History Headscratchers / Mulan

22nd Feb '16 7:29:17 AM Yatagerasu
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** In the original poem, Little Brother (the dog in the movie) was exactly that, but he was too young to serve.
21st Jan '16 7:51:28 AM MrDeath
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** Because her parents didn't have any sons. "Supposed to bear sons" doesn't mean it's something under their control.
21st Jan '16 7:29:02 AM chloso
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* So, in that culture, women were supposed to bear sons, right? So why doesn't Mulan have any brothers?
15th Dec '15 10:49:23 AM MrDeath
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** Yes. Again: '''Honor was a huge freaking deal in ancient China'''. Honor ''was'' seen as more important than someone's life. A family being dishonored basically meant the entire family was ''ruined''.
15th Dec '15 12:21:40 AM whisperstar13
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** So...I'm sorry, but he thought it better to risk his daughter ''dying'' in battle, which was a very likely possibility, than to face dishonor to the family?
27th Nov '15 8:42:52 AM fearlessnikki
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** And perhaps he thought Mulan might stand a better chance than him. After all she's young, and it's not as if she's an idle dame who's never done anything in her life. She's used to working around on the estate and doing chores, so she's quite strong - and that's probably why she made it through the training in the first place.
6th Nov '15 7:48:12 AM MrDeath
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** Because then the "son" would be seen as weak and a coward, and dishonor the family. Basically any reason for Mulan to get drummed out of the army would have been seen as dishonorable.
5th Nov '15 4:58:10 PM whisperstar13
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* If Mulan's father didn't want to go after his daughter and expose her to certain execution, then why didn't he at the very least go to the camp and play along with her disguise, telling Shang that his son snuck off to join the Army without him knowing, and stepping in to take his (her) place and sending Mulan home? He decided it was better to let her go into battle against the ''Hun army'' and just...''hope'' that his daughter who has no combat experience on top of illegally being in disguise manages to come out on top? Seems like a pretty nasty thing for a father to do.
23rd Aug '15 7:36:56 AM washington213
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** ...he explicitly says why in the movie.
7th Jul '15 12:39:14 AM Turtler
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**** My guess is a combination of "they were meant to be out of sight, but wound up getting killed out of sight" and "absolute power is nifty; lets you do things that you probably shouldn't." The Honor Guards you mention exist partially today because the monarchs and institutions they protect (be they the Queen of Britain or the President of the US) are essentially servants of the state, not the state themselves. There are limits to the orders that a President or British Royal could give to a Household Guard (or the Secret Service; which is why Nixon went around them). But Imperial China is an absolute monarchy, the Emperor *Is* the State. So if he decides he wants to go down the stairs to greet his people without any visible guards, who is going to stop him? Chi-Fu can lodge a complaint, but he'd probably be ignored.




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***** It's doubtful that it is Qin Shi Huang; the Qin walls were not very impressive and had to basically be rebuilt over and over and over again (like even the massively impressive Ming and Qing ones have had to be today). The cannons are probably historically inaccurate (given the time of the Xiongnu and their Shan-Yus), but they're probably well advanced from the first emperor.



*** Very well said on both parts. Though especially with the latter case, Your Emperors May Vary. The Emperor is the Son of Heaven, ruler of the world, and sancrosanct. So he would have a very big say on deciding what is illegal or not.




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*** Bingo. It's likely that- as he did later on- Shan-Yu might've sent a few prisoners back with the word that The Great, Magnificent Shan-Yu has decided to test the Emperor and make sure everybody knows. It's also likely that while Chinese military intelligence isn't great, they can know that only *The* Shan-Yu of the Huns (rather than one of his kinsmen/subordinate commanders) would have the ability to command an army as large as the one that took the Great Wall.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.Mulan