, shut the gate off, dialed back, then went back through.



** After reading the above comment, this thought hit me: why didn't the Asdguard start cloning and using Human bodies? We know they can at least clone humans, as they've done it to O'niel, at least. For that matter, why don't they use clones of the *Ancients*? We've never met any alive? But we have, we thawed one out in Antarctica, and I see no reason we wouldn't still have her body (and her genetic material) around. Hell, for that matter, why don't they try seeing if the Nox would let the Asdguard sample their DNA? Do you think the "We <3 Everyone" Nox wouldn't let the great and noble Asdguard clone them to save their race from extinction?\\
And yes, the way they just off-handedly decide to blow themselves up in the first two minutes of the series finally... deeply dissatisfied me, to say the least. I actually really liked the Asdguard.
** I guess they couldn't just start cloning older bodies if we are to take into account that the current Asgards' brains have evolved. The older bodies' brains couldn't handle the knowledge. Maybe that's why they just keep cloning their last body (just making it look younger and more fresh) and that's why the degradation keeps building up to a point where it's impossible to keep cloning. I think it is mentioned that by the time they realized of these degradation problems it was too late to do something to correct it.

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** After reading the above comment, this thought hit me: why didn't the Asdguard Asgard start cloning and using Human bodies? We know they can at least clone humans, as they've done it to O'niel, O'Neill, at least. For that matter, why don't they use clones of the *Ancients*? We've never met any alive? But we have, we thawed one out in Antarctica, and I see no reason we wouldn't still have her body (and her genetic material) around. Hell, for that matter, why don't they try seeing if the Nox would let the Asdguard Asgard sample their DNA? Do you think the "We <3 Everyone" Nox wouldn't let the great and noble Asdguard Asgard clone them to save their race from extinction?\\
And yes, the way they just off-handedly decide to blow themselves up in the first two minutes of the series finally... deeply dissatisfied me, to say the least. I actually really liked the Asdguard.
Asgard.
** I guess they couldn't just start cloning older bodies if we are to take into account that the current Asgards' Asgard's brains have evolved. The older bodies' brains couldn't handle the knowledge. Maybe that's why they just keep cloning their last body (just making it look younger and more fresh) and that's why the degradation keeps building up to a point where it's impossible to keep cloning. I think it is mentioned that by the time they realized of these degradation problems it was too late to do something to correct it.



** Yeah, 'lots', not, 'every damn one of them'. Allow me to recap: One russian team member crushed in a trap door, two more buried alive in the same area, and later eaten by some space bug; One team member having the audacity to suggest a rescue mission, later in the mission he drowns in his own fluids before disintegrating; SGC regularly beats back foreign invaders from the gate, but during Russia's only independent gate mission, they gate to an underwater gate and bring back some alien water, only to have said water possess and kill several officers. this same event triggers a failsafe that nobody could turn off, forcing everyone in the facility to either be killed by nerve gas (quite unpleasant), or go through the gate and drown at crush depth (very unpleasant). One episode cold open has an entire squad of russians gunned down by other russians to steal a symbiote. The black hole incident is definitely freaky, but at least you don't see them torn to bits by the 'hole. Most of the russian casualties occur on-screen, in the foreground. Russians on-screen have like a 90% mortality rate. I could go on. My point is, someone's writing these scripts like it was the cold war, as though it was vital that fiction show how democracy and the US-of-A prevails. Their level of incompetence is laughably inadequate, and like I said, smacks of [=McCarthyism=]. D.J. even says as much, but he gets shot down just like the recurring Russian general. Everyone else in the SGC says the word 'Russians' with the same inflection as 'the NID' or 'Gould.' At least Mayborne gets a little redemption, but all the way to Season 8, every russian is a sucker. Who's idea is this, and why? Did we really need a whole country of redshirts?

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** Yeah, 'lots', not, 'every damn one of them'. Allow me to recap: One russian Russian team member crushed in a trap door, two more buried alive in the same area, and later eaten by some space bug; One team member having the audacity to suggest a rescue mission, later in the mission he drowns in his own fluids before disintegrating; SGC regularly beats back foreign invaders from the gate, but during Russia's only independent gate mission, they gate to an underwater gate and bring back some alien water, only to have said water possess and kill several officers. this same event triggers a failsafe that nobody could turn off, forcing everyone in the facility to either be killed by nerve gas (quite unpleasant), or go through the gate and drown at crush depth (very unpleasant). One episode cold open has an entire squad of russians Russians gunned down by other russians Russians to steal a symbiote. The black hole incident is definitely freaky, but at least you don't see them torn to bits by the 'hole. Most of the russian Russian casualties occur on-screen, in the foreground. Russians on-screen have like a 90% mortality rate. I could go on. My point is, someone's writing these scripts like it was the cold war, as though it was vital that fiction show how democracy and the US-of-A prevails. Their level of incompetence is laughably inadequate, and like I said, smacks of [=McCarthyism=]. D.J. even says as much, but he gets shot down just like the recurring Russian general. Everyone else in the SGC says the word 'Russians' with the same inflection as 'the NID' or 'Gould.' At least Mayborne gets a little redemption, but all the way to Season 8, every russian Russian is a sucker. Who's idea is this, and why? Did we really need a whole country of redshirts?



** All arguments about the morality of killing him are lost when you take into account that they're all too happy to give any goa'uld asylum in exchange for information.

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** All arguments about the morality of killing him are lost when you take into account that they're all too happy to give any goa'uld Goa'uld asylum in exchange for information.



** I don't know if this is canon or not, but according to the [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Book_of_Origin Stargate Wiki]], when the Ori first wrote the Book of Origin their intent was to pose as ''benevolent'' gods. As they became more and more corrupted by power they allowed (or perhaps encouraged) the Priors to twist the stories and verses to suit their needs.

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** I don't know if this is canon or not, but according to the [[http://stargate.[[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Book_of_Origin Stargate Wiki]], when the Ori first wrote the Book of Origin their intent was to pose as ''benevolent'' gods. As they became more and more corrupted by power they allowed (or perhaps encouraged) the Priors to twist the stories and verses to suit their needs.



** Exactly! Part of the SGC's mission is to develop alliances with other worlds. So if that means "Hi medival people in castles! What say you trade us some of your naturally-occuring awesomesause medicine plants for us saving your people from an EarthShatteringKaboom? Do we have a deal?" - then the SGC has done its mission. Remeber, the Stargate program cost the U.S. taxpayers $7,407,000,000 ''per year''. It is a sizable investment of America's budget, and it is completely reasonable that the U.S. government should expect some results that would give us an edge technologically (sorry Daniel, fascinating as [[FantasyCounterpartCulture Space Egyptians, Space Minoans, Space Mongolians]], whatever, might be, they alone don't justify a military expenditure of this magnitute, [[StrawmanHasAPoint as was pointed out by Seantor Kinsey in the season 1 episode "Politics"]]). Besides, the Federation in Franchise/StarTrek can usually handily defeat most any threat thrown at it by [[TheKirk Captain Kirk]] punching an alien in the face and sleeping with [[GreenSkinnedSpaceBabe his woman]], or Picard diplomatically talking it out (or if it's movie Picard, pretending to be Bruce Willis). In the StargateVerse, Earth needs whatever allies/tech we can get our Tau'ri hands on. Even planets with technologically inferior civilizations can have natural resources we could trade for, or be a location we wouldn't mind having access to (in "Enigma" we see that SGC called in a favor with the Space Minoans they saved in "The Broca Divide" and the king there was willing to offer asylum to the Tollan refugees, and again in "Family" we see Teal'c's wife and son being given refuge in the Land of Light.) Besides, since many of the worlds that SG-1 comes across have already been visited by even more advance aliens (starting with the very presence of a stargate), a Trekkish Prime Directive would be worse than useless.

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** Exactly! Part of the SGC's mission is to develop alliances with other worlds. So if that means "Hi medival people in castles! What say you trade us some of your naturally-occuring awesomesause medicine plants for us saving your people from an EarthShatteringKaboom? Do we have a deal?" - then the SGC has done its mission. Remeber, the Stargate program cost the U.S. taxpayers $7,407,000,000 ''per year''. It is a sizable investment of America's budget, and it is completely reasonable that the U.S. government should expect some results that would give us an edge technologically (sorry Daniel, fascinating as [[FantasyCounterpartCulture Space Egyptians, Space Minoans, Space Mongolians]], whatever, might be, they alone don't justify a military expenditure of this magnitute, [[StrawmanHasAPoint as was pointed out by Seantor Kinsey in the season 1 episode "Politics"]]). Besides, the Federation in Franchise/StarTrek can usually handily defeat most any threat thrown at it by [[TheKirk Captain Kirk]] punching an alien in the face and sleeping with [[GreenSkinnedSpaceBabe his woman]], or Picard diplomatically talking it out (or if it's movie Picard, pretending to be Bruce Willis). In the StargateVerse, Earth needs whatever allies/tech we can get our Tau'ri hands on. Even planets with technologically inferior civilizations can have natural resources we could trade for, or be a location we wouldn't mind having access to (in "Enigma" we see that SGC called in a favor with the Space Minoans they saved in "The Broca Divide" and the king there was willing to offer asylum to the Tollan refugees, and again in "Family" we see Teal'c's wife and son being given refuge in the Land of Light.) Besides, since many of the worlds that SG-1 comes across have already been visited by even more advance aliens (starting with the very presence of a stargate), Stargate), a Trekkish Prime Directive would be worse than useless.



* Why didn't the SGC ever mine that naquadah asteroid Anubis sent to Earth, it's 137 kilometers in diameter and 45 percent naquadah. That is billions of tons of the stuff just waiting to be mined and used, yet they spend years afterwords searching planets throughout the stargate network to find planets with reasonable supplies of naquadah.

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* Why didn't the SGC ever mine that naquadah Naquadah asteroid Anubis sent to Earth, it's 137 kilometers in diameter and 45 percent naquadah. Naquadah. That is billions of tons of the stuff just waiting to be mined and used, yet they spend years afterwords searching planets throughout the stargate Stargate network to find planets with reasonable supplies of naquadah.Naquadah.



* I don't know if this is addressed anywhere else, but it just bugs me that the producers kept using the same wormhole-opening stock footage from the pilot in many episodes. Computers covered with sheets and a dark gate room can be seen from when Apophis first came through the stargate. In some you can even see people standing close to the stargate in one scene and then dissapear in the next scene and replaced by a computer.

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* I don't know if this is addressed anywhere else, but it just bugs me that the producers kept using the same wormhole-opening stock footage from the pilot in many episodes. Computers covered with sheets and a dark gate room can be seen from when Apophis first came through the stargate. Stargate. In some you can even see people standing close to the stargate Stargate in one scene and then dissapear in the next scene and replaced by a computer.



* Why is the stargate secret? The SGC hardly has any secrets from its enemies, but they work hard to keep the Taur'i public in the dark. It isn't just wasted effort. There are millions of scientists and engineers who would do useful things for the war effort if they knew about it. Imagine the earth's industrial base upgraded with Goa'uld technology! Six billion free people should be our biggest advantage... if only they knew.

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* Why is the stargate Stargate secret? The SGC hardly has any secrets from its enemies, but they work hard to keep the Taur'i public in the dark. It isn't just wasted effort. There are millions of scientists and engineers who would do useful things for the war effort if they knew about it. Imagine the earth's industrial base upgraded with Goa'uld technology! Six billion free people should be our biggest advantage... if only they knew.



** Maybe they keep names. Maybe their databse goes like this: Code(Pxx-xxx)-(Adress)-(Native name)-(Explored?)-(Owner)-(Notes). So, when you search for [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Langara Langara]], you get all the data, like ([=P2S=]-4C3)-(symbols)-(Langara)-(Yes)-(Langarans)-(Has Naquadria). It's like a library!

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** Maybe they keep names. Maybe their databse goes like this: Code(Pxx-xxx)-(Adress)-(Native name)-(Explored?)-(Owner)-(Notes). So, when you search for [[http://stargate.[[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Langara Langara]], you get all the data, like ([=P2S=]-4C3)-(symbols)-(Langara)-(Yes)-(Langarans)-(Has Naquadria). It's like a library!



* In the episode ''into the fire'' we're introduced to the Goa'uld equivalent of the Puddle Jumper - called a Needle Threader. What the hell happened to it after this episode? this was Season 3, long before Earth had something as basic as the F-302 - yet dispite the fact it would of been useful in a good hundred episodes after this we never see this fully functioning craft ever again. Even if they didn't want to keep this at SG Command for whatever reason they could have, at the very least, sent it to Atlantis as a back up for their very finite supply of Jumpers.

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* In the episode ''into the fire'' we're introduced to the Goa'uld equivalent of the Puddle Jumper - called a Needle Threader. What the hell happened to it after this episode? this was Season 3, long before Earth had something as basic as the F-302 - yet dispite despite the fact it would of been useful in a good hundred episodes after this we never see this fully functioning craft ever again. Even if they didn't want to keep this at SG Command for whatever reason they could have, at the very least, sent it to Atlantis as a back up for their very finite supply of Jumpers.



* Why is it that vast majority of the worlds with humans in them the technology level is either ancient or highly advanced? We see a handful that appear to be around modern-day Earth in technology (the world with the accidental mass de-aging and the one where they learn about Naquadriah come to mind). The Goa'uld suppressing technological development explains some, but it's odd that none of the freely developing worlds are technologically on the level that could be found on Earth around the last 500 years. Hell, I would've loved to see something like a steampunk world based on Egyptian culture. I know the real-world reason is "we aren't going to spend all that money on neat props for a one-off episode when we can just have people huddling in stick huts in the forest", but some kind of in-universe explanation would be appreciated.

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* Why is it that vast majority of the worlds with humans in them the technology level is either ancient or highly advanced? We see a handful that appear to be around modern-day Earth in technology (the world with the accidental mass de-aging and the one where they learn about Naquadriah Naquadria come to mind). The Goa'uld suppressing technological development explains some, but it's odd that none of the freely developing worlds are technologically on the level that could be found on Earth around the last 500 years. Hell, I would've loved to see something like a steampunk world based on Egyptian culture. I know the real-world reason is "we aren't going to spend all that money on neat props for a one-off episode when we can just have people huddling in stick huts in the forest", but some kind of in-universe explanation would be appreciated.



** Another possible explanation is that the teams quite simply haven't come across that many civilisations due to pure chance. There are thousands of gate addresses in their logs.

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** Another possible explanation is that the teams quite simply haven't come across that many civilisations civilizations due to pure chance. There are thousands of gate addresses in their logs.



** Putting aside the fact that there are probably hundreds more of those settlements on the planet, many of these planets are aware of the stargate system, and could possibly use it for dating (hell, even those people who kept Unas as slaves used it to get new blood for their Unas.

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** Putting aside the fact that there are probably hundreds more of those settlements on the planet, many of these planets are aware of the stargate Stargate system, and could possibly use it for dating (hell, even those people who kept Unas as slaves used it to get new blood for their Unas.



** I thnk that's just artistic license for the viewer's benefit (which would explain why the Milky Way gate wormholes changed from "tunnel through space" to "blue version of Atlantis wormhole"). Look at the original movie or The Ark of Truth. Both times when Daniel passes through the gate, we see him being dematerialised, then he goes through the womrhole and then the camera follows. So we're seeing things from the camera's point of view, not the traveller.

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** I thnk think that's just artistic license for the viewer's benefit (which would explain why the Milky Way gate wormholes changed from "tunnel through space" to "blue version of Atlantis wormhole"). Look at the original movie or The Ark of Truth. Both times when Daniel passes through the gate, we see him being dematerialised, dematerialized, then he goes through the womrhole wormhole and then the camera follows. So we're seeing things from the camera's point of view, not the traveller.
traveler.



** There are a lot of plausible explanations, low-ranking Goa'uld, specially trained human slaves, specially trained jaffa, manufacturing technology which allows the construction of sophisticated devices such as hyperdrives and computers to be largely automated (such as something similar to Asgard materialization technology or real-word rapid prototyping technology). As a fan of WorldBuilding, it's the lack of an official answer that bugs [[GordonEcker me]], especially with the {{Flanderization}} of the System Lords into a SkeletonGovernment in later seasons.

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** There are a lot of plausible explanations, low-ranking Goa'uld, specially trained human slaves, specially trained jaffa, Jaffa, manufacturing technology which allows the construction of sophisticated devices such as hyperdrives and computers to be largely automated (such as something similar to Asgard materialization technology or real-word rapid prototyping technology). As a fan of WorldBuilding, it's the lack of an official answer that bugs [[GordonEcker me]], especially with the {{Flanderization}} of the System Lords into a SkeletonGovernment in later seasons.



* The idea that the ancient humans on earth could successfully rebel against the Goa'uld in the first place is effectively destroyed by the series, especially by the episode ''Moebius''. In the original film, we see only Ra, his Pyramid ship, a couple of death-gliders and perhaps a dozen guards. We do not see him in possession of a true army at all. Upon critical inspection, Ra appears to be a spacefaring conman with some extremely advanced weaponry and a handful indoctrinated soldiers to back up his charade. The film really expects us to take this at face value: Ra has no empire of worlds, only Abydos and formerly the Earth. The TV series blows this out of the water by introducing an entire Goa'uld hierarchy of tyrants, all who controlled parts of Earth around the same time in history. All with powerful spaceships that could by themselves, bombard any civillian population into submission. The episode "Moebius" takes us back to Ra's pre-rebellion days in Egypt and we see him in command of an entire army of Jaffa policing his capital city, directly contradicting the flashbacks in the original film where he had perhaps a few guards and the power of intimidation as his main weapon. Since Ra was retconned to have this army, we can reasonably conclude that the other Goa'uld system lords had similar armies at their command around the same time. So how the hell did the humans successfully rebel? Ra could have threatened to wipe out all their newborn infants and had the muscle to back it up if he wanted to maintain order.
** The only reasonable explanation is that the Goa'uld sytem lords had enough human stock off-world already by this time and with no naturally occurring Naquadah to mine, Earth was simply not worth holding onto.

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* The idea that the ancient humans on earth could successfully rebel against the Goa'uld in the first place is effectively destroyed by the series, especially by the episode ''Moebius''. In the original film, we see only Ra, his Pyramid ship, a couple of death-gliders and perhaps a dozen guards. We do not see him in possession of a true army at all. Upon critical inspection, Ra appears to be a spacefaring conman with some extremely advanced weaponry and a handful indoctrinated soldiers to back up his charade. The film really expects us to take this at face value: Ra has no empire of worlds, only Abydos and formerly the Earth. The TV series blows this out of the water by introducing an entire Goa'uld hierarchy of tyrants, all who controlled parts of Earth around the same time in history. All with powerful spaceships that could by themselves, bombard any civillian civilian population into submission. The episode "Moebius" takes us back to Ra's pre-rebellion days in Egypt and we see him in command of an entire army of Jaffa policing his capital city, directly contradicting the flashbacks in the original film where he had perhaps a few guards and the power of intimidation as his main weapon. Since Ra was retconned to have this army, we can reasonably conclude that the other Goa'uld system lords had similar armies at their command around the same time. So how the hell did the humans successfully rebel? Ra could have threatened to wipe out all their newborn infants and had the muscle to back it up if he wanted to maintain order.
** The only reasonable explanation is that the Goa'uld sytem system lords had enough human stock off-world already by this time and with no naturally occurring Naquadah to mine, Earth was simply not worth holding onto.



* JBM: The US Army,the largest branch of the US military not been shown taking an active role in the Stargate program has always bothered me.While the USAF has some very skilled special forces (USAF vet here) the Army has more and a diverse variety of them. They could have thrown the Army a bone or two some time during the show.

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* JBM: The US Army,the largest branch of the US military not been shown taking an active role in the Stargate program has always bothered me. While the USAF has some very skilled special forces (USAF vet here) the Army has more and a diverse variety of them. They could have thrown the Army a bone or two some time during the show.



** In answer to the original question, the Army actually ''is'' involved by the late seasons. [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/SG_team According to the Stargate wiki]], SG-25 is an Army unit that has the same role as the Marine units: combat support. At one point they were also deployed for surveillance of Ori troops ("Uninvited").

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** In answer to the original question, the Army actually ''is'' involved by the late seasons. [[http://stargate.[[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/SG_team According to the Stargate wiki]], SG-25 is an Army unit that has the same role as the Marine units: combat support. At one point they were also deployed for surveillance of Ori troops ("Uninvited").



* Why does US keep whole stargate program secret? I can understand it at first, since of course they want best tech and such, but after it becomes clear that Goa'uld are a threat to Earth woudln't it be better to tell it about to UN? And why is, even after its existance is revealed, whole thing run mainly by US? Considering whole planet is danger this seems like yet another AmericaSavesTheDay with everyone else being useless.

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* Why does US keep whole stargate Stargate program secret? I can understand it at first, since of course they want best tech and such, but after it becomes clear that Goa'uld are a threat to Earth woudln't wouldn't it be better to tell it about to UN? And why is, even after its existance is revealed, whole thing run mainly by US? Considering whole planet is danger this seems like yet another AmericaSavesTheDay with everyone else being useless.



** SG-5 is the diplomatic team. It rarely, if ever, gets mentioned in the show; but logical thinking suggests someone has to be doing it since SG-1 can't be responsibile for maintaining talks with every world. SG-1 is just a vanguard team like The Enterprise in Star Trek.

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** SG-5 is the diplomatic team. It rarely, if ever, gets mentioned in the show; but logical thinking suggests someone has to be doing it since SG-1 can't be responsibile responsible for maintaining talks with every world. SG-1 is just a vanguard team like The Enterprise in Star Trek.



** A few possibilities here. One: When Ra was killed by the Tauri his Jaffa may have been absorbed into the armies of other System Lords (and had their head tattoos remade to reflect their new allegiance), hunted down and killed by Goa'uld who opposed Ra, or committed honorable suicide when they heard of Ra's death. Two: It's possible Ra's army was made up of Jaffa donated from other System Lords. In Japan during the Edo period the shogunate instituted a policy known as sankin kōtai. Among other things, it required every daimyo to contribute a certain number of soldiers to the defense of the capital city. Ra could have done something similar, requiring every System Lord to contribute a certain number of Jaffa warriors to Ra's personal army. It would not only explain why we never saw any Jaffa with Ra's symbol on their foreheads but also why the Jaffa in the movie all wore different helmets. Lastly, and I admit this is purely an attempt at FridgeBrilliance on my part, it's possible Ra's dominance over the System Lords was based not on military might but on control of the stargate system. Consider the following:\\
1. The stargate system is the foundation of Goa'uld civilization. While they do have FTL-capable ships they are only used for the occasional military campaign, diplomatic visit, or when traveling to a planet without a stargate. Goa'uld hyperdrive technology is not advanced enough to make routine interstellar travel (i.e. trade) practical and it can potentially take long weary months to fly from one planet to another. Among the Goa'uld, control of a planet's stargate amounts to control of the planet itself.\\

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** A few possibilities here. One: When Ra was killed by the Tauri his Jaffa may have been absorbed into the armies of other System Lords (and had their head tattoos remade to reflect their new allegiance), hunted down and killed by Goa'uld who opposed Ra, or committed honorable suicide when they heard of Ra's death. Two: It's possible Ra's army was made up of Jaffa donated from other System Lords. In Japan during the Edo period the shogunate instituted a policy known as sankin kōtai. Among other things, it required every daimyo to contribute a certain number of soldiers to the defense of the capital city. Ra could have done something similar, requiring every System Lord to contribute a certain number of Jaffa warriors to Ra's personal army. It would not only explain why we never saw any Jaffa with Ra's symbol on their foreheads but also why the Jaffa in the movie all wore different helmets. Lastly, and I admit this is purely an attempt at FridgeBrilliance on my part, it's possible Ra's dominance over the System Lords was based not on military might but on control of the stargate Stargate system. Consider the following:\\
1. The stargate Stargate system is the foundation of Goa'uld civilization. While they do have FTL-capable ships they are only used for the occasional military campaign, diplomatic visit, or when traveling to a planet without a stargate.Stargate. Goa'uld hyperdrive technology is not advanced enough to make routine interstellar travel (i.e. trade) practical and it can potentially take long weary months to fly from one planet to another. Among the Goa'uld, control of a planet's stargate Stargate amounts to control of the planet itself.\\



So if gate travel is the foundation of the Goa'uld Empire, the Abydos cartouche lists every stargate known to the Goa'uld, the cartouche data exists only on Abydos, and Ra has exclusive control of the planet Abydos, then Ra essentially has total control of the entire Goa'uld Empire! He has the gate address of ''every single planet'' in the Goa'uld Empire (save for the ones without a stargate but the Goa'uld generally aren't interested in those). As stated above, this is something that no other Goa'uld in the galaxy has. By carefully controlling Goa'uld knowledge of the gate system, Ra can control the entire Goa'uld Empire. If another System Lord displeased Ra he could see to it that that System Lord's enemies "discovered" the address to his homeworld or his main source(s) of naquadah. Additionally, if Ra charted the gate addresses himself (I don't know if this is ever confirmed or denied outright) then there could be hundreds, thousands, or even millions of planets with stargates that ''only he knows about''. He could use these secret planets as hidden caches of resources or technology, or dole out the addresses of valuable planets (i.e. ones rich in naquadah) to Goa'uld who serve him faithfully. Knowledge, as they say, is power, and Ra's knowledge is supreme.\\

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So if gate travel is the foundation of the Goa'uld Empire, the Abydos cartouche lists every stargate Stargate known to the Goa'uld, the cartouche data exists only on Abydos, and Ra has exclusive control of the planet Abydos, then Ra essentially has total control of the entire Goa'uld Empire! He has the gate address of ''every single planet'' in the Goa'uld Empire (save for the ones without a stargate Stargate but the Goa'uld generally aren't interested in those). As stated above, this is something that no other Goa'uld in the galaxy has. By carefully controlling Goa'uld knowledge of the gate system, Ra can control the entire Goa'uld Empire. If another System Lord displeased Ra he could see to it that that System Lord's enemies "discovered" the address to his homeworld or his main source(s) of naquadah. Naquadah. Additionally, if Ra charted the gate addresses himself (I don't know if this is ever confirmed or denied outright) then there could be hundreds, thousands, or even millions of planets with stargates Stargates that ''only he knows about''. He could use these secret planets as hidden caches of resources or technology, or dole out the addresses of valuable planets (i.e. ones rich in naquadah) Naquadah) to Goa'uld who serve him faithfully. Knowledge, as they say, is power, and Ra's knowledge is supreme.\\



a) proximity to Cheyenne Mountain and NORAD connection -- applies regardless of Canada knowing about the stargate either officially, unofficially, or not at all;

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a) proximity to Cheyenne Mountain and NORAD connection -- applies regardless of Canada knowing about the stargate Stargate either officially, unofficially, or not at all;



** They also move their minds into the new body every time they clone themselves. As such, it may be that a body will reject the mind unless they are an almost-perfect match, just like organs are rejected unless there is a sufficient match. Since mutations tend to build up slowly, the difference between every clone is less than between any blood connection. Therefore cloning would be necessary to make them live forever. Assuming the Asgard lived in prosperity for a very long time, it was unnecessary for them to grow in population, so the entire population survived solely by cloning. (This doesn't explain why they didn't just store the genetic code of the original individual, and just replicated their genome without any genetic flaws in the same way they replicate replicators, and then instert it into a denuclearized stem cell (everything except making the genome is already possible using currently existing human technology)). Alternately, with a lot more HandWave-ing, Asgard don't have cells like humans do, but are rather extremely complex single-celled organisms (I'm not sure if this is physically possible), which have only one genetic code in their entire body. As a mind inhabits an Asgard body, it adapts to the genetic code of the body so closely that it can only be placed on a perfect genetic match. Clones would then have to be made with the exact genetic content at the time of death, and as such the mutations built up over the course of a lifetime can't be corrected. Since this would make them more liable to detrimental mutations even when reproducing sexually, their genome would require a lot of redundancy, and as such they would stay healthy for a long time of cloning, and then suddenly feel the detrimental effects after an (arbitrary, that is, randomly determinable) number of generations, explaining why they were careless enough to ignore the effects until it was too late. If it were determined that a technology would allow you to live for approximately [[LivingForeverIsAwesome 60 million years]], would you really care about the end of your life? About what would happen if everyone were to do it, and nobody of your trillions-counting civilization would bother to have sex? No, they would prepare for it no more than we prepare for when the sun goes nova, or when it becomes so hot the earth's seas start to evaporate off into space, or when a meteor hits the earth. And when any of those things happen, [[JustBeforeTheEnd and it's too late to save everyone]], we will ask ourselves why our ancestors didn't do anything to prevent this. But it's our nature, and quite possibly theirs too, to think "Eh, I'll get to it later". So [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle now you know]]: [[AnAesop don't procrastinate]].

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** They also move their minds into the new body every time they clone themselves. As such, it may be that a body will reject the mind unless they are an almost-perfect match, just like organs are rejected unless there is a sufficient match. Since mutations tend to build up slowly, the difference between every clone is less than between any blood connection. Therefore cloning would be necessary to make them live forever. Assuming the Asgard lived in prosperity for a very long time, it was unnecessary for them to grow in population, so the entire population survived solely by cloning. (This doesn't explain why they didn't just store the genetic code of the original individual, and just replicated their genome without any genetic flaws in the same way they replicate replicators, and then instert insert it into a denuclearized stem cell (everything except making the genome is already possible using currently existing human technology)). Alternately, with a lot more HandWave-ing, Asgard don't have cells like humans do, but are rather extremely complex single-celled organisms (I'm not sure if this is physically possible), which have only one genetic code in their entire body. As a mind inhabits an Asgard body, it adapts to the genetic code of the body so closely that it can only be placed on a perfect genetic match. Clones would then have to be made with the exact genetic content at the time of death, and as such the mutations built up over the course of a lifetime can't be corrected. Since this would make them more liable to detrimental mutations even when reproducing sexually, their genome would require a lot of redundancy, and as such they would stay healthy for a long time of cloning, and then suddenly feel the detrimental effects after an (arbitrary, that is, randomly determinable) number of generations, explaining why they were careless enough to ignore the effects until it was too late. If it were determined that a technology would allow you to live for approximately [[LivingForeverIsAwesome 60 million years]], would you really care about the end of your life? About what would happen if everyone were to do it, and nobody of your trillions-counting civilization would bother to have sex? No, they would prepare for it no more than we prepare for when the sun goes nova, or when it becomes so hot the earth's seas start to evaporate off into space, or when a meteor hits the earth. And when any of those things happen, [[JustBeforeTheEnd and it's too late to save everyone]], we will ask ourselves why our ancestors didn't do anything to prevent this. But it's our nature, and quite possibly theirs too, to think "Eh, I'll get to it later". So [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle now you know]]: [[AnAesop don't procrastinate]].



** Plus, it wasn't that long ago and the stargate program is classified. The hippies could still be alive today, or could have told people they know who would still be alive.
* In "2001" they give the Aschen addresses to dangerous stargates, "first one being a black hole and all. They get progressively darker from there." Given what happens when you dial a stargate orbiting a black hole, how could ''anything'' be considered worse than that? Furthermore, given that dialing such a stargate would result in the destruction of the planet that dialed it, isn't that basically committing genocide? Either the Aschen dialed it from one of their vassal worlds, causing the deaths of untold numbers of innocents, or they dialed it from the Aschen homeworld, killing untold numbers of innocents and a lot of bad guys too. Why not just give them addresses to a dead world or a Goa'uld stronghold? Giving them an address that's guaranteed (barring the Aschen doing what SG-1 did) to destroy the planet just seems like a really dick move for O'Neill/Hammond/whoever to do.

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** Plus, it wasn't that long ago and the stargate Stargate program is classified. The hippies could still be alive today, or could have told people they know who would still be alive.
* In "2001" they give the Aschen addresses to dangerous stargates, Stargates, "first one being a black hole and all. They get progressively darker from there." Given what happens when you dial a stargate Stargate orbiting a black hole, how could ''anything'' be considered worse than that? Furthermore, given that dialing such a stargate Stargate would result in the destruction of the planet that dialed it, isn't that basically committing genocide? Either the Aschen dialed it from one of their vassal worlds, causing the deaths of untold numbers of innocents, or they dialed it from the Aschen homeworld, killing untold numbers of innocents and a lot of bad guys too. Why not just give them addresses to a dead world or a Goa'uld stronghold? Giving them an address that's guaranteed (barring the Aschen doing what SG-1 did) to destroy the planet just seems like a really dick move for O'Neill/Hammond/whoever to do.



** Anubis states explicitly that he has rules to follow and is not allowed to use the knowledge and powers of an ascended being; presumably that includes the knowledge of how dial all the Stargates in the galaxy at once, or modifying the device to emit a different type of energy. He had to manipulate others into modifying the weapon and modifying the stargate (Carter, Selmak and Ba'al) because he wasn't allowed to it himself.

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** Anubis states explicitly that he has rules to follow and is not allowed to use the knowledge and powers of an ascended being; presumably that includes the knowledge of how dial all the Stargates in the galaxy at once, or modifying the device to emit a different type of energy. He had to manipulate others into modifying the weapon and modifying the stargate Stargate (Carter, Selmak and Ba'al) because he wasn't allowed to it himself.



** The Butterfly Effect. Maybe when Ra took the stargate in the ''Moebius'' timeline it resulted in someone getting killed that wasn't killed in the standard timeline. This person could have been the ancestor of someone in Carter's life that inspired her, and with this person missing from her formative years she's a different person. Similarly in ''Continuum'' it's possible that the deaths of the people on the ship meant that someone besides O'Neill was picked for one particular mission decades later, which gave Jack more time with his son, which prompted a talk on gun safety.

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** The Butterfly Effect. Maybe when Ra took the stargate Stargate in the ''Moebius'' timeline it resulted in someone getting killed that wasn't killed in the standard timeline. This person could have been the ancestor of someone in Carter's life that inspired her, and with this person missing from her formative years she's a different person. Similarly in ''Continuum'' it's possible that the deaths of the people on the ship meant that someone besides O'Neill was picked for one particular mission decades later, which gave Jack more time with his son, which prompted a talk on gun safety.



** In the series of novels based off of the original Stargate movie they do bring tanks, attack helicopters, Stinger missiles and Humvees to Abydos through the stargate and use them to great effect against Ra's troops (now under the command of Hathor). The Stinger missiles are the most effective because the death gliders have absolutely no defense or countermeasure against them, whereas the tanks are the least effective because the staff weapons melt the wheels and tread and render the vehicle immobile. Presumably the reason they don't use such vehicles in the Stargate series is because they prefer stealth and infiltration rather than battalions of armored vehicles.

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** In the series of novels based off of the original Stargate movie they do bring tanks, attack helicopters, Stinger missiles and Humvees to Abydos through the stargate Stargate and use them to great effect against Ra's troops (now under the command of Hathor). The Stinger missiles are the most effective because the death gliders have absolutely no defense or countermeasure against them, whereas the tanks are the least effective because the staff weapons melt the wheels and tread and render the vehicle immobile. Presumably the reason they don't use such vehicles in the Stargate series is because they prefer stealth and infiltration rather than battalions of armored vehicles.



** The stargate is 6.7 meters in diameter, that's plenty of room for any ground vehicle to be driven through. The real reason why they don't have extensive military hardware deployed via the stargate or 302s is because that's ''way'' beyond the show's budget. The producers probably thought of it but decided it's better to show than tell by have Carter report on the epic tank battles offworld.

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** The stargate Stargate is 6.7 meters in diameter, that's plenty of room for any ground vehicle to be driven through. The real reason why they don't have extensive military hardware deployed via the stargate Stargate or 302s is because that's ''way'' beyond the show's budget. The producers probably thought of it but decided it's better to show than tell by have Carter report on the epic tank battles offworld.



[[http://stargate-sg1-solutions.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/teamthroughgate.jpg Look at this]]. Where the ramp is, it's ''just'' wide enough for four people, standing shoulder-to-shoulder, to walk through the gate at once. Tanks, as I understand it, are rather wider than that.
** The "Needle Threader" is 6.5 meters wide and tall, so the event horizon has to be a little wider than that or there would be literally no margin for error in piloting the thing. An Abrams tank is 3.66 meters wide and 2.44 meters tall so aside from adjusting the ramp height on the gates a little bit there's no problem fitting one through. As for the photo, chalk it up to SpecialEffectsFailure since they haven't always been consistent in how big the gate really is (in that pic it looks about 5 meters, tops). Hell, in the early season opening credits we see a Death Glider fly through a deactivated stargate, which would defeat the entire purpose of making Needle Threaders in the first place.
** We never see any Death Glider flying through a deactivated stargate. If it's the same image I'm thinking of, it fly ''above'' it, nearly crashing into, yes, but certainly not through. The wingspan of an ordinary Death Glider just never allowed it. There's no error from the special effect team here, just your eyes needing to be checked.

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[[http://stargate-sg1-solutions.[[http://Stargate-sg1-solutions.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/teamthroughgate.jpg Look at this]]. Where the ramp is, it's ''just'' wide enough for four people, standing shoulder-to-shoulder, to walk through the gate at once. Tanks, as I understand it, are rather wider than that.
** The "Needle Threader" is 6.5 meters wide and tall, so the event horizon has to be a little wider than that or there would be literally no margin for error in piloting the thing. An Abrams tank is 3.66 meters wide and 2.44 meters tall so aside from adjusting the ramp height on the gates a little bit there's no problem fitting one through. As for the photo, chalk it up to SpecialEffectsFailure since they haven't always been consistent in how big the gate really is (in that pic it looks about 5 meters, tops). Hell, in the early season opening credits we see a Death Glider fly through a deactivated stargate, Stargate, which would defeat the entire purpose of making Needle Threaders in the first place.
** We never see any Death Glider flying through a deactivated stargate.Stargate. If it's the same image I'm thinking of, it fly ''above'' it, nearly crashing into, yes, but certainly not through. The wingspan of an ordinary Death Glider just never allowed it. There's no error from the special effect team here, just your eyes needing to be checked.



** As far as sending armored vehicles through the stargate to other planets? Here's an ArmorPiercingQuestion: How do you get it ''to'' the stargate? Last I looked, the only way down to the SGC's gate is through two elevators, and the base's corridors aren't built to accommodate tanks. The crane from "Redemption"? Same problem. And factor in that they'd have to rebuilt the ramp to take a tank's weight instead of people and F.R.E.D.

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** As far as sending armored vehicles through the stargate Stargate to other planets? Here's an ArmorPiercingQuestion: How do you get it ''to'' the stargate? Stargate? Last I looked, the only way down to the SGC's gate is through two elevators, and the base's corridors aren't built to accommodate tanks. The crane from "Redemption"? Same problem. And factor in that they'd have to rebuilt the ramp to take a tank's weight instead of people and F.R.E.D.



** At least wide enough for the gate, either 4.6m (http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate) or 6.7m (http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate).

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** At least wide enough for the gate, either 4.6m (http://stargate.(http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate) or 6.7m (http://stargate.(http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate).



** In addition, keep in mind that gods in Stargate are different from gods in real world religions. In stargate, these gods can be seen, as well as their power. Apophis' followers got to see him in flesh and blood. They saw his technology which, to their relatively primitive culture, seemed like magic. In real life (forgive me if I step on any religious person's toes here), there is no such cold, hard proof that any religion is true. That's why it's called ''belief''. As a result, cultures in Stargate don't really need to put faith in their gods, they believe what they see. So once they see evidence to the contrary, it's easier to change their minds.

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** In addition, keep in mind that gods in Stargate are different from gods in real world religions. In stargate, Stargate, these gods can be seen, as well as their power. Apophis' followers got to see him in flesh and blood. They saw his technology which, to their relatively primitive culture, seemed like magic. In real life (forgive me if I step on any religious person's toes here), there is no such cold, hard proof that any religion is true. That's why it's called ''belief''. As a result, cultures in Stargate don't really need to put faith in their gods, they believe what they see. So once they see evidence to the contrary, it's easier to change their minds.



* Just re-watched "48 Hours", where Teal'c is trapped inside the memory of the stargate due to a crashed ''al'kesh'' flattening the originating DHD. Daniel and Maj. Davis spend half the episode playing politics with the Russians to get their DHD. A bit of FridgeLogic occurred to me. Namely, why did nobody even mention the fact that Area 51 still had the DHD found with the Beta Gate in Antarctica? Why couldn't they just fly that one over?

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* Just re-watched "48 Hours", where Teal'c is trapped inside the memory of the stargate Stargate due to a crashed ''al'kesh'' flattening the originating DHD. Daniel and Maj. Davis spend half the episode playing politics with the Russians to get their DHD. A bit of FridgeLogic occurred to me. Namely, why did nobody even mention the fact that Area 51 still had the DHD found with the Beta Gate in Antarctica? Why couldn't they just fly that one over?



* How does a stargate know how long it has to remain open? It always seems to remain open for just the right amount of time, but there doesn't seem to be a timer or anything on [=DHDs.=]

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* How does a stargate Stargate know how long it has to remain open? It always seems to remain open for just the right amount of time, but there doesn't seem to be a timer or anything on [=DHDs.=]



** Alternatively, the stargate can BreakTheFourthWall and [[ScriptReadingDoors read the script]]. :P

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** Alternatively, the stargate Stargate can BreakTheFourthWall and [[ScriptReadingDoors read the script]]. :P



** You're misunderstanding what's happening; the MALP is transmitting info back through the stargate, at no point do they keep getting info from the probes after the gate has closed down.

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** You're misunderstanding what's happening; the MALP is transmitting info back through the stargate, Stargate, at no point do they keep getting info from the probes after the gate has closed down.



* Is it me, or is there a very simple defense mechanism missing from earth's stargate? We know that gates won't dial when sufficiently obstructed (hence, the usefulness of burying a stargate), so why is there no mechanism to do so? A simple extendable platform behind the stargate would have been enough, and it would prevent earth from being locked off by continuous redialing.

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* Is it me, or is there a very simple defense mechanism missing from earth's stargate? Stargate? We know that gates won't dial when sufficiently obstructed (hence, the usefulness of burying a stargate), Stargate), so why is there no mechanism to do so? A simple extendable extensible platform behind the stargate Stargate would have been enough, and it would prevent earth from being locked off by continuous redialing.



** Shrug it off is maybe too passively worded, but there really isn't anything that people can do with only "a weird energy has passed over the entire earth". It was a single-time occurrence that passed in an instant (considering how fast it reached orbit on Dakara), so it's doubtful that any sort of accurate readings were taken. People would wonder what in the world was going on, but there is no information available to them that could lead back to the stargate program. Maybe in an earlier season a civilian investigation could have led to the answer, as the stargate required a huge amount of external power and could be noticeable through that. The president's probably going to have to give a few speeches about "I ain't got no clue what's been going on, but I got my best people working on figuring it out.", but there really isn't anything else people can look for.

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** Shrug it off is maybe too passively worded, but there really isn't anything that people can do with only "a weird energy has passed over the entire earth". It was a single-time occurrence that passed in an instant (considering how fast it reached orbit on Dakara), so it's doubtful that any sort of accurate readings were taken. People would wonder what in the world was going on, but there is no information available to them that could lead back to the stargate Stargate program. Maybe in an earlier season a civilian investigation could have led to the answer, as the stargate Stargate required a huge amount of external power and could be noticeable through that. The president's probably going to have to give a few speeches about "I ain't got no clue what's been going on, but I got my best people working on figuring it out.", but there really isn't anything else people can look for.



** It might just be some ritual or protocol. The Jaffa might have some assigned ritual that's been passed down, "When the god says to gather potential bodies for his queen, dial these addresses on the stargate. If the gate opens, go through and find some suitable hosts." The ritual might not have been updated in quite some time, it's just that this time when they carried it out the Earth gate opened instead of failing to dial. So, they went through.

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** It might just be some ritual or protocol. The Jaffa might have some assigned ritual that's been passed down, "When the god says to gather potential bodies for his queen, dial these addresses on the stargate.Stargate. If the gate opens, go through and find some suitable hosts." The ritual might not have been updated in quite some time, it's just that this time when they carried it out the Earth gate opened instead of failing to dial. So, they went through.



* In ''Out of Mind'' and ''Into the Fire'', how in the world did a female tok'ra agent manage to infiltrate the ranks of Hathor? Hathor's drug only works on men, so shouldn't a female 'jaffa' defecting to her cause a lot of suspicion? Like, at least enough suspicion to check her belly-button?
** Not really. The Jaffa would presumably want to defect to anyone more powerful. Or indeed, maybe she just liked Hathor's style. The Goa'uld are statedly arrogant and vain. It wouldn't have been a problem to convince Hathor that she was so amazing that they decided to defect to her (also, goa'uld sometimes serve under other more powerful goa'uld. Was it explicitly stated that the tok'ra was pretending to be a jaffa?)
* So here is the ultimate question (in my mind). Having watched ten seasons of the show, two truths seem to reamin evident in the SG-1 team. One: They get captured all the time! Two: Their tactics when arriving at a new planet never seem to change much... leading to them getting captured again and again and again... and again. The Show could be called Stargate Escape from Capture. So my question is, why did they never adopt some new tactics, policies, maybe a little bit of GenreSavvy to avoid being captured or maybe even a shoot first response to being captured by people[=/=]alien race #8472?

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* In ''Out of Mind'' and ''Into the Fire'', how in the world did a female tok'ra Tok'ra agent manage to infiltrate the ranks of Hathor? Hathor's drug only works on men, so shouldn't a female 'jaffa' 'Jaffa' defecting to her cause a lot of suspicion? Like, at least enough suspicion to check her belly-button?
** Not really. The Jaffa would presumably want to defect to anyone more powerful. Or indeed, maybe she just liked Hathor's style. The Goa'uld are statedly arrogant and vain. It wouldn't have been a problem to convince Hathor that she was so amazing that they decided to defect to her (also, goa'uld Goa'uld sometimes serve under other more powerful goa'uld. Goa'uld. Was it explicitly stated that the tok'ra Tok'ra was pretending to be a jaffa?)
Jaffa?)
* So here is the ultimate question (in my mind). Having watched ten seasons of the show, two truths seem to reamin remain evident in the SG-1 team. One: They get captured all the time! Two: Their tactics when arriving at a new planet never seem to change much... leading to them getting captured again and again and again... and again. The Show could be called Stargate Escape from Capture. So my question is, why did they never adopt some new tactics, policies, maybe a little bit of GenreSavvy to avoid being captured or maybe even a shoot first response to being captured by people[=/=]alien race #8472?



### By the time of the series the Goa'uld had plain lost track of [=P3X-888=], the planet where the Goa'uld and Unas both evolved, and they have a taboo against breeding hosts. They had, in fact, lost track of it so long ago that regular Goa'uld and [=P3X-888=] Goa'uld had undergone divergent evolution (for starters, no naquadah in the blood of [=P3X-888=] Goa'uld). The other planets where we've seen non-infested unas are likewise abandoned. So, unas just plain weren't widely available, whereas they seeded humans all over the damn galaxy.

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### By the time of the series the Goa'uld had plain lost track of [=P3X-888=], the planet where the Goa'uld and Unas both evolved, and they have a taboo against breeding hosts. They had, in fact, lost track of it so long ago that regular Goa'uld and [=P3X-888=] Goa'uld had undergone divergent evolution (for starters, no naquadah Naquadah in the blood of [=P3X-888=] Goa'uld). The other planets where we've seen non-infested unas Unas are likewise abandoned. So, unas Unas just plain weren't widely available, whereas they seeded humans all over the damn galaxy.



### Most Goa'uld don't ''like'' getting into physical combat. Unas bodies are tougher, but human hosts regenerate, too, and in fact they're easier to repair than an unas. Humans also have more dexterous hands, making them more useful to somebody who prefers to stay well behind the front lines.

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### Most Goa'uld don't ''like'' getting into physical combat. Unas bodies are tougher, but human hosts regenerate, too, and in fact they're easier to repair than an unas.Unas. Humans also have more dexterous hands, making them more useful to somebody who prefers to stay well behind the front lines.



** On a separate note, I strongly question the argument that human hosts are easier to repair than an Unas host. As I said, we see in the series that an Unas!Goa'uld is able to survive damage that would instantly kill a human!Goa'uld. The Unas!Goa'uld in "Thor's Hammer" is shot several times by O'neill but survives, while every time a human!Goa'uld is shot with a Tauri weapon they pretty much die instantly. The Unas!Goa'uld in "Demons" takes ''several'' shots from a staff weapon before being too damaged to heal, but Cronos, Amaunet, and many other human!Goa'uld die from a single staff blast.
** "Easier" probably means "takes less out of the symbiote". The symbiote's healing powers to its host aren't unlimited, as demonstrated by A) Selmak being so weakened from keeping Saroosh alive that it was questionable whether it could heal Jacob's leukemia in "The Tok'ra, Part II", and B) Junior giving up the ghost after being shared between Teal'c and Bra'tac in "The Changeling". And again, most Goa'uld don't lead from the front, so the actual need for the extra durability of an unas is sharply limited.
** I believe it is also that among other qualities the symbiote takes from it's host is general intelligence. Smarter hosts make smarter blended entities. Additionally, humans as a species seem to have a knack for being easily manipulated via religious imagery and generally form groups, meaning they could extend their control by setting up cults that worship them. It is unclear whether other species such as the unas would share this trait, it may be possible to control one unas and a few that can be directly intimidated, but there may not be bigger social structures that can be exploited.

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** On a separate note, I strongly question the argument that human hosts are easier to repair than an Unas host. As I said, we see in the series that an Unas!Goa'uld is able to survive damage that would instantly kill a human!Goa'uld. The Unas!Goa'uld in "Thor's Hammer" is shot several times by O'neill O'Neill but survives, while every time a human!Goa'uld is shot with a Tauri weapon they pretty much die instantly. The Unas!Goa'uld in "Demons" takes ''several'' shots from a staff weapon before being too damaged to heal, but Cronos, Amaunet, and many other human!Goa'uld die from a single staff blast.
** "Easier" probably means "takes less out of the symbiote". The symbiote's healing powers to its host aren't unlimited, as demonstrated by A) Selmak being so weakened from keeping Saroosh alive that it was questionable whether it could heal Jacob's leukemia in "The Tok'ra, Part II", and B) Junior giving up the ghost after being shared between Teal'c and Bra'tac in "The Changeling". And again, most Goa'uld don't lead from the front, so the actual need for the extra durability of an unas Unas is sharply limited.
** I believe it is also that among other qualities the symbiote takes from it's host is general intelligence. Smarter hosts make smarter blended entities. Additionally, humans as a species seem to have a knack for being easily manipulated via religious imagery and generally form groups, meaning they could extend their control by setting up cults that worship them. It is unclear whether other species such as the unas Unas would share this trait, it may be possible to control one unas Unas and a few that can be directly intimidated, but there may not be bigger social structures that can be exploited.



* Why did SG-1 allow Brooks to escape with the Al'kesh at the end of ''Endgame''? It was strongly implied that only three members of the Trust (Brooks, Hoskins and Jennings) were on-board; Hoskins was dead and Jennings incapacitated. Even if Brooks managed to enter hyperspace before being caught, Sam and Daniel could have easily piloted the ship back to Earth. Letting Brooks and Jennings escape with enough weapons to wipe out entire worlds of Go'a'uld and Jaffa was an incredible setback...
* So, starting in the movie, and going all the way through SG-1 and Atlantis, the SGC and the capital ships have at least dozens, probably hundreds, of nukes at their disposal. Where do they come from? In real life, nuclear weapons manufacture and storage is extremely tightly controlled by the IAEA and the UN. If they were taken from existing US stockpiles, standard inspections of those stockpiles would've either shown that 1) they're "missing" (hidden in a secret facility or on our spaceships), or 2) they've would seen the naquadah-enhanced warheads designed to be moved by remote control on wheels. [[SarcasmMode I think the UN would have disapproved of that.]] And it's known that the DOD was incredibly stringent regarding security, so they waited ''seven or eight'' years (movie in 1995/96, "Disclosure" in 2003) to tell the other permanent members of the Security Council. How did they get away with it?

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* Why did SG-1 allow Brooks to escape with the Al'kesh at the end of ''Endgame''? It was strongly implied that only three members of the Trust (Brooks, Hoskins and Jennings) were on-board; Hoskins was dead and Jennings incapacitated. Even if Brooks managed to enter hyperspace before being caught, Sam and Daniel could have easily piloted the ship back to Earth. Letting Brooks and Jennings escape with enough weapons to wipe out entire worlds of Go'a'uld Goa'uld and Jaffa was an incredible setback...
* So, starting in the movie, and going all the way through SG-1 and Atlantis, the SGC and the capital ships have at least dozens, probably hundreds, of nukes at their disposal. Where do they come from? In real life, nuclear weapons manufacture and storage is extremely tightly controlled by the IAEA and the UN. If they were taken from existing US stockpiles, standard inspections of those stockpiles would've either shown that 1) they're "missing" (hidden in a secret facility or on our spaceships), or 2) they've would seen the naquadah-enhanced Naquadah-enhanced warheads designed to be moved by remote control on wheels. [[SarcasmMode I think the UN would have disapproved of that.]] And it's known that the DOD was incredibly stringent regarding security, so they waited ''seven or eight'' years (movie in 1995/96, "Disclosure" in 2003) to tell the other permanent members of the Security Council. How did they get away with it?



** ''[[http://screenshots.filesnetwork.com/98/potd/1131388994_59.jpg Prometheus]]'' & ''[[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/File:Daedalus_Schematic.jpg Daedalus]]'' schematics.

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** ''[[http://screenshots.filesnetwork.com/98/potd/1131388994_59.jpg Prometheus]]'' & ''[[http://stargate.''[[http://Stargate.wikia.com/wiki/File:Daedalus_Schematic.jpg Daedalus]]'' schematics.



* Why didn't SGC ever use tanks or deriatives? It would make perfect sense using an IFV there.
** How would they get a tank down into the SGC in the first place? Also, there the part of the airforce, which to my knowledge don't use land based armored vehicles much.

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* Why didn't SGC ever use tanks or deriatives? derivatives? It would make perfect sense using an IFV there.
** How would they get a tank down into the SGC in the first place? Also, there the they are part of the airforce, Air Force, which to my knowledge don't doesn't use land based land-based armored vehicles much.
22nd Feb '16 12:35:59 AM harlbior
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*** Yeah, but surely, with all their technology, teh Tok'Ra could use cloning combined with genetic tweaking to create genetic diversity. Also, the Asgard cloning degredation happened after many iterations, because they weren't cloning from original DNA, they were cloning from clones from clones.

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*** ** Yeah, but surely, with all their technology, teh Tok'Ra could use cloning combined with genetic tweaking to create genetic diversity. Also, the Asgard cloning degredation happened after many iterations, because they weren't cloning from original DNA, they were cloning from clones from clones.



*** Nothing, but I was wondering about the out of universe reason (the real life reason) that the director had for giving Ra a short hair cut.
*** The guy they used to play Ra in Continuum is the same actor who played Ra in the season 8 episode Mobius. Just like O'Niell and Jackson have different actors for the TV series, so does Ra.
*** Yeah, but they could have just given the Ra actor a wig of long hair. My question is why didn’t they?

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*** ** Nothing, but I was wondering about the out of universe reason (the real life reason) that the director had for giving Ra a short hair cut.
*** ** The guy they used to play Ra in Continuum is the same actor who played Ra in the season 8 episode Mobius. Just like O'Niell and Jackson have different actors for the TV series, so does Ra.
*** ** Yeah, but they could have just given the Ra actor a wig of long hair. My question is why didn’t they?



*** You're probably right.
*** It might be that they "just didn't care" because it "just didn't matter"... Snake Plissken turned into [=MacGyver=] between the movie and series, a character going from long hair to short hair in the transition doesn't seem like a big deal. Besides, reportedly the people who made the series and the people who made the movie didn't like each other very much... departing from the movie in such a visually obvious way might have been their [[StealthInsult subtle middle finger]].

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*** ** You're probably right.
*** ** It might be that they "just didn't care" because it "just didn't matter"... Snake Plissken turned into [=MacGyver=] between the movie and series, a character going from long hair to short hair in the transition doesn't seem like a big deal. Besides, reportedly the people who made the series and the people who made the movie didn't like each other very much... departing from the movie in such a visually obvious way might have been their [[StealthInsult subtle middle finger]].



*** In-universe, the Starfleet communication badges are supposed to have built-in Universal Translators.

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*** ** In-universe, the Starfleet communication badges are supposed to have built-in Universal Translators.



*** There really needs to be some sort of explanatory trope for this. It falls under the Mantra, really, but too many people blow that off because they think it means "Don't question anything, ever!" What it should mean, and maybe what we need a new trope for, is that "When adherence to accuracy would get in the way of being entertaining, in subject matter created with almost the sole intent to entertain, then it is both understandable and preferable that accuracy be asked to go take a smoke break."

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*** ** There really needs to be some sort of explanatory trope for this. It falls under the Mantra, really, but too many people blow that off because they think it means "Don't question anything, ever!" What it should mean, and maybe what we need a new trope for, is that "When adherence to accuracy would get in the way of being entertaining, in subject matter created with almost the sole intent to entertain, then it is both understandable and preferable that accuracy be asked to go take a smoke break."



*** The plates were shown to be just about useless in the same episode and subsequent episodes. Surely they could make something with all the knowledge of the Asgard. It would be too late for SG-1, but would have made the last few seasons of Atlantis.
*** What do you mean "useless"? O'Neill's life was saved by one of those plates ''in that very episode''.
*** The far more pressing question is why they never carry Hand Devices around in their backpacks for emergencies. SG-1 have captured at least one (Seth) and it's Naquadah lockout could quite easily be circumvented by Carter or Vala. Whilst the Goa'uld shielding is far weaker than the Ancient or Ori equivalent, it has been repeatedly shown to be resistent to bullets and energy weapons. There is even an instance of it holding up against the Spider Replicators (just before Apophis died) - realistically its only weakness is the lack of mobility and it's inability to block bladed weapons.
*** The few hand devices and personal shields the SGC has captured are probably squirreled away at Area 51 for study.
*** Also, lack of mobility with the shield is no small issue. Suppose that, say, Carter decides to carry around a shield and activates it when the team gets ambushed by enemy Jaffa. Now she's out in the open, unable to move ''OR'' shoot out of the shield (which means if her team needs help with fire support she's unable to give it), and the instant she drops the shield she's exposed to enemy fire. An enemy could sit with his weapon pointed at her, essentially pinning her down to one spot while the rest of her team is battling the other enemies. Remember that the standard modus operandi of the Goa'uld is to throw up the shield and stand back while his/her Jaffa body guards take care of the threat. It's not suited for a combat soldier, at least not in the configuration the Goa'uld designed them. Redesign it as a mobile shield and we'll talk.
*** You can only use Hand Devices if you've got a symbiont in you. Carter can just ''barely'' use one because she had one in her at one point, and her ability to do so is incredibly unreliable. Equipping SG teams with them as standard would be completely pointless.

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*** ** The plates were shown to be just about useless in the same episode and subsequent episodes. Surely they could make something with all the knowledge of the Asgard. It would be too late for SG-1, but would have made the last few seasons of Atlantis.
*** ** What do you mean "useless"? O'Neill's life was saved by one of those plates ''in that very episode''.
*** ** The far more pressing question is why they never carry Hand Devices around in their backpacks for emergencies. SG-1 have captured at least one (Seth) and it's Naquadah lockout could quite easily be circumvented by Carter or Vala. Whilst the Goa'uld shielding is far weaker than the Ancient or Ori equivalent, it has been repeatedly shown to be resistent to bullets and energy weapons. There is even an instance of it holding up against the Spider Replicators (just before Apophis died) - realistically its only weakness is the lack of mobility and it's inability to block bladed weapons.
*** ** The few hand devices and personal shields the SGC has captured are probably squirreled away at Area 51 for study.
*** ** Also, lack of mobility with the shield is no small issue. Suppose that, say, Carter decides to carry around a shield and activates it when the team gets ambushed by enemy Jaffa. Now she's out in the open, unable to move ''OR'' shoot out of the shield (which means if her team needs help with fire support she's unable to give it), and the instant she drops the shield she's exposed to enemy fire. An enemy could sit with his weapon pointed at her, essentially pinning her down to one spot while the rest of her team is battling the other enemies. Remember that the standard modus operandi of the Goa'uld is to throw up the shield and stand back while his/her Jaffa body guards take care of the threat. It's not suited for a combat soldier, at least not in the configuration the Goa'uld designed them. Redesign it as a mobile shield and we'll talk.
*** ** You can only use Hand Devices if you've got a symbiont in you. Carter can just ''barely'' use one because she had one in her at one point, and her ability to do so is incredibly unreliable. Equipping SG teams with them as standard would be completely pointless.



*** The Asgard are also vastly superior in terms of FTL travel. In "Unnatural Selection" Thor's ship tows the ''Prometheus'' all the way from who-knows-where in deep space to the planet Earth in mere seconds, then tows them all the way to the Asgard galaxy in mere hours, all without any refuelling in between. By contrast, the Ancients had to rely on the Stargate system which required massive starships like the ''Destiny'' to spend millions of years seeding the galaxy with gates, while periodically dipping into the corona of a star to recharge the batteries.
*** The Asgard are vastly superior ''now'', not back then. ''Destiny'' was probably flying around before the Asgard even ''had'' FTL. Ancient vessels are still far and away faster than Asgard ships. Atlantis is ten-thousand years old and can still outpace an Asgard vessel.
*** "The Asgard are vastly superior ''now'', not back then." Not the point. The point is they have advanced from where they were before, which counters the point that they have made no advancement since the time of the Four Races. I don't deny that the Ancients were definitely more technologically advanced than the Asgard. That fact is consistent across all continuities. But just because they were less advanced than the Ancients doesn't mean they were "useless" in comparison. It's possible that the alliance of the Four Great Races was based on something other than mere technological superiority. (Also, the fact that the Asgard were still around long after the Ancients were wiped out has to count for something.) Recall also that ''Stargate Atlantis'' was created quite some time after the Asgard's technology level was already established in ''Stargate SG-1''. It's hardly the Asgard's fault that ''Atlantis'' writers got a little lazy with their continuity.

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*** ** The Asgard are also vastly superior in terms of FTL travel. In "Unnatural Selection" Thor's ship tows the ''Prometheus'' all the way from who-knows-where in deep space to the planet Earth in mere seconds, then tows them all the way to the Asgard galaxy in mere hours, all without any refuelling in between. By contrast, the Ancients had to rely on the Stargate system which required massive starships like the ''Destiny'' to spend millions of years seeding the galaxy with gates, while periodically dipping into the corona of a star to recharge the batteries.
*** ** The Asgard are vastly superior ''now'', not back then. ''Destiny'' was probably flying around before the Asgard even ''had'' FTL. Ancient vessels are still far and away faster than Asgard ships. Atlantis is ten-thousand years old and can still outpace an Asgard vessel.
*** ** "The Asgard are vastly superior ''now'', not back then." Not the point. The point is they have advanced from where they were before, which counters the point that they have made no advancement since the time of the Four Races. I don't deny that the Ancients were definitely more technologically advanced than the Asgard. That fact is consistent across all continuities. But just because they were less advanced than the Ancients doesn't mean they were "useless" in comparison. It's possible that the alliance of the Four Great Races was based on something other than mere technological superiority. (Also, the fact that the Asgard were still around long after the Ancients were wiped out has to count for something.) Recall also that ''Stargate Atlantis'' was created quite some time after the Asgard's technology level was already established in ''Stargate SG-1''. It's hardly the Asgard's fault that ''Atlantis'' writers got a little lazy with their continuity.



*** When has it been stated that ''Destiny's'' shields are superior to Asgard modern shields? We haven't seen the ''Destiny'' in battle yet. So far all the shield has done is keep the air in, and even then, a fair amount of air still slips out (compare to an ''Atlantis'' episode where the Daedalus' shields were able to keep an exposed hangar completely pressurised for an extended period of time). The only hint of advanced tech on the ship is that it is able to "think" for itself, a system which I assume was put in place more because it was intended to be an unmanned ship.
*** Did you miss the part where the ship '''flew through a freaking sun'''? ''Nothing'' in the Milky Way galaxy has been shown capable of something like that.
*** And whose to say an Asgard ship couldn't fly through a sun with a strong enough power source? True, when a Wraith virus took over the ''Daedalus'' and tried to fly into into a sun, they were in trouble, but compare that to a later episode when the ''Daedalus'', powered by a ZPM, could use its shields to deflect a sun burst. The Destiny has the advantage that it's specifically design to draw power from suns. The longer it spends in the sun, the more powerful its shields are. Give an Asgard ship unlimited power and it could probably fly through a sun too.
*** 1. We have no idea what the energy output of something like an Ori Beam weapon is. None whatsoever. We can estimate a lower limit based on the energy required to tear through a Ha'tak's mass, but it's a lower limit. The actual energy released could easily be far higher than the energy absorbed during a short visit to a star's corona. 2. We do know of at least one thing capable of surviving in a star. Naquadah, as seen in Exodus (which is apparently capable of surviving even core temperatures, which are much higher).
*** Not knowing the upper limit doesn't necessarily mean that it's extremely high, either. It's just like those facetious arguments that [[SpiderMan May Parker]] is the strongest being in the Marvel Universe because we've never seen an upper limit to her abilities.
*** I object to the adjective "easily." Stars are... energetic. And hot. Having said that, I seem to recall an ''SG-1'' episode where Jacob hid a Ha'tak in the "outer layer" of a star to hide from a System Lord's sensors (and they lasted for a while, not just thirty sweaty seconds). If I'm remembering that episode correctly, then skimming through a star might not be the most impressive feat ever, in-universe.
*** A Season 3 episode of ''Atlantis'' shows the ''Daedalus'' taking a Coronal Mass Ejection directly to their shields and holding for a while. It's powered by a ZPM, and takes the hit pretty well. Assuming there's some degradation of the technology between Asgard ships, and being installed on inferior Human ships, it's not entirely unreasonable to think the Asgard ships would be very capable of performing similar manoeuvres to the ''Destiny''.
*** The difference could be attributed to the different types of technology. Asgard shields eventually degrade over time regardless of the amount of power you pump into them. Ancient shields always stay at 100% until the required power runs out (so an Asgard shield has 100 power and 100 resiliency, while an Ancient shield just has 200 power and stays at 200 until the power runs out). Rush refers to it when he's trying to channel more power into ''Destiny'''s shields at one point -- the problem with the attacks the ship was taking is that they're depleting the power that ''Destiny'' is funnelling into the shields, not that the shields themselves are degrading. Based on that, if ''Destiny'' had enough power stored up (and we know that it does), it could survive in a sun for an extended period of time to recharge while an Asgard-based shield would degrade even with a ZPM installed.

to:

*** ** When has it been stated that ''Destiny's'' shields are superior to Asgard modern shields? We haven't seen the ''Destiny'' in battle yet. So far all the shield has done is keep the air in, and even then, a fair amount of air still slips out (compare to an ''Atlantis'' episode where the Daedalus' shields were able to keep an exposed hangar completely pressurised for an extended period of time). The only hint of advanced tech on the ship is that it is able to "think" for itself, a system which I assume was put in place more because it was intended to be an unmanned ship.
*** ** Did you miss the part where the ship '''flew through a freaking sun'''? ''Nothing'' in the Milky Way galaxy has been shown capable of something like that.
*** ** And whose to say an Asgard ship couldn't fly through a sun with a strong enough power source? True, when a Wraith virus took over the ''Daedalus'' and tried to fly into into a sun, they were in trouble, but compare that to a later episode when the ''Daedalus'', powered by a ZPM, could use its shields to deflect a sun burst. The Destiny has the advantage that it's specifically design to draw power from suns. The longer it spends in the sun, the more powerful its shields are. Give an Asgard ship unlimited power and it could probably fly through a sun too.
*** ** 1. We have no idea what the energy output of something like an Ori Beam weapon is. None whatsoever. We can estimate a lower limit based on the energy required to tear through a Ha'tak's mass, but it's a lower limit. The actual energy released could easily be far higher than the energy absorbed during a short visit to a star's corona. 2. We do know of at least one thing capable of surviving in a star. Naquadah, as seen in Exodus (which is apparently capable of surviving even core temperatures, which are much higher).
*** ** Not knowing the upper limit doesn't necessarily mean that it's extremely high, either. It's just like those facetious arguments that [[SpiderMan May Parker]] is the strongest being in the Marvel Universe because we've never seen an upper limit to her abilities.
*** ** I object to the adjective "easily." Stars are... energetic. And hot. Having said that, I seem to recall an ''SG-1'' episode where Jacob hid a Ha'tak in the "outer layer" of a star to hide from a System Lord's sensors (and they lasted for a while, not just thirty sweaty seconds). If I'm remembering that episode correctly, then skimming through a star might not be the most impressive feat ever, in-universe.
*** ** A Season 3 episode of ''Atlantis'' shows the ''Daedalus'' taking a Coronal Mass Ejection directly to their shields and holding for a while. It's powered by a ZPM, and takes the hit pretty well. Assuming there's some degradation of the technology between Asgard ships, and being installed on inferior Human ships, it's not entirely unreasonable to think the Asgard ships would be very capable of performing similar manoeuvres to the ''Destiny''.
*** ** The difference could be attributed to the different types of technology. Asgard shields eventually degrade over time regardless of the amount of power you pump into them. Ancient shields always stay at 100% until the required power runs out (so an Asgard shield has 100 power and 100 resiliency, while an Ancient shield just has 200 power and stays at 200 until the power runs out). Rush refers to it when he's trying to channel more power into ''Destiny'''s shields at one point -- the problem with the attacks the ship was taking is that they're depleting the power that ''Destiny'' is funnelling into the shields, not that the shields themselves are degrading. Based on that, if ''Destiny'' had enough power stored up (and we know that it does), it could survive in a sun for an extended period of time to recharge while an Asgard-based shield would degrade even with a ZPM installed.



*** This has been pointed out in several instances by O'Neill, Jackson, and as pointed out, Shepard, from ''Atlantis''. This troper suspects that this is the point that the writers were trying to establish, that the Ancients, for all of their technology, were as flawed anyone else, and that technological superiority is no guarantee of moral superiority or even cleverness. The Ancients, introduced as god-like in capacity, are eventually revealed to be as foolish as mortals, and no one is immune to hubris.
*** Or, the writers simply wanted to show how heroic the Earth humans (Tau'ri) are. This can be difficult when you have an established race of actually benevolent people (which the Ancients were originally portrayed as).

to:

*** ** This has been pointed out in several instances by O'Neill, Jackson, and as pointed out, Shepard, from ''Atlantis''. This troper suspects that this is the point that the writers were trying to establish, that the Ancients, for all of their technology, were as flawed anyone else, and that technological superiority is no guarantee of moral superiority or even cleverness. The Ancients, introduced as god-like in capacity, are eventually revealed to be as foolish as mortals, and no one is immune to hubris.
*** ** Or, the writers simply wanted to show how heroic the Earth humans (Tau'ri) are. This can be difficult when you have an established race of actually benevolent people (which the Ancients were originally portrayed as).



*** No, no, that covers it perfectly if you consider the whole thing as a rewind. Teal'c's molecules would have cycled out, yeah... but been replaced by his current molecules. Since his current molecules are staying, they aren't being cycled out (backwards) during the rewind.

to:

*** ** No, no, that covers it perfectly if you consider the whole thing as a rewind. Teal'c's molecules would have cycled out, yeah... but been replaced by his current molecules. Since his current molecules are staying, they aren't being cycled out (backwards) during the rewind.



*** You know, except for calling the character "Tiruku"...
*** Lies, "Tiruku" is the greatest thing ever.
*** They show ''Stargate'' in Japan? Awesome!

to:

*** ** You know, except for calling the character "Tiruku"...
*** ** Lies, "Tiruku" is the greatest thing ever.
*** ** They show ''Stargate'' in Japan? Awesome!



*** Even if it ''does'' end in "s" " 's " is proper, although it's become accepted (if not ''technically'' correct) for folks to leave off the "s" on singular possessives; lord knows you hear it when you say it, at least in the dialect of English I grew up with. It's not like English needs any more bizarre grammar rules.
*** One way to get an apostrophe that close to the end: "The apostrophes in most contractions replace a single letter, but can't's apostrophe replaces two."

to:

*** ** Even if it ''does'' end in "s" " 's " is proper, although it's become accepted (if not ''technically'' correct) for folks to leave off the "s" on singular possessives; lord knows you hear it when you say it, at least in the dialect of English I grew up with. It's not like English needs any more bizarre grammar rules.
*** ** One way to get an apostrophe that close to the end: "The apostrophes in most contractions replace a single letter, but can't's apostrophe replaces two."



*** Just to be pedantic, 100 light-years would not be nearly long enough to get to another galazy. IIRC, the Milkey Way itself is about 100,000 light-years in diameter, and the next-nearest Galaxy - Andromeda - is something like two-and-a-half million light-years away.

to:

*** ** Just to be pedantic, 100 light-years would not be nearly long enough to get to another galazy. IIRC, the Milkey Way itself is about 100,000 light-years in diameter, and the next-nearest Galaxy - Andromeda - is something like two-and-a-half million light-years away.



*** But even that doesn't make sense, because modern constellations look nothing like they did when the Stargate network was supposedly built.
*** Remember how the original TV series pilot retconned the movie. Abydos was the closest system to Earth, and other systems couldn't be reached because the stars had moved enough that the Stargate coordinates no longer worked. Only when they learned to compensate for this drift could they get to other systems. In other words, the "constellations change" thing was taken into account from the very start.
*** Still, this doesn't answer the question of why the constellation symbols ''physically carved on the gates'' match the way these constellations appear now, not the way they looked millions of years ago.
*** Maybe it's not carved on the gates. Maybe it's nanotech that changes shape when corralitive updates are done. That would also explain why the POO on the gate was the original one when they used a different gate (but not why the old earth symbol changed to the at in the first place. head meet wall)

to:

*** ** But even that doesn't make sense, because modern constellations look nothing like they did when the Stargate network was supposedly built.
*** ** Remember how the original TV series pilot retconned the movie. Abydos was the closest system to Earth, and other systems couldn't be reached because the stars had moved enough that the Stargate coordinates no longer worked. Only when they learned to compensate for this drift could they get to other systems. In other words, the "constellations change" thing was taken into account from the very start.
*** ** Still, this doesn't answer the question of why the constellation symbols ''physically carved on the gates'' match the way these constellations appear now, not the way they looked millions of years ago.
*** ** Maybe it's not carved on the gates. Maybe it's nanotech that changes shape when corralitive updates are done. That would also explain why the POO on the gate was the original one when they used a different gate (but not why the old earth symbol changed to the at in the first place. head meet wall)



*** In ''Film/{{Stargate}}'', the Earth and Abydos Stargates had different symbols. However, ''Series/StargateSG1'' retconned away this aspect, making symbols on all Milky Way Stargates identical except for the point of origin, which is unique for every Stargate. But then, the movie placed Abydos "at the other side of the known universe"...
*** Since the Stargates are spread all over the galaxy and beyond, "at the other side of the known universe"), would the marking constellations look different from each different point?
*** A little clarification: "at the other side of the known universe" is a phrase from the movie, referring to Abydos, which is wrong in the series, where Abydos is one of the closest planets to Earth having a Stargate, and is within the Milky Way galaxy. Apart from it, Stargates are present in Pegasus, Ida (the Asgard home galaxy), probably in the Ori galaxy (how would the Priors travel otherwise?), and whatever galaxy ''Stargate Universe'' takes place in. But the Ancients had limited time to plant Stargates throughout galaxies, and with the limitations of the address system they could have linked 38 galaxies, at most.
*** It's confirmed that there are Stargates in the Ori galaxy the instant someone from the Ori galaxy gets to our galaxy via a Stargate...

to:

*** ** In ''Film/{{Stargate}}'', the Earth and Abydos Stargates had different symbols. However, ''Series/StargateSG1'' retconned away this aspect, making symbols on all Milky Way Stargates identical except for the point of origin, which is unique for every Stargate. But then, the movie placed Abydos "at the other side of the known universe"...
*** ** Since the Stargates are spread all over the galaxy and beyond, "at the other side of the known universe"), would the marking constellations look different from each different point?
*** ** A little clarification: "at the other side of the known universe" is a phrase from the movie, referring to Abydos, which is wrong in the series, where Abydos is one of the closest planets to Earth having a Stargate, and is within the Milky Way galaxy. Apart from it, Stargates are present in Pegasus, Ida (the Asgard home galaxy), probably in the Ori galaxy (how would the Priors travel otherwise?), and whatever galaxy ''Stargate Universe'' takes place in. But the Ancients had limited time to plant Stargates throughout galaxies, and with the limitations of the address system they could have linked 38 galaxies, at most.
*** ** It's confirmed that there are Stargates in the Ori galaxy the instant someone from the Ori galaxy gets to our galaxy via a Stargate...



*** And let's face it, the movie was never meant to be anything more (aside from potentially a couple more movies) and when you make a series that is lasting 10 seasons (plus two spin-offs) there is going to need to be some serious retcon to keep things somewhat cohesive. They did the same thing with Star Trek over the years and now there is a much more cohesive overall universe that does not quite resemble what it was in the beginning.
*** I still like my hypothesis that I typed up somewhere else that, instead of the simple to explain but impractical "6 points to form 3 lines of position to get a fix in space plus a point of origin" system, that it's actually the identity, azimuth and elevation from two pulsars plus the point of origin as a procedural glyph. The point of origin symbol is unique on each gate to indicate what planet you're on. To dial a distant galaxy, you add an 8th symbol just before the point of origin as a sort of area code, as if to say this point between these two pulsars in this other galaxy. The Milky way system uses constellations as seen from Earth as letters in an alphanumeric alphabet because Earth is really important to the Ancients' history, but they don't mean the actual constellations themselves. Other galaxies use local constellations so that no two addresses can be alike.

to:

*** ** And let's face it, the movie was never meant to be anything more (aside from potentially a couple more movies) and when you make a series that is lasting 10 seasons (plus two spin-offs) there is going to need to be some serious retcon to keep things somewhat cohesive. They did the same thing with Star Trek over the years and now there is a much more cohesive overall universe that does not quite resemble what it was in the beginning.
*** ** I still like my hypothesis that I typed up somewhere else that, instead of the simple to explain but impractical "6 points to form 3 lines of position to get a fix in space plus a point of origin" system, that it's actually the identity, azimuth and elevation from two pulsars plus the point of origin as a procedural glyph. The point of origin symbol is unique on each gate to indicate what planet you're on. To dial a distant galaxy, you add an 8th symbol just before the point of origin as a sort of area code, as if to say this point between these two pulsars in this other galaxy. The Milky way system uses constellations as seen from Earth as letters in an alphanumeric alphabet because Earth is really important to the Ancients' history, but they don't mean the actual constellations themselves. Other galaxies use local constellations so that no two addresses can be alike.



*** That sort of misses the point. The question I'm asking is, when you step through a Stargate, undergo "molecular deconstruction" and then get reassembled at the other side, is that person on the other side still ''you'', or just a copy of you, while you are irrevocably gone?
*** That is an interesting question, but perhaps we should go into on the TeleportersAndTransporters page?
*** In the movie and early episodes of SG-1, people were half-frozen and slingshotted out of the Stargate. This implies transportation. I'm not sure, but early on they might have even mentioned sensations during the transport.
*** IIRC, the story had no transporter feature - the gates created a stable wormhole that you just walked through. Later on, however, they decided to make it into some kind of teleporter system.
*** The whole "Stargate is a kind of transporter" thing has some other problems. We've been told that ''wormholes'' (not specifically ''stargates'') are one-way for matter, but bidirectional for energy. But if a Stargate works, as it is implied, by converting matter into energy, transmitting it, then reconstructing it on the other end, the reasons for it only going one way break down. We can of course, come up with other reasons for this (That it's a property of the gate mechanism, not the wormhole, or that the "bandwidth" is asymmetric: if there's not enough bandwidth for a radio signal, you get some static. With matter, you arrive without your kidneys) but they don't jive with the on-screen explanations.
*** The bandwidth issue would actually explain it. Comparatively small upload is enough for anything we'd treat as energy. The amount of energy in a physical object is humongous compared to this, so the wormhole can't send such a huge amount the other way.
*** From what I gather the Stargate disassembles you and sends you through the wormhole atom by atom. You are reassemble with everything in the same position, with no possibility of duplication. The Soul/Death issue is avoided.
*** Perhaps it's just a safety precaution hardwired into the gate network. It's known there are dozens of safety precautions the gate system has - it being a plot point at one time that the Earth's custom built interface ignores quite a few of them, including not making a wormhole which goes through a star. It makes sense that after a [[BodyHorror single nasty incident]], the Ancients would quickly just make it impossible at all times to have matter travel in both directions.
*** In one episode Teal'c gets "trapped in the buffer" of a Stargate, so presumably there is transference rather than copying, otherwise they'd just have downloaded a copy and erased the original.
*** It would be impossible to create a wormhole to transport a person in one piece (more energy then there is in the entire universe). A stargate creates a very small, stable wormhole (a feat in and of itself) and then the gate identifies the position of every particle in your body, breaks it down, transports it through the wormhole and then reconstructs the person on the other side, including the masses momentum. Electromagnetic radiation is immune to the one way restriction, most likely because the gates can only handle deconstruction/construction in one direction but electromagnetic radiation is already subatomic particles.
*** Lets say the gate acts differently on fermions and bosons (look these up on wikipedia if you don't know what they are, I think this is the distinction the first poster was trying to find when saying "matter" and "energy", which wouldn't strictly be correct). Since photons and (conjecturally) gravitons are bosons, they are transmitted back through the gate (as seen in the episode with the black hole). People are made of electrons and nucleons, which are fermions, and it is established that these only go one way. Whether Cooper pairs of electrons can travel backwards through the gate, and what the effect of supersymmetry are left as exercises for the reader.

to:

*** ** That sort of misses the point. The question I'm asking is, when you step through a Stargate, undergo "molecular deconstruction" and then get reassembled at the other side, is that person on the other side still ''you'', or just a copy of you, while you are irrevocably gone?
*** ** That is an interesting question, but perhaps we should go into on the TeleportersAndTransporters page?
*** ** In the movie and early episodes of SG-1, people were half-frozen and slingshotted out of the Stargate. This implies transportation. I'm not sure, but early on they might have even mentioned sensations during the transport.
*** ** IIRC, the story had no transporter feature - the gates created a stable wormhole that you just walked through. Later on, however, they decided to make it into some kind of teleporter system.
*** ** The whole "Stargate is a kind of transporter" thing has some other problems. We've been told that ''wormholes'' (not specifically ''stargates'') are one-way for matter, but bidirectional for energy. But if a Stargate works, as it is implied, by converting matter into energy, transmitting it, then reconstructing it on the other end, the reasons for it only going one way break down. We can of course, come up with other reasons for this (That it's a property of the gate mechanism, not the wormhole, or that the "bandwidth" is asymmetric: if there's not enough bandwidth for a radio signal, you get some static. With matter, you arrive without your kidneys) but they don't jive with the on-screen explanations.
*** ** The bandwidth issue would actually explain it. Comparatively small upload is enough for anything we'd treat as energy. The amount of energy in a physical object is humongous compared to this, so the wormhole can't send such a huge amount the other way.
*** ** From what I gather the Stargate disassembles you and sends you through the wormhole atom by atom. You are reassemble with everything in the same position, with no possibility of duplication. The Soul/Death issue is avoided.
*** ** Perhaps it's just a safety precaution hardwired into the gate network. It's known there are dozens of safety precautions the gate system has - it being a plot point at one time that the Earth's custom built interface ignores quite a few of them, including not making a wormhole which goes through a star. It makes sense that after a [[BodyHorror single nasty incident]], the Ancients would quickly just make it impossible at all times to have matter travel in both directions.
*** ** In one episode Teal'c gets "trapped in the buffer" of a Stargate, so presumably there is transference rather than copying, otherwise they'd just have downloaded a copy and erased the original.
*** ** It would be impossible to create a wormhole to transport a person in one piece (more energy then there is in the entire universe). A stargate creates a very small, stable wormhole (a feat in and of itself) and then the gate identifies the position of every particle in your body, breaks it down, transports it through the wormhole and then reconstructs the person on the other side, including the masses momentum. Electromagnetic radiation is immune to the one way restriction, most likely because the gates can only handle deconstruction/construction in one direction but electromagnetic radiation is already subatomic particles.
*** ** Lets say the gate acts differently on fermions and bosons (look these up on wikipedia if you don't know what they are, I think this is the distinction the first poster was trying to find when saying "matter" and "energy", which wouldn't strictly be correct). Since photons and (conjecturally) gravitons are bosons, they are transmitted back through the gate (as seen in the episode with the black hole). People are made of electrons and nucleons, which are fermions, and it is established that these only go one way. Whether Cooper pairs of electrons can travel backwards through the gate, and what the effect of supersymmetry are left as exercises for the reader.



*** I got the further impression that at a certain point the gate itself would forcibly pull you through if you put too much of your mass into the entrance, but that is pure conjecture on my part.

to:

*** ** I got the further impression that at a certain point the gate itself would forcibly pull you through if you put too much of your mass into the entrance, but that is pure conjecture on my part.



*** And Walter has lots of fun EngagingChevrons.

to:

*** ** And Walter has lots of fun EngagingChevrons.



*** For the rare cases when eight-chevron addresses must be used, the DHD can be temporarily disconnected.
*** That always bugged me. Couldn't they allow eight-chevron addresses by hitting the big red button first, to tell the DHD "I'm doing a long-distance dial," then the eight glyphs, then the big red button again?
*** It was demonstrated in one episode (when they used it for a Tok'ra funeral ceremony) that pushing the big red button before pushing any other buttons just activates the wormhole without a destination, causing an unstable vortex and then immediately shutting down again. Also, pretty sure it was mentioned that a regular DHD doesn't have enough power to connect to another galaxy on its own.

to:

*** ** For the rare cases when eight-chevron addresses must be used, the DHD can be temporarily disconnected.
*** ** That always bugged me. Couldn't they allow eight-chevron addresses by hitting the big red button first, to tell the DHD "I'm doing a long-distance dial," then the eight glyphs, then the big red button again?
*** ** It was demonstrated in one episode (when they used it for a Tok'ra funeral ceremony) that pushing the big red button before pushing any other buttons just activates the wormhole without a destination, causing an unstable vortex and then immediately shutting down again. Also, pretty sure it was mentioned that a regular DHD doesn't have enough power to connect to another galaxy on its own.



*** The people who hijacked the Antarctic Stargate in "Touchstone" repaired the DHD. And I'm not proposing to allow someone to press it directly; it could be concealed and controlled via the dialling computer.
*** The Antarctic Stargate's DHD was said to have run out of power ''after'' that. It was obviously an attempt by the writers to cover what would otherwise be a plot hole, but it does explain the problem away. Of course now that Earth has spaceships there's no reason we can't pick up a spare one from another planet.
*** Yes there is: It would leave that planet without a DHD. This is just one tropers opinion, but the Ancients probably designed each DHD to only work with a specific Stargate to prevent this from happening. Of course, Stargates can be manually dialled with the help of the circus strongman or friendly neighbourhood Jaffa, so...

to:

*** ** The people who hijacked the Antarctic Stargate in "Touchstone" repaired the DHD. And I'm not proposing to allow someone to press it directly; it could be concealed and controlled via the dialling computer.
*** ** The Antarctic Stargate's DHD was said to have run out of power ''after'' that. It was obviously an attempt by the writers to cover what would otherwise be a plot hole, but it does explain the problem away. Of course now that Earth has spaceships there's no reason we can't pick up a spare one from another planet.
*** ** Yes there is: It would leave that planet without a DHD. This is just one tropers opinion, but the Ancients probably designed each DHD to only work with a specific Stargate to prevent this from happening. Of course, Stargates can be manually dialled with the help of the circus strongman or friendly neighbourhood Jaffa, so...



*** That's a good point. Anyone and his mother can activate a Stargate that's connected to a DHD so long as they know at least one valid address. But with the SGC's computerized system the Stargate can ''only'' be activated from one place: the gate control room. With this setup the SGC has much greater control over how, when, and why the stargate can be activated and who can do so. They can install any number of security measures, such as identity scanners or password programs, making it next to impossible for anyone to activate the gate without official permission (or at least not without someone finding out about it). And when you have dudes like the [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Reetou Reetou]] and the [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stragoth Stragoth]] running around, preventing unauthorized gate activations is a top priority.
*** Another advantage: efficiency. The [[MacGyvering MacGyver'ed]] DHD may dial slower than a regular DHD but it also does it ''automatically'', meaning you can just log into the computer, select "dial Abydos", and let it run. You don't have to worry about "wrong numbers" (so to speak) like you would if you had to use a DHD to dial the gate up by hand (and considering how much it costs just to turn the gate on, the SGC would definitely want to make sure the address is dialled right the first time). Also, exploring the galaxy via stargate means keeping a database of '''every single world you've ever visited or plan to visit'''. No one human has the mental capacity to memorize each and every one of those addresses, so having a digital database of every single gate address to select from every time you dial up the gate would be invaluable.
*** No one, except Rodney [=McKay=]!

to:

*** ** That's a good point. Anyone and his mother can activate a Stargate that's connected to a DHD so long as they know at least one valid address. But with the SGC's computerized system the Stargate can ''only'' be activated from one place: the gate control room. With this setup the SGC has much greater control over how, when, and why the stargate can be activated and who can do so. They can install any number of security measures, such as identity scanners or password programs, making it next to impossible for anyone to activate the gate without official permission (or at least not without someone finding out about it). And when you have dudes like the [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Reetou Reetou]] and the [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stragoth Stragoth]] running around, preventing unauthorized gate activations is a top priority.
*** ** Another advantage: efficiency. The [[MacGyvering MacGyver'ed]] DHD may dial slower than a regular DHD but it also does it ''automatically'', meaning you can just log into the computer, select "dial Abydos", and let it run. You don't have to worry about "wrong numbers" (so to speak) like you would if you had to use a DHD to dial the gate up by hand (and considering how much it costs just to turn the gate on, the SGC would definitely want to make sure the address is dialled right the first time). Also, exploring the galaxy via stargate means keeping a database of '''every single world you've ever visited or plan to visit'''. No one human has the mental capacity to memorize each and every one of those addresses, so having a digital database of every single gate address to select from every time you dial up the gate would be invaluable.
*** ** No one, except Rodney [=McKay=]!



*** This has always bugged me - if your DHD has 37 glyphs plus one point of origin glyph, but addresses can have any combination of six out of '''''38''''' glyphs, how do you dial a planet that uses the one missing glyph?
*** You don't, simple as that. Probably for good reason, like going through a sun or something. Probably have to bounce through a midpoint.

to:

*** ** This has always bugged me - if your DHD has 37 glyphs plus one point of origin glyph, but addresses can have any combination of six out of '''''38''''' glyphs, how do you dial a planet that uses the one missing glyph?
*** ** You don't, simple as that. Probably for good reason, like going through a sun or something. Probably have to bounce through a midpoint.



*** All right, why didn't they use the ''Prometheus'' immediately after "Unnatural Selection" to pick an unused Stargate, and then return the Russian one?
*** The Prometheus didn't get a ''reliable'' hyperdrive until season 8: all the homegrown or Goa'uld ones they gave it before that either blew up or were too underpowered for it to do anything but patrol around earth.
*** Okay, but go even later to season 9 or 10 and they're still acting like they need the Russian Stargate: the Russians use it as leverage to get a spaceship. Arguably, at this point the threat is more that the Russian Stargate program would interfere with theirs, since the network treats gates on the same planet as identical.
*** Except that the Russians managed to find a way around this a third of the way into season 4 ("Watergate"), and they only picked it up at the beginning of the season.
*** Better yet, why not just pick up several gates and allow each nation to run their own Stargate program? Admittedly, several gates on one planet could present a problem, but as long as they schedule their departures properly, it could work. As for returning teams, they could have all teams head to the Alpha site first (this would also deal with any issue regarding teams needing to return early for whatever reason) and arrange a "return to earth" schedule.
*** While there's no excuse during SG-1's run, at the end of Atlantis, the titular city [[spoiler: returns to Earth, and becomes the dominant gate there. It pretty much cuts out Russia using the Giza gate as leverage, since Atlantis is an International Earth expedition, although it might still be under jurisdiction of the U.S. military. As Atlantis was brought to U.S. territory by U.S. personnel, though, it could justifiably be considered U.S. property at that point.]]
*** Wasn't it landed in international waters by an international team?
*** [[spoiler: At the end of the episode they say how they're going to return Atlantis to Pegasus, so that's moot.]]
*** Note that the Russians sold their gate to the US for the short-lived Korelev. After that, they have no real leverage and don't act like it.

to:

*** ** All right, why didn't they use the ''Prometheus'' immediately after "Unnatural Selection" to pick an unused Stargate, and then return the Russian one?
*** ** The Prometheus didn't get a ''reliable'' hyperdrive until season 8: all the homegrown or Goa'uld ones they gave it before that either blew up or were too underpowered for it to do anything but patrol around earth.
*** ** Okay, but go even later to season 9 or 10 and they're still acting like they need the Russian Stargate: the Russians use it as leverage to get a spaceship. Arguably, at this point the threat is more that the Russian Stargate program would interfere with theirs, since the network treats gates on the same planet as identical.
*** ** Except that the Russians managed to find a way around this a third of the way into season 4 ("Watergate"), and they only picked it up at the beginning of the season.
*** ** Better yet, why not just pick up several gates and allow each nation to run their own Stargate program? Admittedly, several gates on one planet could present a problem, but as long as they schedule their departures properly, it could work. As for returning teams, they could have all teams head to the Alpha site first (this would also deal with any issue regarding teams needing to return early for whatever reason) and arrange a "return to earth" schedule.
*** ** While there's no excuse during SG-1's run, at the end of Atlantis, the titular city [[spoiler: returns to Earth, and becomes the dominant gate there. It pretty much cuts out Russia using the Giza gate as leverage, since Atlantis is an International Earth expedition, although it might still be under jurisdiction of the U.S. military. As Atlantis was brought to U.S. territory by U.S. personnel, though, it could justifiably be considered U.S. property at that point.]]
*** ** Wasn't it landed in international waters by an international team?
*** ** [[spoiler: At the end of the episode they say how they're going to return Atlantis to Pegasus, so that's moot.]]
*** ** Note that the Russians sold their gate to the US for the short-lived Korelev. After that, they have no real leverage and don't act like it.



*** It makes all the difference to the people who live in ''that'' dimension/universe.
*** Exactly. It's like saying "Well, if there are other continents, who cares if all the people on this continent die? There'll still be people, with the same number of limbs and heads as the people here, so nothing will change."
*** Teal'c said it best: "Ours is the only reality of consequence."

to:

*** ** It makes all the difference to the people who live in ''that'' dimension/universe.
*** ** Exactly. It's like saying "Well, if there are other continents, who cares if all the people on this continent die? There'll still be people, with the same number of limbs and heads as the people here, so nothing will change."
*** ** Teal'c said it best: "Ours is the only reality of consequence."



*** That is because you are (most likely) American.
*** Don't know about that guy, but I'm british and it's been bugging me too.
*** Nemec could be derived from Czech "Němec" (meaning German), just without diacritics.

to:

*** ** That is because you are (most likely) American.
*** ** Don't know about that guy, but I'm british and it's been bugging me too.
*** ** Nemec could be derived from Czech "Němec" (meaning German), just without diacritics.



*** Nemec only had a one year contract (as they all did) so he was let go for the more popular character/actor when Shanks came back. There was talk of keeping him, but they had a rule of 4 to a team. (Which they "forgot" when Vala showed up) For whatever reason he wasn't considered to be a reoccurring character like Janet.

to:

*** ** Nemec only had a one year contract (as they all did) so he was let go for the more popular character/actor when Shanks came back. There was talk of keeping him, but they had a rule of 4 to a team. (Which they "forgot" when Vala showed up) For whatever reason he wasn't considered to be a reoccurring character like Janet.



*** According to man himself Shanks left because he didn't like what the writers were doing with his character. He left looking for greener pastures & finding none, came back. The bring back Daniel campaign helped too. He still wasn't happy with the writing for Daniel and that shows in his acting sometimes.

to:

*** ** According to man himself Shanks left because he didn't like what the writers were doing with his character. He left looking for greener pastures & finding none, came back. The bring back Daniel campaign helped too. He still wasn't happy with the writing for Daniel and that shows in his acting sometimes.



*** If that's the case, why do the !Egyptian Goa'uld use Graecophone nameforms? If they really ''were'' the Egyptian gods, Osiris would be Asar, Hathor would have called herself Het-Heru, and Apophis would have been Apep instead. And yet, they weren't. Why?
*** They sometimes use alternate names. Notably, in [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/The_Curse The Curse]] Osiris asks Daniel where his (her?) brother Setesh (Seth) was.
*** It's because none of the characters ''know'' unequivocally. The only sources of information are distorted ancient myth, and the Goa'uld, who have been bulls***ing so long they believe their own press by now.
*** Another problem: If ancient Earth mythology is based on (for lack of a better term) "Goa'uld politics", why are there different mythologies for every Earth culture? We've seen more than once that a single Goa'uld is capable of dominating entire planets (probably several planets) so why is there a separate Goa'uld-based mythology for each individual Earth culture?
*** The RPG explains that as Earth was was a valuable resource to the Goa'uld (basically a source of human slaves and breeding stocks for their personal worlds), it was divided between them, and as such, each of the major Earth cultures got its own pantheon of "local gods". And they're called what they're called because those are conventional English names for the gods, so this is the result of the Main/TranslationConvention behind Main/AliensSpeakingEnglish at work. For all we know, the names of the System Lords may "really" sound completely different from both English and localized names.
*** It's worth noting that there are historical parallels here. For example, in Edo-period Japan one of the policies of the shogunate was the sankin kōtai system. It required every daimyo to periodically move between the capital city of Edo and his han (domain), typically spending alternate years in each place. The whole purpose of the system was to control the daimyos and keep them loyal to the shogun. The idea was that constant travel to and from the capital would put a financial strain on the daimyos (since they would have to spend ridiculous amounts of money maintaining two different lavish residences) so they wouldn't go to war, as well as to encourage trade and economic activity through frequent travel. The shogun also required the wife and heir of each daimyo to remain in the capital year-round as hostages in case any of the daimyos got any funny ideas about independence. King Louis XIV of France also had a similar policy. French nobility had to spend six months out of every year at the Palace at Versailles to assist the King in his duties of state and personal functions (parties, banquets, etc.). We know that Ra ruled over the System Lords for many years. It's possible he instituted a similar system during that time using Earth as the "capital" of his empire.
*** Just to expand on this, how come all the Goa'uld can speak English? I mena, call me daft of you like, but I can't see the Goa-uld passing for medieval European gentry (and even that wouldn't be close enough, 19th-centry European gentry?).
*** It's probably a case of TranslationConvention when the Goa'uld are among themselves or among their Jaffa/Lotars. Otherwise is just pure, shameless AliensSpeakingEnglish.

to:

*** ** If that's the case, why do the !Egyptian Goa'uld use Graecophone nameforms? If they really ''were'' the Egyptian gods, Osiris would be Asar, Hathor would have called herself Het-Heru, and Apophis would have been Apep instead. And yet, they weren't. Why?
*** ** They sometimes use alternate names. Notably, in [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/The_Curse The Curse]] Osiris asks Daniel where his (her?) brother Setesh (Seth) was.
*** ** It's because none of the characters ''know'' unequivocally. The only sources of information are distorted ancient myth, and the Goa'uld, who have been bulls***ing bulls**ing so long they believe their own press by now.
*** ** Another problem: If ancient Earth mythology is based on (for lack of a better term) "Goa'uld politics", why are there different mythologies for every Earth culture? We've seen more than once that a single Goa'uld is capable of dominating entire planets (probably several planets) so why is there a separate Goa'uld-based mythology for each individual Earth culture?
*** ** The RPG explains that as Earth was was a valuable resource to the Goa'uld (basically a source of human slaves and breeding stocks for their personal worlds), it was divided between them, and as such, each of the major Earth cultures got its own pantheon of "local gods". And they're called what they're called because those are conventional English names for the gods, so this is the result of the Main/TranslationConvention behind Main/AliensSpeakingEnglish at work. For all we know, the names of the System Lords may "really" sound completely different from both English and localized names.
*** ** It's worth noting that there are historical parallels here. For example, in Edo-period Japan one of the policies of the shogunate was the sankin kōtai system. It required every daimyo to periodically move between the capital city of Edo and his han (domain), typically spending alternate years in each place. The whole purpose of the system was to control the daimyos and keep them loyal to the shogun. The idea was that constant travel to and from the capital would put a financial strain on the daimyos (since they would have to spend ridiculous amounts of money maintaining two different lavish residences) so they wouldn't go to war, as well as to encourage trade and economic activity through frequent travel. The shogun also required the wife and heir of each daimyo to remain in the capital year-round as hostages in case any of the daimyos got any funny ideas about independence. King Louis XIV of France also had a similar policy. French nobility had to spend six months out of every year at the Palace at Versailles to assist the King in his duties of state and personal functions (parties, banquets, etc.). We know that Ra ruled over the System Lords for many years. It's possible he instituted a similar system during that time using Earth as the "capital" of his empire.
*** ** Just to expand on this, how come all the Goa'uld can speak English? I mena, call me daft of you like, but I can't see the Goa-uld passing for medieval European gentry (and even that wouldn't be close enough, 19th-centry European gentry?).
*** ** It's probably a case of TranslationConvention when the Goa'uld are among themselves or among their Jaffa/Lotars. Otherwise is just pure, shameless AliensSpeakingEnglish.



*** For that matter, the event horizon looks a bit on the blue side. Blue light scatters more through media like air and water.

to:

*** ** For that matter, the event horizon looks a bit on the blue side. Blue light scatters more through media like air and water.



*** Yes, in "Watergate" it is outright stated that surface tension prevents things that aren't trying to get through the gate from getting through. Thus, dialling out from a stargate submerged in water doesn't flood the other end.

to:

*** ** Yes, in "Watergate" it is outright stated that surface tension prevents things that aren't trying to get through the gate from getting through. Thus, dialling out from a stargate submerged in water doesn't flood the other end.



*** Assuming you ''could'' establish such a connection. It's been established that when Stargate dials its own address, it gets a busy signal- you can't dial your own planet.
*** Yes. It isn't possible to connect two Stargates that are located anywhere near each other. By extension, this also avoids the "infinite fall scenario" that is possible in ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}''.
*** However, with ''Series/StargateUniverse'' revealing that the ninth chevron is used to lock a gate address to a specific gate rather than it's location, it's possible that they might explore this scenario in the upcoming series.

to:

*** ** Assuming you ''could'' establish such a connection. It's been established that when Stargate dials its own address, it gets a busy signal- you can't dial your own planet.
*** ** Yes. It isn't possible to connect two Stargates that are located anywhere near each other. By extension, this also avoids the "infinite fall scenario" that is possible in ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}''.
*** ** However, with ''Series/StargateUniverse'' revealing that the ninth chevron is used to lock a gate address to a specific gate rather than it's location, it's possible that they might explore this scenario in the upcoming series.



*** They had the order of the glyphs, but how did they deduce that chevrons on the Stargate itself were ordered 7-1-2-3-9-8-4-5-6? And for that matter, how did they determine which chevron was the top one if it (retroactively) looks the same as the other eight?
*** Um...what? Seriously, I have no idea what you're talking about.
*** The question more or less boils down to "How did they know which end of the thing was "up"?" A gate's got nine or ten (can't recall which, but it's more than they use) chevrons, and you dial an address by lining symbol 1 up with chevron 1, and so forth. But there's not really a particular order to those chevrons. On a combination lock, you've got one mark at the top of the dial that means "Line the number you want up with this," but a Stargate's got ten of those instead of just one. But I think this goes back to the "How do you actually signal that you want the position the wheel is in now to count?" question: whenever you do the thing that means "I've got the wheel where I want it" (probably reversing direction), the "next" chevron lights up, which means you've only got to try dialing it once to deduce the location of the first six chevrons (It's only the seventh chevron that fails to lock if an address is invalid). And then three more tries to find which chevron is seventh.
*** Yes, I was wondering exactly that. (There are nine chevrons, by the way.) And in the series, the top chevron is easily determined because it's the only one that locks, others just light up. However, here's another question: how did they determine which side of the Stargate was the front if it looks symmetrical?
*** Uh, it isn't symmetrical that way: the back doesn't have the ring or the chevrons, it's just flat with some engraving on it. You just don't see it that often, is all.
*** And in [[TheMovie the original movie]], it was even easier to orient the Stargate: most chevrons have a \|_|/ shape, while the top one appears to have more of a \\|-|// shape. This is seen when Daniel identifies the seventh symbol in the address.
*** They spent 15 years, obviously, answering the "How do you actually signal that you want the position the wheel is in now to count?" question.
*** A possible explanation for how they discovered the order is that when the SG-1 dialled the stargate in 1969, there was a security camera watching. They would have seen the chevrons lighting up (And the order in which they did so), but the video quality might have been low enough that they couldn't make out details (Like which symbols were dialed).

to:

*** ** They had the order of the glyphs, but how did they deduce that chevrons on the Stargate itself were ordered 7-1-2-3-9-8-4-5-6? And for that matter, how did they determine which chevron was the top one if it (retroactively) looks the same as the other eight?
*** ** Um...what? Seriously, I have no idea what you're talking about.
*** ** The question more or less boils down to "How did they know which end of the thing was "up"?" A gate's got nine or ten (can't recall which, but it's more than they use) chevrons, and you dial an address by lining symbol 1 up with chevron 1, and so forth. But there's not really a particular order to those chevrons. On a combination lock, you've got one mark at the top of the dial that means "Line the number you want up with this," but a Stargate's got ten of those instead of just one. But I think this goes back to the "How do you actually signal that you want the position the wheel is in now to count?" question: whenever you do the thing that means "I've got the wheel where I want it" (probably reversing direction), the "next" chevron lights up, which means you've only got to try dialing it once to deduce the location of the first six chevrons (It's only the seventh chevron that fails to lock if an address is invalid). And then three more tries to find which chevron is seventh.
*** ** Yes, I was wondering exactly that. (There are nine chevrons, by the way.) And in the series, the top chevron is easily determined because it's the only one that locks, others just light up. However, here's another question: how did they determine which side of the Stargate was the front if it looks symmetrical?
*** ** Uh, it isn't symmetrical that way: the back doesn't have the ring or the chevrons, it's just flat with some engraving on it. You just don't see it that often, is all.
*** ** And in [[TheMovie the original movie]], it was even easier to orient the Stargate: most chevrons have a \|_|/ shape, while the top one appears to have more of a \\|-|// shape. This is seen when Daniel identifies the seventh symbol in the address.
*** ** They spent 15 years, obviously, answering the "How do you actually signal that you want the position the wheel is in now to count?" question.
*** ** A possible explanation for how they discovered the order is that when the SG-1 dialled the stargate in 1969, there was a security camera watching. They would have seen the chevrons lighting up (And the order in which they did so), but the video quality might have been low enough that they couldn't make out details (Like which symbols were dialed).



*** Actually, not always. In "The Torment of Tantalus", they power the Stargate from lightning. (A very [=BTTFish=] solution...)
*** And from ''car engines'' in 1969!
*** It's been established that the stargate's Unobtainium acts as a sort of capacitor for all sorts of energy. Basically they just had to throw any form of energy at it and wait until fully charged. Of course, as they didn't know that at first and as they surely didn't want to fry the supposedly delicate alien tech, they might have been wary to attempt a direct linkup to the nearest nuclear reactor...
*** It will absorb any form of energy, but it might not be absorbed efficiently. In 'Heroes', Carter claims that the gate consumes 25% more energy in the SGC than with a DHD.
*** It's also not all that safe to just plug the gate into any old power source. In a flashback from 'The Torment of Tantalus' Ernest tells Catherine that one of the generators exploded while they were trying to power up the gate back in the 1950s.

to:

*** ** Actually, not always. In "The Torment of Tantalus", they power the Stargate from lightning. (A very [=BTTFish=] solution...)
*** ** And from ''car engines'' in 1969!
*** ** It's been established that the stargate's Unobtainium acts as a sort of capacitor for all sorts of energy. Basically they just had to throw any form of energy at it and wait until fully charged. Of course, as they didn't know that at first and as they surely didn't want to fry the supposedly delicate alien tech, they might have been wary to attempt a direct linkup to the nearest nuclear reactor...
*** ** It will absorb any form of energy, but it might not be absorbed efficiently. In 'Heroes', Carter claims that the gate consumes 25% more energy in the SGC than with a DHD.
*** ** It's also not all that safe to just plug the gate into any old power source. In a flashback from 'The Torment of Tantalus' Ernest tells Catherine that one of the generators exploded while they were trying to power up the gate back in the 1950s.



*** Which is ''perfectly safe'' as long as the enemy doesn't remember that they live in a Hollywood Math universe where all encryption can be broken by any moderately smart person in the universe inside of eight hours, or two seconds before the deadline, whichever comes first. Oh, wait....

to:

*** ** Which is ''perfectly safe'' as long as the enemy doesn't remember that they live in a Hollywood Math universe where all encryption can be broken by any moderately smart person in the universe inside of eight hours, or two seconds before the deadline, whichever comes first. Oh, wait....



*** The Milky Way gates work fine in space. Remember when Carter blew up a sun? They're just not usually kept in space, probably because there's only about one Puddle Jumper in the entire Milky Way. Or... two, depending on how you count it when it went back in time. And then didn't. I don't know. Moebius just bugs me.
*** Any Stargate can be a space gate. Remember when they attached an external power supply to the gate, dialed it, and chucked it out the cargo bay into the black hole? We already know that naquadah is practically indestructible, why wouldn't it work in space?

to:

*** ** The Milky Way gates work fine in space. Remember when Carter blew up a sun? They're just not usually kept in space, probably because there's only about one Puddle Jumper in the entire Milky Way. Or... two, depending on how you count it when it went back in time. And then didn't. I don't know. Moebius just bugs me.
*** ** Any Stargate can be a space gate. Remember when they attached an external power supply to the gate, dialed it, and chucked it out the cargo bay into the black hole? We already know that naquadah is practically indestructible, why wouldn't it work in space?



*** Who says every intermediate Gate is just floating in space with a couple Naquadah power packs on it? Furthermore, why leave behind the DHD when you steal the Gate for this bridge? And DHDs have the power source for the standard Stargate. Take the DHD apart to hardwire the power supply and dialing computer to the appropriate Gate, then place it in the right spot.
*** It seems to me that, 1.) information is transferred much faster than matter, and 2.) gate power requirements are logarithmic or exponential. Sending a gate twice as far might take four times as much power.
*** I'd regard the bridge as using the equivalent logic as a game of golf. One person is generally not able to hit the ball all the way to the green. Instead you hit the ball part the way and then from there you hit it again. The ability to hit a ball X metres 10 times is completely different from the ability to hit it 10*X metres in one go. In this case it'd be like the difference between having one golfer standing at the tee and trying to reach the green and having a whole bunch of golfers each hitting the ball to the next until it eventually gets there.

to:

*** ** Who says every intermediate Gate is just floating in space with a couple Naquadah power packs on it? Furthermore, why leave behind the DHD when you steal the Gate for this bridge? And DHDs have the power source for the standard Stargate. Take the DHD apart to hardwire the power supply and dialing computer to the appropriate Gate, then place it in the right spot.
*** ** It seems to me that, 1.) information is transferred much faster than matter, and 2.) gate power requirements are logarithmic or exponential. Sending a gate twice as far might take four times as much power.
*** ** I'd regard the bridge as using the equivalent logic as a game of golf. One person is generally not able to hit the ball all the way to the green. Instead you hit the ball part the way and then from there you hit it again. The ability to hit a ball X metres 10 times is completely different from the ability to hit it 10*X metres in one go. In this case it'd be like the difference between having one golfer standing at the tee and trying to reach the green and having a whole bunch of golfers each hitting the ball to the next until it eventually gets there.



*** For the most part the Ancients didn't go to war much--they were wiped out by a plague, with the exception of the Lanteans who didn't seem to be as smart as the MW-based Ancients.
*** Anubis's "call forwarding" device probably ''was'' Ancient in origin, given that all of his other above-Goa'uld-norm technology came from his knowledge of the Ancients. Most likely it's something they invented after abandoning Atlantis, though. And given that when they were living in Atlantis, any unauthorized use of the Stargate would surely have been by the Wraith, having the uninvited guests splatter against the shield would've been considered a nice bonus, not a shortcoming.

to:

*** ** For the most part the Ancients didn't go to war much--they were wiped out by a plague, with the exception of the Lanteans who didn't seem to be as smart as the MW-based Ancients.
*** ** Anubis's "call forwarding" device probably ''was'' Ancient in origin, given that all of his other above-Goa'uld-norm technology came from his knowledge of the Ancients. Most likely it's something they invented after abandoning Atlantis, though. And given that when they were living in Atlantis, any unauthorized use of the Stargate would surely have been by the Wraith, having the uninvited guests splatter against the shield would've been considered a nice bonus, not a shortcoming.



*** There ''is'' a way to "screen unwanted calls". When the Ancients left Atlantis in "Before I Sleep", they locked its Stargate so that it could be only accessed from Earth. It just isn't used widely because it's inconvenient, and the Tau'ri probably lack the knowledge to reprogram this defense system. Also, it's possible that this is limited to Pegasus, since its gate system looks more secure overall (for example, only the Atlantis gate can dial other galaxies).
*** On the subject of dialing other galaxies, that's not a quirk of the Pegasus gate network, but rather one of Atlantis's control system. The dialer in Atlantis has a control crystal that allows input of an eighth chevron, which run-of-the-mill [=DHDs=] lack. Install that crystal in any given DHD and the gate it's attached to can dial other galaxies. The same applies to the Milky Way gate system. The SGC can dial out because it's using its own custom dialing computer rather than a normal DHD.

to:

*** ** There ''is'' a way to "screen unwanted calls". When the Ancients left Atlantis in "Before I Sleep", they locked its Stargate so that it could be only accessed from Earth. It just isn't used widely because it's inconvenient, and the Tau'ri probably lack the knowledge to reprogram this defense system. Also, it's possible that this is limited to Pegasus, since its gate system looks more secure overall (for example, only the Atlantis gate can dial other galaxies).
*** ** On the subject of dialing other galaxies, that's not a quirk of the Pegasus gate network, but rather one of Atlantis's control system. The dialer in Atlantis has a control crystal that allows input of an eighth chevron, which run-of-the-mill [=DHDs=] lack. Install that crystal in any given DHD and the gate it's attached to can dial other galaxies. The same applies to the Milky Way gate system. The SGC can dial out because it's using its own custom dialing computer rather than a normal DHD.



*** There are already Sufficiently Advanced Decon Chambers that act as big rooms with metal walls -- the Asgardian Thor's Hammer and Human Gate Room, for example. The problem is that we're talking a setting where people routinely make planet-busting bombs, and the gate itself is a very, very big bomb ready to go off if anything too big goes boom near it. You can block all incoming calls completely, or limit it to a very small number of gates, but if you're letting anything unknown through in the first place there's too much opportunity for damage. The Tauri don't set it to always-off mode because the gate system is also their only (in earlier seasons) or primary method of communication and travel; there's no telling when a Stargate team might need to dial in after gating or being moved to a different planet than they were assigned to, and the only way to check whether an incoming call is good or bad is to turn off call-blocking.

to:

*** ** There are already Sufficiently Advanced Decon Chambers that act as big rooms with metal walls -- the Asgardian Thor's Hammer and Human Gate Room, for example. The problem is that we're talking a setting where people routinely make planet-busting bombs, and the gate itself is a very, very big bomb ready to go off if anything too big goes boom near it. You can block all incoming calls completely, or limit it to a very small number of gates, but if you're letting anything unknown through in the first place there's too much opportunity for damage. The Tauri don't set it to always-off mode because the gate system is also their only (in earlier seasons) or primary method of communication and travel; there's no telling when a Stargate team might need to dial in after gating or being moved to a different planet than they were assigned to, and the only way to check whether an incoming call is good or bad is to turn off call-blocking.



*** This is not what I asked. Where does it fold into?
*** Main/{{Hammerspace}}!

to:

*** ** This is not what I asked. Where does it fold into?
*** ** Main/{{Hammerspace}}!



*** The took off the gate's faceplate added the machinery, then modified the faceplate to fit the machinery. Just like changing the faceplate on your computer so it can hold another cd tray except instead of replacing with a new plate they modified the old one.

to:

*** ** The took off the gate's faceplate added the machinery, then modified the faceplate to fit the machinery. Just like changing the faceplate on your computer so it can hold another cd tray except instead of replacing with a new plate they modified the old one.



*** The original iris was made of Titanium (outright said so in "Children of the Gods) which would suit this purpose just fine as it is stronger than steel at half the weight. The second iris (installed after the original was destroyed when they dialed into a black hole) was made of Trinium which is hundreds of times stronger than even that. Although there wouldn't be any traveler puree as the iris prevents any matter sent through the stargate from reintegrating at all.
*** This. They stated that the iris was close enough to the event horizon that matter did not even reintegrate. It didn't matter how much mass the bad guys threw through the gate. Matter doesn't even reintegrate, so what ends up hitting the iris is a subatomic particle stream. It creates heat and a burst of radiation (you often see teams analyzing the radiation, and from that they can determine what kind of matter they tried to send through). So the iris doesn't necessarily have to be "strong", it just has to be heat and radiation resistant.

to:

*** ** The original iris was made of Titanium (outright said so in "Children of the Gods) which would suit this purpose just fine as it is stronger than steel at half the weight. The second iris (installed after the original was destroyed when they dialed into a black hole) was made of Trinium which is hundreds of times stronger than even that. Although there wouldn't be any traveler puree as the iris prevents any matter sent through the stargate from reintegrating at all.
*** ** This. They stated that the iris was close enough to the event horizon that matter did not even reintegrate. It didn't matter how much mass the bad guys threw through the gate. Matter doesn't even reintegrate, so what ends up hitting the iris is a subatomic particle stream. It creates heat and a burst of radiation (you often see teams analyzing the radiation, and from that they can determine what kind of matter they tried to send through). So the iris doesn't necessarily have to be "strong", it just has to be heat and radiation resistant.



*** They did manage to duplicate the effects of Sokar's weapon on Earth when O'Neill was trapped on an alien planet when the local stargate was buried after an explosion (which made him believe it was destroyed). It took them several months, and it doesn't specify whether alien technology was used, but if the people at SGC can accomplish that, you'd think that it wouldn't be difficult for Goa'uld to do the same.

to:

*** ** They did manage to duplicate the effects of Sokar's weapon on Earth when O'Neill was trapped on an alien planet when the local stargate was buried after an explosion (which made him believe it was destroyed). It took them several months, and it doesn't specify whether alien technology was used, but if the people at SGC can accomplish that, you'd think that it wouldn't be difficult for Goa'uld to do the same.



*** Which means that when Apophis took over Sokar's forces, he inherited the weapon. But when Apophis's forces were wiped out, the technology was probably lost.

to:

*** ** Which means that when Apophis took over Sokar's forces, he inherited the weapon. But when Apophis's forces were wiped out, the technology was probably lost.



*** Mmmrmm. It seems like an awful big coincidence that the symbol which is only coincidentally associated with Earth is also the first letter of "Atlantis" in Ancientese.
*** Maybe Ra took that Stargate from a planet that was once more closely associated with Atlantis than Earth.
*** Doesn't O'Neill identify the lost city as "Terra Atlantis"? Supposing that Atlantis was at some point more closely associated with some other planet, and, by coincidence, Ra raided that planet for a spare Stargate.
*** Now that I think of it, a simpler answer might be what we actually see: the At symbol is still on the gate even during the seasons where they were using the Antarctica gate. Maybe that symbol ''does'' mean "Earth", and whatever gate you plug in to Earth's position in the network will "grow" an At symbol in that position.
*** This was probably just a production error -- they didn't bother to modify the main prop. And I only remember two episodes in which it was seen: "Window of Opportunity" and "Watergate". The DHD in "Solitudes" shows a [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Image:0eb.svg different symbol]]. Since it was Earth's original Stargate, it's logical to assume that the symbol is Earth's original POO.
*** That still doesn't explain why Ancient databases like Merlin's phase-shifting device and the Atlantis hologram room show Milky Way addresses ending with the sun-over-pyramid symbol rather then the circle-and-line symbol.
*** Perhaps 'At' is just the standard Point of Origin symbol, and only planets that were of particular importance to the Ancients had specific ones. Maybe that's the real reason that the vast majority of the other stargates have the 'At' symbol on them - it's not that the prop department only had two mock-up gates (one of which was permanently on-set), it's that this just happens to be the placeholder symbol until the Ancients wanted to give it a planet-specific one.
*** My concern with the whole point-of-origin thing was SGU. They had to use Earth's point of origin to dial Destiny no matter what planet they were on (Eli stated it was more of a code than an address). The problem: the original Ancient gate that would've been on Earth when Destiny was sent out was the Antarctic one, that had the point of origin from Solitudes. But they used the point of origin from the gate Ra brough to earth to dial Destiny. We know the system is intelligent in some way (perhaps Ra recoded the system to make that the new default Earth gate), and it knew to use the "current" Earth point of origin rather than the original. But it's still weird, knowing what we know from Solitudes. Other times when they are using the Antarctic gate and you see the Ra gate point of origin is just due to stock footage, I give them a pass on that.

to:

*** ** Mmmrmm. It seems like an awful big coincidence that the symbol which is only coincidentally associated with Earth is also the first letter of "Atlantis" in Ancientese.
*** ** Maybe Ra took that Stargate from a planet that was once more closely associated with Atlantis than Earth.
*** ** Doesn't O'Neill identify the lost city as "Terra Atlantis"? Supposing that Atlantis was at some point more closely associated with some other planet, and, by coincidence, Ra raided that planet for a spare Stargate.
*** ** Now that I think of it, a simpler answer might be what we actually see: the At symbol is still on the gate even during the seasons where they were using the Antarctica gate. Maybe that symbol ''does'' mean "Earth", and whatever gate you plug in to Earth's position in the network will "grow" an At symbol in that position.
*** ** This was probably just a production error -- they didn't bother to modify the main prop. And I only remember two episodes in which it was seen: "Window of Opportunity" and "Watergate". The DHD in "Solitudes" shows a [[http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Image:0eb.svg different symbol]]. Since it was Earth's original Stargate, it's logical to assume that the symbol is Earth's original POO.
*** ** That still doesn't explain why Ancient databases like Merlin's phase-shifting device and the Atlantis hologram room show Milky Way addresses ending with the sun-over-pyramid symbol rather then the circle-and-line symbol.
*** ** Perhaps 'At' is just the standard Point of Origin symbol, and only planets that were of particular importance to the Ancients had specific ones. Maybe that's the real reason that the vast majority of the other stargates have the 'At' symbol on them - it's not that the prop department only had two mock-up gates (one of which was permanently on-set), it's that this just happens to be the placeholder symbol until the Ancients wanted to give it a planet-specific one.
*** ** My concern with the whole point-of-origin thing was SGU. They had to use Earth's point of origin to dial Destiny no matter what planet they were on (Eli stated it was more of a code than an address). The problem: the original Ancient gate that would've been on Earth when Destiny was sent out was the Antarctic one, that had the point of origin from Solitudes. But they used the point of origin from the gate Ra brough to earth to dial Destiny. We know the system is intelligent in some way (perhaps Ra recoded the system to make that the new default Earth gate), and it knew to use the "current" Earth point of origin rather than the original. But it's still weird, knowing what we know from Solitudes. Other times when they are using the Antarctic gate and you see the Ra gate point of origin is just due to stock footage, I give them a pass on that.



*** There is a good chance that if they picked up another snake, the hammer-scanner by the gate would find and take it into the labyrinth, leaving the team at square one. Besides, Chulak is unfriendly territory.

to:

*** ** There is a good chance that if they picked up another snake, the hammer-scanner by the gate would find and take it into the labyrinth, leaving the team at square one. Besides, Chulak is unfriendly territory.



*** I believe the counter-suggestion is "Remove Junior, hustle Teal'c back through the Gate before he goes septic, then send someone off to Chulak to steal him a new belly-snake. Tremendously risky, but probably better for diplomatic purposes than destroying the Hammer. Either they didn't think of it, or their risk assessment process led them to believe such a plan risked more than it saved.
*** By that point in the series, Chulak was more or less a no-fly-zone for the Tau'ri, since they'd been there a couple times already, and Goa'uld larvae in particular were ''much'' more heavily guarded. Stealing one would've been a mission unto itself, and valuable as Teal'c is, they probably weren't going to risk losing RedShirt after RedShirt just for his sake.
*** It seems that the easiest way to steal a symbiote would be to find a Jaffa, shoot him in the face, and pull the snake out of his belly.

to:

*** ** I believe the counter-suggestion is "Remove Junior, hustle Teal'c back through the Gate before he goes septic, then send someone off to Chulak to steal him a new belly-snake. Tremendously risky, but probably better for diplomatic purposes than destroying the Hammer. Either they didn't think of it, or their risk assessment process led them to believe such a plan risked more than it saved.
*** ** By that point in the series, Chulak was more or less a no-fly-zone for the Tau'ri, since they'd been there a couple times already, and Goa'uld larvae in particular were ''much'' more heavily guarded. Stealing one would've been a mission unto itself, and valuable as Teal'c is, they probably weren't going to risk losing RedShirt after RedShirt just for his sake.
*** ** It seems that the easiest way to steal a symbiote would be to find a Jaffa, shoot him in the face, and pull the snake out of his belly.



*** If you think about how often Teal'c actually got them into trouble, you have to wonder if it was worth it. Or if they shoulda made him wear a basecap and leave the staff weapon. I mean, Werher von Braun wasn't wearing his Nazi-uniform when he worked at NASA either.
*** They were expecting to be able to ''talk'' with the Asgard when they got there. One assumes they would have explained that Teal'c no longer serves the Goa'uld and personally vouched for him. They weren't expecting a magic hammer to whisk him off to an underground labyrinth.

to:

*** ** If you think about how often Teal'c actually got them into trouble, you have to wonder if it was worth it. Or if they shoulda made him wear a basecap and leave the staff weapon. I mean, Werher von Braun wasn't wearing his Nazi-uniform when he worked at NASA either.
*** ** They were expecting to be able to ''talk'' with the Asgard when they got there. One assumes they would have explained that Teal'c no longer serves the Goa'uld and personally vouched for him. They weren't expecting a magic hammer to whisk him off to an underground labyrinth.



*** I always thought that this was pretty clearly the intent. Their standard post is to stand there and guard that room, they've been doing it for weeks if not months, and since nothing ever happens they got pretty complacent.

to:

*** ** I always thought that this was pretty clearly the intent. Their standard post is to stand there and guard that room, they've been doing it for weeks if not months, and since nothing ever happens they got pretty complacent.



*** Also, Daniel had help from Merlin.
*** It's also a possiblity that Daniel was the exception, not the Jaffa. If we assume for a moment that the "burst into flames" thing is a failsafe placed in all Priors, then I think Adria deliberately left it out of Daniel because if he died, she would lose the knowledge needed to build Merlin's weapon. True, Daniel might betray her, but she likely assumed that even if he did, there would be no way he could outsmart her. But as stated by the previous troper, Merlin helped.

to:

*** ** Also, Daniel had help from Merlin.
*** ** It's also a possiblity that Daniel was the exception, not the Jaffa. If we assume for a moment that the "burst into flames" thing is a failsafe placed in all Priors, then I think Adria deliberately left it out of Daniel because if he died, she would lose the knowledge needed to build Merlin's weapon. True, Daniel might betray her, but she likely assumed that even if he did, there would be no way he could outsmart her. But as stated by the previous troper, Merlin helped.



*** ''Some'' Naquaddah is stable. There is also weapons-grade Naquaddah (Naquadria is unique to Jonas Quinn's world) which you can make bombs out of, and you can also make something like a nuclear reactor from the stuff. That said, it's not ''extremely'' volatile. They used it, I assume, for the same reason you can make stuff very strong by adding a bit of depleted uranium. It's a ridiculously heavy superconductive element with some unstable isotopes.
*** Naquadah is stated to be a super-heavy element. It's located in a still hypothetical in the real world island of stability that's speculated to exist in atomic numbers higher than known elements in the periodic table. If such a thing exists in reality, it is *probably* radioactive, but in the way that bismuth is. Bismuth-209 was long thought to be stable, but presumed to be radioactive on theoretical grounds. It was finally proven mathematically to be radioactive, but its half life is 10 billion times the age of the universe. Naquadah is most likely the same - technically radioactive, but decays so slowly that it's safe to deal with as if it were stable. *Naquadria* on the other hand, is a highly unstable radioactive isotope of naquadah (probably with an extra neutron or two).
*** Naqadah magnifies conventional and nuclear explosions. As for the Stargates, that's a bit that was grandfathered over from the Emmerich movie.
*** Didn't the nine-chevron planets have Naquadria cores?

to:

*** ** ''Some'' Naquaddah is stable. There is also weapons-grade Naquaddah (Naquadria is unique to Jonas Quinn's world) which you can make bombs out of, and you can also make something like a nuclear reactor from the stuff. That said, it's not ''extremely'' volatile. They used it, I assume, for the same reason you can make stuff very strong by adding a bit of depleted uranium. It's a ridiculously heavy superconductive element with some unstable isotopes.
*** ** Naquadah is stated to be a super-heavy element. It's located in a still hypothetical in the real world island of stability that's speculated to exist in atomic numbers higher than known elements in the periodic table. If such a thing exists in reality, it is *probably* radioactive, but in the way that bismuth is. Bismuth-209 was long thought to be stable, but presumed to be radioactive on theoretical grounds. It was finally proven mathematically to be radioactive, but its half life is 10 billion times the age of the universe. Naquadah is most likely the same - technically radioactive, but decays so slowly that it's safe to deal with as if it were stable. *Naquadria* on the other hand, is a highly unstable radioactive isotope of naquadah (probably with an extra neutron or two).
*** ** Naqadah magnifies conventional and nuclear explosions. As for the Stargates, that's a bit that was grandfathered over from the Emmerich movie.
*** ** Didn't the nine-chevron planets have Naquadria cores?



*** Ruled out by Orlin's 'toaster' stargate in ''Ascension''. The ''Universe' Stargates also appear to have a much more machine-like structure, and are very easily damaged.
*** IIRC the toastergate was specifically mentioned to only work the one time before burning out.

to:

*** ** Ruled out by Orlin's 'toaster' stargate in ''Ascension''. The ''Universe' Stargates also appear to have a much more machine-like structure, and are very easily damaged.
*** ** IIRC the toastergate was specifically mentioned to only work the one time before burning out.



*** Not so. Gods are the children of other gods. Just like "children of men" is sometimes used to refer to all of humanity.

to:

*** ** Not so. Gods are the children of other gods. Just like "children of men" is sometimes used to refer to all of humanity.



*** I always got the feeling that the name Goa'uld in its meaning as "children of the gods" referred to the species as a whole, who in their religious dogma were regarded as demigods, with only the System Lords being true gods. Consider the fact that no System Lord ever seems to think that ordering Jaffa to kill lesser Goa'uld might damage the belief that the System Lords are immortal gods.
*** The writers needed to refer to them somehow, and I think they wanted to be clever combining "gold" and "au", the symbol for gold on the periodic table. Stick the "au" in the middle of "gold".
*** Also, the bastardized pronounciation of "Goa'uld" used by much of the cast, "Gould," bears a strong resemblance to "ghoul," an undead creature that feasts on corpses. A fitting epithet for the overdressed, boombox-voiced snake-in-the-heads.

to:

*** ** I always got the feeling that the name Goa'uld in its meaning as "children of the gods" referred to the species as a whole, who in their religious dogma were regarded as demigods, with only the System Lords being true gods. Consider the fact that no System Lord ever seems to think that ordering Jaffa to kill lesser Goa'uld might damage the belief that the System Lords are immortal gods.
*** ** The writers needed to refer to them somehow, and I think they wanted to be clever combining "gold" and "au", the symbol for gold on the periodic table. Stick the "au" in the middle of "gold".
*** ** Also, the bastardized pronounciation of "Goa'uld" used by much of the cast, "Gould," bears a strong resemblance to "ghoul," an undead creature that feasts on corpses. A fitting epithet for the overdressed, boombox-voiced snake-in-the-heads.



*** Actually, it has been stated that the Book of Origin itself doesn't contain any of the "burn the heritics" stuff and the ori and priors use their athority to interpret it that way to get the masses to kill for them. From "Origin":

to:

*** ** Actually, it has been stated that the Book of Origin itself doesn't contain any of the "burn the heritics" stuff and the ori and priors use their athority to interpret it that way to get the masses to kill for them. From "Origin":



*** From "Line in the Sand":

to:

*** ** From "Line in the Sand":



*** They changed bases multiple times over the series, but the ones seen in seasons two and three look different than the ones seen later on.
*** EvolutionaryRetcon perhaps?

to:

*** ** They changed bases multiple times over the series, but the ones seen in seasons two and three look different than the ones seen later on.
*** ** EvolutionaryRetcon perhaps?



*** AFAIK, that 'button in the middle' on a DHD ''is'' the Point of Origin key. I'll have to pay attention the next time I see Daniel dial on a DHD, but I'm pretty sure of this theory ...
*** People are seen dialing six and seven symbols throughout the years. but i think the previous poster is right and any time they dial seven its a production error (like the chevrons lit up one by one on incoming wormholes. Although I have a theory on that ill put forth in the relevent section) But you can set a gate to only accept addresses from certain gates if you are smart enough so the idea of adding call id to the system is probably the reason points of origin exist. The Ancients were just showing uncharacteristic foresight :P

to:

*** ** AFAIK, that 'button in the middle' on a DHD ''is'' the Point of Origin key. I'll have to pay attention the next time I see Daniel dial on a DHD, but I'm pretty sure of this theory ...
*** ** People are seen dialing six and seven symbols throughout the years. but i think the previous poster is right and any time they dial seven its a production error (like the chevrons lit up one by one on incoming wormholes. Although I have a theory on that ill put forth in the relevent section) But you can set a gate to only accept addresses from certain gates if you are smart enough so the idea of adding call id to the system is probably the reason points of origin exist. The Ancients were just showing uncharacteristic foresight :P



*** The RPG says that any objects entering a Stargate in the "wrong" direction (such as from the exit, or from the back) are destroyed.

to:

*** ** The RPG says that any objects entering a Stargate in the "wrong" direction (such as from the exit, or from the back) are destroyed.



*** Well, a couple times the remains are seen smoking afterward, so maybe they're flash fried so hot they just evaporate.
*** Why doesn't the iris get destroyed by the horizontal flush?
*** Its very close proximity to the event horizon prevents the flush from occurring in the first place.
*** Also, they usually close the Iris ''after'' the incoming wormhole is established. That said, we have seen 'Gates open without a kawoosh, usually as a result of sufficiently advanced alternate dialing technologies, so it's possible that they eventually figured out the Iris would prevent the kawoosh.
*** The matter is probably reduced to elementary particles, permanently, or (less likely) converted to energy, which is then absorbed by the gate.
*** That would be a massive amount of energy, 100lbs of person, rock, whatever, equals 45,359.237 grams of matter converted to energy. For comparison the bomb dropped on Hiroshima converted about 3 grams of matter to energy. The phrase EarthShatteringKaboom ceases to be meaningful. How much ice did the kawoosh in Continuum shave off of the hull breach in the Achille's? 400, 500lbs? Safe to say the gate would have plenty of power. To wit, the Mark IX bomb is said to be multi-gigaton. Okay, a gigaton is 4.184×10^18 joules of energy. Let's say it's a 5 gigaton blast(209,200,000,000 joules). Matter releases 9×10^16 J/kg of energy. If we assume the gate vaporized an even 400lbs (181.436948 kilograms) the gate would of had to absorb 16,329,325,300,000,000,000 joules. Now I'm no expert, but uh, one of those numbers is waaay bigger than the other. The stargate would of had to absorb orders of magnitude more energy than their "Gatebuster" bomb put out. Think of the two schmucks who vaporized themselves when SG-1 was trapped in that prison cave. Bet they had a combined weight over 400lbs.
*** Maybe all that energy gets pushed off into subspace.

to:

*** ** Well, a couple times the remains are seen smoking afterward, so maybe they're flash fried so hot they just evaporate.
*** ** Why doesn't the iris get destroyed by the horizontal flush?
*** ** Its very close proximity to the event horizon prevents the flush from occurring in the first place.
*** ** Also, they usually close the Iris ''after'' the incoming wormhole is established. That said, we have seen 'Gates open without a kawoosh, usually as a result of sufficiently advanced alternate dialing technologies, so it's possible that they eventually figured out the Iris would prevent the kawoosh.
*** ** The matter is probably reduced to elementary particles, permanently, or (less likely) converted to energy, which is then absorbed by the gate.
*** ** That would be a massive amount of energy, 100lbs of person, rock, whatever, equals 45,359.237 grams of matter converted to energy. For comparison the bomb dropped on Hiroshima converted about 3 grams of matter to energy. The phrase EarthShatteringKaboom ceases to be meaningful. How much ice did the kawoosh in Continuum shave off of the hull breach in the Achille's? 400, 500lbs? Safe to say the gate would have plenty of power. To wit, the Mark IX bomb is said to be multi-gigaton. Okay, a gigaton is 4.184×10^18 joules of energy. Let's say it's a 5 gigaton blast(209,200,000,000 joules). Matter releases 9×10^16 J/kg of energy. If we assume the gate vaporized an even 400lbs (181.436948 kilograms) the gate would of had to absorb 16,329,325,300,000,000,000 joules. Now I'm no expert, but uh, one of those numbers is waaay bigger than the other. The stargate would of had to absorb orders of magnitude more energy than their "Gatebuster" bomb put out. Think of the two schmucks who vaporized themselves when SG-1 was trapped in that prison cave. Bet they had a combined weight over 400lbs.
*** ** Maybe all that energy gets pushed off into subspace.



*** In early seasons maybe, but why not after season 8, I mean the Free Jaffa ought to have had at least a few they could give (or exchange, for a mass of weapons).

to:

*** ** In early seasons maybe, but why not after season 8, I mean the Free Jaffa ought to have had at least a few they could give (or exchange, for a mass of weapons).



*** Maybe they think that it would be much too tempting to keep a sarcophagus around, even for emergencies? Regarding the Tok'ra: Jacob/Selmak mentioned in season 7 that acquiring the Telchak Device in order to try and develop an addiction-free version of the sarcophagus would be something that should definitely be pursued.

to:

*** ** Maybe they think that it would be much too tempting to keep a sarcophagus around, even for emergencies? Regarding the Tok'ra: Jacob/Selmak mentioned in season 7 that acquiring the Telchak Device in order to try and develop an addiction-free version of the sarcophagus would be something that should definitely be pursued.



*** Yes, it's been demonstrated that the sarcophagus can restore someone who was ''made'' a Jaffa. Not someone who was ''born'' a Jaffa.

to:

*** ** Yes, it's been demonstrated that the sarcophagus can restore someone who was ''made'' a Jaffa. Not someone who was ''born'' a Jaffa.



*** That was for the SuperSoldiers that couldn't be killed by normal means. But it's still a good point. From the looks of it, it seems like redesigning the staff weapons into a more traditional gun shape would solve most of those problems...
*** They do have a cupboard full of staves and zats and stuff. It's just that P90s are really, really good. Remember the episode where they give P90s to some Jaffa folks, and Carter gives a demonstration where she obliterates a wooden post with P90 fire?
*** If they have that many of them why not just strap a few to the F-302s just to give them a few weapons that don't run out?

to:

*** ** That was for the SuperSoldiers that couldn't be killed by normal means. But it's still a good point. From the looks of it, it seems like redesigning the staff weapons into a more traditional gun shape would solve most of those problems...
*** ** They do have a cupboard full of staves and zats and stuff. It's just that P90s are really, really good. Remember the episode where they give P90s to some Jaffa folks, and Carter gives a demonstration where she obliterates a wooden post with P90 fire?
*** ** If they have that many of them why not just strap a few to the F-302s just to give them a few weapons that don't run out?



*** Daedalus was an ordinary man who tried to fly with wings he built himself. Doesn't sound like a problem to me.
*** Which is ridiculous, considering the amount of alien tech built into it. They should have swapped the names for the Prometheus and the Daedalus.
*** The naming of the Apollo would still be quite problematic, since three members of the Greek Pantheon (Kronos, Athene and Ares) appeared as Goa'uld, and it wouldn't have been inconceivable that they might encounter a Goa'uld with the same name. But then again, the Apollo mainly operated in Pegasus, so it would have been very unlikely that it would have encountered its namesake.
*** Even if there are Goa'uld with the names of these ships, these myths inspired our enitre civilization. naming ships after them has been common practive for centuries and i doubt it would quickly change.

to:

*** ** Daedalus was an ordinary man who tried to fly with wings he built himself. Doesn't sound like a problem to me.
*** ** Which is ridiculous, considering the amount of alien tech built into it. They should have swapped the names for the Prometheus and the Daedalus.
*** ** The naming of the Apollo would still be quite problematic, since three members of the Greek Pantheon (Kronos, Athene and Ares) appeared as Goa'uld, and it wouldn't have been inconceivable that they might encounter a Goa'uld with the same name. But then again, the Apollo mainly operated in Pegasus, so it would have been very unlikely that it would have encountered its namesake.
*** ** Even if there are Goa'uld with the names of these ships, these myths inspired our enitre civilization. naming ships after them has been common practive for centuries and i doubt it would quickly change.



*** General O'Neill?
*** The problem is that the United States already has an aircraft carrier and a space shuttle named ''Enterprise''.
*** That just gives them plausible deniability. "Wait, what did you just say about the Enterprise?" "Um...the aircraft carrier, currently blahblahblah." "But you mentioned space!" "Well....they're planning on going to see the shuttle. Yeah."

to:

*** ** General O'Neill?
*** ** The problem is that the United States already has an aircraft carrier and a space shuttle named ''Enterprise''.
*** ** That just gives them plausible deniability. "Wait, what did you just say about the Enterprise?" "Um...the aircraft carrier, currently blahblahblah." "But you mentioned space!" "Well....they're planning on going to see the shuttle. Yeah."



*** Pattern recognition: The Earth symbol was a pyramid with one circle (the single sun) above it. It makes sense that its symbol would be similar to the Earth one, but distinct, so when Skaara draws the symbol, it makes Daniel realize what it is.
*** There's also the fact that, while it is only obliquely stated, Daniel recorded all the symbols on the Abydos gate in his notebook. He recognized Skaara's drawing as matching one of the symbols he'd seen. As to why they didn't try multiple PoO. How much power did they bring with them? How many tries would they get at dialing.
*** The gates have been in use for centuries, so there presumably 'would' be enough power to dial a few dozen times.

to:

*** ** Pattern recognition: The Earth symbol was a pyramid with one circle (the single sun) above it. It makes sense that its symbol would be similar to the Earth one, but distinct, so when Skaara draws the symbol, it makes Daniel realize what it is.
*** ** There's also the fact that, while it is only obliquely stated, Daniel recorded all the symbols on the Abydos gate in his notebook. He recognized Skaara's drawing as matching one of the symbols he'd seen. As to why they didn't try multiple PoO. How much power did they bring with them? How many tries would they get at dialing.
*** ** The gates have been in use for centuries, so there presumably 'would' be enough power to dial a few dozen times.



*** He says he used Earth as a point of origin, not that he used the symbol. He used that gate's unique symbol as the POO key, and the gate interpreted that as "Here," or as Earth, and it worked.

to:

*** ** He says he used Earth as a point of origin, not that he used the symbol. He used that gate's unique symbol as the POO key, and the gate interpreted that as "Here," or as Earth, and it worked.



*** I know that someone might say something about it being an address to a specific gate, but I don't think it works that way. The AI involved in the tech of the gates has some kind of spacial map inside it (extrapolation based on shown evidence) and can pinpoint a gate by an approximate location in space. This is also why the gates can't seem to open when dialing the same address in a nearby area (such as the two gates on earth). Just a theory.

to:

*** ** I know that someone might say something about it being an address to a specific gate, but I don't think it works that way. The AI involved in the tech of the gates has some kind of spacial map inside it (extrapolation based on shown evidence) and can pinpoint a gate by an approximate location in space. This is also why the gates can't seem to open when dialing the same address in a nearby area (such as the two gates on earth). Just a theory.



*** First, Goa'uld seem possessed by an innate desire for power, but (with a few exceptions) they're not generally all that militaristic; if they've got a bunch of people thinking they're god and all the immediate pleasures they could want, they're as happy as a snake in the sun. Which is, in fact, what they are. Militarizing requires a military-industrial complex, and that requires people to operate it. Since their only choices are other Goa'uld (who would eventually try to kill them because they're innately self-serving) or Jaffa who they're trying to appear magical to, they pretty much have to do everything themselves or risk getting bumped off.
*** Second, most Goa'uld control more than one planet. Ever played Civilization? At the beginning of the game you've got a couple little villages that you can control instantly and micromanage to your heart's content, but by the time you reach the modern era you have tens if not hundreds of cities and armies moving around; at a certain point it becomes too tedious to give everything new orders every turn so you either hit "automate" or just let them sit doing nothing until you need them. And this is in a video game where you're omnipresent and your commands are obeyed instantly; it's not much of a stretch to imagine any one person who was in control of a couple dozen planets would say "ah screw it, it's good enough" when faced with the prospect of micromanaging each one individually.
*** Similarly, and even more appropriate perhaps, try playing Spore during the space stage and take over the entire galaxy. Now imagine your one ship is your command ship and in order to do anything significant in your empire, YOU and you alone must go take care of it, because otherwise the people on the planet will not think of you as their god protector and fear you and your weapons of destruction.
*** Another way to think about it is this... who goes to those planets? The system lord or maybe a lesser underling and... the SG-1 team. Every planet they went to was surprised to see someone other than the Gou'ald and usually going through the gate grabbed the attention of the local system lord and they would be in the system in a few short hours or days (in galactic terms that is really short travel time). And if you think about what might happen if you left some group of "soldiers" (even "loyal" Jaffa in small numbers) behind, they would probably get bored or just start rethinking the whole idea of being subservient and lead a rebellion on the planet they were supposed to be protecting.

to:

*** ** First, Goa'uld seem possessed by an innate desire for power, but (with a few exceptions) they're not generally all that militaristic; if they've got a bunch of people thinking they're god and all the immediate pleasures they could want, they're as happy as a snake in the sun. Which is, in fact, what they are. Militarizing requires a military-industrial complex, and that requires people to operate it. Since their only choices are other Goa'uld (who would eventually try to kill them because they're innately self-serving) or Jaffa who they're trying to appear magical to, they pretty much have to do everything themselves or risk getting bumped off.
*** ** Second, most Goa'uld control more than one planet. Ever played Civilization? At the beginning of the game you've got a couple little villages that you can control instantly and micromanage to your heart's content, but by the time you reach the modern era you have tens if not hundreds of cities and armies moving around; at a certain point it becomes too tedious to give everything new orders every turn so you either hit "automate" or just let them sit doing nothing until you need them. And this is in a video game where you're omnipresent and your commands are obeyed instantly; it's not much of a stretch to imagine any one person who was in control of a couple dozen planets would say "ah screw it, it's good enough" when faced with the prospect of micromanaging each one individually.
*** ** Similarly, and even more appropriate perhaps, try playing Spore during the space stage and take over the entire galaxy. Now imagine your one ship is your command ship and in order to do anything significant in your empire, YOU and you alone must go take care of it, because otherwise the people on the planet will not think of you as their god protector and fear you and your weapons of destruction.
*** ** Another way to think about it is this... who goes to those planets? The system lord or maybe a lesser underling and... the SG-1 team. Every planet they went to was surprised to see someone other than the Gou'ald and usually going through the gate grabbed the attention of the local system lord and they would be in the system in a few short hours or days (in galactic terms that is really short travel time). And if you think about what might happen if you left some group of "soldiers" (even "loyal" Jaffa in small numbers) behind, they would probably get bored or just start rethinking the whole idea of being subservient and lead a rebellion on the planet they were supposed to be protecting.



*** "Ground goa'uld" was just what O'Neill called it. They didn't ''literally'' get it by grinding up symbiotes, but by extracting and then modifying the chemicals the symbiotes release. Since the Tok'ra ''are'' symbiotes, it's probably easier for them to get said chemicals.

to:

*** ** "Ground goa'uld" was just what O'Neill called it. They didn't ''literally'' get it by grinding up symbiotes, but by extracting and then modifying the chemicals the symbiotes release. Since the Tok'ra ''are'' symbiotes, it's probably easier for them to get said chemicals.



*** There's no "probably" about it. Before Tretonin is developed, when Apophis seeks asylum at SG-1, Teal'c taunts him with this very thing. He tells him that once the Goa'uld are defeated, Jaffa will turn the tables on the Goa'uld and treat ''them'' as just a resource to be used and discarded when they're no longer useful.

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*** ** There's no "probably" about it. Before Tretonin is developed, when Apophis seeks asylum at SG-1, Teal'c taunts him with this very thing. He tells him that once the Goa'uld are defeated, Jaffa will turn the tables on the Goa'uld and treat ''them'' as just a resource to be used and discarded when they're no longer useful.



*** Yes but there are a million things that could happen that would have kept Jonas on the team, but not ONE of the teams has him? Really? And I know we don't see all of the teams, but some of the ones we do see have some weird stuff (an Asgard, Martuf, a Carter who appears to be the one from Mobius, and a team with the upgrades armbands) but not something that should be relatively common in the multiverse? and If Jonas was on one of the teams we would have seen him since a good number of fans have been complaining for years that he has never been brought back (or even mentioned since the beginning of season 8 even in places where it would make sense to.)
*** Logically the 'ripple effect' ones were SG-1s that ended up in a similar situation to the current SG-1: ie, they survived Anubis (so Daniel had to have come back), they pissed off the Ori, etc. Maybe it's rare for a non Cameron-and-Daniel team to have done so?
*** The SG teams from "Ripple Effect" were only able to arrive because of the black hole created in "Beachead," which means any team we see had to have experienced a similair set of events in their home reality for that black hole to form at all. Any reality that did not have that black hole couldn't have sent a team here in "Ripple Effect." Draw your own conclusions from that.
*** There's an answer for that. In the episode they specifically say that the reason why so many of the 'same person' can exist in the same universe is because the parallel universes were ''so close together.'' This means that the similarities between the universes were so great that being in "our" universe didn't cause a cellular cascade failure. There would have to be a very great number of identical factors present. Obviously Mitchell leading the team was a common element for many. Remember that before when Dr. Carter came through from the [=SGA=], the differences between the parallel universes nearly tore her apart.

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*** ** Yes but there are a million things that could happen that would have kept Jonas on the team, but not ONE of the teams has him? Really? And I know we don't see all of the teams, but some of the ones we do see have some weird stuff (an Asgard, Martuf, a Carter who appears to be the one from Mobius, and a team with the upgrades armbands) but not something that should be relatively common in the multiverse? and If Jonas was on one of the teams we would have seen him since a good number of fans have been complaining for years that he has never been brought back (or even mentioned since the beginning of season 8 even in places where it would make sense to.)
*** ** Logically the 'ripple effect' ones were SG-1s that ended up in a similar situation to the current SG-1: ie, they survived Anubis (so Daniel had to have come back), they pissed off the Ori, etc. Maybe it's rare for a non Cameron-and-Daniel team to have done so?
*** ** The SG teams from "Ripple Effect" were only able to arrive because of the black hole created in "Beachead," which means any team we see had to have experienced a similair set of events in their home reality for that black hole to form at all. Any reality that did not have that black hole couldn't have sent a team here in "Ripple Effect." Draw your own conclusions from that.
*** ** There's an answer for that. In the episode they specifically say that the reason why so many of the 'same person' can exist in the same universe is because the parallel universes were ''so close together.'' This means that the similarities between the universes were so great that being in "our" universe didn't cause a cellular cascade failure. There would have to be a very great number of identical factors present. Obviously Mitchell leading the team was a common element for many. Remember that before when Dr. Carter came through from the [=SGA=], the differences between the parallel universes nearly tore her apart.



*** Considering they were almost out of energy by the episode's climax, that's probably how it was intended to be taken.

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*** ** Considering they were almost out of energy by the episode's climax, that's probably how it was intended to be taken.



*** Because they would've had no idea how many people they would actually need to make the adjustments. As we've seen, someone would've needed to stay old and Teal'c is the obvious choice because of his long life. If it was just Carter, she'd emerge from the dilation field as a ~80 year old woman. Plus I think anyone would go insane while stuck in an enclosed space for several decades.

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*** ** Because they would've had no idea how many people they would actually need to make the adjustments. As we've seen, someone would've needed to stay old and Teal'c is the obvious choice because of his long life. If it was just Carter, she'd emerge from the dilation field as a ~80 year old woman. Plus I think anyone would go insane while stuck in an enclosed space for several decades.



*** What makes you think that SG-1 can improve in a couple years what the Asgard have been working on for ''centuries''? Eventually, there's an upper limit to what you can do with the techniques, knowledge, and materials available to you. Technology isn't a linear function where things will always improve if you just put more time into it.
*** The reason that the time dilation field was engaged in the first place was because the shields were down and another hit would take them out. By the time the field activated, we can see that the blast is within the range of the shields, so upgrading them would have been pointless, even if they were fully functional. As for hull integrity, there's not much that can be done on that front. The ship was already built out of one of the sturdiest materials available (Trinium), which the Ori beam weapons can tear through like copy paper. The hull is just not meant to take that kind of punishment; that's what the shields are for.

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*** ** What makes you think that SG-1 can improve in a couple years what the Asgard have been working on for ''centuries''? Eventually, there's an upper limit to what you can do with the techniques, knowledge, and materials available to you. Technology isn't a linear function where things will always improve if you just put more time into it.
*** ** The reason that the time dilation field was engaged in the first place was because the shields were down and another hit would take them out. By the time the field activated, we can see that the blast is within the range of the shields, so upgrading them would have been pointless, even if they were fully functional. As for hull integrity, there's not much that can be done on that front. The ship was already built out of one of the sturdiest materials available (Trinium), which the Ori beam weapons can tear through like copy paper. The hull is just not meant to take that kind of punishment; that's what the shields are for.



*** By "he doesn't like her" you mean "he lusts after her". But it's Claudia freaking Black so who can blame him?

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*** ** By "he doesn't like her" you mean "he lusts after her". But it's Claudia freaking Black so who can blame him?



*** What's wrong with "Hathor"? Granted it's a pretty weak episode, but I can't think of any particular continuity problems with it.
*** Goa'uld don't take dna from the host species to make them viable (later we see goa'uld jump from Unas to humans just fine), Jaffa aren't humans who are altered by queens (they're genetically engineered that way as was stated before and after Hathor), if the Goa'uld had this drug the whole time, why not use the drug to easily enslave all the planets you want? I could go on but I think the point is made.
*** It should also be pointed out that even though it seems to have general errors, it was never actually disavowed from cannon. When the writers specifically reference the episode "Hathor" in the season 8 episode "Citizen Joe," to lampshade the errors concerning Jaffa and Goa'uld, one cannot claim they declared the episode non-cannon.
*** To add to this point, the errors are minor in retrospect. Jaffa are genetically engineered '''Humans.''' The pouch is not born into a Jaffa, but given to a Jaffa (or anyone, really) using the Goa'uld device for the process. The only serious contradictions are the DNA thing and how Goa'uld Queens work. But when the episode in general is lampshaded away 7 seasons later, it's hard to take the claim of "writers made it non-canon" seriously.

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*** ** What's wrong with "Hathor"? Granted it's a pretty weak episode, but I can't think of any particular continuity problems with it.
*** ** Goa'uld don't take dna from the host species to make them viable (later we see goa'uld jump from Unas to humans just fine), Jaffa aren't humans who are altered by queens (they're genetically engineered that way as was stated before and after Hathor), if the Goa'uld had this drug the whole time, why not use the drug to easily enslave all the planets you want? I could go on but I think the point is made.
*** ** It should also be pointed out that even though it seems to have general errors, it was never actually disavowed from cannon. When the writers specifically reference the episode "Hathor" in the season 8 episode "Citizen Joe," to lampshade the errors concerning Jaffa and Goa'uld, one cannot claim they declared the episode non-cannon.
*** ** To add to this point, the errors are minor in retrospect. Jaffa are genetically engineered '''Humans.''' The pouch is not born into a Jaffa, but given to a Jaffa (or anyone, really) using the Goa'uld device for the process. The only serious contradictions are the DNA thing and how Goa'uld Queens work. But when the episode in general is lampshaded away 7 seasons later, it's hard to take the claim of "writers made it non-canon" seriously.



*** Okay so if Jaffa are born with pouches, why did Teal'c want to stop the implantation of a symbiote in his son? Wouldn't his son die?
*** Yes. But Teal'c didn't know that. (He's a soldier, not a doctor). So it's a good thing that mission failed or he would have had egg on his face.
*** But how could Teal'c not know that? Teal'c may not be a doctor but he's not an idiot. He knows that a symbiote acts as a Jaffa's immune system. He knows that a Jaffa will die without a symbiote. Why in the world would he just assume that his son would be okay without a symbiote?
*** Because the Symbiote suppresses the hosts immune system. Everything that Teal'c knows at this point is that a Jaffa with a Symbiote can't live without it, and that a Goa'uld fundamentally alters its hosts immune system. From those two points it would be a safe assumption that a Jaffa who had never been implanted might have a regular human immune system, how was he to know that they'd been engineered for their immune systems to fail at a certain age?
*** Teal'c wanted to stop the implanting, because as far as he knew, up to that point, his son had been a fairly healthy boy without a the Goa'uld symbiote, and Teal'c wanted it to stay that way. Unbeknownst to our favorite Jaffa, his son Rya'c had come down with scarlet fever and needed a symbiote badly, lest he die. Cue an OhCrap moment for Teal'c.

to:

*** ** Okay so if Jaffa are born with pouches, why did Teal'c want to stop the implantation of a symbiote in his son? Wouldn't his son die?
*** ** Yes. But Teal'c didn't know that. (He's a soldier, not a doctor). So it's a good thing that mission failed or he would have had egg on his face.
*** ** But how could Teal'c not know that? Teal'c may not be a doctor but he's not an idiot. He knows that a symbiote acts as a Jaffa's immune system. He knows that a Jaffa will die without a symbiote. Why in the world would he just assume that his son would be okay without a symbiote?
*** ** Because the Symbiote suppresses the hosts immune system. Everything that Teal'c knows at this point is that a Jaffa with a Symbiote can't live without it, and that a Goa'uld fundamentally alters its hosts immune system. From those two points it would be a safe assumption that a Jaffa who had never been implanted might have a regular human immune system, how was he to know that they'd been engineered for their immune systems to fail at a certain age?
*** ** Teal'c wanted to stop the implanting, because as far as he knew, up to that point, his son had been a fairly healthy boy without a the Goa'uld symbiote, and Teal'c wanted it to stay that way. Unbeknownst to our favorite Jaffa, his son Rya'c had come down with scarlet fever and needed a symbiote badly, lest he die. Cue an OhCrap moment for Teal'c.



*** Judging by Daniel's leg, when they stopped Ba'al from succeeding (even though he and they had already gone back in time), it undid everything that happened since he was executed in the present. [[CloningBlues Supposedly executed]]. Which makes ''no sense'' based on how they treated time travel in previous episodes, and even earlier in the movie. This troper's opinion? Psychic hallucination. Makes more sense than anything else would.
*** It's completely consistent with how time travel had been treated before. When they stopped Ba'al, the new timeline created from that over wrote the old one where he succeeded. Just like when he succeeded it over wrote the one where he never went back. Just like in "Mobius" when fiddling in ancient egypt overwrote their timeline with the one with no stargate, just like in 2010 where sending a note back caused that timeline to be over written. I'm not sure where your problem is.
*** There was a big difference with Continuum's time travel--they could *see* the effects of Ba'al's time travel happening. If someone changes the past, you don't notice people disappearing, the timeline just gets overwritten. The best [[Fanon]] explanation I can make is that they had the same time frame to notice and travel on their own as when Ba'al had his original stargate travel to the past occurring, but would anyone everywhere in the galaxy using a stargate have been "saved" from the changing timestream?
*** TV shows that use both Time Travel overwritting and multiple universe storylines are designed to mess with your head. The two concepts of multiple universe and overwritting are mutually incompatable.
*** [Ad Speak]If your universe has been overwritten why not try this universe next door (TM) which is exactly the same, except it wasn't overwritten. [/Ad Speak]

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*** ** Judging by Daniel's leg, when they stopped Ba'al from succeeding (even though he and they had already gone back in time), it undid everything that happened since he was executed in the present. [[CloningBlues Supposedly executed]]. Which makes ''no sense'' based on how they treated time travel in previous episodes, and even earlier in the movie. This troper's opinion? Psychic hallucination. Makes more sense than anything else would.
*** ** It's completely consistent with how time travel had been treated before. When they stopped Ba'al, the new timeline created from that over wrote the old one where he succeeded. Just like when he succeeded it over wrote the one where he never went back. Just like in "Mobius" when fiddling in ancient egypt overwrote their timeline with the one with no stargate, just like in 2010 where sending a note back caused that timeline to be over written. I'm not sure where your problem is.
*** ** There was a big difference with Continuum's time travel--they could *see* the effects of Ba'al's time travel happening. If someone changes the past, you don't notice people disappearing, the timeline just gets overwritten. The best [[Fanon]] explanation I can make is that they had the same time frame to notice and travel on their own as when Ba'al had his original stargate travel to the past occurring, but would anyone everywhere in the galaxy using a stargate have been "saved" from the changing timestream?
*** ** TV shows that use both Time Travel overwritting and multiple universe storylines are designed to mess with your head. The two concepts of multiple universe and overwritting are mutually incompatable.
*** ** [Ad Speak]If your universe has been overwritten why not try this universe next door (TM) which is exactly the same, except it wasn't overwritten. [/Ad Speak]



*** You're totally misunderstanding it. It's never stated nor implied implied that the original captain is "our" Cam Mitchell. He's "our" Mitchell's ''grandfather'' from start to end.
*** It's a pretty damn big coincidence that Cam has an identical grandfather who is roughly the same age as Cam would be if he was sent back to 1920ish (which he was) who his grandmother refuses to tell him about.
*** Actually, I think someone's confused here... The photo in the locker at the end had Cam's grandfather and an older Cam Mitchell ''both'' in the picture. And when Baal (or one of the clones... whatever) dialed into the ships hold, Cam was in the hold as well, waiting for the attack. He provided a crew member with a weapon to help him fight. Also, the final guy was killed by Cam's grandfather, who we saw when the gate shut down at the end of the battle. (if memory serves.) So, Cam was ''NOT'' his own grandfather.
*** Where's it ever said his grandmother refuses to talk about him? The bit where Cam knows exactly what ship he was on? Or has his grandfather's photo in his locker? Yeah, Granny was keeping it a big secret there.
*** This is a fantastic example of WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief. Thousands (perhaps hundreds of thousands) of film and TV have used the identical actor/actress as a sibling or forebear - its just something you have to accept if you are going to enjoy the show. If you are looking for an explanation as to ''why'' this happens look no further than ViewersAreMorons. Its the same reason most stories involving bodyswaps dub over the opposite actors voice.
*** ^I ''knew'' there was a reason "Holiday" was so funny...

to:

*** ** You're totally misunderstanding it. It's never stated nor implied implied that the original captain is "our" Cam Mitchell. He's "our" Mitchell's ''grandfather'' from start to end.
*** ** It's a pretty damn big coincidence that Cam has an identical grandfather who is roughly the same age as Cam would be if he was sent back to 1920ish (which he was) who his grandmother refuses to tell him about.
*** ** Actually, I think someone's confused here... The photo in the locker at the end had Cam's grandfather and an older Cam Mitchell ''both'' in the picture. And when Baal (or one of the clones... whatever) dialed into the ships hold, Cam was in the hold as well, waiting for the attack. He provided a crew member with a weapon to help him fight. Also, the final guy was killed by Cam's grandfather, who we saw when the gate shut down at the end of the battle. (if memory serves.) So, Cam was ''NOT'' his own grandfather.
*** ** Where's it ever said his grandmother refuses to talk about him? The bit where Cam knows exactly what ship he was on? Or has his grandfather's photo in his locker? Yeah, Granny was keeping it a big secret there.
*** ** This is a fantastic example of WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief. Thousands (perhaps hundreds of thousands) of film and TV have used the identical actor/actress as a sibling or forebear - its just something you have to accept if you are going to enjoy the show. If you are looking for an explanation as to ''why'' this happens look no further than ViewersAreMorons. Its the same reason most stories involving bodyswaps dub over the opposite actors voice.
*** ** ^I ''knew'' there was a reason "Holiday" was so funny...



*** How they were able to dial the gate with neither DHD nor access to the dialing computer is a fair question in and of itself.
*** Cassandra did it with a device on her hand at the end of the episode 1969, so it is technically possible.

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*** ** How they were able to dial the gate with neither DHD nor access to the dialing computer is a fair question in and of itself.
*** ** Cassandra did it with a device on her hand at the end of the episode 1969, so it is technically possible.



*** Promotions based on merit apparently ''do'' occur in the SGC. Also, she got to Captain as part of an engineering career, but she already had two promotions during her ''combat'' career.

to:

*** ** Promotions based on merit apparently ''do'' occur in the SGC. Also, she got to Captain as part of an engineering career, but she already had two promotions during her ''combat'' career.



*** It's inaccurate compared to rifles yeah, but Teal'ce good enough that he could probably take her hand off easily enough (about the same size as a person at 30 yards).
*** Um, no. This is the same sort of argument people use to say "Well the police could have just shot him in the leg or the arm". Guns and marksmanship do not work like that, especially not in life-or-death situations. Guns are ''not'' as accurate as most videogames and movies make them seem, and staff weapons are less accurate than guns. Teal'c did what he had to do to save Daniel's life, and Daniel understands that and forgives him.

to:

*** ** It's inaccurate compared to rifles yeah, but Teal'ce good enough that he could probably take her hand off easily enough (about the same size as a person at 30 yards).
*** ** Um, no. This is the same sort of argument people use to say "Well the police could have just shot him in the leg or the arm". Guns and marksmanship do not work like that, especially not in life-or-death situations. Guns are ''not'' as accurate as most videogames and movies make them seem, and staff weapons are less accurate than guns. Teal'c did what he had to do to save Daniel's life, and Daniel understands that and forgives him.



*** Why not use the Asgard matter synthesizer to build a little robot to run the crystal back to the control room? Or just leave a videotape with the assumption that once the TDB is turned on, Sam will find it fairly quickly, and send HERSELF back through time, aging only a few hours (or weeks, if they don't notice it right away). Fact is, there was no need for Teal'c to have to age so much. When you can run time forwards and backwards at will, there's no rush.
*** Because all of that presumes a whole lot. It presumes no one will step on the tape or kick the robot over while the ship is being evacuated. It presumes someone will actually find the tape or pay attention to the robot. It presumes this would all even work with something that was created entirely after the time stop began rather than having previously existed. Teal'c going back was the only way to be absolutely certain that they wouldn't just be caught in an infinite loop, and after spending all those years on that ship, they wanted to be absolutely frikkin' certain.

to:

*** ** Why not use the Asgard matter synthesizer to build a little robot to run the crystal back to the control room? Or just leave a videotape with the assumption that once the TDB is turned on, Sam will find it fairly quickly, and send HERSELF back through time, aging only a few hours (or weeks, if they don't notice it right away). Fact is, there was no need for Teal'c to have to age so much. When you can run time forwards and backwards at will, there's no rush.
*** ** Because all of that presumes a whole lot. It presumes no one will step on the tape or kick the robot over while the ship is being evacuated. It presumes someone will actually find the tape or pay attention to the robot. It presumes this would all even work with something that was created entirely after the time stop began rather than having previously existed. Teal'c going back was the only way to be absolutely certain that they wouldn't just be caught in an infinite loop, and after spending all those years on that ship, they wanted to be absolutely frikkin' certain.



*** I think they eventually settled on the second one being the way for an incoming wormhole to activate. Perhaps Sam upgraded some firmware in the gate which (inadvertently) caused the dial-in time to speed up? Or perhaps it's indicative of the method of dialing on the other end? Spinning means the dialing was "manual" (ie, not using an ancient dialing device) while simply clicking in is done by using a DHD?
*** In at least one episode, the "chevrons lighting up" method is shown to have occurred on a planet that was dialed to from Earth, which we all know uses the "manual" method, so it's probably just an inconsistency.
*** There's actually another way that's only shown in one or two instances: all 7 chevrons light up simultaneously, followed by the ka-whoosh a few seconds later. Some have claimed that this is the correct way and that all of the others were production errors, since the destination gate technically isn't going to know it's being dialed until the source gate has received the final symbol (or at least until it's got the 6th symbol). In "Solitudes", when Sam tries dialing Earth's address, the SGC gate is shown with all 7 chevrons glowing simultaneously, and Daniel later describes it as being just like an incoming wormhole.

to:

*** ** I think they eventually settled on the second one being the way for an incoming wormhole to activate. Perhaps Sam upgraded some firmware in the gate which (inadvertently) caused the dial-in time to speed up? Or perhaps it's indicative of the method of dialing on the other end? Spinning means the dialing was "manual" (ie, not using an ancient dialing device) while simply clicking in is done by using a DHD?
*** ** In at least one episode, the "chevrons lighting up" method is shown to have occurred on a planet that was dialed to from Earth, which we all know uses the "manual" method, so it's probably just an inconsistency.
*** ** There's actually another way that's only shown in one or two instances: all 7 chevrons light up simultaneously, followed by the ka-whoosh a few seconds later. Some have claimed that this is the correct way and that all of the others were production errors, since the destination gate technically isn't going to know it's being dialed until the source gate has received the final symbol (or at least until it's got the 6th symbol). In "Solitudes", when Sam tries dialing Earth's address, the SGC gate is shown with all 7 chevrons glowing simultaneously, and Daniel later describes it as being just like an incoming wormhole.



*** Well that could be easily hand-waved as part of the process that caused him to be in his high-school years in the first place. The clone wasn't perfect. Granted, the DNA was supposed to be identical when Frasier checked him over, but Thor had to screw with his genes to stop him from falling apart. Sure, it's pushing it, but all they'd really need would be an actor who looks close enough. To be honest though, even given SG-1's habit of bringing back characters from seasons long past, we're a bit past the point where it would ever be reused.
*** Given the DNA shifting, therefore letting the clone look only similar to the original, it would be very much like the Stargate humor to beautify Kurt Russel into a twenty-something Jack.

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*** ** Well that could be easily hand-waved as part of the process that caused him to be in his high-school years in the first place. The clone wasn't perfect. Granted, the DNA was supposed to be identical when Frasier checked him over, but Thor had to screw with his genes to stop him from falling apart. Sure, it's pushing it, but all they'd really need would be an actor who looks close enough. To be honest though, even given SG-1's habit of bringing back characters from seasons long past, we're a bit past the point where it would ever be reused.
*** ** Given the DNA shifting, therefore letting the clone look only similar to the original, it would be very much like the Stargate humor to beautify Kurt Russel into a twenty-something Jack.



*** Yes UnfortunateImplications abound, but I'm just going to come out and say it: most men don't stop fantasizing about High School girls they just realize they can no longer safely pursue them. Case in point, the Japanese schoolgirl models who are really 22 but are made to look like children... O'neill wouldn't be the only man in existence who would pursue teenage girls if he was knocked back a few decades. As for the whole ''who would want to go back to high school?'' O'Neill Jr is now legally a different person. Unless the Air Force gave him a job (which ''wouldn't'' be anything like his former role, the most he could hope for would be a consultant or someone with a far lower rank) he would need to go back through the education system in order to aquire the qualifications to get a decent job. Finally you have to ask yourself this: would O'Neill Jr even WANT to rejoin the military? he has spent his entire life fighting - from the Gulf War right up to fully fledged alien invasions. Given a second chance at life maybe he would follow the alternate O'Neill's example from ''Moebius'' and run a boating business; not to mention the death of his son, which he still blames himself for. Stands to reason he would avoid guns and fighting altogether in an effort to stop things like ''leave a loaded gun/gun and ammo in close proximity around the house where your unsupervised child can reach it'' this time around.

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*** ** Yes UnfortunateImplications abound, but I'm just going to come out and say it: most men don't stop fantasizing about High School girls they just realize they can no longer safely pursue them. Case in point, the Japanese schoolgirl models who are really 22 but are made to look like children... O'neill wouldn't be the only man in existence who would pursue teenage girls if he was knocked back a few decades. As for the whole ''who would want to go back to high school?'' O'Neill Jr is now legally a different person. Unless the Air Force gave him a job (which ''wouldn't'' be anything like his former role, the most he could hope for would be a consultant or someone with a far lower rank) he would need to go back through the education system in order to aquire the qualifications to get a decent job. Finally you have to ask yourself this: would O'Neill Jr even WANT to rejoin the military? he has spent his entire life fighting - from the Gulf War right up to fully fledged alien invasions. Given a second chance at life maybe he would follow the alternate O'Neill's example from ''Moebius'' and run a boating business; not to mention the death of his son, which he still blames himself for. Stands to reason he would avoid guns and fighting altogether in an effort to stop things like ''leave a loaded gun/gun and ammo in close proximity around the house where your unsupervised child can reach it'' this time around.



*** [[AnalogyBackfire Cavemen don't possess the scientific method.]] There already exist theoretical designs for spaceships. We can build airtight ships. Giving humans knowledge of advanced Asgard technology, giving them the materials required, and provided they have an army of scientists and engineers whose job it is to make the best system possible, and a budget 100 times larger than the ISS[[note]]because seriously, it's the most important piece of military technology of the century[[/note]] -- that's more like giving the people who made the Rhodian colossus a crash course on blast furnace technology, giving them a blast furnace, coal and purified iron and ask them to make a steel suit of armor. It's not easy, but it's not at all impossible. The ''Prometheus'' is the most important line of defense against planetary invasion. It took the Americans 12 years to go from designing a space rocket to going to the moon and back. And that served barely any practical purpose. The Prometheus project would receive ten times the funds and work the Apollo project did. And most of it would be naval ship design made airtight.

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*** ** [[AnalogyBackfire Cavemen don't possess the scientific method.]] There already exist theoretical designs for spaceships. We can build airtight ships. Giving humans knowledge of advanced Asgard technology, giving them the materials required, and provided they have an army of scientists and engineers whose job it is to make the best system possible, and a budget 100 times larger than the ISS[[note]]because seriously, it's the most important piece of military technology of the century[[/note]] -- that's more like giving the people who made the Rhodian colossus a crash course on blast furnace technology, giving them a blast furnace, coal and purified iron and ask them to make a steel suit of armor. It's not easy, but it's not at all impossible. The ''Prometheus'' is the most important line of defense against planetary invasion. It took the Americans 12 years to go from designing a space rocket to going to the moon and back. And that served barely any practical purpose. The Prometheus project would receive ten times the funds and work the Apollo project did. And most of it would be naval ship design made airtight.



*** You could go one further, if you combine the fact the Asgard have beaming technology and the fact that Carter was able to knock up the Stargate equivalent of a replicator in Endless... we're essentially at a point where you have the capability of scanning bodies perfectly and the ability to create just about anything - seems like the Asgard could make just about any type of body they wanted, even one that was capable of ascension... but no, they decide to just blow themselves up.
*** After reading the above comment, this thought hit me: why didn't the Asdguard start cloning and using Human bodies? We know they can at least clone humans, as they've done it to O'niel, at least. For that matter, why don't they use clones of the *Ancients*? We've never met any alive? But we have, we thawed one out in Antarctica, and I see no reason we wouldn't still have her body (and her genetic material) around. Hell, for that matter, why don't they try seeing if the Nox would let the Asdguard sample their DNA? Do you think the "We <3 Everyone" Nox wouldn't let the great and noble Asdguard clone them to save their race from extinction?\\

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*** ** You could go one further, if you combine the fact the Asgard have beaming technology and the fact that Carter was able to knock up the Stargate equivalent of a replicator in Endless... we're essentially at a point where you have the capability of scanning bodies perfectly and the ability to create just about anything - seems like the Asgard could make just about any type of body they wanted, even one that was capable of ascension... but no, they decide to just blow themselves up.
*** ** After reading the above comment, this thought hit me: why didn't the Asdguard start cloning and using Human bodies? We know they can at least clone humans, as they've done it to O'niel, at least. For that matter, why don't they use clones of the *Ancients*? We've never met any alive? But we have, we thawed one out in Antarctica, and I see no reason we wouldn't still have her body (and her genetic material) around. Hell, for that matter, why don't they try seeing if the Nox would let the Asdguard sample their DNA? Do you think the "We <3 Everyone" Nox wouldn't let the great and noble Asdguard clone them to save their race from extinction?\\



*** I guess they couldn't just start cloning older bodies if we are to take into account that the current Asgards' brains have evolved. The older bodies' brains couldn't handle the knowledge. Maybe that's why they just keep cloning their last body (just making it look younger and more fresh) and that's why the degradation keeps building up to a point where it's impossible to keep cloning. I think it is mentioned that by the time they realized of these degradation problems it was too late to do something to correct it.
*** Thor actually says that the reason they could no longer clone themselves is because their final attempt to forestall the process generated an irreparable genetic degradation. While cloning had blocked off their ability to evolve to ascension because of how they were tampering with their bodies (more brainpower etc.), it was their attempt to fix that very problem they created for themselves which wound up screwing them over.
*** Irreparable in the ''current generation of clones'' I can believe, but are we supposed to believe that that they have somehow managed to contaminate ''every single sample of Asgard DNA in their entire genetic library''!!? Every cell sample that could have been used to create a new generation of clones? Sorry, but that was just lazy writing. A convenient explanation for why the Asgard would dump every single piece of technology they possess into our primitive laps.

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*** ** I guess they couldn't just start cloning older bodies if we are to take into account that the current Asgards' brains have evolved. The older bodies' brains couldn't handle the knowledge. Maybe that's why they just keep cloning their last body (just making it look younger and more fresh) and that's why the degradation keeps building up to a point where it's impossible to keep cloning. I think it is mentioned that by the time they realized of these degradation problems it was too late to do something to correct it.
*** ** Thor actually says that the reason they could no longer clone themselves is because their final attempt to forestall the process generated an irreparable genetic degradation. While cloning had blocked off their ability to evolve to ascension because of how they were tampering with their bodies (more brainpower etc.), it was their attempt to fix that very problem they created for themselves which wound up screwing them over.
*** ** Irreparable in the ''current generation of clones'' I can believe, but are we supposed to believe that that they have somehow managed to contaminate ''every single sample of Asgard DNA in their entire genetic library''!!? Every cell sample that could have been used to create a new generation of clones? Sorry, but that was just lazy writing. A convenient explanation for why the Asgard would dump every single piece of technology they possess into our primitive laps.



*** Before the Russian's had their water troubles the SGC was completely taken over by a group of aliens. Not to mention the Goa'uld SG member. Sure a lot of Russians have died on screen, but so have a lot of SGC members, and just about every problem the Russian Stargate program has suffered from was first a problem for the SGC.

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*** ** Before the Russian's had their water troubles the SGC was completely taken over by a group of aliens. Not to mention the Goa'uld SG member. Sure a lot of Russians have died on screen, but so have a lot of SGC members, and just about every problem the Russian Stargate program has suffered from was first a problem for the SGC.



*** Alar wasn't just going to teach us about missiles, he was willing to share everything. Power supplies, shield technology and medicine. Things that could have been used to save Earth and protect the planet. Jack was perfectly willing to support a war he knew nothing about to get that technology, but not this? Besides, the man was no threat to him, he didn't kill him in self defence. Why not take him to Earth and keep him locked up in a cell for life? The scumbag gets whats coming to him and all of Earth benefits from better defences and medicine. Win, win scenario.
*** Simply put, Jack was outraged by Alar's actions and motivations. And, probably, he was a little mad at himself for supporting them once he found out just what they were up to. So, he took it out on the most deserving target available to him. Remember, Jack plays TheMcCoy quite often in this show, so he's prone to acting on emotion rather than rationality at times.
*** The US did exactly that with Unit 731, the Japanese biological weapons research team during WW2. They were given immunity from prosecution in exchange for their research.
*** See Operation Paperclip. The US wanted scientists from Nazi Germany to help in their own technological development but Truman didn't want any actual Nazis to be granted asylum. The people in charge of the operation gave Wernher von Braun and Arthur Rudolph new papers because they thought that a guilty conscience was a small price to pay for American technological superiority. O'Neil really screwed up on that one.
*** That's the logic of Senator Kinsey and the NID. Having historical precedent does not make something morally right. Stargate Command is supposed to be the Good Guys™, and General Hammond in particular has stated that as long as he is in command "the SGC will hold itself to the highest ethical standard", even if it goes against their immediate interests. The SGC has made a point of acting against human rights violations and war crimes within their jurisdiction (i.e. anywhere except Earth). Oh, I'm sure the NID under Col. Simmons would have been willing to do a Paperclip for Alar. I'm also sure they'd have kidnapped Apophis a host who wouldn't be missed before Sokar rendered the question moot in "Serpent's Song". The Eurondans trying to wipe out the rest of their planet's population for not being blond blue-eyed whites is no morally different than the Goa'uld wiping out entire civilizations because they could possibly be a threat at some unforeseeable point in the future, or the Aschen turning inhabited planets into farmland after sterilizing the inhabitants. Just because the USA put Earth Nazis into witness protection doesn't mean the SGC should do the same for Space Nazis. {{Telefrag}}ging Alar was a more merciful death than the son of a bitch deserved, and Jack even warned him not to follow SG-1 to Earth.
*** Offering someone immunity from prosecution, and a free ride in exchange for tech? I can see the argument for that being morally cowardice. But slamming the escape door closed and leaving them to die? that's not the only other option. "Holding yourself to the highest moral standards" generally *doesn't* involve deliberately killing people in a judge-jury-and-executioner manner, following one person's snap decision based on information they've only had 5 minutes to consider and no chance to verify. It seems as if Jack decided to condemn a large number of people to death for being bigots. Where's the diplomatic option? "We'll give you enough heavy water to power your shield generators, if you immediately cease offensive actions and at least *try* to negotiate a peace"
*** "We'll give you _____ if you'll promise not to continue offensive actions" is pretty much Europe's entire lead-up to World War II. It would only have encouraged them to string along the SGC with, "Yes, see? We're trying!" as they continued the war of extermination that they started. Peaceful coexistence stopped being an option when one side decided to start gassing literally the whole planet.
*** All arguments about the morality of killing him are lost when you take into account that they're all too happy to give any goa'uld asylum in exchange for information.
*** "It seems as if Jack decided to condemn a large number of people to death for being bigots." Uh, no, he was condemning them for being ''genocidal maniacs'', or did you miss that part of the episode? Jack's decision was ''arguably'' a moral grey area. But hardly one he should be expected to apologize for, or even feel bad for. Suppose a person from a neutral country during WWII stumbled upon Adolf Hitler about to die from a fatal stab wound. He could save Hitler's life, but instead he decides to let Hitler die, because he knows all the horrible things that Hitler has done. Should that person feel bad about letting a genocidal mass murderer die? Has he done something wrong by refusing to save Hitler's life?

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*** ** Alar wasn't just going to teach us about missiles, he was willing to share everything. Power supplies, shield technology and medicine. Things that could have been used to save Earth and protect the planet. Jack was perfectly willing to support a war he knew nothing about to get that technology, but not this? Besides, the man was no threat to him, he didn't kill him in self defence. Why not take him to Earth and keep him locked up in a cell for life? The scumbag gets whats coming to him and all of Earth benefits from better defences and medicine. Win, win scenario.
*** ** Simply put, Jack was outraged by Alar's actions and motivations. And, probably, he was a little mad at himself for supporting them once he found out just what they were up to. So, he took it out on the most deserving target available to him. Remember, Jack plays TheMcCoy quite often in this show, so he's prone to acting on emotion rather than rationality at times.
*** ** The US did exactly that with Unit 731, the Japanese biological weapons research team during WW2. They were given immunity from prosecution in exchange for their research.
*** ** See Operation Paperclip. The US wanted scientists from Nazi Germany to help in their own technological development but Truman didn't want any actual Nazis to be granted asylum. The people in charge of the operation gave Wernher von Braun and Arthur Rudolph new papers because they thought that a guilty conscience was a small price to pay for American technological superiority. O'Neil really screwed up on that one.
*** ** That's the logic of Senator Kinsey and the NID. Having historical precedent does not make something morally right. Stargate Command is supposed to be the Good Guys™, and General Hammond in particular has stated that as long as he is in command "the SGC will hold itself to the highest ethical standard", even if it goes against their immediate interests. The SGC has made a point of acting against human rights violations and war crimes within their jurisdiction (i.e. anywhere except Earth). Oh, I'm sure the NID under Col. Simmons would have been willing to do a Paperclip for Alar. I'm also sure they'd have kidnapped Apophis a host who wouldn't be missed before Sokar rendered the question moot in "Serpent's Song". The Eurondans trying to wipe out the rest of their planet's population for not being blond blue-eyed whites is no morally different than the Goa'uld wiping out entire civilizations because they could possibly be a threat at some unforeseeable point in the future, or the Aschen turning inhabited planets into farmland after sterilizing the inhabitants. Just because the USA put Earth Nazis into witness protection doesn't mean the SGC should do the same for Space Nazis. {{Telefrag}}ging Alar was a more merciful death than the son of a bitch deserved, and Jack even warned him not to follow SG-1 to Earth.
*** ** Offering someone immunity from prosecution, and a free ride in exchange for tech? I can see the argument for that being morally cowardice. But slamming the escape door closed and leaving them to die? that's not the only other option. "Holding yourself to the highest moral standards" generally *doesn't* involve deliberately killing people in a judge-jury-and-executioner manner, following one person's snap decision based on information they've only had 5 minutes to consider and no chance to verify. It seems as if Jack decided to condemn a large number of people to death for being bigots. Where's the diplomatic option? "We'll give you enough heavy water to power your shield generators, if you immediately cease offensive actions and at least *try* to negotiate a peace"
*** ** "We'll give you _____ if you'll promise not to continue offensive actions" is pretty much Europe's entire lead-up to World War II. It would only have encouraged them to string along the SGC with, "Yes, see? We're trying!" as they continued the war of extermination that they started. Peaceful coexistence stopped being an option when one side decided to start gassing literally the whole planet.
*** ** All arguments about the morality of killing him are lost when you take into account that they're all too happy to give any goa'uld asylum in exchange for information.
*** ** "It seems as if Jack decided to condemn a large number of people to death for being bigots." Uh, no, he was condemning them for being ''genocidal maniacs'', or did you miss that part of the episode? Jack's decision was ''arguably'' a moral grey area. But hardly one he should be expected to apologize for, or even feel bad for. Suppose a person from a neutral country during WWII stumbled upon Adolf Hitler about to die from a fatal stab wound. He could save Hitler's life, but instead he decides to let Hitler die, because he knows all the horrible things that Hitler has done. Should that person feel bad about letting a genocidal mass murderer die? Has he done something wrong by refusing to save Hitler's life?



*** Also they may have created the religion, but they had to convert people to it. Generally peaceful religions do a better job winning converts and any sort of violence comes later. Once they had people born in it they might have had people who were convinced the violent way was the proper way to interpret it though. Also maybe the energy put off by "You're so awesome, we love you," worship is more potent than "Please don't hurt us, we'll do anything," worship
*** One gets the impression that Origen ''was'' a pretty peaceful religion for some time back home -- The thing that makes Vala's husband start questioning his orders is when he notices that the way the Priors are teaching it ''now'' conflicts with the way they taught it when he was a child. It may be easier to keep the faithful in line with a "good" religion for 90% of the time, and only switch over to the bloodier version when it's crusadin' time.

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*** ** Also they may have created the religion, but they had to convert people to it. Generally peaceful religions do a better job winning converts and any sort of violence comes later. Once they had people born in it they might have had people who were convinced the violent way was the proper way to interpret it though. Also maybe the energy put off by "You're so awesome, we love you," worship is more potent than "Please don't hurt us, we'll do anything," worship
*** ** One gets the impression that Origen ''was'' a pretty peaceful religion for some time back home -- The thing that makes Vala's husband start questioning his orders is when he notices that the way the Priors are teaching it ''now'' conflicts with the way they taught it when he was a child. It may be easier to keep the faithful in line with a "good" religion for 90% of the time, and only switch over to the bloodier version when it's crusadin' time.



*** This makes a lot of sense, and explains the Ancient's unwillingness to do anything that looks like playing god- they already fled from a shining example of good intentions paving a path straight to hell.

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*** ** This makes a lot of sense, and explains the Ancient's unwillingness to do anything that looks like playing god- they already fled from a shining example of good intentions paving a path straight to hell.



*** Err, no. You are basically suggesting that SGC should risk having our WHOLE PLANET DIE HORRIBLY to whatever the Goa'uld throw at it and I remind you: orbital bombardment, slavery, extinction level asteroids, exploding gates etc etc. So some people on some planet learn that not only are they not alone but also are lameassed farmers who suck. I certainly do not want to see our planet die just to protect some farming communities backwater way of viewing the world. Cant make omlette without breaking some eggs. In a fight for your life, things such as morals and principles have to go out of the window asap. Just remember how useful the technology given by that nazi race could have been in all the near doom scenarios the SGC had over the years. Especially since you can take what they have and then go dispose of them for whatever reason later on when its fitting your plans. SGC wasted a lot of chances to get tech just for morals and principles. It may have worked out well enough thanks to the incredibly luck o'neil had when budding up with the asgard. God knows this could have gone really BAD without those guys. Point in case: Wasting your chances to get vital tech is bad. Doubly so when doing it out of reason of non interference rule or some such BS.
*** Telford totally calls O'Neill on this in ''Series/StargateUniverse'', but we're not supposed to take him seriously. Regardless, Stargate Command isn't like the Federation. They really are looking out for number 1, and with the Goa'uld poised to snuff out their little corner of the universe should they feel the need to, you can hardly blame them for being somewhat lax in their intereference policies. They do draw a line at helping other civilizations win wars, at least when the benefit for doing so isn't all that immediate.

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*** ** Err, no. You are basically suggesting that SGC should risk having our WHOLE PLANET DIE HORRIBLY to whatever the Goa'uld throw at it and I remind you: orbital bombardment, slavery, extinction level asteroids, exploding gates etc etc. So some people on some planet learn that not only are they not alone but also are lameassed farmers who suck. I certainly do not want to see our planet die just to protect some farming communities backwater way of viewing the world. Cant make omlette without breaking some eggs. In a fight for your life, things such as morals and principles have to go out of the window asap. Just remember how useful the technology given by that nazi race could have been in all the near doom scenarios the SGC had over the years. Especially since you can take what they have and then go dispose of them for whatever reason later on when its fitting your plans. SGC wasted a lot of chances to get tech just for morals and principles. It may have worked out well enough thanks to the incredibly luck o'neil had when budding up with the asgard. God knows this could have gone really BAD without those guys. Point in case: Wasting your chances to get vital tech is bad. Doubly so when doing it out of reason of non interference rule or some such BS.
*** ** Telford totally calls O'Neill on this in ''Series/StargateUniverse'', but we're not supposed to take him seriously. Regardless, Stargate Command isn't like the Federation. They really are looking out for number 1, and with the Goa'uld poised to snuff out their little corner of the universe should they feel the need to, you can hardly blame them for being somewhat lax in their intereference policies. They do draw a line at helping other civilizations win wars, at least when the benefit for doing so isn't all that immediate.



*** Manpower is always an issue. Four people has, apparently, been determined to be the most economical team they can send out, so you double up on roles. SG-1 has, as you suggested, a translator (Daniel) and scientist (Sam), with Daniel also doubling as a diplomat, as he can determine local customs and languages. Sam doubles as part of the "military escort" you mentioned. Teal'c is humanity's single best source for information on the other worlds and Goa'uld in general for the first couple of seasons, ''and'' he's a badass supersoldier. There is risk, yes, that someone will see the sigil on his head first and cause trouble, but that's a risk they're willing to take for the sake of his input--that said, I don't recall ''any'' enemies that the SGC gains just from having Teal'c go out with SG-1. Some single-episode conflict, sure, but nothing lasting.\\\

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*** ** Manpower is always an issue. Four people has, apparently, been determined to be the most economical team they can send out, so you double up on roles. SG-1 has, as you suggested, a translator (Daniel) and scientist (Sam), with Daniel also doubling as a diplomat, as he can determine local customs and languages. Sam doubles as part of the "military escort" you mentioned. Teal'c is humanity's single best source for information on the other worlds and Goa'uld in general for the first couple of seasons, ''and'' he's a badass supersoldier. There is risk, yes, that someone will see the sigil on his head first and cause trouble, but that's a risk they're willing to take for the sake of his input--that said, I don't recall ''any'' enemies that the SGC gains just from having Teal'c go out with SG-1. Some single-episode conflict, sure, but nothing lasting.\\\



*** Actually, according to Zelenka, it basically [[LiesToChildren ''is'' a giant battery that is impossible to recharge.]] [[TechnoBabble It extracts vacuum energy from]] [[HammerSpace an artificially created region of subspace-time]] until maximum entropy is reached and the artificial region of subspace-time collapses, at which point you're left with an utterly useless giant crystal. The difficult part therefore is not creating the physical component (which, with the Asgard fabricator, you can pretty much do all day long), it's creating the artificial region of subspace-time and then presumably containing it.
*** Indeed. [=ZPMs=] are not, and never were, an limitless energy source. If fully-charged [=ZPMs=] could be run off a production line located somewhere in Atlantis at a rate of knots, then a) there'd be more of them lying around; b) it's difficult to see how the Ancients could ever have lost the war with the Wraith; and c) Project Arcturus would have been completely unnecesssary. [=ZPMs=] are used for applications that require incredibly high energy/power to weight/volume ratios, such as interstellar vessels and planetary defence platforms. It wouldn't surprise me if the mechanism for creating them wasn't a Naquadah reactor the size of a small moon that got blown up by the Wraith at the beginning of the war.

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*** ** Actually, according to Zelenka, it basically [[LiesToChildren ''is'' a giant battery that is impossible to recharge.]] [[TechnoBabble It extracts vacuum energy from]] [[HammerSpace an artificially created region of subspace-time]] until maximum entropy is reached and the artificial region of subspace-time collapses, at which point you're left with an utterly useless giant crystal. The difficult part therefore is not creating the physical component (which, with the Asgard fabricator, you can pretty much do all day long), it's creating the artificial region of subspace-time and then presumably containing it.
*** ** Indeed. [=ZPMs=] are not, and never were, an limitless energy source. If fully-charged [=ZPMs=] could be run off a production line located somewhere in Atlantis at a rate of knots, then a) there'd be more of them lying around; b) it's difficult to see how the Ancients could ever have lost the war with the Wraith; and c) Project Arcturus would have been completely unnecesssary. [=ZPMs=] are used for applications that require incredibly high energy/power to weight/volume ratios, such as interstellar vessels and planetary defence platforms. It wouldn't surprise me if the mechanism for creating them wasn't a Naquadah reactor the size of a small moon that got blown up by the Wraith at the beginning of the war.



*** No way in hell did they use that much water. They probably used a gallon, tops, and just enlarged the footage.
*** Uh, no. A gallon is a very very small amount. You're talking about a freaking milk carton. They did it by positioning a jet engine over a tank of water. That's a lot more than a gallon.
*** I fail to see why you would need a jet engine to achieve that sort of effect. Look at the movie: The inital flush just looks like someone dropping something into water, which is then reversed. This is followed by the other end of the gate in some kind of whirlpool effect (this bit's entirely absent from the show). How do you need a bloody ''jet engine'' to do either of those?
*** It doesn't matter what you think it looks like. That's how they did it. No two ways about it. But, to give an explanation, dropping something into the water does not create the same effect as the Stargate opening. Air does not sink, hence the jet engine. Furthermore, doing on a small scale and enlarging it would cause distortions. Doing it life-sized and pasting it in creates a more realistic effect.

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*** ** No way in hell did they use that much water. They probably used a gallon, tops, and just enlarged the footage.
*** ** Uh, no. A gallon is a very very small amount. You're talking about a freaking milk carton. They did it by positioning a jet engine over a tank of water. That's a lot more than a gallon.
*** ** I fail to see why you would need a jet engine to achieve that sort of effect. Look at the movie: The inital flush just looks like someone dropping something into water, which is then reversed. This is followed by the other end of the gate in some kind of whirlpool effect (this bit's entirely absent from the show). How do you need a bloody ''jet engine'' to do either of those?
*** ** It doesn't matter what you think it looks like. That's how they did it. No two ways about it. But, to give an explanation, dropping something into the water does not create the same effect as the Stargate opening. Air does not sink, hence the jet engine. Furthermore, doing on a small scale and enlarging it would cause distortions. Doing it life-sized and pasting it in creates a more realistic effect.



*** But then, wouldn't the conversation continue: "Yes, we do. It has a force field which can withstand nuclear bombardment and has enough weaponry to blow up your capital city. Now what are you going to do about it." It's not as if Russia, the US and China aren't already the dominant military powers. Any weapon in the hands of the US, China and/or Russia which doesn't prevent their countries from being annihilated by firing 100 nukes at it does not change the balance of power on Earth. There is no difference between being able to destroy your enemy's cities in 10 minutes or in 60, as long as MAD stays true. Only now, they could better enforce the ban on nuclear proliferation. A simple WaveMotionGun attack on Kim Jong Il's palace and another ship on standby to deflect any missile launch, and bam! Nuclear threat emliminated. Similar operations could be used to topple dictatorial regimes all across the globe, at a much lower cost than the present wars/peace missions. Yes, there would be a lot of rapid change, but ask yourself: would you seriously start panicking if the countries which already have enough bombs to blow up the Earth 20 times over within 2 hours get orbital death rays that can do the same thing in 5 minutes? No, I think this is standard ReedRichardsIsUseless.
*** For starters China could (as in real life) greatly restrict the international sales of rare earth metals unless the U.S handed over the technology. Besides that it wouldn't be at all difficult for Russia or China to promptly show much more aggression in Southeast Asia and Eastern Europe/Central Asia respectively. As for not freaking out, when China announced it had an aircraft carrier (something the entire world knew for years) it made international news. I suspect they would ''not'' calmly accept America possessing an interstellar aircraft carrier.

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*** ** But then, wouldn't the conversation continue: "Yes, we do. It has a force field which can withstand nuclear bombardment and has enough weaponry to blow up your capital city. Now what are you going to do about it." It's not as if Russia, the US and China aren't already the dominant military powers. Any weapon in the hands of the US, China and/or Russia which doesn't prevent their countries from being annihilated by firing 100 nukes at it does not change the balance of power on Earth. There is no difference between being able to destroy your enemy's cities in 10 minutes or in 60, as long as MAD stays true. Only now, they could better enforce the ban on nuclear proliferation. A simple WaveMotionGun attack on Kim Jong Il's palace and another ship on standby to deflect any missile launch, and bam! Nuclear threat emliminated. Similar operations could be used to topple dictatorial regimes all across the globe, at a much lower cost than the present wars/peace missions. Yes, there would be a lot of rapid change, but ask yourself: would you seriously start panicking if the countries which already have enough bombs to blow up the Earth 20 times over within 2 hours get orbital death rays that can do the same thing in 5 minutes? No, I think this is standard ReedRichardsIsUseless.
*** ** For starters China could (as in real life) greatly restrict the international sales of rare earth metals unless the U.S handed over the technology. Besides that it wouldn't be at all difficult for Russia or China to promptly show much more aggression in Southeast Asia and Eastern Europe/Central Asia respectively. As for not freaking out, when China announced it had an aircraft carrier (something the entire world knew for years) it made international news. I suspect they would ''not'' calmly accept America possessing an interstellar aircraft carrier.



*** Plus it's been shown that metal conducts a zat fire and when you consider that Jaffa tend to wear entire suits made of metal, it's possible that the energy is intensified.

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*** ** Plus it's been shown that metal conducts a zat fire and when you consider that Jaffa tend to wear entire suits made of metal, it's possible that the energy is intensified.



*** First of all, Rodney looked genuinely terrified whever Mitchell brought out that lemon. Secondly, that episode doesn't portray him as lovable. It portayed the other's reactions to him as though he were still in "48 Hours".
*** The lemon wouldn't have hurt him. Rodney is a hypochondriac to the extreme. I don't think he was actually allergic to anything.
*** Lorne wasn't all that fond of him at first, either. Obviously [=McKay=] is just more grating to people he hasn't met yet.
*** I suppose. Still, in that season six two part opening Carter and [=McKay=] bonded a little. She went as far as to kiss him on the cheek. She couldn't of quietly told Mitchell "Yes, he's annoying, but he means well."?
*** Would it really have helped? He wouldn't be any less annoying for the effort, and others would be less likely to put up with him. Part of the blame also has to fall on Sheppard for this, since he encouraged Mitchell's bad behavior.
*** Yes, it most likely would have helped. Even annoying people appreciate being ressured that not everyone on the planet is out to get them. And yes, the blame should fall on Sheppard as well.
*** "Rodney looked genuinely terrified whever Mitchell brought out that lemon." Well, Rodney can be a bit neurotic. It's possible he overreacted.
*** There's an even greater possibility that it was an icredably tasteless joke.
*** That too.

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*** ** First of all, Rodney looked genuinely terrified whever Mitchell brought out that lemon. Secondly, that episode doesn't portray him as lovable. It portayed the other's reactions to him as though he were still in "48 Hours".
*** ** The lemon wouldn't have hurt him. Rodney is a hypochondriac to the extreme. I don't think he was actually allergic to anything.
*** ** Lorne wasn't all that fond of him at first, either. Obviously [=McKay=] is just more grating to people he hasn't met yet.
*** ** I suppose. Still, in that season six two part opening Carter and [=McKay=] bonded a little. She went as far as to kiss him on the cheek. She couldn't of quietly told Mitchell "Yes, he's annoying, but he means well."?
*** ** Would it really have helped? He wouldn't be any less annoying for the effort, and others would be less likely to put up with him. Part of the blame also has to fall on Sheppard for this, since he encouraged Mitchell's bad behavior.
*** ** Yes, it most likely would have helped. Even annoying people appreciate being ressured that not everyone on the planet is out to get them. And yes, the blame should fall on Sheppard as well.
*** ** "Rodney looked genuinely terrified whever Mitchell brought out that lemon." Well, Rodney can be a bit neurotic. It's possible he overreacted.
*** ** There's an even greater possibility that it was an icredably tasteless joke.
*** ** That too.



*** IIRC, it was either implied or outright stated that the coup was going down in matter of days. And even just securing the gate would still have been a violation of U.S law if it was to support a coup.
*** It's not exactly on the up and up to have started no less than three ''seperate'' interstellar/intergalactic wars, either. As far as US law goes, you can handwave it as only applying to Earth and call it a day. Or national security concerns. Really, as long as the entire project is secret, they can get away with a lot.
*** Only if you assume none of their superiors are willing to hold them accountable. And recall that everyone who knows about the Stargate program is certain it'll one day go public. If and when it does, the SGC doesn't want a pile of illegal and morally questionable actions on their records.

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*** ** IIRC, it was either implied or outright stated that the coup was going down in matter of days. And even just securing the gate would still have been a violation of U.S law if it was to support a coup.
*** ** It's not exactly on the up and up to have started no less than three ''seperate'' interstellar/intergalactic wars, either. As far as US law goes, you can handwave it as only applying to Earth and call it a day. Or national security concerns. Really, as long as the entire project is secret, they can get away with a lot.
*** ** Only if you assume none of their superiors are willing to hold them accountable. And recall that everyone who knows about the Stargate program is certain it'll one day go public. If and when it does, the SGC doesn't want a pile of illegal and morally questionable actions on their records.



*** The reason that not everyone agrees is that the movie clearly shows that you're wrong. Because among other things, Cam's nose didn't grow bigger over the couple of years he spent in the past.

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*** ** The reason that not everyone agrees is that the movie clearly shows that you're wrong. Because among other things, Cam's nose didn't grow bigger over the couple of years he spent in the past.



*** Because it's standardized. Say you have a list of 300 planets. When you got the list, they were all given numerical designations; since then, you've found 50 of them have names. Now, are you going to go with the sorting system that encompasses ''all'' the planets, or keep two different listings for the sake of a minority of those planets? The latter is just more complicated.
*** They probably don't even know the names for most of those planets. Even assuming the planet is inhabited and they can ask the locals about its name, they need to actually explore it first. For ''some'' planets known to the Goa'uld, Teal'c may know their Goa'uld names, but it's unlikely he has that many of them memorized.

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*** ** Because it's standardized. Say you have a list of 300 planets. When you got the list, they were all given numerical designations; since then, you've found 50 of them have names. Now, are you going to go with the sorting system that encompasses ''all'' the planets, or keep two different listings for the sake of a minority of those planets? The latter is just more complicated.
*** ** They probably don't even know the names for most of those planets. Even assuming the planet is inhabited and they can ask the locals about its name, they need to actually explore it first. For ''some'' planets known to the Goa'uld, Teal'c may know their Goa'uld names, but it's unlikely he has that many of them memorized.



*** The president would do the signing, but at that point in the show the vast majority of the country (including Congress) would have had no idea that any of this was going on. Normally you could assume that this was actually a memorandum of understanding, which is often used by the president when a legal treaty is impossible, but at multiple points they specifically referred to it as a treaty. Of course these are soldiers and not diplomats so they simply might not have known the difference.
*** Or, y'know, it's a treaty being signed in a secret facility where a secret program is conducted and the other signatory is a bunch of aliens who are trying to help us keep our planet from being blown up, so maybe they figured they're in uncharted waters and just went with what worked rather than strict adherence to the way our government's set up. The setting has multiple secret space-warships zooming around, I really don't think they're going to quibble over not following our guidelines for treaties to the letter.

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*** ** The president would do the signing, but at that point in the show the vast majority of the country (including Congress) would have had no idea that any of this was going on. Normally you could assume that this was actually a memorandum of understanding, which is often used by the president when a legal treaty is impossible, but at multiple points they specifically referred to it as a treaty. Of course these are soldiers and not diplomats so they simply might not have known the difference.
*** ** Or, y'know, it's a treaty being signed in a secret facility where a secret program is conducted and the other signatory is a bunch of aliens who are trying to help us keep our planet from being blown up, so maybe they figured they're in uncharted waters and just went with what worked rather than strict adherence to the way our government's set up. The setting has multiple secret space-warships zooming around, I really don't think they're going to quibble over not following our guidelines for treaties to the letter.



*** However, there are a number of planets that apparently have been forgotten by the Goa'uld and left in peace for centuries, yet they show no sign of technical development. If things start progressing on such places, I do not see how the Goa'uld could notice anything before they get to the lever of developing something like wireless radio transmitters. (Even if you were sitting on the Moon, how could you observe anything about the level of technology on Earth before circa 1850?) Not to mention there's also several planets where the humans are free from the Goa'uld, yet they habitually use technology left behind by them or other spacefaring species, and those escape notice as well.
*** Admittedly, my memory of the series isn't that good, but a lot of civilizations are much smaller in population than Earth standard. A smaller population sample would hinder development. Some could have also deliberately regressed. Earth has also had a lot of wars to help spur progress.
*** Another possible explanation is that the teams quite simply haven't come across that many civilisations due to pure chance. There are thousands of gate addresses in their logs.
*** They do encounter a few. Off the top of my head there's the planet of people that all lost their memory shortly before SG-1 showed up and the planet that had been de-populated by an alien bioweapon so that they could use it as farmland. Both of those were roughly early 20th century-equivalent before disaster struck. However, look at it this way: The "ancient" civilizations they find range from know-of-agriculture-but-nothing-else up to just-pre-industrial-revolution. That's a span of roughly 8 000 years in Earth history, while a relatively "modern" society would only be recognizable in about the last 150 years. So the odds of them encountering a civilization even remotely on-par with ours is quite low. Odds are that they'll either be pre-industrial or will have had their industrial revolution 200+ years ago and so be far ahead of us (just look at how far we've come in 10 years, never mind a hundred). It's also worth noting that human history is littered with cultures that became quite advanced before eventually collapsing and losing their technology (the Romans had indoor heating and plumbing, for example, which were lost when the western empire fell.) so those "primitive" societies may have simply suffered a natural societal collapse that set them back.

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*** ** However, there are a number of planets that apparently have been forgotten by the Goa'uld and left in peace for centuries, yet they show no sign of technical development. If things start progressing on such places, I do not see how the Goa'uld could notice anything before they get to the lever of developing something like wireless radio transmitters. (Even if you were sitting on the Moon, how could you observe anything about the level of technology on Earth before circa 1850?) Not to mention there's also several planets where the humans are free from the Goa'uld, yet they habitually use technology left behind by them or other spacefaring species, and those escape notice as well.
*** ** Admittedly, my memory of the series isn't that good, but a lot of civilizations are much smaller in population than Earth standard. A smaller population sample would hinder development. Some could have also deliberately regressed. Earth has also had a lot of wars to help spur progress.
*** ** Another possible explanation is that the teams quite simply haven't come across that many civilisations due to pure chance. There are thousands of gate addresses in their logs.
*** ** They do encounter a few. Off the top of my head there's the planet of people that all lost their memory shortly before SG-1 showed up and the planet that had been de-populated by an alien bioweapon so that they could use it as farmland. Both of those were roughly early 20th century-equivalent before disaster struck. However, look at it this way: The "ancient" civilizations they find range from know-of-agriculture-but-nothing-else up to just-pre-industrial-revolution. That's a span of roughly 8 000 years in Earth history, while a relatively "modern" society would only be recognizable in about the last 150 years. So the odds of them encountering a civilization even remotely on-par with ours is quite low. Odds are that they'll either be pre-industrial or will have had their industrial revolution 200+ years ago and so be far ahead of us (just look at how far we've come in 10 years, never mind a hundred). It's also worth noting that human history is littered with cultures that became quite advanced before eventually collapsing and losing their technology (the Romans had indoor heating and plumbing, for example, which were lost when the western empire fell.) so those "primitive" societies may have simply suffered a natural societal collapse that set them back.



*** Putting aside the fact that there are probably hundreds more of those settlements on the planet, many of these planets are aware of the stargate system, and could possibly use it for dating (hell, even those people who kept Unas as slaves used it to get new blood for their Unas.

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*** ** Putting aside the fact that there are probably hundreds more of those settlements on the planet, many of these planets are aware of the stargate system, and could possibly use it for dating (hell, even those people who kept Unas as slaves used it to get new blood for their Unas.



*** Except that Daniel Jackson should have been fully aware that the Viking history was (much like Egyptian) at least partially marked by slavery, piracy and wars of aggression and conquest which the Asgard didn't seem interested in discouraging. Also that still doesn't explain why he specifically chose the Norse when he should have known that Christianity had greatly skewed the mythology which could quite possibly hide a darker past. For that matter IIRC he never actually had anything before presenting before Teal'c to suggest that the Asgard had actually existed. Simply because aliens had taken the roles of Egyptian gods one wouldn't normally conclude that every major mythology was definitely based on actual alien visitors.
*** Viking ''history'' is full of slavery, piracy, and war, yes. But we're talking about mythology here, and there's little evidence that the Norse gods themselves encouraged such behavior. Besides, the precise distinction Daniel drew was between "tyrant" gods and "knowledge giver" gods. Daniel's point was the Egyptian gods were tyrants, but the Norse gods generally were not (though as I said, he was using a rather liberal interpretation). Also, it seemed to this troper that he was merely suggesting that the SGC investigate the possibility. Drawing up a proposal, as it were. Obviously he couldn't know ''for sure'' that other "gods" were aliens who were hostile to the Goa'uld and friendly to humans, but the SGC didn't have anything to lose by at least trying to find out.
*** Yeah, Daniel is just sorta outlining a theory at that point. As the previous troper said, making a proposal to, perhaps, look into it more in depth. It's only once Teal'c recognizes Thor's Hammer--and, in fact, recognizes it as something that scares the Goa'uld enough that they go out of their way to make sure the Jaffa know not to dial the address for it even accidentally--that they really conclude that the Norse gods were aliens and could be allies. Hell, if Teal'c hadn't spoken up, maybe Daniel would've continued his presentation with another set of benevolent gods.

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*** ** Except that Daniel Jackson should have been fully aware that the Viking history was (much like Egyptian) at least partially marked by slavery, piracy and wars of aggression and conquest which the Asgard didn't seem interested in discouraging. Also that still doesn't explain why he specifically chose the Norse when he should have known that Christianity had greatly skewed the mythology which could quite possibly hide a darker past. For that matter IIRC he never actually had anything before presenting before Teal'c to suggest that the Asgard had actually existed. Simply because aliens had taken the roles of Egyptian gods one wouldn't normally conclude that every major mythology was definitely based on actual alien visitors.
*** ** Viking ''history'' is full of slavery, piracy, and war, yes. But we're talking about mythology here, and there's little evidence that the Norse gods themselves encouraged such behavior. Besides, the precise distinction Daniel drew was between "tyrant" gods and "knowledge giver" gods. Daniel's point was the Egyptian gods were tyrants, but the Norse gods generally were not (though as I said, he was using a rather liberal interpretation). Also, it seemed to this troper that he was merely suggesting that the SGC investigate the possibility. Drawing up a proposal, as it were. Obviously he couldn't know ''for sure'' that other "gods" were aliens who were hostile to the Goa'uld and friendly to humans, but the SGC didn't have anything to lose by at least trying to find out.
*** ** Yeah, Daniel is just sorta outlining a theory at that point. As the previous troper said, making a proposal to, perhaps, look into it more in depth. It's only once Teal'c recognizes Thor's Hammer--and, in fact, recognizes it as something that scares the Goa'uld enough that they go out of their way to make sure the Jaffa know not to dial the address for it even accidentally--that they really conclude that the Norse gods were aliens and could be allies. Hell, if Teal'c hadn't spoken up, maybe Daniel would've continued his presentation with another set of benevolent gods.



*** "Native Americans didn't advance for myriad reasons" Yes, ''that is what I said''. Thank you for repeating my own argument for me. As I said, technological advancement is dependent on numerous factors, trade is only ONE of them. And the ONLY way trade can lead to technological advancement ''is if you have technologically advanced trading partners that are willing and able to barter with you for technology''. The Athosians ''do not have this''. Most surviving civilizations in the Pegasus Galaxy are very primitive. The ones that aren't are either unwilling to trade (the Genii, the Travelers) or have been wiped out by the Wraith (the Satedans). Doesn't matter how many trading partners the Athosians may or may not have if none of them have more than Middle Ages-level technology.

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*** ** "Native Americans didn't advance for myriad reasons" Yes, ''that is what I said''. Thank you for repeating my own argument for me. As I said, technological advancement is dependent on numerous factors, trade is only ONE of them. And the ONLY way trade can lead to technological advancement ''is if you have technologically advanced trading partners that are willing and able to barter with you for technology''. The Athosians ''do not have this''. Most surviving civilizations in the Pegasus Galaxy are very primitive. The ones that aren't are either unwilling to trade (the Genii, the Travelers) or have been wiped out by the Wraith (the Satedans). Doesn't matter how many trading partners the Athosians may or may not have if none of them have more than Middle Ages-level technology.



*** There are a lot of plausible explanations, low-ranking Goa'uld, specially trained human slaves, specially trained jaffa, manufacturing technology which allows the construction of sophisticated devices such as hyperdrives and computers to be largely automated (such as something similar to Asgard materialization technology or real-word rapid prototyping technology). As a fan of WorldBuilding, it's the lack of an official answer that bugs [[GordonEcker me]], especially with the {{Flanderization}} of the System Lords into a SkeletonGovernment in later seasons.

to:

*** ** There are a lot of plausible explanations, low-ranking Goa'uld, specially trained human slaves, specially trained jaffa, manufacturing technology which allows the construction of sophisticated devices such as hyperdrives and computers to be largely automated (such as something similar to Asgard materialization technology or real-word rapid prototyping technology). As a fan of WorldBuilding, it's the lack of an official answer that bugs [[GordonEcker me]], especially with the {{Flanderization}} of the System Lords into a SkeletonGovernment in later seasons.



*** Also Ra may have decided to use the rebellion as a tactical maneuver: if the natural inclination of the system lords was to crush the rebellion, that would take time and resources to achieve. Ra may have chosen to pack up and leave first while the rest tried to quell the rebellion, knowing that he had enough free resources and manpower to attack and seize assets belonging to the other system lords in order to gain more power and further secure his supremacy.
*** Perhaps Stargate the film and Stargate SG-1 take place in alternate universes. That would explain variation in the Ra tale, Abydos being in this galaxy and not another as in the film and why there's an extra "L" in Jack O'Neill's last name.

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*** ** Also Ra may have decided to use the rebellion as a tactical maneuver: if the natural inclination of the system lords was to crush the rebellion, that would take time and resources to achieve. Ra may have chosen to pack up and leave first while the rest tried to quell the rebellion, knowing that he had enough free resources and manpower to attack and seize assets belonging to the other system lords in order to gain more power and further secure his supremacy.
*** ** Perhaps Stargate the film and Stargate SG-1 take place in alternate universes. That would explain variation in the Ra tale, Abydos being in this galaxy and not another as in the film and why there's an extra "L" in Jack O'Neill's last name.



*** True, but they weren't getting into prolonged ground attack/defense situations very often. Most of the SGC missions are small exploration teams. Notice how at the first sign of trouble O'Neall would almost always order the team to retreat through the Stargate. They weren't equipped for ground assaults and the show doesn't pretend like they are.

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*** ** True, but they weren't getting into prolonged ground attack/defense situations very often. Most of the SGC missions are small exploration teams. Notice how at the first sign of trouble O'Neall would almost always order the team to retreat through the Stargate. They weren't equipped for ground assaults and the show doesn't pretend like they are.



*** ''That's'' all they're getting for seven billion?
*** Training, Canteen, Hospital New technology research and development and you know....several interstellar spaceships.

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*** ** ''That's'' all they're getting for seven billion?
*** ** Training, Canteen, Hospital New technology research and development and you know....several interstellar spaceships.



*** It's not so much that it's a ''bad'' episode as it doesn't fit very well with later canon, like with Hathor being able to make Jaffa, or needing human DNA to make little Goa'ulds. Sorta like how in the last few seasons they just quietly pretended the Zat guns never disintegrated anyone.
*** Some fans actually consider it a ''better'' "female-empowerment" episode than the even worse Emancipation. What with all the female staff of the SGC having to retake it from the men, without killing any of them. The ladies be BadAss, indeed. On the whole, though, Hathor opens up some real cans of worms, from her [[GameBreaker game-breaking mind control ability]], Jaffa-Making belly device (and "un-Jaffa-ing" someone with a sarcophagus), the "Code of Life" (though it could be rationalized to just improve chances of blending, not a requirement), and her [[DoubleStandardRape mind-control rape of Daniel]], who was still all about finding and rescuing his wife at that point. And then there's how she got shot, caught fire, set ''water'' on fire, then walked away.

to:

*** ** It's not so much that it's a ''bad'' episode as it doesn't fit very well with later canon, like with Hathor being able to make Jaffa, or needing human DNA to make little Goa'ulds. Sorta like how in the last few seasons they just quietly pretended the Zat guns never disintegrated anyone.
*** ** Some fans actually consider it a ''better'' "female-empowerment" episode than the even worse Emancipation. What with all the female staff of the SGC having to retake it from the men, without killing any of them. The ladies be BadAss, indeed. On the whole, though, Hathor opens up some real cans of worms, from her [[GameBreaker game-breaking mind control ability]], Jaffa-Making belly device (and "un-Jaffa-ing" someone with a sarcophagus), the "Code of Life" (though it could be rationalized to just improve chances of blending, not a requirement), and her [[DoubleStandardRape mind-control rape of Daniel]], who was still all about finding and rescuing his wife at that point. And then there's how she got shot, caught fire, set ''water'' on fire, then walked away.



*** Those aren't UnfortunateImplications at all. Some experts are saying now that really very few people are either 100% totally gay/lesbian or 100% totally straight. Something as complex and varied as human sexuality cannot be boiled down to a simple either/or binary. So yeah, it's possible that Hathor's "magic" ''might'' work on men who normally identify as gay. Gay men are still ''men'', after all, with a male sexuality.

to:

*** ** Those aren't UnfortunateImplications at all. Some experts are saying now that really very few people are either 100% totally gay/lesbian or 100% totally straight. Something as complex and varied as human sexuality cannot be boiled down to a simple either/or binary. So yeah, it's possible that Hathor's "magic" ''might'' work on men who normally identify as gay. Gay men are still ''men'', after all, with a male sexuality.



*** He probably got Kinsey's actor Ronnie Cox conflated with the character.

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*** ** He probably got Kinsey's actor Ronnie Cox conflated with the character.



*** The show portrays the people at Stargate Command as heroic and noble, not the U.S. military as a whole. General Hammond, for example, was a good man who cared enough about collateral damage to listen to Jack O'Neill (who has a similar moral code) in the first episode. General West from the movie and General Bauer in Season 4, on the other hand, have absolutely no compunction tossing nukes around the galaxy like 4th of July fireworks (prompting the heroes to have to work against them).
*** These people who're portrayed as heroic and noble aren't all soldiers. Jack and Daniel are a military/civilian duo that play off of each other really well, with each of them getting episodes that validate their background and methods, and the show's overall take on it seems to be that there isn't really one right or wrong approach. Different things work for different situations.
*** The entire NID/Trust plotline is a glaring TakeThat to the nastier aspects of the American security state and military-industrial complex, and was a background arc that lasted through the entire series (it was explored in far more depth than, say, Section 31). I'd say there was plenty of cynicism and criticism thrown at U.S. militarism by the show.
*** For that matter, the U.S. government itself wasn't always squeaky clean - they were smart enough not to piss off powerful alien races like the rogue NID did, but when they were dealing with alien races they thought were powerless (the Salish in "Spirits," the Unas in "Enemy Mine"), they acted just like the NID, to the disgust of the main characters.
*** I'm sorry but I have to disagree with the points listed above. Specifically, the argument that the show doesn't portray the military as a heroic and noble organization. While I will grant you that there were ''individual'' military officers who were portrayed negatively, they were vastly outnumbered by the ones who weren't. The show clearly portrays heroism and nobility as the ''norm'' for the US military, and the few officers who weren't heroic and noble as the exception. The few times when Hammond was forced to act in a dishonorable fashion, such as the incident with the Salish, it was clearly at the behest of non-military superiors and they weren't happy about it. And in the incident with the Unas in "Enemy Mine" the military superiors were ''considering'' relocating the Unas but only as a last resort of Daniel's attempt at diplomacy didn't work out. At no point during either of those episodes was the military shown to be ''unreasonable''. As for the NID and the Trust, both those groups were rather obviously ''not'' affiliated with the military. The NID is a civilian agency, and the Trust is a conspiracy of private business interests. You could credibly call this a TakeThat at the CIA and Big Business, but calling it a critique of the "military-industrial complex" is a bit of a stretch, especially when both those groups were ''directly in conflict'' with the military. Most important of all, the ''actual'' US military considered Stargate to be a highly positive portrayal of them, so much so that they happily endorsed the show, made high-ranking Air Force officers available as guest-stars, and even ''loaned them a submarine'' to use in one episode.

to:

*** ** The show portrays the people at Stargate Command as heroic and noble, not the U.S. military as a whole. General Hammond, for example, was a good man who cared enough about collateral damage to listen to Jack O'Neill (who has a similar moral code) in the first episode. General West from the movie and General Bauer in Season 4, on the other hand, have absolutely no compunction tossing nukes around the galaxy like 4th of July fireworks (prompting the heroes to have to work against them).
*** ** These people who're portrayed as heroic and noble aren't all soldiers. Jack and Daniel are a military/civilian duo that play off of each other really well, with each of them getting episodes that validate their background and methods, and the show's overall take on it seems to be that there isn't really one right or wrong approach. Different things work for different situations.
*** ** The entire NID/Trust plotline is a glaring TakeThat to the nastier aspects of the American security state and military-industrial complex, and was a background arc that lasted through the entire series (it was explored in far more depth than, say, Section 31). I'd say there was plenty of cynicism and criticism thrown at U.S. militarism by the show.
*** ** For that matter, the U.S. government itself wasn't always squeaky clean - they were smart enough not to piss off powerful alien races like the rogue NID did, but when they were dealing with alien races they thought were powerless (the Salish in "Spirits," the Unas in "Enemy Mine"), they acted just like the NID, to the disgust of the main characters.
*** ** I'm sorry but I have to disagree with the points listed above. Specifically, the argument that the show doesn't portray the military as a heroic and noble organization. While I will grant you that there were ''individual'' military officers who were portrayed negatively, they were vastly outnumbered by the ones who weren't. The show clearly portrays heroism and nobility as the ''norm'' for the US military, and the few officers who weren't heroic and noble as the exception. The few times when Hammond was forced to act in a dishonorable fashion, such as the incident with the Salish, it was clearly at the behest of non-military superiors and they weren't happy about it. And in the incident with the Unas in "Enemy Mine" the military superiors were ''considering'' relocating the Unas but only as a last resort of Daniel's attempt at diplomacy didn't work out. At no point during either of those episodes was the military shown to be ''unreasonable''. As for the NID and the Trust, both those groups were rather obviously ''not'' affiliated with the military. The NID is a civilian agency, and the Trust is a conspiracy of private business interests. You could credibly call this a TakeThat at the CIA and Big Business, but calling it a critique of the "military-industrial complex" is a bit of a stretch, especially when both those groups were ''directly in conflict'' with the military. Most important of all, the ''actual'' US military considered Stargate to be a highly positive portrayal of them, so much so that they happily endorsed the show, made high-ranking Air Force officers available as guest-stars, and even ''loaned them a submarine'' to use in one episode.



*** Likely the Canadians knew, but were too polite to say anything about it. Maybe they thought it would be rude to impose.
*** The thing about Canada is that everything else aside, it has an extremely high amount of resources, such as oil and precious metals. If the Stargate program needed more of those resources, who would they ask? The friendly country next door that works well with the States most of the time, or one of several countries that doesn't like the States very much at all.

to:

*** ** Likely the Canadians knew, but were too polite to say anything about it. Maybe they thought it would be rude to impose.
*** ** The thing about Canada is that everything else aside, it has an extremely high amount of resources, such as oil and precious metals. If the Stargate program needed more of those resources, who would they ask? The friendly country next door that works well with the States most of the time, or one of several countries that doesn't like the States very much at all.



*** Just to clarify, Canada has not been UNDER Great Britain, in regards to its relations with other countries, since 1931. For constitutional matters, we got control in 1982. The previous poster is correct in stating there is a bond between Canada and Britain: military personnel and (I think) Members of Parliament) swear an oath to the Monarch & its heirs. That connection wouldn't be a reason for Canada (or any Commonwealth nation) to be informed just cos Great Britain was. As for possible In Universe reasons why Canada gets informed of the attack but wasn't at the meeting:

to:

*** ** Just to clarify, Canada has not been UNDER Great Britain, in regards to its relations with other countries, since 1931. For constitutional matters, we got control in 1982. The previous poster is correct in stating there is a bond between Canada and Britain: military personnel and (I think) Members of Parliament) swear an oath to the Monarch & its heirs. That connection wouldn't be a reason for Canada (or any Commonwealth nation) to be informed just cos Great Britain was. As for possible In Universe reasons why Canada gets informed of the attack but wasn't at the meeting:



*** Not necessarily. Just because he's in the military doesn't mean he approves of the draft. Indeed, a lot of the modern opposition to a military draft comes from the US military itself. They'd rather have skilled volunteers who actually ''want'' to be there, than a random bunch of malcontents who will likely half-ass the job.

to:

*** ** Not necessarily. Just because he's in the military doesn't mean he approves of the draft. Indeed, a lot of the modern opposition to a military draft comes from the US military itself. They'd rather have skilled volunteers who actually ''want'' to be there, than a random bunch of malcontents who will likely half-ass the job.



*** The lie made the hippies even more inclined to help them. Instead of just being a rag-tag gang of hitchhikers, SG-1 are now brave revolutionaries fighting against The Establishment. This causes the hippies to feel a sense of kinship with SG-1. On the other hand, the truth might have actually turned the hippies against them. SG-1 are all members of (or associated with) the US military, so in a sense they ARE The Establishment.
*** Plus, it wasn't that long ago and the stargate program is classified. The hippies could still be alive today, or could have told people they know who would still be alive.

to:

*** ** The lie made the hippies even more inclined to help them. Instead of just being a rag-tag gang of hitchhikers, SG-1 are now brave revolutionaries fighting against The Establishment. This causes the hippies to feel a sense of kinship with SG-1. On the other hand, the truth might have actually turned the hippies against them. SG-1 are all members of (or associated with) the US military, so in a sense they ARE The Establishment.
*** ** Plus, it wasn't that long ago and the stargate program is classified. The hippies could still be alive today, or could have told people they know who would still be alive.



*** Anubis is forbidden from using a good portion of Ancient knowledge, he probably can't retain it when outside "the diner", but neither the Carters nor Ba'al used any ancient knowledge when they found then reprogrammed the weapon and did the dial all gates thing. Besides which, Anubis [=DID=] reprogram the device himself and was seconds away from using it in "Threads." So if he knew about the weapon when Dakara was still in his possession, via Ba'al, why didn't he use it? And if he didn't know at the time, when did he learn about it?
*** Because he doesn't know ''how'', like I said; or rather, he probably does know how, but he's not allowed to use that knowledge. Not every Goa'uld knows the exact same thing as every other Goa'uld. Ba'al had already shown that he knows how to modify DHD programs in "Avenger 2.0," and "Beachhead" reveals that he had Nerus' help in this episode. Anubis had probably never in his life tried to re-program a DHD to dial multiple gates so, even if he learned how after he ascended, he's not allowed to use that knowledge. He has to manipulate other people who ''do'' know how to do it for him. What he was going to do in "Threads" was use the device that had already been modified.
*** The truth of the matter is we have very little idea exactly what information Anubis had access to. The phrase "He can only use knowledge he could have otherwise gained as an ordinary Goa'uld" is ridiculously vauge. We know for a fact he had knowledge to recreate Telchak's cube from scratch, make those unnecesarily spikey implants that fit into your brain, design weapons and sheilds superior to that of an Asgard vessel and reprogram the Dakara superweaopn from "kill replicators" to "wipe out all life." Despite this he clearly did not know the location of Atlantis, nor did he know there was a [=ZPM=] on Proclarush Taonas. (If he did he probably would have taken it.)

to:

*** ** Anubis is forbidden from using a good portion of Ancient knowledge, he probably can't retain it when outside "the diner", but neither the Carters nor Ba'al used any ancient knowledge when they found then reprogrammed the weapon and did the dial all gates thing. Besides which, Anubis [=DID=] reprogram the device himself and was seconds away from using it in "Threads." So if he knew about the weapon when Dakara was still in his possession, via Ba'al, why didn't he use it? And if he didn't know at the time, when did he learn about it?
*** ** Because he doesn't know ''how'', like I said; or rather, he probably does know how, but he's not allowed to use that knowledge. Not every Goa'uld knows the exact same thing as every other Goa'uld. Ba'al had already shown that he knows how to modify DHD programs in "Avenger 2.0," and "Beachhead" reveals that he had Nerus' help in this episode. Anubis had probably never in his life tried to re-program a DHD to dial multiple gates so, even if he learned how after he ascended, he's not allowed to use that knowledge. He has to manipulate other people who ''do'' know how to do it for him. What he was going to do in "Threads" was use the device that had already been modified.
*** ** The truth of the matter is we have very little idea exactly what information Anubis had access to. The phrase "He can only use knowledge he could have otherwise gained as an ordinary Goa'uld" is ridiculously vauge. We know for a fact he had knowledge to recreate Telchak's cube from scratch, make those unnecesarily spikey implants that fit into your brain, design weapons and sheilds superior to that of an Asgard vessel and reprogram the Dakara superweaopn from "kill replicators" to "wipe out all life." Despite this he clearly did not know the location of Atlantis, nor did he know there was a [=ZPM=] on Proclarush Taonas. (If he did he probably would have taken it.)



*** And there was the fact that the rest of the Ori were gone by this point. From the moment Adria ascended, she received the power of ''all'' the Ori worshippers in existence. It's possible that the Ancients just simply didn't have the power to stop her.

to:

*** ** And there was the fact that the rest of the Ori were gone by this point. From the moment Adria ascended, she received the power of ''all'' the Ori worshippers in existence. It's possible that the Ancients just simply didn't have the power to stop her.



*** Also, in regard to the star incident specifically, in that case the gate was connected to a black hole. So the star matter was being pulled through by the force of gravity. So it would seem the gate does do some sort of "check". It takes a force greater than the pressure detected when the wormhole opens to initiate travel through the gate.

to:

*** ** Also, in regard to the star incident specifically, in that case the gate was connected to a black hole. So the star matter was being pulled through by the force of gravity. So it would seem the gate does do some sort of "check". It takes a force greater than the pressure detected when the wormhole opens to initiate travel through the gate.



*** TheReveal was intended for the 3rd movie "Revolution".

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*** ** TheReveal was intended for the 3rd movie "Revolution".



*** The RPG makes it explicit: anything that goes through the wrong side of a gate, or the wrong way through an open connection, is disintegrated. Which raises questions about where the released energy goes (and it would be a very violent explosion), but eh...
*** Which opens up a world of easily-solved-problems where dangerous items the SGC had to sort out and deal with could have simply been tossed through the back of a gate. This presents such a problem for the writers that it isn't until Season NINE that anyone thinks to use the "Kawoosh" for disposal - despite knowing at least two groups they have seen using this for a method of burial (The Tokra and the prison planet in season 2)

to:

*** ** The RPG makes it explicit: anything that goes through the wrong side of a gate, or the wrong way through an open connection, is disintegrated. Which raises questions about where the released energy goes (and it would be a very violent explosion), but eh...
*** ** Which opens up a world of easily-solved-problems where dangerous items the SGC had to sort out and deal with could have simply been tossed through the back of a gate. This presents such a problem for the writers that it isn't until Season NINE that anyone thinks to use the "Kawoosh" for disposal - despite knowing at least two groups they have seen using this for a method of burial (The Tokra and the prison planet in season 2)



*** You don't think there's already ways for people in the military to die without leaving a body? People have been getting blown up, crushed, and just plain lost at sea since warfare began. Just not having a body isn't going to raise suspicions that much.

to:

*** ** You don't think there's already ways for people in the military to die without leaving a body? People have been getting blown up, crushed, and just plain lost at sea since warfare began. Just not having a body isn't going to raise suspicions that much.



*** Plus, for Ba'al's Jaffa, relocating to the Jaffa Free Nation effectively means leaving their homes and place in their community behind, taking only with them the clothes on their backs, having to start over from scratch. Ba'al most likely treats his Jaffa well.

to:

*** ** Plus, for Ba'al's Jaffa, relocating to the Jaffa Free Nation effectively means leaving their homes and place in their community behind, taking only with them the clothes on their backs, having to start over from scratch. Ba'al most likely treats his Jaffa well.



*** Maybe at some point, they all decided to Ascend? AFAIK, their powers were never fully explained, so they could well have been a near-ascension species.

to:

*** ** Maybe at some point, they all decided to Ascend? AFAIK, their powers were never fully explained, so they could well have been a near-ascension species.



*** Um, not true. At the end of "Thor's Chariot", Gerwyn specifically mentions that the Asgard are going to build a new Hammer that will ignore Teal'c.

to:

*** ** Um, not true. At the end of "Thor's Chariot", Gerwyn specifically mentions that the Asgard are going to build a new Hammer that will ignore Teal'c.



*** No, it's because Goa'uld have perfect genetic memories. Every host they take, they gain access to that persons memories. Now consider what a harcesis is; a person born with the memories of two Goa'uld, who have each lived thousands of years. If Apophis had taken his own harcesis child as a host, he would have gained all the memories of his queen, as well as doubling up on his own memories. He basically would have an entire extra Goa'ulds lifetime of memories. He would know everything Amonet knows, every thought she had ever had, every feeling. For an immortal being that's probably quite an experiance. This is also exactly why harcesis are forbidden by the Goa'uld; imagine every System Lord using harcesis' as hosts all the time, doubling up on memories, learning secrets and gaining knowledge they could never aquire otherwise. Left unchecked it could upset the delicate balance of power they have set up and cause them to self destruct, so they forbid it outright.

to:

*** ** No, it's because Goa'uld have perfect genetic memories. Every host they take, they gain access to that persons memories. Now consider what a harcesis is; a person born with the memories of two Goa'uld, who have each lived thousands of years. If Apophis had taken his own harcesis child as a host, he would have gained all the memories of his queen, as well as doubling up on his own memories. He basically would have an entire extra Goa'ulds lifetime of memories. He would know everything Amonet knows, every thought she had ever had, every feeling. For an immortal being that's probably quite an experiance. This is also exactly why harcesis are forbidden by the Goa'uld; imagine every System Lord using harcesis' as hosts all the time, doubling up on memories, learning secrets and gaining knowledge they could never aquire otherwise. Left unchecked it could upset the delicate balance of power they have set up and cause them to self destruct, so they forbid it outright.



*** (OP) Good point, I forgot about the configuration of the other teams; still the fact that SG and AT 1 are Jack of All Trades teams, personally speaking, makes the lack of a medic even worse. So many lives could have been saved across the course of both these shows if SG-1 had a fully equipped medic as a fifth member. After doing some more research, not only would this have saved scores of random extras but potentially Jacob and Dr Fraiser.
*** That is not how special operations teams work, according to my uncle. Every single member of the team is supposed be at least a basic medic. You don't have to have an MD to keep someone from bleeding out. Any member of an SG team should be able to patch up another team member enough to get their butt back to the Stargate or other form of evac. Medics aren't as common as one would think. For example, a Marine Corps infantry company has only four corpsmen, or dedicated medics. There just isn't room on a four-man team for a medic when you can train the entire team to be good enough medics to patch up a soldier so he can be evacuated.

to:

*** ** (OP) Good point, I forgot about the configuration of the other teams; still the fact that SG and AT 1 are Jack of All Trades teams, personally speaking, makes the lack of a medic even worse. So many lives could have been saved across the course of both these shows if SG-1 had a fully equipped medic as a fifth member. After doing some more research, not only would this have saved scores of random extras but potentially Jacob and Dr Fraiser.
*** ** That is not how special operations teams work, according to my uncle. Every single member of the team is supposed be at least a basic medic. You don't have to have an MD to keep someone from bleeding out. Any member of an SG team should be able to patch up another team member enough to get their butt back to the Stargate or other form of evac. Medics aren't as common as one would think. For example, a Marine Corps infantry company has only four corpsmen, or dedicated medics. There just isn't room on a four-man team for a medic when you can train the entire team to be good enough medics to patch up a soldier so he can be evacuated.



*** Failing the possibility of conventional vehicles, why don't the SGC have an armed MALP? I can understand the ordinary model being unarmed as it is a First Contact tool, but there is no reason why they couldn't design a second model with some form of mounted light machine gun or even a turret. A radio controlled tank would have come in handy on any number of occasions, the episode where SG-1 was captured by Hathor is one of the best examples.
*** The stargate is 6.7 meters in diameter, that's plenty of room for any ground vehicle to be driven through. The real reason why they don't have extensive military hardware deployed via the stargate or 302s is because that's ''way'' beyond the show's budget. The producers probably thought of it but decided it's better to show than tell by have Carter report on the epic tank battles offworld.
*** The diameter is how wide it is at the ''center''. Vehicles would have to be able to get through it about half-way to the edge from that, where the ramp usually is. And the 6.7 meters is from one ''outside'' edge to the other, and the vehicle would have to get through the ''inside'' edges, which probably has a diameter at least two meters smaller.\\\

to:

*** ** Failing the possibility of conventional vehicles, why don't the SGC have an armed MALP? I can understand the ordinary model being unarmed as it is a First Contact tool, but there is no reason why they couldn't design a second model with some form of mounted light machine gun or even a turret. A radio controlled tank would have come in handy on any number of occasions, the episode where SG-1 was captured by Hathor is one of the best examples.
*** ** The stargate is 6.7 meters in diameter, that's plenty of room for any ground vehicle to be driven through. The real reason why they don't have extensive military hardware deployed via the stargate or 302s is because that's ''way'' beyond the show's budget. The producers probably thought of it but decided it's better to show than tell by have Carter report on the epic tank battles offworld.
*** ** The diameter is how wide it is at the ''center''. Vehicles would have to be able to get through it about half-way to the edge from that, where the ramp usually is. And the 6.7 meters is from one ''outside'' edge to the other, and the vehicle would have to get through the ''inside'' edges, which probably has a diameter at least two meters smaller.\\\



*** The "Needle Threader" is 6.5 meters wide and tall, so the event horizon has to be a little wider than that or there would be literally no margin for error in piloting the thing. An Abrams tank is 3.66 meters wide and 2.44 meters tall so aside from adjusting the ramp height on the gates a little bit there's no problem fitting one through. As for the photo, chalk it up to SpecialEffectsFailure since they haven't always been consistent in how big the gate really is (in that pic it looks about 5 meters, tops). Hell, in the early season opening credits we see a Death Glider fly through a deactivated stargate, which would defeat the entire purpose of making Needle Threaders in the first place.
*** We never see any Death Glider flying through a deactivated stargate. If it's the same image I'm thinking of, it fly ''above'' it, nearly crashing into, yes, but certainly not through. The wingspan of an ordinary Death Glider just never allowed it. There's no error from the special effect team here, just your eyes needing to be checked.
*** [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqDS6eOG_hM Season 2 intro]]. At 00:32, if that's not a death glider flying through the gate then at the very least shows another vehicle besides, needle threaders, jumpers or darts that can fit through a gate, which is a big oversight in itself.
*** Bad eyesight crossed with poorly-timed cut-to-next-scene-in-montage. Look at the Season 1 episode that shot comes from, "Singularity". It clearly shows the glider swoop past the gate, clearing it with mere meters to spare. (It was strafing O'Neill and Teal'c at the time.)

to:

*** ** The "Needle Threader" is 6.5 meters wide and tall, so the event horizon has to be a little wider than that or there would be literally no margin for error in piloting the thing. An Abrams tank is 3.66 meters wide and 2.44 meters tall so aside from adjusting the ramp height on the gates a little bit there's no problem fitting one through. As for the photo, chalk it up to SpecialEffectsFailure since they haven't always been consistent in how big the gate really is (in that pic it looks about 5 meters, tops). Hell, in the early season opening credits we see a Death Glider fly through a deactivated stargate, which would defeat the entire purpose of making Needle Threaders in the first place.
*** ** We never see any Death Glider flying through a deactivated stargate. If it's the same image I'm thinking of, it fly ''above'' it, nearly crashing into, yes, but certainly not through. The wingspan of an ordinary Death Glider just never allowed it. There's no error from the special effect team here, just your eyes needing to be checked.
*** ** [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqDS6eOG_hM Season 2 intro]]. At 00:32, if that's not a death glider flying through the gate then at the very least shows another vehicle besides, needle threaders, jumpers or darts that can fit through a gate, which is a big oversight in itself.
*** ** Bad eyesight crossed with poorly-timed cut-to-next-scene-in-montage. Look at the Season 1 episode that shot comes from, "Singularity". It clearly shows the glider swoop past the gate, clearing it with mere meters to spare. (It was strafing O'Neill and Teal'c at the time.)



*** Which, how wide is that in the narrow dimension? Unless I miss my guess they'd have to tip the tank up on its side or something.
*** At least wide enough for the gate, either 4.6m (http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate) or 6.7m (http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate).
*** I mean how wide is the slot front to back (i.e. the ''narrow'' dimension, not the ''wide'' dimension). The gate looks to be only about a foot and a half thick.
*** The SGC is a repurposed nuclear missile facility and the gate room itself is at the bottom of the main missile silo. If you can fit a nuclear missile in there, you can fit a tank in there.

to:

*** ** Which, how wide is that in the narrow dimension? Unless I miss my guess they'd have to tip the tank up on its side or something.
*** ** At least wide enough for the gate, either 4.6m (http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate) or 6.7m (http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Stargate).
*** ** I mean how wide is the slot front to back (i.e. the ''narrow'' dimension, not the ''wide'' dimension). The gate looks to be only about a foot and a half thick.
*** ** The SGC is a repurposed nuclear missile facility and the gate room itself is at the bottom of the main missile silo. If you can fit a nuclear missile in there, you can fit a tank in there.



*** Um, 15 million years is a ''long'' time. Considering the entirety of human history fits within about 10,000 years... A better question is why they placed Atlantis (and the Stargate) in the most inhospitable place on Earth.
*** It wasn't always. During the ice age, the poles were downright tropical.
*** Antarctica hasn't been tropical for tens of millions of years, certainly not at any ice age in recent Earth history. Still, you'd think the Ancients would be able to pick up and move once it started freezing over at some point.
*** Frankly history is not the strong point of the show. They have aliens apparently creating/taking over religions around the same point in time even though some of those religions had completely disappeared thousands of years before the others showed up. The best approach is to ignore established facts about human evolution and human history and just go with rule of cool.
*** They kind of addressed that. The same plague that the Ancients were struggling with millions of years ago wiped out most of the life in the galaxy. As such, the Ancients used the superweapon at Dakara to recreate life in the galaxy. The implication is that the new life was based on Ancient DNA, thus eventually giving rise to humans

to:

*** ** Um, 15 million years is a ''long'' time. Considering the entirety of human history fits within about 10,000 years... A better question is why they placed Atlantis (and the Stargate) in the most inhospitable place on Earth.
*** ** It wasn't always. During the ice age, the poles were downright tropical.
*** ** Antarctica hasn't been tropical for tens of millions of years, certainly not at any ice age in recent Earth history. Still, you'd think the Ancients would be able to pick up and move once it started freezing over at some point.
*** ** Frankly history is not the strong point of the show. They have aliens apparently creating/taking over religions around the same point in time even though some of those religions had completely disappeared thousands of years before the others showed up. The best approach is to ignore established facts about human evolution and human history and just go with rule of cool.
*** ** They kind of addressed that. The same plague that the Ancients were struggling with millions of years ago wiped out most of the life in the galaxy. As such, the Ancients used the superweapon at Dakara to recreate life in the galaxy. The implication is that the new life was based on Ancient DNA, thus eventually giving rise to humans



*** In addition, keep in mind that gods in Stargate are different from gods in real world religions. In stargate, these gods can be seen, as well as their power. Apophis' followers got to see him in flesh and blood. They saw his technology which, to their relatively primitive culture, seemed like magic. In real life (forgive me if I step on any religious person's toes here), there is no such cold, hard proof that any religion is true. That's why it's called ''belief''. As a result, cultures in Stargate don't really need to put faith in their gods, they believe what they see. So once they see evidence to the contrary, it's easier to change their minds.

to:

*** ** In addition, keep in mind that gods in Stargate are different from gods in real world religions. In stargate, these gods can be seen, as well as their power. Apophis' followers got to see him in flesh and blood. They saw his technology which, to their relatively primitive culture, seemed like magic. In real life (forgive me if I step on any religious person's toes here), there is no such cold, hard proof that any religion is true. That's why it's called ''belief''. As a result, cultures in Stargate don't really need to put faith in their gods, they believe what they see. So once they see evidence to the contrary, it's easier to change their minds.



*** Okay, I hadn't seen "Frozen" yet. I get the impression Carter's line about the Beta DHD being depleted was written to patch that plot hole.

to:

*** ** Okay, I hadn't seen "Frozen" yet. I get the impression Carter's line about the Beta DHD being depleted was written to patch that plot hole.



*** I think the guy who responded to my previous query had his timing a little off. The DHD probably ran out of power after they got it back from the NID.

to:

*** ** I think the guy who responded to my previous query had his timing a little off. The DHD probably ran out of power after they got it back from the NID.



*** No. That staff blast came through the gate travelling from dialing gate to receiving gate like regular matter does. We're talking about stuff that can go the other way.
*** My bad. In that case I'm guessing staff blasts can only go one-way. When their mechanism is described at all, it's as a plasma weapon, and plasma is matter.

to:

*** ** No. That staff blast came through the gate travelling from dialing gate to receiving gate like regular matter does. We're talking about stuff that can go the other way.
*** ** My bad. In that case I'm guessing staff blasts can only go one-way. When their mechanism is described at all, it's as a plasma weapon, and plasma is matter.



*** Um, when was it established he was a draft dodger?
*** It's never explicitly stated, but when he says that "illness" kept him from serving that does tend to raise eyebrows with some viewers. There are enduring rumors that [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment various political figures who shall remain nameless]] used ginned-up "illnesses" to get exempted from the draft during the Vietnam War. Of course that's hardly proof that Kinsey is a draft dodger, but still, they didn't ''have'' to give Kinsey that "illness" line. They could have simply had him say he "never served". It would have been perfectly plausible if, by pure chance, Kinsey's draft number was never called up. By giving him the "illness" line it feels like they're calling attention to it and inviting us to speculate.
*** Actually, it's not so much that he's hostile to the military. Remember, at the end of season 1 he firmly indicates that he believes the US military can defeat the Goa'uld. He's initially opposed to the SGC (seeing it as a waste of money). When he can't shut it down, he tries to get his own people in charge and/or direct control towards his allies in the NID. He later tries to get direct control of it himself. So it's not so much that he hates the military. He just doesn't want them running the program. Most of his complaints that seem anti-military or more aimed at the fact that he is putting the blame for the current state of affairs with the Goa'uld on Hammond's decisions. IE: Government should propose and military should only dispose. Also, it's unclear if he's a draft dodger. He simply stated that "illness robbed me of the chance to ever serve in this country's military". Take that for whatever it is worth.

to:

*** ** Um, when was it established he was a draft dodger?
*** ** It's never explicitly stated, but when he says that "illness" kept him from serving that does tend to raise eyebrows with some viewers. There are enduring rumors that [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment various political figures who shall remain nameless]] used ginned-up "illnesses" to get exempted from the draft during the Vietnam War. Of course that's hardly proof that Kinsey is a draft dodger, but still, they didn't ''have'' to give Kinsey that "illness" line. They could have simply had him say he "never served". It would have been perfectly plausible if, by pure chance, Kinsey's draft number was never called up. By giving him the "illness" line it feels like they're calling attention to it and inviting us to speculate.
*** ** Actually, it's not so much that he's hostile to the military. Remember, at the end of season 1 he firmly indicates that he believes the US military can defeat the Goa'uld. He's initially opposed to the SGC (seeing it as a waste of money). When he can't shut it down, he tries to get his own people in charge and/or direct control towards his allies in the NID. He later tries to get direct control of it himself. So it's not so much that he hates the military. He just doesn't want them running the program. Most of his complaints that seem anti-military or more aimed at the fact that he is putting the blame for the current state of affairs with the Goa'uld on Hammond's decisions. IE: Government should propose and military should only dispose. Also, it's unclear if he's a draft dodger. He simply stated that "illness robbed me of the chance to ever serve in this country's military". Take that for whatever it is worth.



*** True, but Anibus would have needed a body to dial the gate, and by the end of the episode the Russian guy he arrived in was not exactly up to the task. At least, that's what the camera shot seemed to imply.
*** The dialogue, character actions and final shot did imply that Anubis was trapped and would not be able to escape the frozen world, but it was never ''explicitly'' stated that he'd be trapped (At least, I don't believe there was). When he re-appeared it was never explained, I think we were just supposed to accept that he'd done something whacky to get off the planet. Regarding retaking his old army, that one's actually easier to understand. The Kull Warriors, the key to his army and Ba'al's as well, obeyed him; Ba'al might have had the other System Lords running, but when Anubis showed up and said "Point your guns at him!" the Kulls would have done so. Ba'al could either resist, and be gunned down since his loyal Jaffa had no chance against them, or bide his time for his eventual betrayal.
*** He roped a couple of snow turtles.

to:

*** ** True, but Anibus would have needed a body to dial the gate, and by the end of the episode the Russian guy he arrived in was not exactly up to the task. At least, that's what the camera shot seemed to imply.
*** ** The dialogue, character actions and final shot did imply that Anubis was trapped and would not be able to escape the frozen world, but it was never ''explicitly'' stated that he'd be trapped (At least, I don't believe there was). When he re-appeared it was never explained, I think we were just supposed to accept that he'd done something whacky to get off the planet. Regarding retaking his old army, that one's actually easier to understand. The Kull Warriors, the key to his army and Ba'al's as well, obeyed him; Ba'al might have had the other System Lords running, but when Anubis showed up and said "Point your guns at him!" the Kulls would have done so. Ba'al could either resist, and be gunned down since his loyal Jaffa had no chance against them, or bide his time for his eventual betrayal.
*** ** He roped a couple of snow turtles.



*** And by extension every other living thing in the galaxy.
*** No, they didn't care about the rest of the galaxy (In a way, that was their very point). It was all about getting Oma to see that she shouldn't involve herslf in the lower planes because of the potential dangers.

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*** ** And by extension every other living thing in the galaxy.
*** ** No, they didn't care about the rest of the galaxy (In a way, that was their very point). It was all about getting Oma to see that she shouldn't involve herslf in the lower planes because of the potential dangers.



*** To simplify this very good answer: it's not just a pure judgement, it's also a punishment for his actions before. Yes, he showed cowardice in asking to go, but I think it's also Hammond using his (limited) power as commander of the SGC to 'reward' Kinsey for his jerkish actions before. Note that Kinsey asked Hammond for permission, meaning that Hammond is the one person who can allow someone to go through the 'Gate - either that, or Kinsey didn't need to ask, but messed up and asked anyway, giving Hammond the chance to say no.

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*** ** To simplify this very good answer: it's not just a pure judgement, it's also a punishment for his actions before. Yes, he showed cowardice in asking to go, but I think it's also Hammond using his (limited) power as commander of the SGC to 'reward' Kinsey for his jerkish actions before. Note that Kinsey asked Hammond for permission, meaning that Hammond is the one person who can allow someone to go through the 'Gate - either that, or Kinsey didn't need to ask, but messed up and asked anyway, giving Hammond the chance to say no.



*** Let's be honest here, unless it was sustained or repeated, most people wouldn't have noticed anything other than a flickering light and maybe a tingle. Those that did take notice of it would stop, look around to see if it was going to happen again, and then when it didn't, just move on with their lives. The vast, ''vast'' majority of people aren't going to go investigating what--to them--is a brief, minor disturbance that they probably just imagined anyway.

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*** ** Let's be honest here, unless it was sustained or repeated, most people wouldn't have noticed anything other than a flickering light and maybe a tingle. Those that did take notice of it would stop, look around to see if it was going to happen again, and then when it didn't, just move on with their lives. The vast, ''vast'' majority of people aren't going to go investigating what--to them--is a brief, minor disturbance that they probably just imagined anyway.



*** Or rather than a "nice view", they actually want to be able to see what's happening? If a couple of enemy Jaffa jump through the 'gate after the SG team, they need to see that immediately so they can respond appropriately, or whatever other situation it is. Yeah, they could use cameras and monitors and get much the same effect, but there's nothing quite like being able to see what's actually going on with your own eyes.

to:

*** ** Or rather than a "nice view", they actually want to be able to see what's happening? If a couple of enemy Jaffa jump through the 'gate after the SG team, they need to see that immediately so they can respond appropriately, or whatever other situation it is. Yeah, they could use cameras and monitors and get much the same effect, but there's nothing quite like being able to see what's actually going on with your own eyes.



*** I think the implication is that Adria believed the lies of the Ori, despite having the power to verify that they were lying. Why didn't they just ask her to verify that they were lying. (This of course, presumes that Adria really did believe what the Ori were saying, rather than just playing along with the lie for everyone else.)

to:

*** ** I think the implication is that Adria believed the lies of the Ori, despite having the power to verify that they were lying. Why didn't they just ask her to verify that they were lying. (This of course, presumes that Adria really did believe what the Ori were saying, rather than just playing along with the lie for everyone else.)



*** I'm not sure there's enough evidence that they "lost track" of the Unas homeworld. Certainly they abandoned it, but I don't recall it ever being said that the Goa'uld had completely lost track of the planet.

to:

*** ** I'm not sure there's enough evidence that they "lost track" of the Unas homeworld. Certainly they abandoned it, but I don't recall it ever being said that the Goa'uld had completely lost track of the planet.



*** I didn't mean to suggest that ''all'' Goa'uld ought to stick with Unas hosts, but I'm wondering why we don't see more more of a balance. A Goa'uld scientist, sure, he's got a good reason to prefer a human host, if only for the nimbler hands. But Terok (the Goa'uld who tortured Teal'c in "The Serpent's Venom") seems like a prime candidate for an Unas host. Since his whole job seems to be torturing/interrogating prisoners for Heru'ur, one would think being a terrifying demonesque monster with teeth and claws would be a bit plus for him. And speaking of demons, shouldn't there have been tons of Unas!Goa'uld running around on Sokar's Hellworld? They even said in that episode that Sokar used Unas!Goa'uld to torment his victims, but we saw none of them there. See also "The First Commandment", another episode that makes a strong argument for why ''some'' Goa'uld ought to stick with Unas hosts. Intimidating primitive human tribes is a lot easier when you ''literally'' look like a demon.
*** On a separate note, I strongly question the argument that human hosts are easier to repair than an Unas host. As I said, we see in the series that an Unas!Goa'uld is able to survive damage that would instantly kill a human!Goa'uld. The Unas!Goa'uld in "Thor's Hammer" is shot several times by O'neill but survives, while every time a human!Goa'uld is shot with a Tauri weapon they pretty much die instantly. The Unas!Goa'uld in "Demons" takes ''several'' shots from a staff weapon before being too damaged to heal, but Cronos, Amaunet, and many other human!Goa'uld die from a single staff blast.
*** "Easier" probably means "takes less out of the symbiote". The symbiote's healing powers to its host aren't unlimited, as demonstrated by A) Selmak being so weakened from keeping Saroosh alive that it was questionable whether it could heal Jacob's leukemia in "The Tok'ra, Part II", and B) Junior giving up the ghost after being shared between Teal'c and Bra'tac in "The Changeling". And again, most Goa'uld don't lead from the front, so the actual need for the extra durability of an unas is sharply limited.
*** I believe it is also that among other qualities the symbiote takes from it's host is general intelligence. Smarter hosts make smarter blended entities. Additionally, humans as a species seem to have a knack for being easily manipulated via religious imagery and generally form groups, meaning they could extend their control by setting up cults that worship them. It is unclear whether other species such as the unas would share this trait, it may be possible to control one unas and a few that can be directly intimidated, but there may not be bigger social structures that can be exploited.

to:

*** ** I didn't mean to suggest that ''all'' Goa'uld ought to stick with Unas hosts, but I'm wondering why we don't see more more of a balance. A Goa'uld scientist, sure, he's got a good reason to prefer a human host, if only for the nimbler hands. But Terok (the Goa'uld who tortured Teal'c in "The Serpent's Venom") seems like a prime candidate for an Unas host. Since his whole job seems to be torturing/interrogating prisoners for Heru'ur, one would think being a terrifying demonesque monster with teeth and claws would be a bit plus for him. And speaking of demons, shouldn't there have been tons of Unas!Goa'uld running around on Sokar's Hellworld? They even said in that episode that Sokar used Unas!Goa'uld to torment his victims, but we saw none of them there. See also "The First Commandment", another episode that makes a strong argument for why ''some'' Goa'uld ought to stick with Unas hosts. Intimidating primitive human tribes is a lot easier when you ''literally'' look like a demon.
*** ** On a separate note, I strongly question the argument that human hosts are easier to repair than an Unas host. As I said, we see in the series that an Unas!Goa'uld is able to survive damage that would instantly kill a human!Goa'uld. The Unas!Goa'uld in "Thor's Hammer" is shot several times by O'neill but survives, while every time a human!Goa'uld is shot with a Tauri weapon they pretty much die instantly. The Unas!Goa'uld in "Demons" takes ''several'' shots from a staff weapon before being too damaged to heal, but Cronos, Amaunet, and many other human!Goa'uld die from a single staff blast.
*** ** "Easier" probably means "takes less out of the symbiote". The symbiote's healing powers to its host aren't unlimited, as demonstrated by A) Selmak being so weakened from keeping Saroosh alive that it was questionable whether it could heal Jacob's leukemia in "The Tok'ra, Part II", and B) Junior giving up the ghost after being shared between Teal'c and Bra'tac in "The Changeling". And again, most Goa'uld don't lead from the front, so the actual need for the extra durability of an unas is sharply limited.
*** ** I believe it is also that among other qualities the symbiote takes from it's host is general intelligence. Smarter hosts make smarter blended entities. Additionally, humans as a species seem to have a knack for being easily manipulated via religious imagery and generally form groups, meaning they could extend their control by setting up cults that worship them. It is unclear whether other species such as the unas would share this trait, it may be possible to control one unas and a few that can be directly intimidated, but there may not be bigger social structures that can be exploited.



*** Being arrogant and isolationist didn't stop the Ancients or the Nox from being a member of the alliance.
*** Neither were to the extreme of the Tollan though, the Nox was the most isolationist and they still got out of the cloud city enough to yank the Tollan out the fire (twice) and had enough humility and compassion to save and at least listen to SG1 before shooing them out. The Ancients moved up and down the scale of arrogance (sometimes just pure arrogance, sometimes arrogance born of good intentions and experience), but they didn't become isolationists until they ascended. The Tollans were both Isolationist ''and'' Arrogant, and remained so even when it was demonstrated not to be a good thing.

to:

*** ** Being arrogant and isolationist didn't stop the Ancients or the Nox from being a member of the alliance.
*** ** Neither were to the extreme of the Tollan though, the Nox was the most isolationist and they still got out of the cloud city enough to yank the Tollan out the fire (twice) and had enough humility and compassion to save and at least listen to SG1 before shooing them out. The Ancients moved up and down the scale of arrogance (sometimes just pure arrogance, sometimes arrogance born of good intentions and experience), but they didn't become isolationists until they ascended. The Tollans were both Isolationist ''and'' Arrogant, and remained so even when it was demonstrated not to be a good thing.
21st Feb '16 11:44:45 PM harlbior
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** If we were to assume the number of chevrons locked for an appropriate address were between 1 and 9, that would be 61,191,108,557,860 possible permutations of symbols without repeats and and 69,681,401,296,978 permutations of symbols with repeats. That's a lot of choices. [[note]] This is based on adding the number of permutations possible for choices between 1 and 9 out of 38 different symbols. Look [[https://www.mathsisfun.com/combinatorics/combinations-permutations.html here]] for some details.[[/note]].

to:

** If we were to assume the number of chevrons locked for an appropriate address were between 1 and 9, that would be 61,191,108,557,860 possible permutations of symbols without repeats and and 69,681,401,296,978 169,681,401,296,978 permutations of symbols with repeats. That's a lot of choices. [[note]] This is based on adding the number of permutations possible for choices between 1 and 9 out of 38 different symbols. Look [[https://www.mathsisfun.com/combinatorics/combinations-permutations.html here]] for some details.[[/note]].
21st Feb '16 11:42:33 PM harlbior
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** If we were to assume the number of chevrons locked for an appropriate address were between 1 and 9, that would be 1,467,104,760 (about 1 billion) possible combinations without repetition and 9,915,446,970 (about 10 billion) combinations with repetitions. That's a lot of choices. [[note]] This is based on adding the number of combinations possible for combinations with choosing between 1 and 9 out of 38 different symbols. Look [[https://www.mathsisfun.com/combinatorics/combinations-permutations.html here]] for some details.[[/note]].

to:

** If we were to assume the number of chevrons locked for an appropriate address were between 1 and 9, that would be 1,467,104,760 (about 1 billion) 61,191,108,557,860 possible combinations permutations of symbols without repetition repeats and 9,915,446,970 (about 10 billion) combinations and 69,681,401,296,978 permutations of symbols with repetitions.repeats. That's a lot of choices. [[note]] This is based on adding the number of combinations permutations possible for combinations with choosing choices between 1 and 9 out of 38 different symbols. Look [[https://www.mathsisfun.com/combinatorics/combinations-permutations.html here]] for some details.[[/note]].
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