History Headscratchers / DieAnstalt

18th Jul '15 5:31:59 PM Nire
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to:

** It's possible that these objects are only allowed under supervision (since the patients only gain them while in session with you), but in real life much safer alternatives would typically be used in such exercises. It can also vary depending on whether or not a patient has shown actual suicidal tendencies before.
2nd Sep '13 2:00:27 AM jistasheep
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* The in-game analysis states that Lilo has been normally communicative for most of his time with his owner and has only recently started showing symptoms. Question: why is he assumed to be autistic? The diagnostic criteria for autism requires symptoms to become apparent when a patient is very young (or, I suppose, when a cuddlytoy is very new.)
** [[spoiler:In my (non-professional) opinion, PTSD might be a better diagnosis for him; his symptoms started after an event that was traumatic to him, both because of the teacher's actions and because he believed that it was his fault that his owner failed her math test. Your mileage may vary, of course.]]

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* The in-game analysis states that Lilo has been normally communicative for most of his time with his owner and has only recently started showing symptoms. Question: why is he assumed to be autistic? The diagnostic criteria for autism requires symptoms to become apparent when a patient is very young (or, I suppose, when a cuddlytoy cuddly toy is very new.)
** [[spoiler:In my (non-professional) opinion, PTSD might be a better diagnosis for him; his symptoms started after an event that was traumatic to him, both because of the teacher's actions and because he believed that it was his fault that his owner failed her math test. Your mileage may vary, of course.]]
** [[spoiler:Or perhaps reactive mutism? Either way, there is no reason not to assume that Lilo has been autistic for all of his aware life - autism is not a disorder that can be cured, contrary to the game's portrayal.
]]
2nd Jul '13 9:57:26 PM wallwalker
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* OK, so, in the patient lounge, there's a sign that's a noose with a red "no" symbol over it. That clearly implies "no self harm or suicide allowed". So, how come they let Dolly, who they know is emotionally unstable, around pain-inducing objects like needles and inflatable bats? She could, and does, cause some serious self damage with that stuff.

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* OK, so, in the patient lounge, there's a sign that's a noose with a red "no" symbol over it. That clearly implies "no self harm or suicide allowed". So, how come However, they occasionally let Dolly, who they know is emotionally unstable, around pain-inducing their patients have objects like needles that they can, and do, cause themselves significant harm with. Why aren't they being more careful with that stuff?
** Example 1: [[spoiler:Dolly with knitting needles,
inflatable bats? She could, bats, and does, cause some serious self damage even paintbrush handles.]]
** Example 2: [[spoiler:Lilo. Choose play therapy at the wrong time, and you'll give him a wooden "ball-on-a-string" type toy. He will promptly proceed to hit himself in the head repeatedly
with the ball, possibly on purpose, and will show up outside afterwards with bandages wrapped around his head and with his progress considerably hindered.]]

* The in-game analysis states
that stuff.Lilo has been normally communicative for most of his time with his owner and has only recently started showing symptoms. Question: why is he assumed to be autistic? The diagnostic criteria for autism requires symptoms to become apparent when a patient is very young (or, I suppose, when a cuddlytoy is very new.)
** [[spoiler:In my (non-professional) opinion, PTSD might be a better diagnosis for him; his symptoms started after an event that was traumatic to him, both because of the teacher's actions and because he believed that it was his fault that his owner failed her math test. Your mileage may vary, of course.]]
27th Nov '12 3:35:23 PM taekarado
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* OK, so, in the patient lounge, there's a sign that's a noose with a red "no" symbol over it. So, how come they let Dolly, who they know is emotionally unstable, around pain-inducing objects like needles and inflatable bats?

to:

* OK, so, in the patient lounge, there's a sign that's a noose with a red "no" symbol over it. That clearly implies "no self harm or suicide allowed". So, how come they let Dolly, who they know is emotionally unstable, around pain-inducing objects like needles and inflatable bats?bats? She could, and does, cause some serious self damage with that stuff.
26th Nov '12 7:35:03 AM taekarado
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OK, so, in the patient lounge, there's a sign that's a noose with a red "no" symbol over it. So, how come Dub gets a jump rope? That could easily be made into a noose. You'd think that's the first thing they'd confiscate in a psychiatric clinic.

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* OK, so, in the patient lounge, there's a sign that's a noose with a red "no" symbol over it. So, how come Dub gets a jump rope? That could easily be made into a noose. You'd think that's the first thing they'd confiscate in a psychiatric clinic.they let Dolly, who they know is emotionally unstable, around pain-inducing objects like needles and inflatable bats?
24th Nov '12 10:07:14 AM cygnavamp
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Added DiffLines:

OK, so, in the patient lounge, there's a sign that's a noose with a red "no" symbol over it. So, how come Dub gets a jump rope? That could easily be made into a noose. You'd think that's the first thing they'd confiscate in a psychiatric clinic.
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