History Headscratchers / LordOfTheFlies

15th Feb '17 5:53:42 PM Mr.Phorcys
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** Not only does the appearance of the naval officer count as a DeusExMachina that deconstructs the "island adventure" endings, but it also has a few other effects. For starters, the arrival immediately highlights the contrast between Jack's tribe and the society they left -- and how far the boys have regressed (one can't even remember his own name!). Then we have the fact that modern militaries are some of the most disciplined, well-organized(in short, the most "civilized") institutions in the world -- nothing could be further from the tribe. And yet, that "civilized" military is doing exactly what Jack is doing -- going out and killing people. Not only that, but remember that in the early parts of the book, the boys talk about how adults would just be wiser and smarter than they are. The fact that there is a war, and that the supposedly better adults are no better than the boys, demonstrates that even modern society might be little more than a more complex conch shell.
15th Feb '17 5:19:20 PM Mr.Phorcys
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** And the pig represents more than just an offering to "the Beast" -- it represents just how far gone Jack and the tribe is, and the "Lord of the Flies" is also the decay of the society Piggy tried to create. The offering is also made ''irrationally'', to satiate fears of the Beast and acts as a symbol of the tribe, just as the conch is the symbol of Piggy's society.

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** And the pig represents is more than just an offering to "the Beast" -- it represents just how far gone Jack and the his tribe is, are, and the "Lord of the Flies" is also by extension the decay of the society Piggy tried to create. The offering is also made ''irrationally'', to satiate fears of the Beast and acts act as a symbol of the tribe, just as the conch is the symbol of Piggy's society.society. If the dead paratrooper were the "Lord of the Flies", it would have been a more rational threat -- something everyone could both see and fear, as opposed to the unfounded idea of a spooky monster -- and one of the driving themes of the story is that an irrational fear can lead to people descending to acts they never would do under normal circumstances. Thus the symbol of how uncivilized we can be, the pig's head, is the "Lord of the Flies".
30th Sep '16 5:12:30 AM Mr.Phorcys
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*** Because "the Beast" had always been mostly unfounded, an embodiment of the primal fear that there is ''something else'' out there. It was a vaguely existential threat, one that "society" couldn't immediately clear away, thus allowing for the rise of Jack and the tribe. But by the time Simon found the parachutist, the nature of "the Beast" didn't matter anymore -- the greatest threat to the boys was now their slide into barbarism and the decay of their society as a response ''to'' "the Beast", as represented by the pig's head -- and the Lord of the Flies says that even if Simon goes back to the camp, he will still be there.
30th Sep '16 4:12:18 AM Mr.Phorcys
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Added DiffLines:

** And the pig represents more than just an offering to "the Beast" -- it represents just how far gone Jack and the tribe is, and the "Lord of the Flies" is also the decay of the society Piggy tried to create. The offering is also made ''irrationally'', to satiate fears of the Beast and acts as a symbol of the tribe, just as the conch is the symbol of Piggy's society.
17th Sep '16 3:09:51 PM aidansean
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** Given that a plane crashed on the island, and then a second plane got shot down over it, it's not all that surprising. They're clearly on the periphery of a war zone and the island-wide fire was a big distress signal.
5th Jun '16 11:28:21 PM Statzkeen
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*** Well it wouldn't make much sense for the story to continue once the ship arrives, would it?
6th May '16 6:42:19 AM aye_amber
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*** Nuts to you guys. This isn't ''StandByMe''. If I was stranded on an island for God-knows-how-long, I'd do ''anything'' that could potentially get me and everyone else off the island as quickly as possible. And if it meant looting a dead guy just to acquire something that could better prove that everyone's paranoid fears about "The Beast" was a load of bullcrap so that they could focus more on getting off the island, I'd freaking do it.

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*** Nuts to you guys. This isn't ''StandByMe''.''Film/StandByMe''. If I was stranded on an island for God-knows-how-long, I'd do ''anything'' that could potentially get me and everyone else off the island as quickly as possible. And if it meant looting a dead guy just to acquire something that could better prove that everyone's paranoid fears about "The Beast" was a load of bullcrap so that they could focus more on getting off the island, I'd freaking do it.
21st Jan '16 3:24:20 PM shamblingdead2
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*** Seconded here. "Who saves them? A man with a gun." They're going back to a "civilization" that is just as violent and chaotic and just about as ''uncivilized'' as the situation on the island. This book came out amidst the bleak cynicism of the post-WWII, Cold War era, and it shows the general morale of the time.
9th Oct '14 1:53:04 PM Homemaderat
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** The little boy's "beast" was actually just him waking up from a really bad nightmare, stumbling around and coming across Simon, who was, to quote Ralph, "mucking around in the dark." It's just meant to show how ingrained our primordial fears are, and to kick-start the notion of a beast. And yes, Piggy makes a point of mentioning that the boy is never seen again after the fire, implying that he died in it.

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** The little boy's "beast" was actually just him waking up from a really bad nightmare, stumbling around and coming across Simon, who was, to quote Ralph, "mucking around in the dark." It's just meant to show how ingrained our primordial fears are, and to kick-start the notion of a beast. And yes, Piggy makes a point of mentioning that the boy is never seen again after the fire, implying that he died in it.it.
** The first littlun's beast is not really identified, it's the second one they believe to have been Simon. Golding's book by way of the Lord of the Flies scene attempts to just wrap it all up as in the boy's imagination, but in the same way never definitely answers the question, so with no factual answer go ahead and assume the real beast ate up the littlun that never appeared again after the fire, or that he imagined it and died in the fire. Whichever strikes your fancy.
7th Jul '14 8:00:17 AM Bauglir100
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*** Nuts to you guys. This isn't ''StandByMe''. If I was stranded by an island for God-knows-how-long, I'd do ''anything'' that could potentially get me and everyone else off the island as quickly as possible. And if it meant looting a dead guy just to acquire something that could better prove that everyone's paranoid fears about "The Beast" was a load of bullcrap so that they could focus more on getting off the island, I'd freaking do it.

to:

*** Nuts to you guys. This isn't ''StandByMe''. If I was stranded by on an island for God-knows-how-long, I'd do ''anything'' that could potentially get me and everyone else off the island as quickly as possible. And if it meant looting a dead guy just to acquire something that could better prove that everyone's paranoid fears about "The Beast" was a load of bullcrap so that they could focus more on getting off the island, I'd freaking do it.
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