History Headscratchers / LuckyNumberSlevin

15th May '16 10:10:24 PM CB2001
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*** [[spoiler: Even more so the fact that the Goodkat is specialized in "doing the jobs that no one else wants," meaning that for a hit on the Rabbi's son, no other hitman would be dumb or crazy enough to do it due to the high risk that comes with it or the morality behind it. We see an example of this with Goodkat and the young Slevin, with Goodkat hired to kill him because no other hitman would have the guts to do it. Unfortunately for the Boss and the Rabbi, for that moment, he was someone who couldn't kill a kid either. So, since Goodkat's reputation would still stand as someone who still did such jobs. So, the Boss hiring Goodkat is no surprise, as he's hiring a man who specializes in hits that no one else would be sane enough to do.]]
13th Oct '15 3:21:06 PM Discar
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*** The key is what the bookie says to Max. The bookie offers terrible odds, Max objects ("The racing form says 9-to-1!"), but the bookie says that he'll get the good odds IF the spread sticks (which isn't guaranteed, unlike the bookie's odds). He also said that he would take the bet and "lay it off" - meaning that he's accepting Max's wager for 20 grand without requiring the 20 grand up front, because basically the new outfit (whatever The Rabbi and The Boss' new syndicate was called) was going to front Max the 20 grand. Max being able to pay off the bookie and collect his money (minus "the juice," the bookie's cut on the bet) is dependent on his horse winning the race. The point is that Max doesn't have the money for a legitimate bet, which is why he's seeing a bookie in the first place. (The other reason to see a bookie is if gambling is illegal in your state.) What makes Max a fool is not the odds, but that he didn't have the money to pay the bookie (or more importantly, the mob) in the first place.

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*** ** The key is what the bookie says to Max. The bookie offers terrible odds, Max objects ("The racing form says 9-to-1!"), but the bookie says that he'll get the good odds IF the spread sticks (which isn't guaranteed, unlike the bookie's odds). He also said that he would take the bet and "lay it off" - meaning that he's accepting Max's wager for 20 grand without requiring the 20 grand up front, because basically the new outfit (whatever The Rabbi and The Boss' new syndicate was called) was going to front Max the 20 grand. Max being able to pay off the bookie and collect his money (minus "the juice," the bookie's cut on the bet) is dependent on his horse winning the race. The point is that Max doesn't have the money for a legitimate bet, which is why he's seeing a bookie in the first place. (The other reason to see a bookie is if gambling is illegal in your state.) What makes Max a fool is not the odds, but that he didn't have the money to pay the bookie (or more importantly, the mob) in the first place.
13th Oct '15 2:53:46 PM AlmightyHamSandwich
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** Not much of a gamble considering Yitzhok's protection and the fact that Goodkat is, in his words, "a world-class assassin." Goodkat was likely the only person The Boss COULD call.

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** [[spoiler: Not much of a gamble considering Yitzhok's protection and the fact that Goodkat is, in his words, "a world-class assassin." Goodkat was likely the only person The Boss COULD call.
call.]]
13th Oct '15 2:53:20 PM AlmightyHamSandwich
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** Not much of a gamble considering Yitzhok's protection and the fact that Goodkat is, in his words, "a world-class assassin." Goodkat was likely the only person The Boss COULD call.
14th Sep '15 4:06:20 PM CockroachCharlie
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** [[spoiler: In reality, the only real gamble once the two concocted their revenge scheme was that Goodcat would get hired and not some other specialist.]]
15th Oct '13 11:34:32 PM atypicaloracle
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*** This isn't a headscratcher if you're paying attention to what the bookie says to Max. The bookie offers terrible odds, Max objects ("The racing form says 9-to-1!"), but the bookie says that he'll get the good odds IF the spread sticks (which isn't guaranteed, unlike the bookie's odds). He also said that he would take the bet and "lay it off" - meaning that he's accepting Max's wager for 20 grand without requiring the 20 grand up front. Max being able to pay off the bookie and collect his $18,000 (minus "the juice," the bookie's cut on the bet, which he says is two grand) is dependent on his horse winning the race. The point is that Max doesn't have the money for a legitimate bet, which is why he's seeing a bookie in the first place. You don't go to a bookie if you have the money for a legitimate bet (or else if you live in a state where gambling is illegal, of course). What makes Max a fool is not the odds, but that he didn't have the money to pay the bookie in the first place.

to:

*** This isn't a headscratcher if you're paying attention to The key is what the bookie says to Max. The bookie offers terrible odds, Max objects ("The racing form says 9-to-1!"), but the bookie says that he'll get the good odds IF the spread sticks (which isn't guaranteed, unlike the bookie's odds). He also said that he would take the bet and "lay it off" - meaning that he's accepting Max's wager for 20 grand without requiring the 20 grand up front. front, because basically the new outfit (whatever The Rabbi and The Boss' new syndicate was called) was going to front Max the 20 grand. Max being able to pay off the bookie and collect his $18,000 money (minus "the juice," the bookie's cut on the bet, which he says is two grand) bet) is dependent on his horse winning the race. The point is that Max doesn't have the money for a legitimate bet, which is why he's seeing a bookie in the first place. You don't go (The other reason to see a bookie is if you have the money for a legitimate bet (or else if you live in a state where gambling is illegal, of course). illegal in your state.) What makes Max a fool is not the odds, but that he didn't have the money to pay the bookie (or more importantly, the mob) in the first place.
14th Oct '13 5:00:21 AM atypicaloracle
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*** This isn't a headscratcher if you're paying attention to what the bookie says to Max. The bookie offers terrible odds, Max objects ("The racing form says 9-to-1!") but the point is that Max doesn't have the money for a legitimate bet, which is why he's seeing a bookie in the first place. You don't go to a bookie if you have the money for a legitimate bet (or else if you live in a state where gambling is illegal, of course).

to:

*** This isn't a headscratcher if you're paying attention to what the bookie says to Max. The bookie offers terrible odds, Max objects ("The racing form says 9-to-1!") 9-to-1!"), but the bookie says that he'll get the good odds IF the spread sticks (which isn't guaranteed, unlike the bookie's odds). He also said that he would take the bet and "lay it off" - meaning that he's accepting Max's wager for 20 grand without requiring the 20 grand up front. Max being able to pay off the bookie and collect his $18,000 (minus "the juice," the bookie's cut on the bet, which he says is two grand) is dependent on his horse winning the race. The point is that Max doesn't have the money for a legitimate bet, which is why he's seeing a bookie in the first place. You don't go to a bookie if you have the money for a legitimate bet (or else if you live in a state where gambling is illegal, of course). What makes Max a fool is not the odds, but that he didn't have the money to pay the bookie in the first place.
14th Oct '13 4:56:16 AM atypicaloracle
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to:

*** This isn't a headscratcher if you're paying attention to what the bookie says to Max. The bookie offers terrible odds, Max objects ("The racing form says 9-to-1!") but the point is that Max doesn't have the money for a legitimate bet, which is why he's seeing a bookie in the first place. You don't go to a bookie if you have the money for a legitimate bet (or else if you live in a state where gambling is illegal, of course).
15th Dec '12 1:22:10 PM Discar
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[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:The gangs]]




[[/folder]]

[[folder:Max's bet]]




[[/folder]]

[[folder:The Rabbi and Hebrew]]



* Once Slevin "became" Nick Fisher, how did he know for sure that Morgan Freeman was going to send him on a mission to kill The Fairy?
** Well first of all the events played out like so, both the boss and rabbis bookies were killed, then slevin killed the boss's son. boss calls goodkat, it is goodkat who says he needs nick fisher. having looked through both books for someone who appears in both and has a lot of debt, nick fisher fits both criteria. its all there in the film during the chess scene goodkat explains his plan to boss, about his plan to make it look like two gay guys comitting double suicide.

to:

** The Rabbi knows Slevin isn't Nick Fisher, but he doesn't make any attempt finding out who he ''is''.

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Batman Gambit]]

* Once [[spoiler:Once Slevin "became" Nick Fisher, how did he know for sure that Morgan Freeman was going to send him on a mission to kill The Fairy?
Fairy]]?
** Well [[spoiler:Well first of all the events played out like so, both the boss and rabbis bookies were killed, then slevin killed the boss's son. boss calls goodkat, it is goodkat who says he needs nick fisher. having looked through both books for someone who appears in both and has a lot of debt, nick fisher fits both criteria. its all there in the film during the chess scene goodkat explains his plan to boss, about his plan to make it look like two gay guys comitting double suicide.suicide]].

[[/folder]]
26th Sep '12 9:03:37 PM greyfield
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Added DiffLines:

** No, no, no. There is no loan, per se. Max places a bet with the bookie for twenty thousand at the bookie's posted odds which are much worse than the track, under the assumption Max can cover the losses if they occur. (The bookie asks him as much.) The bookie's not going to just give him twenty grand and then ask him to place a bet with him at worse odds.
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