History Headscratchers / Clue

29th Jun '16 1:25:42 PM ElvenQueen
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* In the second and third endings, it's revealed that [[spoiler: either Mrs. Peacock or Professor Plum]] was the one who killed Mr. Boddy while everyone else was in the kitchen to find the cook dead. During TheSummation, Wadsworth says that the murderer used the kitchen's secret passage to go back to the study, but how could [[spoiler: Mrs. Peacock/Professor Plum]] have gotten into the passage without anyone noticing? Are we to assume that everyone was so focused on the cook's corpse that they didn't hear the sound of the secret passage opening and closing?

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* In the second and third endings, it's revealed that [[spoiler: either Mrs. Peacock or Professor Plum]] was the one who killed Mr. Boddy while everyone else was in the kitchen to find the cook dead. During TheSummation, Wadsworth says that the murderer used the kitchen's secret passage to go back to the study, but how could [[spoiler: Mrs. Peacock/Professor Plum]] have gotten into the passage without anyone noticing? Are we to assume that everyone was so focused on the cook's corpse that they didn't hear the sound of the secret passage opening and closing?
closing? For that matter, how would [[spoiler: Professor Plum]] have known about the passage in the first place? Unlike [[spoiler: Mrs. Peacock]], [[spoiler: he]] didn't have a connection to anyone who was familiar with the house.
29th Jun '16 10:15:36 AM ElvenQueen
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to:

* In the second and third endings, it's revealed that [[spoiler: either Mrs. Peacock or Professor Plum]] was the one who killed Mr. Boddy while everyone else was in the kitchen to find the cook dead. During TheSummation, Wadsworth says that the murderer used the kitchen's secret passage to go back to the study, but how could [[spoiler: Mrs. Peacock/Professor Plum]] have gotten into the passage without anyone noticing? Are we to assume that everyone was so focused on the cook's corpse that they didn't hear the sound of the secret passage opening and closing?
14th May '16 9:50:03 PM nombretomado
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*** HarsherInHindsight, or just Historian's Fallacy. In the 1950s homosexuality really was seen as a social threat, and not just in the U.S. In the U.S. it was closely associated with communism, which was also considered very, very bad (along with socialism and pacifism). So while technically yes, a person could be a kickass FBI agent and gay, he could not be a kickass FBI agent and ''openly'' gay. Kind of like how Salvatore of MadMen could not be a kickass ad man and openly gay.

to:

*** HarsherInHindsight, or just Historian's Fallacy. In the 1950s homosexuality really was seen as a social threat, and not just in the U.S. In the U.S. it was closely associated with communism, which was also considered very, very bad (along with socialism and pacifism). So while technically yes, a person could be a kickass FBI agent and gay, he could not be a kickass FBI agent and ''openly'' gay. Kind of like how Salvatore of MadMen ''Series/MadMen'' could not be a kickass ad man and openly gay.
8th May '16 12:52:18 AM Ingonyama
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** It may not be true to reality (it was just a flashback told during TheSummation and not reflecting reality), but the one time we get to see the Cook's murder in the first ending, [[spoiler:Yvette]] is shown stabbing her while she's at the sink washing dishes; the freezer is right behind them, so the murderer could easily have caught her as she fell and dragged her back into the freezer before she was fully dead and her weight would be too much to bear.
* When the Motorist comes to the house, he claims he was there because "my car broke down" and he saw the lights and wanted to use the phone. Aside from the fact we know he had been invited to inform on Colonel Mustard and was likely saying this upon request in his letter from Wadsworth to keep the others from being suspicious, there is another discrepancy: when we see the Cop discovering his car, it instead looks as if it's been in an accident, up on top of a mound of earth at the side of the road. What was the point of this lie? To make the Motorist seem even less credible, as foreshadowing of TheReveal he was an informant and had been invited? Because otherwise it doesn't seem to make much sense he wouldn't admit he'd had an accident, especially when there was a storm going on.

to:

** It may not be true to reality (it was just a flashback told during TheSummation and not reflecting reality), what actually happened), but the one time we get to see the Cook's murder in the first ending, [[spoiler:Yvette]] is shown stabbing her while she's at the sink washing dishes; the freezer is right behind them, so the murderer could easily have caught her as she fell and dragged her back into the freezer before she was fully dead and her weight would be too much to bear.
* When the Motorist comes to the house, he claims he was there because "my car broke down" and he saw the lights and wanted to use the phone. Aside from the fact we know he had been invited to inform on Colonel Mustard and was likely saying this upon request in his letter from Wadsworth to keep the others from being suspicious, there is another discrepancy: when we see the Cop discovering his car, it instead looks as if it's been in an accident, up on top of a mound of earth at the side of the road. What was the point of this lie? To make the Motorist seem even less credible, as foreshadowing of TheReveal he was an informant and had been invited? Because otherwise it doesn't seem to make much sense he wouldn't admit he'd had an accident, especially when there was a storm going on.
on. On a related note, the Cop simply says he found "an abandoned car", not one that had been in an accident. Perhaps both of these are artifacts from an earlier script, or a case of what was filmed not matching the (unchanged) dialogue? (It's also interesting to wonder what the Cop would have given as his reason for coming to the house if the Motorist's car hadn't been there to be discovered.)
8th May '16 12:45:16 AM Ingonyama
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* So [[LetMeGetThisStraight Let me get this strait.]] There is a piece of evidence that somehow has all the evidence that can convict the criminal, [[IdiotPlot and NONE of them figure to look inside?]]

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* So [[LetMeGetThisStraight Let me get this strait.straight.]] There is a piece of evidence that somehow has all the evidence that can convict the criminal, [[IdiotPlot and NONE of them figure to look inside?]]



*** Good point. Then I guess we have to assume that at some point he ''did'' get transferred to a New England police force, and then the letter was sent requesting he show up right after his shift/with the uniform and squad car, thus making it a short and easy drive.



** As stated above, the why would be both to hide the candlestick itself and keep them from knowing how Boddy was killed.



** She may have been in one of the secret passages. After all, in the first ending, she was the one who told Miss Scarlet about them. She was most likely just inside the passage between the Conservatory and the Study.

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** She may have been in one of the secret passages. After all, in the first ending, she was the one who told Miss Scarlet about them. She was most likely just inside the passage between the Conservatory and the Study.Lounge.


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** It may not be true to reality (it was just a flashback told during TheSummation and not reflecting reality), but the one time we get to see the Cook's murder in the first ending, [[spoiler:Yvette]] is shown stabbing her while she's at the sink washing dishes; the freezer is right behind them, so the murderer could easily have caught her as she fell and dragged her back into the freezer before she was fully dead and her weight would be too much to bear.
* When the Motorist comes to the house, he claims he was there because "my car broke down" and he saw the lights and wanted to use the phone. Aside from the fact we know he had been invited to inform on Colonel Mustard and was likely saying this upon request in his letter from Wadsworth to keep the others from being suspicious, there is another discrepancy: when we see the Cop discovering his car, it instead looks as if it's been in an accident, up on top of a mound of earth at the side of the road. What was the point of this lie? To make the Motorist seem even less credible, as foreshadowing of TheReveal he was an informant and had been invited? Because otherwise it doesn't seem to make much sense he wouldn't admit he'd had an accident, especially when there was a storm going on.
8th May '16 12:16:46 AM Ingonyama
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*** Because, again, of the ValuesDissonance and views of the people at the time. Even the other guests, who had been revealed to be murderers as well as perpetrators of other crimes, would have been appalled by his secret and could possibly have informed on him to people in power, perhaps even as part of some sort of plea-bargaining deal, and he still would not have wanted his bosses to know if he intended to keep his job.
15th Apr '16 11:57:45 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* So [[LetMeGetThisStraight Let me get this strait.]] There is a piece of evidence that somehow has all the evidence that can convict the criminal, and NONE of them [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot figure to]] [[IdiotPlot look inside?]]

to:

* So [[LetMeGetThisStraight Let me get this strait.]] There is a piece of evidence that somehow has all the evidence that can convict the criminal, [[IdiotPlot and NONE of them [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot figure to]] [[IdiotPlot to look inside?]]
28th Mar '16 11:28:03 AM KeithTyler
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** Because he didn't have cause yet, and couldn't figure out who the murderers were (and thus who to arrest) until TheReveal.



** There was a straight-played movie adaptation of Clue, but it is little known.



*** Except in the home release versions, the plate before the last ending is "This is how it really happened," thus it is the "right" ending.



** "They" was everyone, as Wadsworth had shown photograph negatives, and everyone had huddled around to look at them (well, except Peacock...)



*** No way in the 1950s he would have driven his work car from DC to New England. It's too far.



**** Yeah, including the one she points at Wadsworth in the opening scene. Or the one Wadsworth uses to cut the matchsticks.



*** They knew ''why'' they were being invited (their blackmail), but they didn't know ''what for'' (what ''about'' the blackmail?) Was it for further extortion? Was it for exposure? Was it for resolution?



** [[spoiler:Boddy]] has a gun, Green pulls out his gun, [[spoiler:Boddy]] then takes aim directly at Green, so Green shoots in self-defense. Keep in mind Green is only FBI in the last ending, so the parallels to the other two endings don't apply.



**** HarsherInHindsight, or just Historian's Fallacy. In the 1950s homosexuality really was seen as a social threat, and not just in the U.S. In the U.S. it was closely associated with communism, which was also considered very, very bad (along with socialism and pacifism). So while technically yes, a person could be a kickass FBI agent and gay, he could not be a kickass FBI agent and ''openly'' gay. Kind of like how Salvatore of MadMen could not be a kickass ad man and openly gay.



*** That's an interesting theory. But I don't see why he would feel the need to pronounce it to everyone in the room, when none of them were gay or even accused of it.



** Compare with Peacock's reasoning for acquiescing to the blackmail -- "I don't want a scandal, now do I?" even though she insists what was done was not illegal or even improper. Likewise, perhaps, Mustard doesn't want attention to be brought to his wealth as a former colonel. And perhaps he has a Pentagon job and his wealth would be used as a political cudgel against excessive defense spending. So he doesn't want it exposed.



*** Well.. They ''were'' electric, but they got their electric power from the phone line, not from the house power. This was true well into the 80s and 90s (technically still true today if you happen to still have a POTS landline and a non-cordless phone).



*** Wadsworth and Yvette and the cook have obviously been setting up the place, they would have probably cleaned it up before the event.



** It's not a closet, it's a walk-in freezer. It's possible the killer dragged her in there while she was dying. Perhaps the killer dragger her in there and *then* stabbed her. Or perhaps the killer waited until she was already in there, for whatever reason, and killed her then. Also, Peacock and Mustard alone are able to hold the cook's body upright during the fake dance scene, so it's not that one person *couldn't* carry her, but it was easier for four to do it, especially to pick her up off the floor.



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10th Jan '16 7:29:58 PM Nyperold
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Added DiffLines:

**** Perhaps the upstairs is all guest bedrooms and such, and for some reason, they knew he wouldn't be on that floor, preferring to have his butlers and maids tend to that part of the house. And getting his dead body upstairs would also be too much of a hassle.


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** Or just not available. I think of the three cards being sealed away as a metaphor for the fact that there ''is'' no direct incontrovertible evidence if you're not in forensics in-universe. All you have collectively is who ''wasn't'' the murderer, where Mr. Boddy ''wasn't'' killed, and what ''wasn't'' used to kill him. And you're stuck investigating it with a bunch of people, one of whom might be the murderer, and in any case, are only willing to "show their cards" to prove a suggestion wrong. But not all at once, of course...
20th Nov '15 10:19:47 PM TexasKelly
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Added DiffLines:

* The biggest plot hole in '''all three''' endings is the cook's murder - specifically, the circumstances of how her body was discovered. She comes tumbling out of a tiny closet that's barely big enough for just her, but because of her weight, '''four''' of the guests struggle to move her body to the Study and then lift her onto the couch. ''How did the killer move her dead body into the closet by him/herself?'' There doesn't seem to be any logically possible way for that to have occurred! (I suppose it's possible that the killer used the secret passage and surprised the cook while she was already in the closet, but that's a big contrivance...)
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