History Headscratchers / ComicsInGeneral

28th May '16 8:23:56 PM Doug86
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*** Not really. Comics died ''hard'' in the '70s, and it wasn't until 1977/1978 (releases of Franchise/StarWars and its comic adaptation and Film/{{Superman}}) that things started to pick up again. Most of the kitschy 70's stuff (like the above two, Claremont's here-there-and-everywhere storytelling on ComicBook/{{X-Men}}, and crossover titles like ''Comicbook/TheTombOfDracula'') was an attempt by the companies to abandon the FleetingDemographic model of past days and hold onto older fans.

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*** Not really. Comics died ''hard'' in the '70s, and it wasn't until 1977/1978 (releases of Franchise/StarWars and its comic adaptation and Film/{{Superman}}) that things started to pick up again. Most of the kitschy 70's stuff (like the above two, Claremont's here-there-and-everywhere storytelling on ComicBook/{{X-Men}}, ComicBook/Men, and crossover titles like ''Comicbook/TheTombOfDracula'') was an attempt by the companies to abandon the FleetingDemographic model of past days and hold onto older fans.
16th Mar '16 4:11:16 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** But that is probably because the book publishing industry is several magnitudes larger than the comic publishing industry, and thus encompasses a heck of a lot more things to talk about, of which the Star Wars books form a comparative drop in the ocean. And even then, it's still technically an accurate use of the term (if a potentially more confusing one in this case); the Star Wars books are still books, so while the question in this example is not entirely clear to someone not familiar with Jedis, it is still referring to a series of books. In any case, the Star Wars books do not dominate the publishing industry to nearly the same degree that superhero comics dominate the comics industry in many parts of the western world at least (particular America and those areas with comics industries that draw heavily on the American comics industry for content / inspiration) and, even in many places where they do not, are still closely associated with the comics medium as a whole, so the equivalent question "why are there so many superheroes in comics?" makes a lot more sense because it is an accurate reflection of the state of affairs in many people's experience (not to mention that asking "why are there so many superheroes in superhero comics", as well as being needlessly pedantic, is also redundant; since superheroes are the whole point of superhero comics, no one would ask why there were so many in that particular genre anyway). Plus, like it or not, superhero comics are still comics; it is still an accurate, if limiting, use of the term.

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*** But that is probably because the book publishing industry is several magnitudes larger than the comic publishing industry, and thus encompasses a heck of a lot more things to talk about, of which the Star Wars books form a comparative drop in the ocean. And even then, it's still technically an accurate use of the term (if a potentially more confusing one in this case); the Star Wars books are still books, so while the question in this example is not entirely clear to someone not familiar with Jedis, it is still referring to a series of books. In any case, the Star Wars books do not dominate the publishing industry to nearly the same degree that superhero comics dominate the comics industry in many parts of the western world at least (particular America and those areas with comics industries that draw heavily on the American comics industry for content / inspiration) and, even in many places where they do not, are still closely associated with the comics medium as a whole, so the equivalent question "why are there so many superheroes in comics?" makes a lot more sense because it is an accurate reflection of the state of affairs in many people's experience (not experience. Not to mention that asking "why are there so many superheroes in superhero comics", as well as being needlessly pedantic, is also redundant; since superheroes are the whole point of superhero comics, no one would ask why there were so many in that particular genre anyway).anyway. Plus, like it or not, superhero comics are still comics; it is still an accurate, if limiting, use of the term.
16th Mar '16 4:00:12 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** But this gets into the issue of practicality; in an ideal world, yeah, a writer would only work with characters they were interested in, but given the demands of a SharedUniverse with hundreds and hundreds of characters and bucketloads of continuity and interactions between those characters that has to be addressed, this is nothing but a pipe-dream; you're always going to have to deal with characters you might not particularly care for.

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*** But this gets into the issue of practicality; in an ideal world, yeah, a writer would only work with characters they were interested in, but given the demands of a SharedUniverse with hundreds and hundreds of characters and bucketloads of continuity and interactions between those characters that has to be addressed, this is nothing but a pipe-dream; you're always going to have to deal with characters you might not particularly care for. Plus, there's also no guarantee you're only going to get to work on the books featuring the characters you love, particularly if you're just starting out on your career. Everyone wants to write Batman, but not everyone can.
28th Feb '16 7:49:04 PM nombretomado
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** There are however cases where killing the criminal can be the only way to save innocent lives. Take ComicBook/MaximumCarnage for example - heroes spends so much time driving point how they can't kill Carnage, how it will make them as bad as him, while they cannot stop him otherwise. Spider-Man and CaptainAmerica have blood of dozens of innocents on their hands just because they wanted to have moral higher ground. I'm not against no-kill policy, but maybye superheroes shouldn't hold to it so fanatically?

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** There are however cases where killing the criminal can be the only way to save innocent lives. Take ComicBook/MaximumCarnage for example - heroes spends so much time driving point how they can't kill Carnage, how it will make them as bad as him, while they cannot stop him otherwise. Spider-Man and CaptainAmerica ComicBook/CaptainAmerica have blood of dozens of innocents on their hands just because they wanted to have moral higher ground. I'm not against no-kill policy, but maybye superheroes shouldn't hold to it so fanatically?
8th Feb '16 9:48:04 AM Jgorgon
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** The main zeitgeist of the Modern Age is a Silver Age reconstruction, after the deconstruction of the Dark Age.
8th Jan '16 4:29:31 PM nombretomado
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* As much as I like Marvel Comics (''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' and ''SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'' were two of my favorite shows growing up :) ), there's one aspect of them I can't help but be confused by. One minute, the [[{{Muggles}} ordinary people]] are like "The ComicBook/FantasticFour are mutated superheroes! [[SoCoolItsAwesome They're the coolest people ever]]!" and the next minute they're like "The X-Men are mutated superheroes! [[FantasticRacism They are an insult to humanity and must be destroyed]]!" It's HypocriticalHumor without the humor.

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* As much as I like Marvel Comics (''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' (''WesternAnimation/XMen'' and ''SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'' ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'' were two of my favorite shows growing up :) ), up), there's one aspect of them I can't help but be confused by. One minute, the [[{{Muggles}} ordinary people]] are like "The ComicBook/FantasticFour are mutated superheroes! [[SoCoolItsAwesome They're the coolest people ever]]!" and the next minute they're like "The X-Men are mutated superheroes! [[FantasticRacism They are an insult to humanity and must be destroyed]]!" It's HypocriticalHumor without the humor.
3rd Nov '15 3:35:56 PM nombretomado
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** This is just speculation on my part, but when I read the story I got the impression that Cap's death was intended to be permanent and they didn't have a plan in mind to revive him. When Cap's death turned out to be not as popular with the readers as they expected (most likely due to the puss-out way in which he died) they had to bring him back and they had to do it quick to avoid losing readers in the interim. Contrast this with TheDeathOfSuperman which was obviously written from start to finish under the assumption that he would be brought back to life. They had a lot of time to plan and didn't have to scramble to find a reason to resurrect the character.

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** This is just speculation on my part, but when I read the story I got the impression that Cap's death was intended to be permanent and they didn't have a plan in mind to revive him. When Cap's death turned out to be not as popular with the readers as they expected (most likely due to the puss-out way in which he died) they had to bring him back and they had to do it quick to avoid losing readers in the interim. Contrast this with TheDeathOfSuperman ''ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman'' which was obviously written from start to finish under the assumption that he would be brought back to life. They had a lot of time to plan and didn't have to scramble to find a reason to resurrect the character.
8th Oct '15 5:19:06 PM nombretomado
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*** The DCU wasn't supposed to be a shared universe until the JusticeSocietyOfAmerica turned it into one, but the MarvelUniverse started out almost running off the bat once Spidey got popular in the 1960s with a {{Retcon}} for the pre-60s Timely/Atlas comics. There's less of an excuse for Marvel, but bear in mind, the FF don't always get the love. Some 616 residents thought Galactus was a big hoax.

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*** The DCU wasn't supposed to be a shared universe until the JusticeSocietyOfAmerica ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica turned it into one, but the MarvelUniverse started out almost running off the bat once Spidey got popular in the 1960s with a {{Retcon}} for the pre-60s Timely/Atlas comics. There's less of an excuse for Marvel, but bear in mind, the FF don't always get the love. Some 616 residents thought Galactus was a big hoax.
14th Apr '15 6:23:30 PM nombretomado
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* What's the difference between the Ages of comics? Do the quality and tone of the stories really change all that much from era to era? TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks is supposed to be light and soft, TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks is a somewhere in between Golden and Bronze (in comparison to tone), UsefulNotes/TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks is where they started introducing drugs and actual death, TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks is um - darker than all the rest before (isn't this the same thing as the Bronze Age?), and TheModernAgeOfComicBooks is... well I have no clue. Basically I understand that comics became more mature and intelligent as they went on but I don't know what each era was like to really understand the difference between them.

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* What's the difference between the Ages of comics? Do the quality and tone of the stories really change all that much from era to era? TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks is supposed to be light and soft, TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks is a somewhere in between Golden and Bronze (in comparison to tone), UsefulNotes/TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks is where they started introducing drugs and actual death, TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks is um - darker than all the rest before (isn't this the same thing as the Bronze Age?), and TheModernAgeOfComicBooks UsefulNotes/TheModernAgeOfComicBooks is... well I have no clue. Basically I understand that comics became more mature and intelligent as they went on but I don't know what each era was like to really understand the difference between them.
4th Mar '15 8:21:40 PM LongLiveHumour
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*** Not really. Comics died ''hard'' in the '70s, and it wasn't until 1977/1978 (releases of StarWars and its comic adaptation and Film/{{Superman}}) that things started to pick up again. Most of the kitschy 70's stuff (like the above two, Claremont's here-there-and-everywhere storytelling on ComicBook/{{X-Men}}, and crossover titles like ''Comicbook/TheTombOfDracula'') was an attempt by the companies to abandon the FleetingDemographic model of past days and hold onto older fans.

to:

*** Not really. Comics died ''hard'' in the '70s, and it wasn't until 1977/1978 (releases of StarWars Franchise/StarWars and its comic adaptation and Film/{{Superman}}) that things started to pick up again. Most of the kitschy 70's stuff (like the above two, Claremont's here-there-and-everywhere storytelling on ComicBook/{{X-Men}}, and crossover titles like ''Comicbook/TheTombOfDracula'') was an attempt by the companies to abandon the FleetingDemographic model of past days and hold onto older fans.
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