History Headscratchers / Psych

17th Mar '18 10:08:52 PM Grace-the-Ace
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17th Mar '18 10:07:57 PM Grace-the-Ace
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So in 2001 Timothy Omundson (Carlton) played an evil leprechaun in a Disney movie called The Luck of the Irish
I don't really know where I was going with that I just find it very hard to wrap my head around it

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So [[folder:So in 2001 Timothy Omundson (Carlton) played an evil leprechaun in a Disney movie called The Luck of the Irish
I
Irish]]
*I
don't really know where I was going with that I just find it very hard to wrap my head around it
17th Mar '18 10:06:50 PM Grace-the-Ace
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to:

So in 2001 Timothy Omundson (Carlton) played an evil leprechaun in a Disney movie called The Luck of the Irish
I don't really know where I was going with that I just find it very hard to wrap my head around it
15th Mar '18 3:48:37 AM Grace-the-Ace
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[[folder: Um, Carl still owes the bookie money...]]

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[[folder: Um, Carl still owes the bookie money...]]Can't keep my hands to myself... Unless my parents tell me to]]
15th Mar '18 3:47:35 AM Grace-the-Ace
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* Also in that episode, they kinda just arrested the murderer and wrapped stuff up in a neat little Christmas forgiveness bow... Except the reason Ted, Carl, and wats-his-face started robbing peoples houses because they owe a shit ton of money to a bookie, but as far as I know, how Carl was going to pay him back WITHOUT robbing someone was never resolved at all... Did I miss something or did it just slip the writers minds the confirm what was happening with hat?

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* Also in that episode, they kinda just arrested the murderer and wrapped stuff up in a neat little Christmas forgiveness bow... Except the reason Ted, Carl, and wats-his-face started robbing peoples houses because they owe a shit ton of money to a bookie, but as far as I know, how Carl was going to pay him back WITHOUT robbing someone was never resolved at all... Did I miss something or did it just slip the writers minds the confirm what was happening with hat?that?
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15th Mar '18 3:46:40 AM Grace-the-Ace
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[[folder: Um, Carl still owes the bookie money...]]
In the third Christmas episode, Shawn came to stay with the Gusters for a while because, quote, "[Shawn] cannot be held responsible for infesting the ENTIRE [apartment] building [with fleas]!" Basically, he had a little 'fling' with Gus' older sister Joy 10 years ago and they've still got the hots for each other. You can see where this is going.
Fast forward to Christmas morning, Everyone (except Gus) confesses to something, and Joy tells them about Shawn and her. The Gusters get mad, they kick Shawn out, yadda yadda. In the end, they forgive him, stating "We realized you frustrate us in only the way family could."
Anyway, they end up saying that Joy & Shawn can't see each other. But hold up. As Joy stated MULTIPLE TIMES DURING THE EPISODE, she's perfectly capable and mature enough to choose who she sees, and it's really not their place to say whether or not they can, especially not her little brother's. Am I the only one that's a little surprise that Shawn and Joy actually obeyed it? I mean, they could literally barely keep their hands off each other every time they were together in the episode, can someone please explain how things changed?

*Also in that episode, they kinda just arrested the murderer and wrapped stuff up in a neat little Christmas forgiveness bow... Except the reason Ted, Carl, and wats-his-face started robbing peoples houses because they owe a shit ton of money to a bookie, but as far as I know, how Carl was going to pay him back WITHOUT robbing someone was never resolved at all... Did I miss something or did it just slip the writers minds the confirm what was happening with hat?
20th Jan '18 12:54:13 AM DoctorNemesis
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** I imagine that Henry probably ''suspected'' that Shawn opened his eyes but there's no possible way he could know for sure without Shawn actually telling him. Assuming Shawn and Gus never said anything about what happened, since even a disciplinarian like Henry can't actually scold or punish Shawn for something he has no proof he did, Henry just decided to give Shawn the benefit of the doubt and let it lie. Either way, he certainly had no way of knowing that Shawn and Gus both opened ''and'' closed their eyes, thus seeing Sherry about to jump but missing the crucial bit where Henry actually saved her. He probably didn't mention what actually happened because he assumed that either Shawn had his eyes open the whole time and saw the whole thing (in which case there was no need, since he'd seen it), or that Shawn had his eyes closed the whole time and thus didn't see what happened (in which case there was no need, because he didn't see it). As for why he doesn't say anything at all, unlike Shawn Henry's not the kind of guy to blow his own trumpet, and remember that he didn't want the boys there to witness anything to begin with. He probably figures (again assuming they never revealed they opened their eyes) that they didn't see anything anyway, they're too young to fully understand what was happening and he just wants to get them home and move on.

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** I imagine that Henry probably ''suspected'' that Shawn opened his eyes but there's no possible way he could know for sure without Shawn actually telling him. Assuming Shawn and Gus never said anything about what happened, since even a disciplinarian like Henry can't actually scold or punish Shawn for something he has no without any proof he did, Henry presumably just decided to give Shawn the benefit of the doubt and let it lie. Either way, he certainly had no way of knowing that Shawn and Gus both opened ''and'' closed their eyes, thus seeing Sherry about to jump but missing the crucial bit where Henry actually saved her. He probably didn't mention what actually happened because he assumed that either Shawn had his eyes open the whole time and saw the whole thing (in which case there was no need, since he'd seen it), or that Shawn had his eyes closed the whole time and thus didn't see what happened (in which case there was no need, because he didn't see it). As for why he doesn't say anything at all, unlike Shawn Henry's not the kind of guy to blow his own trumpet, and remember that he didn't want the boys there to witness anything to begin with. He probably figures (again assuming they never revealed they opened their eyes) that they didn't see anything anyway, they're too young to fully understand what was happening and he just wants to get them home and move on.
19th Jan '18 11:38:35 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Since either way it's the same basic story outlining the same basic events occurring at the same point in the show's run, it can be reasonably surmised that at least one version of these events happened to Shawn and Gus at some point. It's simply up to the viewer which version of events they'd prefer to consider as the "canonical" version (although given that the episode has "Improvement" in the title, presumably the producers of the episode lean towards the latter version than the earlier one). The fact that Ralph Macchio and Ray Wise (and others) show up as different characters is just a cute little inside joke, really; presumably if the circle really has to be squared beyond RuleOfFunny, you can simply assume that the "Absolute Canonical" version involves the events in the latter version of the episode being the "true" version, but the characters were "actually" the actors who portrayed them in the earlier version.

to:

** Since either way it's the same basic story outlining the same basic events occurring at the same point in the show's run, it can be reasonably surmised that at least one version of these events happened to Shawn and Gus at some point. It's simply up to the viewer which version of events they'd prefer to consider as the "canonical" version (although given that the episode has "Improvement" in the title, presumably the producers of the episode lean towards the latter version than the earlier one). The fact that Ralph Macchio and Ray Wise (and others) show up as different characters is just a cute little inside joke, really; presumably if the circle really has to be squared beyond RuleOfFunny, you can simply assume that the "Absolute Canonical" version involves the events in the latter version of the episode being the "true" version, but the characters were "actually" actually the actors who portrayed them in the earlier version.version (that is, the judge was the Donnelly Rhodes version, not the Ray Wise version, but he did the things that the Ray Wise version did).
19th Jan '18 11:11:26 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Since either way it's the same basic story outlining the same basic events occurring at the same point in the show's run, it can be reasonably surmised that at least one version of these events happened to Shawn and Gus at some point. It's simply up to the viewer which version of events they'd prefer to consider as the "canonical" version (although given that the episode has "Improvement" in the title, presumably the producers of the episode lean towards the latter version than the earlier one). The fact that Ralph Macchio and Ray Wise (and others) show up as different characters is just a cute little inside joke, really.

to:

** Since either way it's the same basic story outlining the same basic events occurring at the same point in the show's run, it can be reasonably surmised that at least one version of these events happened to Shawn and Gus at some point. It's simply up to the viewer which version of events they'd prefer to consider as the "canonical" version (although given that the episode has "Improvement" in the title, presumably the producers of the episode lean towards the latter version than the earlier one). The fact that Ralph Macchio and Ray Wise (and others) show up as different characters is just a cute little inside joke, really.really; presumably if the circle really has to be squared beyond RuleOfFunny, you can simply assume that the "Absolute Canonical" version involves the events in the latter version of the episode being the "true" version, but the characters were "actually" the actors who portrayed them in the earlier version.
19th Jan '18 11:09:13 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Since either way it's the same basic story outlining the same basic events occurring at the same point in the show's run, it can be reasonably surmised that at least one version of these events happened to Shawn and Gus at some point. It's simply up to the viewer which version of events they'd prefer to consider as the "canonical" version (although given that the episode has "Improvement" in the title, presumably the producers of the episode lean towards the latter version than the earlier one). The fact that Ralph Macchio and Ray Wise (and others) show up as different characters is just a cute little inside joke, really.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.Psych