History Headscratchers / ComicsInGeneral

30th Aug '17 6:16:30 AM CosmicFerret
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* Comics are filled to the brim with things that would radically advance/change technology and society. There are scientists both [[MadScientist crazy]] and not-crazy who've invented robots, time travel and even ''[[TheFlash interdimensional treadmills]]'', which must be decades ahead of us AT LEAST, yet you almost never see these wonder materials and inventions utilized by the public masses. [[TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed The Earth, universe and sometimes ALL OF EXISTENCE is threatened daily]], yet the PTSD you'd expect is absent. There's InSpiteOfANail, and there's flipping the nail off.

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* Comics are filled to the brim with things that would radically advance/change technology and society. There are scientists both [[MadScientist crazy]] and not-crazy who've invented robots, time travel and even ''[[TheFlash ''[[ComicBook/TheFlash interdimensional treadmills]]'', which must be decades ahead of us AT LEAST, yet you almost never see these wonder materials and inventions utilized by the public masses. [[TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed The Earth, universe and sometimes ALL OF EXISTENCE is threatened daily]], yet the PTSD you'd expect is absent. There's InSpiteOfANail, and there's flipping the nail off.
13th Aug '17 1:47:12 AM Millenia
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** Because even then understanding the traits doesn't mean you understand what the character is about. The reason they don't bother making the Character Bibles is that long running comics like Detective Comics or Action Comics have to be fluid to change with the metalic age they have deemed it is.

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** Because even then understanding the traits doesn't mean you understand what the character is about. The reason they don't bother making the Character Bibles is that long running comics like Detective Comics or Action Comics have to be fluid to change with the metalic metallic age they have deemed it is.
19th Jul '17 7:54:27 AM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:

*** This one at least comes down to the fact that most superhero comics were originally intended mainly for kids, and the people writing them didn't want to give kids the idea that killing people was an acceptable thing to do.
12th Jun '17 7:15:44 PM Dere
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** Well -out of Universe- you have to remember that when comics started children as young as 14 were still lying about their ages to sign up to fight in wars, and that a great many adults were consciously turning a blind eye to them doing so. By the time that mindset finally passed it was just a narrative convention, which dovetailed nicely into the mid-century fad for kid detectives. Creators now are kinda stuck with them. In-universe of course, many costumed heroes are not entirely paragons of mental stability and many started their own crime-fighting careers as teens (often against teenaged versions of their main super-villain foes) so probably don't see the problem.

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** Well -out of Universe- you have to remember that when comics started children as young as 14 were still lying about their ages to sign up to fight in wars, and that a great many adults were consciously turning a blind eye to them doing so. By the time that mindset finally passed it was just a narrative convention, which dovetailed nicely into the mid-century fad for kid detectives. Creators now are kinda stuck with them. In-universe of course, many costumed heroes are not entirely paragons of mental stability and many started their own crime-fighting careers as teens (often against teenaged versions of their main super-villain foes) so probably don't see the problem.problem.
* Could somebody explain the Women in Refrigerators criticism to this troper? Is the idea supposed to be that no female love interest should ever be killed off? If so, what kind of logic is that? What makes female love interests any more "worthy" than any other kind of characters to warrant the double standard?
8th Mar '17 11:46:57 AM mlsmithca
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* As much as I like Marvel Comics (''WesternAnimation/XMen'' and ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'' were two of my favorite shows growing up), there's one aspect of them I can't help but be confused by. One minute, the [[{{Muggles}} ordinary people]] are like "The ComicBook/FantasticFour are mutated superheroes! [[SoCoolItsAwesome They're the coolest people ever]]!" and the next minute they're like "The X-Men are mutated superheroes! [[FantasticRacism They are an insult to humanity and must be destroyed]]!" It's HypocriticalHumor without the humor.

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* As much as I like Marvel Comics (''WesternAnimation/XMen'' and ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'' were two of my favorite shows growing up), there's one aspect of them I can't help but be confused by. One minute, the [[{{Muggles}} ordinary people]] are like "The ComicBook/FantasticFour are mutated superheroes! [[SoCoolItsAwesome They're the coolest people ever]]!" ever!" and the next minute they're like "The X-Men are mutated superheroes! [[FantasticRacism They are an insult to humanity and must be destroyed]]!" It's HypocriticalHumor without the humor.
21st Dec '16 7:14:12 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Look, we can go back and forth on the practicalities on an in-universe level, but ultimately the answer's always going to come back to the fact that superhero comics -- like any form of story -- are a medium for imparting some kind of lesson to their audience, the audience they were originally intended to impart these lessons to were kids, and the people writing them didn't want their readers to grow up with the idea that killing people was an acceptable way to solve your problems. Sure, this might be a slightly simplistic from an adult perspective (although given how bloodthirsty some adult comic readers appear to be, apparently they could do with learning this lesson as well), but mainstream superheroes by nature are by and large rather simplistic from an adult perspective, and there's really no getting around that fact. Frankly, the problem is arguably less that having superheroes abide by ThouShaltNotKill is a bad idea and more that adult comic readers have generally outgrown the rather basic forms of morality represented in superhero comics (at least in their classic Marvel and DC forms) whether they want to admit it or not, and are often trying to force superheroes to grow up with them rather than either (a) admit this is always going to be a problem and enjoy them anyway or (b) move on to something else.

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** Look, we can go back and forth on the practicalities on an in-universe level, but ultimately the answer's always going to come back to the fact that superhero comics -- like any form of story -- are partially a medium for imparting some kind of lesson to their audience, the audience they were originally intended to impart these lessons to were kids, and the people writing them didn't want their readers to grow up with the idea that killing people was an acceptable way to solve your problems. Sure, this might be a slightly simplistic from an adult perspective (although given how bloodthirsty some adult comic readers appear to be, apparently they could do with learning this lesson as well), but mainstream superheroes by nature are by and large rather simplistic from an adult perspective, and there's really no getting around that fact. Frankly, the problem is arguably less that having superheroes abide by ThouShaltNotKill is a bad idea and more that adult comic readers have generally outgrown the rather basic forms of morality represented in superhero comics (at least in their classic Marvel and DC forms) whether they want to admit it or not, and are often trying to force superheroes to grow up with them rather than either (a) admit this is always going to be a problem and enjoy them anyway or (b) move on to something else.
21st Dec '16 7:10:35 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Look, we can go back and forth on the practicalities on an in-universe level, but ultimately the answer's always going to come back to the fact that superhero comics -- like any form of story -- are a medium for imparting some kind of lesson to their audience, the audience they were originally intended to impart these lessons to were kids, and the people writing them didn't want their readers to grow up with the idea that killing people was an acceptable way to solve your problems. Sure, this might be a slightly simplistic from an adult perspective (although given how bloodthirsty some adult comic readers can be, apparently they could do with learning this lesson as well), but mainstream superheroes by nature are by and large rather simplistic from an adult perspective, and there's really no getting around that fact. Frankly, the problem is arguably less that having superheroes abide by ThouShaltNotKill is a bad idea and more that adult comic readers have generally outgrown the rather basic forms of morality represented in superhero comics (at least in their classic Marvel and DC forms) whether they want to admit it or not, and are trying to force superheroes to grow up with them rather than consider moving on to something else.

to:

** Look, we can go back and forth on the practicalities on an in-universe level, but ultimately the answer's always going to come back to the fact that superhero comics -- like any form of story -- are a medium for imparting some kind of lesson to their audience, the audience they were originally intended to impart these lessons to were kids, and the people writing them didn't want their readers to grow up with the idea that killing people was an acceptable way to solve your problems. Sure, this might be a slightly simplistic from an adult perspective (although given how bloodthirsty some adult comic readers can appear to be, apparently they could do with learning this lesson as well), but mainstream superheroes by nature are by and large rather simplistic from an adult perspective, and there's really no getting around that fact. Frankly, the problem is arguably less that having superheroes abide by ThouShaltNotKill is a bad idea and more that adult comic readers have generally outgrown the rather basic forms of morality represented in superhero comics (at least in their classic Marvel and DC forms) whether they want to admit it or not, and are often trying to force superheroes to grow up with them rather than consider moving either (a) admit this is always going to be a problem and enjoy them anyway or (b) move on to something else.
21st Dec '16 7:06:22 AM DoctorNemesis
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to:

** Look, we can go back and forth on the practicalities on an in-universe level, but ultimately the answer's always going to come back to the fact that superhero comics -- like any form of story -- are a medium for imparting some kind of lesson to their audience, the audience they were originally intended to impart these lessons to were kids, and the people writing them didn't want their readers to grow up with the idea that killing people was an acceptable way to solve your problems. Sure, this might be a slightly simplistic from an adult perspective (although given how bloodthirsty some adult comic readers can be, apparently they could do with learning this lesson as well), but mainstream superheroes by nature are by and large rather simplistic from an adult perspective, and there's really no getting around that fact. Frankly, the problem is arguably less that having superheroes abide by ThouShaltNotKill is a bad idea and more that adult comic readers have generally outgrown the rather basic forms of morality represented in superhero comics (at least in their classic Marvel and DC forms) whether they want to admit it or not, and are trying to force superheroes to grow up with them rather than consider moving on to something else.
28th May '16 8:23:56 PM Doug86
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*** Not really. Comics died ''hard'' in the '70s, and it wasn't until 1977/1978 (releases of Franchise/StarWars and its comic adaptation and Film/{{Superman}}) that things started to pick up again. Most of the kitschy 70's stuff (like the above two, Claremont's here-there-and-everywhere storytelling on ComicBook/{{X-Men}}, and crossover titles like ''Comicbook/TheTombOfDracula'') was an attempt by the companies to abandon the FleetingDemographic model of past days and hold onto older fans.

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*** Not really. Comics died ''hard'' in the '70s, and it wasn't until 1977/1978 (releases of Franchise/StarWars and its comic adaptation and Film/{{Superman}}) that things started to pick up again. Most of the kitschy 70's stuff (like the above two, Claremont's here-there-and-everywhere storytelling on ComicBook/{{X-Men}}, ComicBook/Men, and crossover titles like ''Comicbook/TheTombOfDracula'') was an attempt by the companies to abandon the FleetingDemographic model of past days and hold onto older fans.
16th Mar '16 4:11:16 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** But that is probably because the book publishing industry is several magnitudes larger than the comic publishing industry, and thus encompasses a heck of a lot more things to talk about, of which the Star Wars books form a comparative drop in the ocean. And even then, it's still technically an accurate use of the term (if a potentially more confusing one in this case); the Star Wars books are still books, so while the question in this example is not entirely clear to someone not familiar with Jedis, it is still referring to a series of books. In any case, the Star Wars books do not dominate the publishing industry to nearly the same degree that superhero comics dominate the comics industry in many parts of the western world at least (particular America and those areas with comics industries that draw heavily on the American comics industry for content / inspiration) and, even in many places where they do not, are still closely associated with the comics medium as a whole, so the equivalent question "why are there so many superheroes in comics?" makes a lot more sense because it is an accurate reflection of the state of affairs in many people's experience (not to mention that asking "why are there so many superheroes in superhero comics", as well as being needlessly pedantic, is also redundant; since superheroes are the whole point of superhero comics, no one would ask why there were so many in that particular genre anyway). Plus, like it or not, superhero comics are still comics; it is still an accurate, if limiting, use of the term.

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*** But that is probably because the book publishing industry is several magnitudes larger than the comic publishing industry, and thus encompasses a heck of a lot more things to talk about, of which the Star Wars books form a comparative drop in the ocean. And even then, it's still technically an accurate use of the term (if a potentially more confusing one in this case); the Star Wars books are still books, so while the question in this example is not entirely clear to someone not familiar with Jedis, it is still referring to a series of books. In any case, the Star Wars books do not dominate the publishing industry to nearly the same degree that superhero comics dominate the comics industry in many parts of the western world at least (particular America and those areas with comics industries that draw heavily on the American comics industry for content / inspiration) and, even in many places where they do not, are still closely associated with the comics medium as a whole, so the equivalent question "why are there so many superheroes in comics?" makes a lot more sense because it is an accurate reflection of the state of affairs in many people's experience (not experience. Not to mention that asking "why are there so many superheroes in superhero comics", as well as being needlessly pedantic, is also redundant; since superheroes are the whole point of superhero comics, no one would ask why there were so many in that particular genre anyway).anyway. Plus, like it or not, superhero comics are still comics; it is still an accurate, if limiting, use of the term.
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