History Headscratchers / LiarLiar

28th Apr '16 11:30:21 AM lorgskyegon
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** Remember that he first says "I have a date to play ball with my son." In that ball playing, he will be Jose Canseco.
19th Mar '16 8:58:01 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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*** In short, Ms. Cole is a KarmaHoudini in the same way Larry's ex-wife from ''Film/ThrowMommaFromTheTrain'' is one: the story ended before it could show Karma finally bite them in the ass, but there's no way it isn't going to eventually.
16th Feb '15 7:47:25 PM Sparklles
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** Maybe she was checking the time every now and then, waiting for Fletcher to show up, and happened to do so shortly before Max went to the cake?

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** Maybe she was checking the time every now and then, waiting for Fletcher to show up, and happened to do so shortly before Max went to the cake?cake?
** What's the big deal? I can tell you I ate tuna today at 2:23. Sometimes people just look at clocks.
26th Sep '14 11:47:14 AM maxwellsilver
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*** Additionally, her husband states he had no idea she was underage, which means he could have had the marriage annulled on the grounds of fraud, which would leave her none of his wealth.
12th Aug '14 10:43:42 AM Tegid
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*** I believe the proper answer to this comes from Roger Ebert's commentary about a different film which showed what is often cited as an AchievementInIgonorance in the form of walking on water. Fans have speculated about mundane explanations for it, like the character walking on a barely submerged pier or sandbar, and Ebert's take on this famously went as follows: "The movie presents us with an image, and while you may discuss the meaning of the image, it is not permitted to devise explanations for it. Since Ashby does not show a pier, there is no pier a movie is exactly what it shows us, and nothing more." In the case of Liar Liar, the plot device is framed as magical, not mundane, and no mundane alternative is posited or implied. We are therefore obliged to treat it as such instead of trying to shoehorn a mundane explanation in.

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*** I believe the proper answer to this comes from Roger Ebert's commentary about a different film which showed what is often cited as an AchievementInIgonorance AchievementInIgnorance in the form of walking on water. Fans have speculated about mundane explanations for it, like the character walking on a barely submerged pier or sandbar, and Ebert's take on this famously went as follows: "The movie presents us with an image, and while you may discuss the meaning of the image, it is not permitted to devise explanations for it. Since Ashby does not show a pier, there is no pier a movie is exactly what it shows us, and nothing more." In the case of Liar Liar, the plot device is framed as magical, not mundane, and no mundane alternative is posited or implied. We are therefore obliged to treat it as such instead of trying to shoehorn a mundane explanation in.
12th Aug '14 10:42:27 AM Tegid
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to:

*** I believe the proper answer to this comes from Roger Ebert's commentary about a different film which showed what is often cited as an AchievementInIgonorance in the form of walking on water. Fans have speculated about mundane explanations for it, like the character walking on a barely submerged pier or sandbar, and Ebert's take on this famously went as follows: "The movie presents us with an image, and while you may discuss the meaning of the image, it is not permitted to devise explanations for it. Since Ashby does not show a pier, there is no pier a movie is exactly what it shows us, and nothing more." In the case of Liar Liar, the plot device is framed as magical, not mundane, and no mundane alternative is posited or implied. We are therefore obliged to treat it as such instead of trying to shoehorn a mundane explanation in.
19th Jan '14 7:06:18 AM FairyDreamer
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* Isn't it odd that Audrey just happened to know the exact time Max blew out the candles? There's nothing showing why she would remember that he blew out the candles at exactly 8:15. And yet she tells Fletcher that Max made his birthday wish at that exact time.

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* Isn't it odd that Audrey just happened to know the exact time Max blew out the candles? There's nothing showing why she would remember that he blew out the candles at exactly 8:15. And yet she tells Fletcher that Max made his birthday wish at that exact time.time.
** Maybe she was checking the time every now and then, waiting for Fletcher to show up, and happened to do so shortly before Max went to the cake?
2nd Jan '14 9:44:10 PM hdwarty
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***The way I've always seen it is that telling the truth would include his personal opinions because they're his and his only and he can't speak for others.
2nd Dec '13 10:25:12 PM Lightning4119
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* This might be as simple as "He didn't think of it," but after Fletcher feigns being assaulted in the bathroom to force the case into recess, Judge Stevens asks him if he can continue. Couldn't Fletcher have just pretended to pass out from the beating he took, which would probably be enough of an implication that he can't continue (without him actually having to say "I can't continue," which he can't)? The wish is that he can't ''tell'' a lie.

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* This might be as simple as "He didn't think of it," but after Fletcher feigns being assaulted in the bathroom to force the case into recess, Judge Stevens asks him if he can continue. Couldn't Fletcher have just pretended to pass out from the beating he took, which would probably be enough of an implication that he can't continue (without him actually having to say "I can't continue," which he can't)? The wish is that he can't ''tell'' a lie. lie.
** Earlier, he couldn't even shake his head no if it was dishonest. Faking a fainting spell would have been out of the question. He ''could'' have easily said "yes, but I would really rather not," but that would have been less funny in the long run.


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** Part of the truth wish seems to be blocking out lies of omission.


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15th Nov '13 8:39:38 PM ropertroper
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** Watch the scene carefully. She actually answers all his questions truthfully. He points to the marriage license and birth certificate and asks what they say. Then when she admits she lied to make herself older, he asks, "But why would any woman want to do that?" "I lied about my age so I could get married."

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** Watch the scene carefully. She actually answers all his questions truthfully. He points to the marriage license and birth certificate and asks what they say. Then when she admits she lied to make herself older, he asks, "But why would any woman want to do that?" "I lied about my age so I could get married.""
*Isn't it odd that Audrey just happened to know the exact time Max blew out the candles? There's nothing showing why she would remember that he blew out the candles at exactly 8:15. And yet she tells Fletcher that Max made his birthday wish at that exact time.
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