History Headscratchers / StarTrekFirstContact

21st Nov '17 9:51:11 AM Bense
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** Data locks the computer, and this is apparently enough to stop the Borg from doing ''anything'' with it. He sees them later trying to access the computer and failing, which is when the Borg Queen decides to try persuasion/seduction instead. Starfleet computer security must be just that good. Or the Borg are just that poor at breaking it.
19th Nov '17 2:52:21 PM Borjigin
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19th Nov '17 2:51:41 PM Borjigin
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[[folder:Why can't the Borg stop the self-destruct?]]
* I mean, we've seen the Borg assimilation ability do things that border on reality-warping, such as change the very walls of the ship like some kind of virus-induced shapeshifting. But they can't hack the computers controlling the countdown? Shouldn't their nanites be able to eat/transform all the circuits controlling the countdown? Heck, just infect the wires leading from the computers to whatever they trigger to cause the explosion. Or assimilate the explosive devices themselves. It just seems like there should be hundred ways for an assimilation ability as powerful as theirs to stop something like this.
25th Oct '17 8:56:37 PM costanton11
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** For that matter, why did they shell Cochrine's camp in such a half-assed way? This is the Borg we're talking about, they should have been able to incinerate all of North America in about a second. To paraphrase Riker from TNG, one photon torpedo should have done it.

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** For that matter, why did they shell Cochrine's Cochrane's camp in such a half-assed way? This is the Borg we're talking about, they should have been able to incinerate all of North America in about a second. To paraphrase Riker from TNG, one photon torpedo should have done it.



What doesn't make sense to ''me'' is: why assume they were harvesting skin from ''anybody'', when it'd be easier simply to culture it, and the result would likely be of better quality in any case? Consider, also, that while the Collective isn't particularly moral, Data ''is'', and they would have to take that into account -- showing yourself to be a villain probably isn't all that good a seduction technique. So if they're harvesting it, then either they're peeling it off the corpse of one of Data's dead crew mates, or they're doing the same thing to one of Data's crewmates who is ''still alive''; either way, it's going to make it hard for Data to accept the gift in good conscience, even if he weren't just playing along until he got a chance to save the day.

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What doesn't make sense to ''me'' is: why assume they were harvesting skin from ''anybody'', when it'd be easier simply to culture it, and the result would likely be of better quality in any case? Consider, also, that while the Collective isn't particularly moral, Data ''is'', and they would have to take that into account -- showing yourself to be a villain probably isn't all that good a seduction technique. So if they're harvesting it, then either they're peeling it off the corpse of one of Data's dead crew mates, or they're doing the same thing to one of Data's crewmates crew mates who is ''still alive''; either way, it's going to make it hard for Data to accept the gift in good conscience, even if he weren't just playing along until he got a chance to save the day.



** Worf logs into his console and provides the appropriate authentication, the computer retrieves the available security certificate from Starfleet HQ (or from the Defiant, or from the latest certificate onboard) and incorporates it into the security policy for the Enterprise. (One does imagine Riker having a popup "Security Certificate for "Lt. Worf" on domain "USSEnterprise/Tactical" is expired. Do you wish to "Accept for this Plotline", "Accept Always", or "Deny". Click here for more information)

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** Worf logs into his console and provides the appropriate authentication, the computer retrieves the available security certificate from Starfleet HQ (or from the Defiant, or from the latest certificate onboard) and incorporates it into the security policy for the Enterprise. (One does imagine Riker having a popup "Security Certificate for "Lt. Worf" on domain "USSEnterprise/Tactical" is expired. Do you wish to "Accept for this Plotline", Plot line", "Accept Always", or "Deny". Click here for more information)



*** On the thing about objects not being able to leave the holodeck: It has been theorized that holodecks can replicate simple matter (such as the drawing Data took off the holodeck in "Elementary Dear Data") and food (which explains why Wesley was still wet after he left the Holodeck in "Encounter At Farpoint"). The fact the gangsters dissolved into nothing after leaving the holodeck (in "The Big Goodbye") suggests that complicated organisms such as humans cannot be replicated by the holodeck. On that note, a deleted scene from "Elementary Dear Data" indicated that Moriarty would have been able to leave the Holodeck given how Data took the drawing of the Enterprise out of it. Which contradicts "The Big Goodbye". Still, it was deleted...

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*** On the thing about objects not being able to leave the holodeck: It has been theorized that holodecks can replicate simple matter (such as the drawing Data took off the holodeck in "Elementary Dear Data") and food (which explains why Wesley was still wet after he left the Holodeck in "Encounter At Farpoint"). The fact the gangsters dissolved into nothing after leaving the holodeck (in "The Big Goodbye") suggests that complicated organisms such as humans cannot be replicated by the holodeck. On that note, a deleted scene from "Elementary Dear Data" indicated that Moriarty Moriarity would have been able to leave the Holodeck given how Data took the drawing of the Enterprise out of it. Which contradicts "The Big Goodbye". Still, it was deleted...



** a) and b) were most likely primary targets in said world war III. Nobody said the theory wasn't worked or developed in there (or something similar) and then they moved to Bozeman because there was an unused ICBM for which the current (propably very beaten up) US Government had no need and didn't watch too closely and start building their spaceship out of scraps because in post-nuclear war earth government grants for interstellar spacedrives were most likely hard to get.

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** a) and b) were most likely primary targets in said world war III. Nobody said the theory wasn't worked or developed in there (or something similar) and then they moved to Bozeman because there was an unused ICBM for which the current (propably (probably very beaten up) US Government had no need and didn't watch too closely and start building their spaceship out of scraps because in post-nuclear war earth government grants for interstellar spacedrives were most likely hard to get.



*** I can understand the Borg not wanting to back in time and assimilate inferior technology, but what about the reverse? Why couldn't some Borgs from, say 2375, take a Cube and go back to where the Borg were in 2075, give the past Borg the Cube and whatever else, and bham, the 2075 Borg are 300 years more advanced overnight and way more advanced than anything in that time period. So by the time the 2375 Borg get back to their time, the Borg of the altered 2375 are also 300 hundred years more advanced than when they left! Starfleet had trouble dealing with one regular Cube, how are they going to cope with a Cube with 300 years worth of additional tech on board?

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*** I can understand the Borg not wanting to back in time and assimilate inferior technology, but what about the reverse? Why couldn't some Borgs Borg from, say 2375, take a Cube and go back to where the Borg were in 2075, give the past Borg the Cube and whatever else, and bham, the 2075 Borg are 300 years more advanced overnight and way more advanced than anything in that time period. So by the time the 2375 Borg get back to their time, the Borg of the altered 2375 are also 300 hundred years more advanced than when they left! Starfleet had trouble dealing with one regular Cube, how are they going to cope with a Cube with 300 years worth of additional tech on board?



*** ''"Ironically, humanity was dramatically benefited from something that they now deny other developing species for fear of causing more harm than good."'' But they did not. The Prime Directive states that you shouldn't interfere with pre-warp civilizations (or at the very least ones who didn't already had another First Contact) - the Vulcans didn't do that. It was one man who created the warp-drive but that still meant humanity was capable of expanding outside their planet. Cochrane (a genius but on the same level of intelligent evolution as everyone else on the planet) had made the breakthrough and if he were to get access to the resources (as well as people) he needed to build the ''Phoenix'', he could have easily made dozens more warp-drive vessels and would have been once again noticed by the Vulcans. Humanity had reached the ''intellectual'' level needed to understand and create warp-drive (you can't actually expect that in order for us to be warp-capable, every single person would need to understand the logistics behind it; hell, plenty of starship personel have no intimate knowledge of the workings of the vessel) and there was nothing the Vulcans could do about it. If the timing wasn't right, we may haven't started expanding with the Vulcans' guidance but we would still have created the technology which enables us to explore the galaxy. Humanity/The Federation had never directly denied Contact with an already warp-capable civilization. (A lot of times on ENT, they run into plenty of ships/races which were slower than their own Warp 5 but they readily embraced contact with them because everyone who was warp-capable was already meeting multiple other warp-capable races in our quadrant; they hid themselves whenever a civilization/planet was pre-industrial and had barely gotten to the level of ''our'' 21th century.)

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*** ''"Ironically, humanity was dramatically benefited from something that they now deny other developing species for fear of causing more harm than good."'' But they did not. The Prime Directive states that you shouldn't interfere with pre-warp civilizations (or at the very least ones who didn't already had another First Contact) - the Vulcans didn't do that. It was one man who created the warp-drive but that still meant humanity was capable of expanding outside their planet. Cochrane (a genius but on the same level of intelligent evolution as everyone else on the planet) had made the breakthrough and if he were to get access to the resources (as well as people) he needed to build the ''Phoenix'', he could have easily made dozens more warp-drive vessels and would have been once again noticed by the Vulcans. Humanity had reached the ''intellectual'' level needed to understand and create warp-drive (you can't actually expect that in order for us to be warp-capable, every single person would need to understand the logistics behind it; hell, plenty of starship personel personnel have no intimate knowledge of the workings of the vessel) and there was nothing the Vulcans could do about it. If the timing wasn't right, we may haven't started expanding with the Vulcans' guidance but we would still have created the technology which enables us to explore the galaxy. Humanity/The Federation had never directly denied Contact with an already warp-capable civilization. (A lot of times on ENT, they run into plenty of ships/races which were slower than their own Warp 5 but they readily embraced contact with them because everyone who was warp-capable was already meeting multiple other warp-capable races in our quadrant; they hid themselves whenever a civilization/planet was pre-industrial and had barely gotten to the level of ''our'' 21th century.)



*** But would the human race be any less of an "easy target" if the Borg had arrived, say, in 1955 -- or 500 AD for that matter? Time travel plotlines open such problems.

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*** But would the human race be any less of an "easy target" if the Borg had arrived, say, in 1955 -- or 500 AD for that matter? Time travel plotlines plot lines open such problems.



** Imo, the Borg wanted to destroy cochrane's ship, prevent the birth of the federation, and return to their own timeline without assimilating anyone. Their own development would have been unaffected that way. As to why they are after the federation so persistently, the federation is the most powerful faction in the alpha and beta quadrant, with the added bonus that they seem capable to unite the various other factions against a common enemy. Their existence prevents the Borg from expanding into these quadrants and seeking out new worthy additions on their quest for perfection.
** This never occurred to me until reading these comments, and now the time travel aspect of First Contact is no longer a plot hole to me, but represents something essential to the Borg character. 1-the Queen says Picard thinks in “3 dimensional terms”, implying that as a non-borg he no longer thinks in 4th dimensional terms, the 4th dimension being time. 2-as we see in First Contact, when assimilation fails the Borg launch a time traveling sphere. 3-one of the crucial tenets of Borg philosophy is “it is inevitable.” Perhaps because the Borg have 4th dimensional time travel as a regular part of their strategy and so they KNOW that it is inevitable that they will assimilate you. If they fail, they know they can just travel back in time and assimilate you in the past, this 4th dimensional thinking is inherent to the Borg. Perhaps the Borg cubes and spheres and other ships we see are not all from the ‘present’, they’re from all over the time/space continuum. In their own presents they assimilate what they can, and when that doesn’t work they just send the ship back in time and it performs the assimilation there. Since their goal is perfection they seek the best periods in space AND time to assimilate the best cultural, technological and biological distinctiveness of the galaxies species’ throughout history. So when the Borg wouldn’t attempt to assimilate a species at some point in their history when their technology, culture or evolutionary development sucked, they would only target periods when a species was at their best in all three categories. So in First Contact they picked that particular moment because their attempt to assimilate humans in the present of Next Gen didn’t work, so they calculated the 2nd best period in human history, culturally, technologically and biologically and that was the day before First Contact. Hell, with this theory their 'adaption' methodology may be based on sending information back in time rather than scanning and modifications in the present. Another reason why they are sure that assimilation is inevitable. If you shoot a drone today, it records the damage and downloads that to the hive mind which disseminates that information throughout the Collective into the past, present and future, the Collective then just seeks out the right technology and/or knowledge, past, present or future to counter that attack, then sends the technological know how back in time so that on stardate so-and-so when drone XsubsectionY is shot by another phaser that drone, and all other drones involved in that fight, already have the proper technology installed to resist.

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** Imo, the Borg wanted to destroy cochrane's Cochrane's ship, prevent the birth of the federation, and return to their own timeline without assimilating anyone. Their own development would have been unaffected that way. As to why they are after the federation so persistently, the federation is the most powerful faction in the alpha and beta quadrant, with the added bonus that they seem capable to unite the various other factions against a common enemy. Their existence prevents the Borg from expanding into these quadrants and seeking out new worthy additions on their quest for perfection.
** This never occurred to me until reading these comments, and now the time travel aspect of First Contact is no longer a plot hole to me, but represents something essential to the Borg character. 1-the Queen says Picard thinks in “3 dimensional terms”, implying that as a non-borg non-Borg he no longer thinks in 4th dimensional terms, the 4th dimension being time. 2-as we see in First Contact, when assimilation fails the Borg launch a time traveling sphere. 3-one of the crucial tenets of Borg philosophy is “it is inevitable.” Perhaps because the Borg have 4th dimensional time travel as a regular part of their strategy and so they KNOW that it is inevitable that they will assimilate you. If they fail, they know they can just travel back in time and assimilate you in the past, this 4th dimensional thinking is inherent to the Borg. Perhaps the Borg cubes and spheres and other ships we see are not all from the ‘present’, they’re from all over the time/space continuum. In their own presents they assimilate what they can, and when that doesn’t work they just send the ship back in time and it performs the assimilation there. Since their goal is perfection they seek the best periods in space AND time to assimilate the best cultural, technological and biological distinctiveness of the galaxies species’ throughout history. So when the Borg wouldn’t attempt to assimilate a species at some point in their history when their technology, culture or evolutionary development sucked, they would only target periods when a species was at their best in all three categories. So in First Contact they picked that particular moment because their attempt to assimilate humans in the present of Next Gen didn’t work, so they calculated the 2nd best period in human history, culturally, technologically and biologically and that was the day before First Contact. Hell, with this theory their 'adaption' methodology may be based on sending information back in time rather than scanning and modifications in the present. Another reason why they are sure that assimilation is inevitable. If you shoot a drone today, it records the damage and downloads that to the hive mind which disseminates that information throughout the Collective into the past, present and future, the Collective then just seeks out the right technology and/or knowledge, past, present or future to counter that attack, then sends the technological know how back in time so that on stardate so-and-so when drone XsubsectionY is shot by another phaser that drone, and all other drones involved in that fight, already have the proper technology installed to resist.



* Why do the Borg require higher ambient temperature than humans? Cybernetics generate heat; one would think that at 39 C and 92% humidity, they'd be nonfunctional at best and melting your face at worst. Even if they have supercooling systems, needing a higher ambient temperature implies that they evolved in one, and until they developed or seized said supercoolers cybernetics would be more trouble than they were worth.

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* Why do the Borg require higher ambient temperature than humans? Cybernetics generate heat; one would think that at 39 C and 92% humidity, they'd be nonfunctional at best and melting your face at worst. Even if they have supercooling systems, needing a higher ambient temperature implies that they evolved in one, and until they developed or seized said supercoolers super coolers cybernetics would be more trouble than they were worth.



** Picard's de-assimilation is also presented as something of a unique case, since he was intentionally left with part of his identity during the process. He didn't become "One of Twenty" or somesuch, he was given a name to act as an "emissary". The Borg wanted to preserve his knowledge and leadership skills... it's more like they just layered the Collective on top of his personality. The ExpandedUniverse says that most other attempts at de-assimilation fail, largely because there's just no personality left in most drones to recover.

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** Picard's de-assimilation is also presented as something of a unique case, since he was intentionally left with part of his identity during the process. He didn't become "One of Twenty" or somesuch, some such, he was given a name to act as an "emissary". The Borg wanted to preserve his knowledge and leadership skills... it's more like they just layered the Collective on top of his personality. The ExpandedUniverse says that most other attempts at de-assimilation fail, largely because there's just no personality left in most drones to recover.



* Something that always bothered me: the borg's plan to call their 21st century counterparts for help is a bit pointless in itself (Since time was of the essence), but consider a moment they had actually contacted them. How would the borg of the 21st century have reacted to two different directives from two hive minds/queens? Enough "chaos" for the ol' induced self destruction, you think?

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* Something that always bothered me: the borg's Borg's plan to call their 21st century counterparts for help is a bit pointless in itself (Since time was of the essence), but consider a moment they had actually contacted them. How would the borg Borg of the 21st century have reacted to two different directives from two hive minds/queens? Enough "chaos" for the ol' induced self destruction, you think?



** Data and Picard have a very special connection, that is often overlooked. Beyond just their friendship, Picard explains it quite well to Lily, why he must try. "When I was captured by the Borg, my crew risked everything to save me. There is a person still on board this ship who I owe the same to". In Best of Both Worlds in TNG the crew indeed did go above and beyond to rescue Picard. Data in particular took quite a few personal risks, he was a part of both away teams that were sent in to rescue Picard. (The first one failed, leading to the cliffhanger) Then, later after Picard had been recovered, he was still programmed with Borg Imperial Dogma. Data hooked himself directly to Picard, risking himself being assiimilated and his own neural net frying. He helped Picard re establish neural links and break the hold the Borg had on him. Therefore it could be said that Data did the most, put in herculean efforts, all to save Picard. So it is justified that Picard owes him the very same.

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** Data and Picard have a very special connection, that is often overlooked. Beyond just their friendship, Picard explains it quite well to Lily, why he must try. "When I was captured by the Borg, my crew risked everything to save me. There is a person still on board this ship who I owe the same to". In Best of Both Worlds in TNG the crew indeed did go above and beyond to rescue Picard. Data in particular took quite a few personal risks, he was a part of both away teams that were sent in to rescue Picard. (The first one failed, leading to the cliffhanger) Then, later after Picard had been recovered, he was still programmed with Borg Imperial Dogma. Data hooked himself directly to Picard, risking himself being assiimilated assimilated and his own neural net frying. He helped Picard re establish neural links and break the hold the Borg had on him. Therefore it could be said that Data did the most, put in herculean efforts, all to save Picard. So it is justified that Picard owes him the very same.



** Consider how close Earth and Vulcan are, only a dozen or so light years apart. It's entirely possible that Vulcan would have been the first destination of any human exploratory mission, even if only by virtue of being one of the nearest habitable star systems (it might even be considered the nearest, depending on what future information is gathered on local stars). So regardless of whether or not the Vulcan ship landed, there was a good chance that first contact would occur within a few days. Why not let it happen on the vulcans' terms, rather than the humans'? (Alternatively, given the proximity and tech level of Earth, the Vulcan government might have actually set up a protocol for first contact with humanity.)

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** Consider how close Earth and Vulcan are, only a dozen or so light years apart. It's entirely possible that Vulcan would have been the first destination of any human exploratory mission, even if only by virtue of being one of the nearest habitable star systems (it might even be considered the nearest, depending on what future information is gathered on local stars). So regardless of whether or not the Vulcan ship landed, there was a good chance that first contact would occur within a few days. Why not let it happen on the vulcans' Vulcans' terms, rather than the humans'? (Alternatively, given the proximity and tech level of Earth, the Vulcan government might have actually set up a protocol for first contact with humanity.)
25th Oct '17 10:19:29 AM Bense
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** The whole point of warp drive is to make space travel less expensive, and its an entirely different approach. Telling Cochrane "space travel is just too expensive, you'll never make any money," is like telling the Wright brothers "flight is just a novelty, you'll never make any money building hot-air balloons".

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** The whole point of warp drive is to make space travel less expensive, and its it's an entirely different approach.approach from anything used by humans before. Telling Cochrane "space travel is just too expensive, you'll never make any money," is like telling the Wright brothers "flight is just a novelty, you'll never make any money building hot-air balloons".
13th Oct '17 7:37:48 PM MurrayTheBlue
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** Assuming their research began pre-World War III, they could have pitched it in any number of ways to the US Government to get funding in the build-up to the war.
** Relating to a different question from above, it's extremely unlikely that Lilly and Cochrane did all of their work in the AfterTheEnd setting. They were most likely very well funded by CERN/The US Government until the war. Currently they are just soldiering on with whatever they can find, and the community in Bozeman is staying because their is some semblance of infrastructure and support.
30th Sep '17 8:01:50 AM NewVirginiaCreeper
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** The Borg arrived at a time when Earth would be ripe to conquer. The Borg came back at a focal point, to prevent humanity from creating Warp Drive, which becomes the lynchpin of the later Federation. Picard later agrees, "Humanity is an easy target in this era". Obviously if their goal is to assimilate the whole species, it would be much easier to assimilate a single planet, then a large interstellar civilization like the Federation, which has spread out to a significant portion of the galaxy by the 24th century. Furthermore, in the start of Act II Data mentions they have arrived in a dark, bleak period of humanity, following the third world war. Riker even muses this is a good strategy, most of the major cities have been destroyed, there are few governments left, therefore no resistance. Again, it would be much easier to assimilate a species that is struggling to put itself together, then one who has completely unified.

to:

** The Borg arrived at a time when Earth would be ripe to conquer. The Borg came back at a focal point, to prevent humanity from creating Warp Drive, which becomes the lynchpin of the later Federation. Picard later agrees, "Humanity is an easy target in this era". Obviously if their goal is to assimilate the whole species, it would be much easier to assimilate a single planet, then than a large interstellar civilization like the Federation, which has spread out to a significant portion of the galaxy by the 24th century. Furthermore, in the start of Act II Data mentions they have arrived in a dark, bleak period of humanity, following the third world war. Riker even muses this is a good strategy, most of the major cities have been destroyed, there are few governments left, therefore no resistance. Again, it would be much easier to assimilate a species that is struggling to put itself together, then than one who has completely unified. unified.
*** But would the human race be any less of an "easy target" if the Borg had arrived, say, in 1955 -- or 500 AD for that matter? Time travel plotlines open such problems.
17th Sep '17 1:34:57 PM TTP
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** Data and Picard have a very special connection, that is often overlooked. Beyond just their friendship, Picard explains it quite well to Lily, why he must try. "When I was captured by the Borg, my crew risked everything to save me. There is a person still on board this ship who I owe the same to". In Best of Both Worlds in TNG the crew indeed did go above and beyond to rescue Picard. Data in particular took quite a few personal risks, he was a part of both away teams that were sent in to rescue Picard. (The first one failed, leading to the cliffhanger) Then, later after Picard had been recovered, he was still programmed with Borg Imperial Dogma. Data hooked himself directly to Picard, and helped Picard re establish neural links and break the Borg hold. Therefore it could be said that Data did the most, put in herculean efforts, all to save Picard. So it is justified that Picard owes him the very same.

to:

** Data and Picard have a very special connection, that is often overlooked. Beyond just their friendship, Picard explains it quite well to Lily, why he must try. "When I was captured by the Borg, my crew risked everything to save me. There is a person still on board this ship who I owe the same to". In Best of Both Worlds in TNG the crew indeed did go above and beyond to rescue Picard. Data in particular took quite a few personal risks, he was a part of both away teams that were sent in to rescue Picard. (The first one failed, leading to the cliffhanger) Then, later after Picard had been recovered, he was still programmed with Borg Imperial Dogma. Data hooked himself directly to Picard, risking himself being assiimilated and his own neural net frying. He helped Picard re establish neural links and break the hold the Borg hold.had on him. Therefore it could be said that Data did the most, put in herculean efforts, all to save Picard. So it is justified that Picard owes him the very same.
17th Sep '17 12:35:07 PM TTP
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Added DiffLines:

** Data and Picard have a very special connection, that is often overlooked. Beyond just their friendship, Picard explains it quite well to Lily, why he must try. "When I was captured by the Borg, my crew risked everything to save me. There is a person still on board this ship who I owe the same to". In Best of Both Worlds in TNG the crew indeed did go above and beyond to rescue Picard. Data in particular took quite a few personal risks, he was a part of both away teams that were sent in to rescue Picard. (The first one failed, leading to the cliffhanger) Then, later after Picard had been recovered, he was still programmed with Borg Imperial Dogma. Data hooked himself directly to Picard, and helped Picard re establish neural links and break the Borg hold. Therefore it could be said that Data did the most, put in herculean efforts, all to save Picard. So it is justified that Picard owes him the very same.
17th Sep '17 12:16:41 PM TTP
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** The Borg arrived at a time when Earth would be ripe to conquer. The Borg came back at a focal point, to prevent humanity from creating Warp Drive, which becomes the lynchpin of the later Federation. Picard later agrees, "Humanity is an easy target in this era". Obviously if their goal is to assimilate the whole species, it would be much easier to assimilate a single planet, then a large interstellar civilization like the Federation, which has spread out to a significant portion of the galaxy by the 24th century. Also in the start of Act II Data mentions they have arrived in a dark period of humanity, following the third world war. Riker even realizes this is a good strategy, most of the major cities have been destroyed, there are few governments left, therefore no resistance.

to:

** The Borg arrived at a time when Earth would be ripe to conquer. The Borg came back at a focal point, to prevent humanity from creating Warp Drive, which becomes the lynchpin of the later Federation. Picard later agrees, "Humanity is an easy target in this era". Obviously if their goal is to assimilate the whole species, it would be much easier to assimilate a single planet, then a large interstellar civilization like the Federation, which has spread out to a significant portion of the galaxy by the 24th century. Also Furthermore, in the start of Act II Data mentions they have arrived in a dark dark, bleak period of humanity, following the third world war. Riker even realizes muses this is a good strategy, most of the major cities have been destroyed, there are few governments left, therefore no resistance.resistance. Again, it would be much easier to assimilate a species that is struggling to put itself together, then one who has completely unified.
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