History Headscratchers / HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallowsTheDeathlyHallows

16th Sep '16 6:26:17 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Technically, Harry's blood in Voldemort is what ''kept him from dying'' in the forest, coupled with things like him willingly offering himself to be killed, meaning the Elder Wand didn't recognize Voldemort's Killing Curse as a defeat, since he did so with Harry's consent, meaning it still couldn't be used to kill its master. However, I believe what's implied is that the Elder Wand killed what little part of Harry in Harry that ''wasn't'' Harry - that is to say, the bit of Voldemort's soul that had latched onto him - and the rest of Harry was subsequently dragged into limbo with it, resulting in him having the choice to come back.
19th Aug '16 2:32:59 PM ScroogeMacDuck
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* How does the whole "becoming Master of Death which means accepting death" thing work? It worked for Harry, sure, but he was a hero who had already undergone a lot of character development unrelated to the Hallows. Other than the fact that it wouldn't make a good story, there was nothing theoretically stopping a mediocre and evil character from getting all three hallows. What would happen then? Does owning the three dang things give one a magical brainwash that makes one accept death, or something?
18th Jun '16 9:55:48 PM timemonkey
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*** Because he doesn't cast anything that would give it away until it's far too late and all he has left is his arrogance and denile.

13th May '16 11:58:24 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Also, even if he ''had'' recognized it, what's he going to use it for? Summoning his mother? She's already something of a BrokenPedestal to him, since he initially thought that if she were truly a witch, then she wouldn't have died, only to find out he was wrong. His father? Who he hated for ''abandoning'' his mother (for a decent reason, but young Tom didn't stop to consider that) and killed personally when he was just 16? Even after he found out the Elder Wand existed, he went after just to have a better wand, not due to its status as one of the Hallows.
11th May '16 3:40:52 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Was it ever stated when Dumbledore found and viewed that memory? Maybe it was a bit before he found it inside the shack, and was like, "Wait, did he say Peverell? Could that be the Resurrection Stone?" And then when he finds it, he's all like, "Holy Horcrux, it ''is'' the Resurrection Stone! I'm gonna put this ring on right now so I can use it to contact my dead sister! ...Oh, shoot, what a horrible idea!" He found the ring sometime between the fifth and sixth books, and since the question asked was "Why didn't he recognize it when Tom was at school?", that's the answer - he didn't have access to even the memory for a good look, let alone the actual ring, until Tom had already left the school.
11th May '16 2:59:05 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Also, how do we know Ollivander knows what the Elder Wand looks like? All he told Voldemort about it was just rumors and legends...Was there any confirmation that he's actually seen it before?
11th May '16 1:10:16 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Let's also not forget that all three brothers in the story ''died'' in due time, despite them all having the items capable of making one "Master of Death". If Voldemort had read the story, odds are he would've taken that into account.
11th May '16 9:56:03 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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* This differs from the headscratchers posted above in that is focuses less on the specifics of wand transfer and more on this...stigma that seems to surround the Elder Wand itself. In ''The Tales of Beedle the Bard'', Dumbledore's commentary seems to suggest that only very power-hungry wizards have searched for and claimed ownership of the wand, that no witch has ever been recorded doing so, and even he states that he himself had a weakness for power when he was alive. What I'm asking is, why is the Elder Wand treated as "bad" for being powerful, and why have only combative, power-hungry people gone looking for it? There's nothing to suggest the wand itself exudes some aura that impairs people's judgement and makes them act that way, and that it's just the temperament of those who seek it out, meaning at least one ''good'' person '''not''' could be interest in the wand's uses outside of combat, yes? When it's labelled as "the most powerful wand", does that "powerful" extend to anything more than being unbeatable in a duel and being able to repair other wands?

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* This differs from the headscratchers posted above in that is focuses less on the specifics of wand transfer and more on this...stigma that seems to surround the Elder Wand itself. In ''The Tales of Beedle the Bard'', Dumbledore's commentary seems to suggest that only very power-hungry wizards have searched for and claimed ownership of the wand, that no witch has ever been recorded doing so, and even he states that he himself had a weakness for power when he was alive. What I'm asking is, alive...Even out of the main trio, Ron is the only one who would choose the wand first out of all three hallows. So why is the Elder Wand treated as "bad" for being powerful, and why have when it's really only combative, power-hungry power-seeking people who've ever gone looking for it? There's nothing to suggest the wand itself exudes some aura that impairs people's judgement and makes them act that way, and that way - it's just the temperament of those who seek it out, out - meaning at least one ''good'' person '''not''' could witch or wizard ''could'' be interest in the wand's uses outside of combat, yes? When it's labelled as "the most powerful wand", does that "powerful" extend to anything more than being unbeatable in a duel and being able to repair other wands?
11th May '16 9:53:11 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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* This differs from the headscratchers posted above in that is focuses less on the specifics of wand transfer and more on this...stigma that seems to surround the Elder Wand itself. In ''The Tales of Beedle the Bard'', Dumbledore's commentary seems to suggest that only very power-hungry wizards have searched for and claimed ownership of the wand, that no witch has ever been recorded doing so, and even he states that he himself had a weakness for power when he was alive. What I'm asking is, why is the Elder Wand treated as "bad" for being powerful, and why have only combative, power-hungry people gone looking for it? There's nothing to suggest the wand itself exudes some aura that impairs people's judgement and makes them act that way, meaning at least one ''good'' person '''not''' interested in its combative abilities would've gone looking for it? When it's labelled as "the most powerful wand", does that "powerful" extend to anything more than being unbeatable in a duel and being able to repair other wands?

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* This differs from the headscratchers posted above in that is focuses less on the specifics of wand transfer and more on this...stigma that seems to surround the Elder Wand itself. In ''The Tales of Beedle the Bard'', Dumbledore's commentary seems to suggest that only very power-hungry wizards have searched for and claimed ownership of the wand, that no witch has ever been recorded doing so, and even he states that he himself had a weakness for power when he was alive. What I'm asking is, why is the Elder Wand treated as "bad" for being powerful, and why have only combative, power-hungry people gone looking for it? There's nothing to suggest the wand itself exudes some aura that impairs people's judgement and makes them act that way, and that it's just the temperament of those who seek it out, meaning at least one ''good'' person '''not''' interested could be interest in its combative abilities would've gone looking for it? the wand's uses outside of combat, yes? When it's labelled as "the most powerful wand", does that "powerful" extend to anything more than being unbeatable in a duel and being able to repair other wands?
11th May '16 9:49:33 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** I think one of the requirements for allegiance to switch is that the witch or wizard has to be defeated without their consent. Harry willingly went into the forest do die, hence, Voldemort wasn't ''proving'' anything when he tried to kill him. Also, not only was Voldemort not the master of the Elder Wand at that time, but he had also tried using it to cast the Killing Curse right at the person who ''was'' the master, which may have swayed the wand's decision as well.


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* This differs from the headscratchers posted above in that is focuses less on the specifics of wand transfer and more on this...stigma that seems to surround the Elder Wand itself. In ''The Tales of Beedle the Bard'', Dumbledore's commentary seems to suggest that only very power-hungry wizards have searched for and claimed ownership of the wand, that no witch has ever been recorded doing so, and even he states that he himself had a weakness for power when he was alive. What I'm asking is, why is the Elder Wand treated as "bad" for being powerful, and why have only combative, power-hungry people gone looking for it? There's nothing to suggest the wand itself exudes some aura that impairs people's judgement and makes them act that way, meaning at least one ''good'' person '''not''' interested in its combative abilities would've gone looking for it? When it's labelled as "the most powerful wand", does that "powerful" extend to anything more than being unbeatable in a duel and being able to repair other wands?
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