History Headscratchers / KingKong

24th Sep '16 8:28:41 PM RTaco
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* Why is it that the explorers of Skull Island always risk life and limb to bring Kong himself back, but never stop to pick up any ''other'' unique specimens that'd be even '''more''' of a breakthrough, like dinosaur heads or dead BigCreepyCrawlies? Sure, Kong's size is awe-inspiring, but the discovery of an unknown ape species isn't anywhere ''near'' as scientifically revolutionary as still-extant non-avian dinosaurs, winged rodents, or bugs vastly larger than any known arthropod.

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* Why is it that the explorers of Skull Island always risk life and limb to bring Kong himself back, but never stop to pick up any ''other'' unique specimens that'd be even '''more''' of a breakthrough, like dinosaur heads or dead BigCreepyCrawlies? Sure, Kong's size is awe-inspiring, but the discovery of an unknown ape species isn't anywhere ''near'' as scientifically revolutionary as still-extant non-avian dinosaurs, winged rodents, or bugs vastly larger than any known arthropod.arthropod.
** They had bait for Kong.
24th Sep '16 10:42:47 AM Sharlee
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*** One possible theory, which is sort of justified via the DVD extras, is that Megaprimatus Kong are not native to Skull Island and may have originated in Asia. So you could guess that the ancient civilisation that colonised and built their cities on the island brought the giant apes with them as guards against the far more dangerous predators. At some point, the ancient civilisation fell or abandoned the island, but the giant apes were left behind. By the time Carl Denham arrives, the 'natives' are either remnants of the civilisation or the ancestors of people shipwrecked on the island, whereas Kong is the last of his species. This would explain why the wall is large enough to let Kong through - because it was his races job to defend the civilisation. The natives could still worship Kong since he naturally defends the wall from the other predators.

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*** One possible theory, which is sort of justified via the DVD extras, is that Megaprimatus Kong ''Megaprimatus kong'' are not native to Skull Island and may have originated in Asia. So you could guess that the ancient civilisation that colonised and built their cities on the island brought the giant apes with them as guards against the far more dangerous predators. At some point, the ancient civilisation fell or abandoned the island, but the giant apes were left behind. By the time Carl Denham arrives, the 'natives' are either remnants of the civilisation or the ancestors descendants of people shipwrecked on the island, whereas Kong is the last of his species. This would explain why the wall is large enough to let Kong through - because it was his races job to defend the civilisation. The natives could still worship Kong since he naturally defends the wall from the other predators.
24th Sep '16 10:40:09 AM Sharlee
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** Okay, but how did they ''fit'' Kong into the ship? Its entire hold wasn't much bigger than Kong himself, and was already full of supplies and divided into compartments by walls. They couldn't have just laid him out on the open deck without making their vessel so top-heavy that even a light squall would've tipped it over. And that's not counting all the extra the ''fresh water and food'' they'd need to take on board, just to keep a 20-60 ton animal alive for the voyage home, or the fact they'd run out of chloroform long before reaching the nearest port. No way they'd "just happen" to have sufficient shackles to restrain the ape if he woke up in transit, not unless they'd been planning to trap a herd of elephants on a nearby island after finishing the Skull Island film.

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** Okay, but how did they ''fit'' Kong into the ship? Its entire hold wasn't much bigger than Kong himself, and was already full of supplies and divided into compartments by walls. They couldn't have just laid him out on the open deck without making their vessel so top-heavy that even a light squall would've tipped it over. And that's not counting all the extra the tons of ''fresh water and food'' plants'' they'd need to take on board, just to keep a 20-60 ton animal alive for the voyage home, or the fact they'd run out of chloroform long before reaching the nearest port. No way they'd "just happen" to have sufficient shackles to restrain the ape if he woke up in transit, not unless they'd been planning to trap a herd of elephants on a nearby island after finishing the Skull Island film.
24th Sep '16 10:39:33 AM Sharlee
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Added DiffLines:

** Okay, but how did they ''fit'' Kong into the ship? Its entire hold wasn't much bigger than Kong himself, and was already full of supplies and divided into compartments by walls. They couldn't have just laid him out on the open deck without making their vessel so top-heavy that even a light squall would've tipped it over. And that's not counting all the extra the ''fresh water and food'' they'd need to take on board, just to keep a 20-60 ton animal alive for the voyage home, or the fact they'd run out of chloroform long before reaching the nearest port. No way they'd "just happen" to have sufficient shackles to restrain the ape if he woke up in transit, not unless they'd been planning to trap a herd of elephants on a nearby island after finishing the Skull Island film.
4th Jun '16 10:05:31 AM nombretomado
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* Doesn't the official PS2 game of the 2005 version have a page?

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* Doesn't the official PS2 [=PS2=] game of the 2005 version have a page?
16th Apr '16 1:33:33 PM Sharlee
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* Why is it that the explorers of Skull Island always risk life and limb to bring Kong himself back, but never stop to pick up any ''other'' unique specimens that'd be even '''more''' of a breakthrough, like dinosaur heads or dead BigCreepyCrawlies? Sure, Kong is awe-inspiring, but the discovery of an unknown giant ape isn't as scientifically revolutionary as still-extant dinosaurs, winged rodents, or bugs vastly larger than any known arthropod.

to:

* Why is it that the explorers of Skull Island always risk life and limb to bring Kong himself back, but never stop to pick up any ''other'' unique specimens that'd be even '''more''' of a breakthrough, like dinosaur heads or dead BigCreepyCrawlies? Sure, Kong Kong's size is awe-inspiring, but the discovery of an unknown giant ape species isn't anywhere ''near'' as scientifically revolutionary as still-extant non-avian dinosaurs, winged rodents, or bugs vastly larger than any known arthropod.
16th Apr '16 1:31:55 PM Sharlee
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* In Jackson's insect-pit scene, the BigCreepyCrawlies don't attack until after the flare goes out. Presumably its bright light had been keeping them cowering in their burrows until then ... except the ''Carnictis'' worms that eat the cook don't even have eyes. So why did they hesitate?

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* In Jackson's insect-pit scene, the BigCreepyCrawlies don't attack until after the flare goes out. Presumably its bright light had been keeping them cowering in their burrows until then ... except the ''Carnictis'' worms that eat the cook don't even have eyes. So why did they hesitate?hesitate?
* Why is it that the explorers of Skull Island always risk life and limb to bring Kong himself back, but never stop to pick up any ''other'' unique specimens that'd be even '''more''' of a breakthrough, like dinosaur heads or dead BigCreepyCrawlies? Sure, Kong is awe-inspiring, but the discovery of an unknown giant ape isn't as scientifically revolutionary as still-extant dinosaurs, winged rodents, or bugs vastly larger than any known arthropod.
27th Feb '16 12:18:08 PM Sharlee
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** The natives may have only started offering the sacrifices specifically to Kong, to keep him from crossing the wall out of loneliness and entering the village. His ancestors had their fellow-apes to keep them company, so didn't need human playthings to amuse them. So the ritual may only date back a few decades, depending on how old Kong was in the film and whether any other apes were still alive when he was a youngster.

to:

** The natives may have only started offering the sacrifices specifically to Kong, to keep him from crossing the wall out of loneliness and entering the village. His ancestors had their fellow-apes to keep them company, so didn't need human playthings to amuse them. So the ritual may only date back a few decades, depending on how old Kong was in the film and whether any other apes were still alive when he was a youngster. Even if he ''does'' knock down a few trees every time, there's still thousands of them left standing.
27th Feb '16 12:16:11 PM Sharlee
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*** Although that begs the question of why, if the natives' ancestors had the means of reaching Asia, they didn't just ''move there'' instead of sticking around on a crumbling island full of monsters. Or why a civilization would develop in such an unsuitable place, to begin with.

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*** **** Although that begs the question of why, if the natives' ancestors had the means of reaching Asia, they didn't just ''move there'' instead of sticking around on a crumbling island full of monsters. Or why a civilization would develop in such an unsuitable place, to begin with.
27th Feb '16 12:15:25 PM Sharlee
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**** Although that begs the question of why, if the natives' ancestors had the means of reaching Asia, they didn't just ''move there'' instead of sticking around on a crumbling island full of monsters. Or why a civilization would develop in such an unsuitable place, to begin with.



* If there are sacrifices to Kong on a regular basis (lets say once a year, to be generous), why does he have a fresh batch of giantic trees to knock over each time? Green natives replant them after each sacrifice?

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* If there are sacrifices to Kong on a regular basis (lets say once a year, to be generous), why does he have a fresh batch of giantic gigantic trees to knock over each time? Green natives replant them after each sacrifice?


Added DiffLines:

** The natives may have only started offering the sacrifices specifically to Kong, to keep him from crossing the wall out of loneliness and entering the village. His ancestors had their fellow-apes to keep them company, so didn't need human playthings to amuse them. So the ritual may only date back a few decades, depending on how old Kong was in the film and whether any other apes were still alive when he was a youngster.
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