History Headscratchers / Seinfeld

11th Apr '18 9:08:03 PM speedyboris
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* Who played Mario (of Mario's Pizza) in "The Frogger"? Nobody is listed in the credits so whoever played the character was uncredited, but I have no idea who it is. Anybody know?
22nd Mar '18 10:12:51 PM Business21
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* Jerry is implied in-universe to be extremely well-off financially. He seemingly has unlimited money, and is shown making $50,000 for one gig. So WHY is he living in an old, dilapidated one-bedroom apartment for the duration of the series? I love the apartment because it's the primary set for the series, but if you take it out of the Seinfeld universe, it looks like a starter flat for a broke 20-something. I find it hard to believe that a near-millionaire wouldn't be living in a condo on Park Avenue, or at least a house in the suburbs.
8th Mar '18 8:32:24 PM nombretomado
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** The producers are probably being a bit glib about the show literally being about 'nothing' (since, as it's not a Dadaist [[TheTropelessTale Tropeless Tale]], clearly it's not literally about nothing), but in addition to the points raised about the lack of clear cut moral lessons, the show's also about 'nothing' in the sense that what does happen is usually kind of mundane and banal. In a lot of sitcoms around the time (not all of them, but a lot of them), in each episode there's usually some kind of meaningful central event that informs the entire episode -- this week the characters are going to the prom; next week the characters are hosting a dinner party; the week after that the characters are going on vacation; and so on. Admittedly, ''Seinfeld'' isn't ''entirely'' free of these kind of things, but (particularly in the early seasons), most of the time episodes involve them just kind of dicking around fixating on things that are kind of trivial. This week, George plans a perfect comeback to someone who insulted him; next week, Jerry worries about the size of his girlfriend's hands; the week after that, Elaine gets into a petty feud with the guy who runs the soup restaurant she goes to for lunch; and so on. It's about 'nothing' in the sense that what happens in most of the episodes by most standards isn't really that important or significant.

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** The producers are probably being a bit glib about the show literally being about 'nothing' (since, as it's not a Dadaist [[TheTropelessTale [[JustForFun/TheTropelessTale Tropeless Tale]], clearly it's not literally about nothing), but in addition to the points raised about the lack of clear cut moral lessons, the show's also about 'nothing' in the sense that what does happen is usually kind of mundane and banal. In a lot of sitcoms around the time (not all of them, but a lot of them), in each episode there's usually some kind of meaningful central event that informs the entire episode -- this week the characters are going to the prom; next week the characters are hosting a dinner party; the week after that the characters are going on vacation; and so on. Admittedly, ''Seinfeld'' isn't ''entirely'' free of these kind of things, but (particularly in the early seasons), most of the time episodes involve them just kind of dicking around fixating on things that are kind of trivial. This week, George plans a perfect comeback to someone who insulted him; next week, Jerry worries about the size of his girlfriend's hands; the week after that, Elaine gets into a petty feud with the guy who runs the soup restaurant she goes to for lunch; and so on. It's about 'nothing' in the sense that what happens in most of the episodes by most standards isn't really that important or significant.
16th Feb '18 4:17:38 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Even if they did, Kurt could still be charged with assaulting a police officer, which is a separate crime.
16th Feb '18 4:15:22 AM DoctorNemesis
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** She also likely exaggerated the nature of the relationship to portray herself as an innocent victim and George as a scheming predator. WoundedGazelleGambit and such.
15th Feb '18 5:54:20 AM DoctorNemesis
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** The producers are probably being a bit glib about the show literally being about 'nothing' (since, as it's not a Dadaist TropelessTale, clearly it's not literally about nothing), but in addition to the points raised about the lack of clear cut moral lessons, the show's also about 'nothing' in the sense that what does happen is usually kind of mundane and banal. In a lot of sitcoms around the time (not all of them, but a lot of them), in each episode there's usually some kind of meaningful central event that informs the entire episode -- this week the characters are going to the prom; next week the characters are hosting a dinner party; the week after that the characters are going on vacation; and so on. Admittedly, ''Seinfeld'' isn't ''entirely'' free of these kind of things, but (particularly in the early seasons), most of the time episodes involve them just kind of dicking around fixating on things that are kind of trivial. This week, George plans a perfect comeback to someone who insulted him; next week, Jerry worries about the size of his girlfriend's hands; the week after that, Elaine gets into a petty feud with the guy who runs the soup restaurant she goes to for lunch; and so on. It's about 'nothing' in the sense that what happens in most of the episodes by most standards isn't really that important or significant.

to:

** The producers are probably being a bit glib about the show literally being about 'nothing' (since, as it's not a Dadaist TropelessTale, [[TheTropelessTale Tropeless Tale]], clearly it's not literally about nothing), but in addition to the points raised about the lack of clear cut moral lessons, the show's also about 'nothing' in the sense that what does happen is usually kind of mundane and banal. In a lot of sitcoms around the time (not all of them, but a lot of them), in each episode there's usually some kind of meaningful central event that informs the entire episode -- this week the characters are going to the prom; next week the characters are hosting a dinner party; the week after that the characters are going on vacation; and so on. Admittedly, ''Seinfeld'' isn't ''entirely'' free of these kind of things, but (particularly in the early seasons), most of the time episodes involve them just kind of dicking around fixating on things that are kind of trivial. This week, George plans a perfect comeback to someone who insulted him; next week, Jerry worries about the size of his girlfriend's hands; the week after that, Elaine gets into a petty feud with the guy who runs the soup restaurant she goes to for lunch; and so on. It's about 'nothing' in the sense that what happens in most of the episodes by most standards isn't really that important or significant.
15th Feb '18 5:53:15 AM DoctorNemesis
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** The producers are probably being a bit glib about the show literally being about 'nothing' (since, as it's not a Dadaist TropelessTale, clearly it's not literally about nothing), but in addition to the points raised about the lack of clear cut moral lessons, the show's also about 'nothing' in the sense that what does happen is usually kind of mundane and banal. In a lot of sitcoms around the time (not all of them, but a lot of them), in each episode there's usually some kind of meaningful central event that informs the entire episode -- this week the characters are going to the prom; next week the characters are hosting a dinner party; the week after that the characters are going on vacation; and so on. Admittedly, ''Seinfeld'' isn't ''entirely'' free of these kind of things, but (particularly in the early seasons), most of the time episodes involve them just kind of dicking around fixating on things that are kind of trivial. This week, George plans a perfect comeback to someone who insulted him; next week, Jerry worries about the size of his girlfriend's hands; the week after that, Elaine gets into a petty feud with the guy who runs the soup restaurant she goes to for lunch; and so on. It's about 'nothing' in the sense that what happens in most of the episodes by most standards isn't really that important or significant.



** Out-of-universe, Cranston could also have been required to wear particular styles or facial hair for other roles that he had; actors are sometimes contractually obliged to develop or keep a particular look for a character (usually if they're doing a recurring role like a theatre production or a starring/recurring role on a TV show) that they'll have to wear in other, smaller roles that they might also get during the production. So on some occasions Cranston might have had another role which, say, required him to have a beard and the ''Seinfeld'' producers were okay with him keeping it. In-universe, as above, Tim's probably just one of those people who's constantly trying out a new look.

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** Out-of-universe, Cranston could also have been required to wear particular styles or facial hair for other roles that he had; actors are sometimes contractually obliged to develop or keep a particular look for a character (usually if (if they're doing a recurring role like a nightly theatre production production, or a starring/recurring role on feature film where they might be called to set at irregular intervals over a TV show) period of months, and so on) that they'll have to wear in other, smaller roles that they might also get during the production. So on some occasions Cranston might have had another role which, say, required him to have a beard and the ''Seinfeld'' producers were okay with him keeping it. it since, hey, who cares if Jerry's dentist has a beard this time? In-universe, as above, Tim's probably just one of those people who's constantly trying out a new look.
15th Feb '18 5:37:13 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Out-of-universe, Cranston could also have been required to wear particular styles or facial hair for other roles that he had; actors are sometimes contractually obliged to develop or keep a particular look for a character (usually if they're doing a recurring role like a theatre production or a starring/recurring role on a TV show) that they'll have to wear in other, smaller roles that they might also get during the production. So on some occasions Cranston might have had another role which, say, required him to have a beard and the ''Seinfeld'' producers were okay with him keeping it. In-universe, as above, Tim's probably just one of those people who's constantly trying out a new look.
2nd Jan '18 3:26:16 PM speedyboris
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** They would get severe burns if they sat out in the sun like Kramer did.
3rd Dec '17 11:38:42 PM dyson88
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*** It wasn't just bad luck. George's girlfriend Cheryl was a lawyer who tried to keep Babu from being deported. When she find out George and Jerry had been lying to her, she dropped Babu's case, causing him to get deported. Presumably she told Babu exactly why she wouldn't help him anymore, explaning why he blames them for it.
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