History Headscratchers / LiarGame

20th Dec '15 12:44:36 PM ACommonHero
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**In point of fact, every "exceptional" player is in the game by means of substitution. Akiyama is in the game by substituting himself for a random participant he meets on the way to the third round. Fukunaga is here as a substitute for his roommate, if I remember correctly. Yokoya, similarly to Akiyama, convinces a random participant to let him be his substitute (but in the first revival round rather than the second round like Akiyama). [[spoiler:Harimoto and his group are all substitutes themselves, in particular substituting for a famous musician and three other random people.]] The only exceptional person to receive their invitation "naturally" by selection by the LGT (assuming they don't send invitations in such a way as to attract certain substitutes, which is particularly unlikely in the case of Harimoto's group) is Nao Kanzaki, and she doesn't seem to be exceptional until after the first third of the games. So it seems likely either the invitations were random, targeted at people who would be desperate enough to participate at all (my personal theory, [[spoiler:even in spite of the LGTs true motives]]), or were selected by some other criteria that has nothing to do with their intelligence but was still "targeted" in some way.
7th Aug '15 12:07:46 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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*** Yeah... the theory was based on the J-Drama, which apparently really gave 100 million to the winner as a prize. Still, according to [[http://www.onemanga.com/Liar_Game/28/21/ this]] the debt for being the loser and the debt from the M-card are one and the same. That means 200 million is all that's needed for the loser. Also, this is a plan that's in response to Yokoya being revealed to have taken 10 votes from everyone. He offered to sell his excess votes; this would be enough to let everyone know that transferring votes is possible. Once the second round is over and it becomes common knowledge that you can transfer votes, the plan can be put into action. The loser half of the duo only requires 200 million to be left with no debt or profit. The winner half of the duo... yeah, this plan would've only been plausible in the J-drama.
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*** Yeah... the theory was based on the J-Drama, which apparently really gave 100 million to the winner as a prize. Still, according to [[http://www.onemanga.com/Liar_Game/28/21/ this]] the debt for being the loser and the debt from the M-card are one and the same. That means 200 million is all that's needed for the loser. Also, this is a plan that's in response to Yokoya being revealed to have taken 10 votes from everyone. He offered to sell his excess votes; this would be enough to let everyone know that transferring votes is possible. Once the second round is over and it becomes common knowledge that you can transfer votes, the plan can be put into action. The loser half of the duo only requires 200 million to be left with no debt or profit. The winner half of the duo... yeah, this plan would've only been plausible in the J-drama.

* IIRC, in the Revival round Fukunaga had bought 5 votes on every round from every player except Nao for 100 million. But in order to not have to pay that amount, he sells his 5 votes on every round to each player for 100 million, cancelling the debt and making this a contract by the rules of the Downsizing game. The problem is: he can't give every vote to every player on every round. If he promises to give every vote to every player, by default that should be a void contract except for one player. So, the PlotHole is... how did that work?
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* IIRC, in In the Revival round round: ** Fukunaga had bought 5 votes on every round from every player except Nao for 100 million. But in order to not have to pay that amount, he sells his 5 votes on every round to each player for 100 million, cancelling the debt and making this a contract by the rules of the Downsizing game. The problem is: he can't give every vote to every player on every round. If he promises to give every vote to every player, by default that should be a void contract except for one player. So, the PlotHole is... how did that work?

*** Apparently there's a page missing in Mangafox between [[http://www.mangafox.com/manga/liar_game/v03/c022/15.html page 15]] and [[http://www.mangafox.com/manga/liar_game/v03/c022/16.html 16]] of chapter 22, but... [[http://imgur.com/2dQT0.png here it is]]. Unless there was a translation error, that's what I understood from that. **** Fukunaga didn't buy anything.He threatened to make the game end in a tie, unless they all payed him, and bought his strategy that would cause Nao to lose. He only gives his votes to one player, there were enough people in the group for each of them to get five votes from another person.
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*** Apparently there's a page missing in Mangafox between [[http://www.mangafox.com/manga/liar_game/v03/c022/15.html page 15]] and [[http://www.mangafox.com/manga/liar_game/v03/c022/16.html 16]] of chapter 22, but... [[http://imgur.com/2dQT0.png here it is]]. Unless there was a translation error, that's what I understood from that. **** ** Fukunaga didn't buy anything.He threatened to make the game end in a tie, unless they all payed him, and bought his strategy that would cause Nao to lose. He only gives his votes to one player, there were enough people in the group for each of them to get five votes from another person.
31st Jan '15 12:22:24 PM Mayhavecontrol
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** [[spoiler: We know the third volume was banned before publications and the author died of "illness" 20 years before the story took place, is not inconceivable for the book to have been banned and suppressed in the meantime making it obscure and difficult to find in the time the story took place; in fact, Yokoya acquired his in an antique bookstore.]]
31st Jan '15 7:46:08 AM Ayjee
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* As of chapter 201, it's confirmed that the rounds of the Liar Game are [[spoiler:taken directly from a novel ''titled'' Liar Game, and reading this novel gave Yokoya an enormous advantage]]. Did none of the other participants think to use Google?
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* As of chapter 201, it's confirmed that the rounds of the Liar Game are [[spoiler:taken directly from a novel ''titled'' Liar Game, and reading this novel gave Yokoya an enormous advantage]]. Did none of the other participants think to use Google?Google "Liar Game" and discover this for themselves?
31st Jan '15 7:42:22 AM Ayjee
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* As of chapter 201, it's confirmed that the rounds of the Liar Game are [[spoiler:taken directly from a novel ''titled'' Liar Game, and reading this novel gave Yokoya an enormous advantage]]. Did none of the other participants think to use Google?
21st Aug '14 9:35:59 PM AbraSliver
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** It's called "The Liar Game". You expect them to be truthful? Also, we find out that Harimoto and his group were "stand-ins" for other people; one of whom is a famous musician facing financial difficulties. As such, it's almost assuredly that they are little more than a "money-making scam". But that might not be doing them justice because if Yokoya is correct that the losers become human guinea pigs, then the "money-making scam" is just a surface image for something more nefarious: slavery enforced by immoral corporate heads.
13th May '14 11:10:09 AM Kazeto
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** It's about the mentality. The whole game is about cheating and lying, would you really want to show anyone something valuable that could be either stolen or used against you in any way (such as a phone)? Not to mention that most participants likely never had to rely on their phones to produce evidence for anything before, thus decreasing the chances of it coming to their minds at the time.
15th Apr '14 11:36:21 AM WHT1
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*** It says that in the very first chapter. ->'''Directions:''' After the game is concluded, office representatives will come to retrieve the [[GratuitousEnglish money]]. At that time, what will be collected is: The [[GratuitousEnglish money]] that was given to both players at the start of the game. In [Nao's] case, the bills totaling one hundred million yen, numbered from [=BGL00585KK=] to [=BGL10584KK=].
5th Apr '14 11:56:51 PM Zmflavius
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** It is actually worth noting that of the selections, virtually all, with the exception of the 'exceptional' people are people in desperate situations. Most are either heavily in debt, or extremely financially vulnerable (frex, one of the three from the second revival round had before the game declared bankruptcy, Nao herself has to take care of a seriously ill father, whose medical bills probably suck up a lot of her free money). By contrast, Yokoya, an exceptional player, is the heir to a major corporation and has few qualms about throwing about hundreds of millions of yen. The rest of the exceptional players are not as well off, to be sure, and may even be financially in trouble (as this troper recalls, Fukunaga also had some financial issues), but nevertheless, there is a high chance they were selected as much for brains as for any ancillary qualities. So there you have it; ultimately, it seems the game is designed with the intention of having a few 'star players' and a large number of pawns to fill out the ranks. The pawns are recruited with the intention of being easy to bind to LGT (they quickly amass debt owing to poor or sub-optimal play, and are tied to the LGT that way); the star players because they can be trusted to play the game for itself, and stay financially stable either through other means (Yokoya) or simply since they keep playing the game. So while all players ostensibly are all equal participants, this is not the case with selection; some players are selected as 'players' and others as 'pawns.' Finally, in this case, Nao appears to have been an exception, selected as a pawn, but revealing exceptional capabilities. Those types of players are ancillary benefits; diamonds in the rough if you will.
21st Feb '14 12:59:20 PM spudsabre
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**** They lost in score, which is what counts regardless of where the money ends up.
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