History Headscratchers / Clue

20th May '17 12:56:30 PM Bergamot
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** (The obvious answer is that if [[spoiler:Wadsworth/Mr. Green]] jumped out a window and the cops stormed in after the first murder, the movie would have been only twenty minutes long. The meta-answer is that whatever character jumps out the window is instantly exempted from being the murderer, which potentially ruins one of the three endings. ''But still!'')
20th May '17 12:43:06 PM Bergamot
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*** Except that back-up ''was'' available--[[spoiler:the door-to-door evangelist was the Chief, and the moment the group steps outside, G-men and police leap out of the bushes to surround them.]]



** For that matter, why would J. Edgar Hoover himself call the house in which there was an ongoing undercover investigation? Finding out that the head of the FBI so much as knew his telephone number might cause even the most hardened criminal to give up his plans and flee, possibly after murdering the rest of the guests. (And even if it ''wasn't'' the real Hoover, but another senior agent who gave that name as an alias...really, you'd think the FBI could come up with a better, less immediately-identifiable codename.)



** 1. The cop ''was'' invited. Wadsworth said that everyone had been invited there. He wore his uniform perhaps because he was uncertain what would happen and a uniform is really a cop's best (psychological) weapon. Really, who's to say? 2. "They" was the people who had seen the photo of Yvette as a prostitute, ''in flagrante delecto'' with Col. Mustard. 3. Whether there is a "real" ending depends on what version you watch, but in that ''particular'' ending Wadsworth obviously found it to his advantage not to be the actual killer of anyone, in case there was legal trouble.

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** 1. The cop ''was'' invited. Wadsworth said that everyone had been invited there. He wore his uniform perhaps because he was uncertain what would happen and a uniform is really a cop's best (psychological) weapon. Really, who's to say? 2. "They" was the people who had seen the photo of Yvette as a prostitute, ''in flagrante delecto'' with Col. Mustard. 3. Whether there is a "real" ending depends on what version you watch, but in that ''particular'' ending Wadsworth obviously found it to his advantage not to be the actual killer of anyone, in case there was legal trouble.
28th Mar '17 8:14:39 AM DoctorNemesis
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** He might not have been immediately able to. By the very nature of the job, undercover operatives generally don't have quick access to back-up, since having a whole bunch of FBI agents lurking around would potentially spook the people he was going undercover on. Back-up might not have been immediately available to him and if he'd revealed his cover there might not have been anything stopping the others from murdering ''him'' to silence him before getting the hell out of there, meaning that he wouldn't have had much choice but to keep up his cover despite the bodies dropping around him if he wanted to figure out what was going on.
25th Feb '17 10:12:32 AM ElvenQueen
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*** Except that [[spoiler: both Professor Plum and Mrs. Peacock]] are in the kitchen with the others in the beginning of the scene where the cook's corpse is found. So either the killer used the secret passage while most everyone else was gathered around the cook, or just slipped out of the kitchen and hurried back to the study. The latter scenario might be simpler and less risky than going through the secret passage, except Wadsworth never says anything about Mr. Boddy's murder in the second and third endings that contradicts what he says about it during TheSummation, so the murderer must have used the kitchen/study passage. Perhaps everyone was too distracted by the cook's body to notice the killer going into the secret passage (it's worth mentioning that the conservatory/lounge passage opens without making a sound during the scene where the motorist is killed, presumably because he's too focused on his phone call to notice any noise being made), but my question of how [[spoiler: Professor Plum]] knew about the passage still stands.

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*** Except that [[spoiler: both Professor Plum and Mrs. Peacock]] are ''are'' in the kitchen with the others in the beginning of the scene where the cook's corpse is found.found--they're standing on the stairs with Colonel Mustard, Miss Scarlet, and Mrs. White as Mr. Green has a look around the room. So either the killer used the secret passage while most everyone else was gathered around the cook, or just slipped out of the kitchen and hurried back to the study. The latter scenario might be simpler and less risky than going through the secret passage, except Wadsworth never says anything about Mr. Boddy's murder in the second and third endings that contradicts what he says about it during TheSummation, so the murderer must have used the kitchen/study passage. Perhaps everyone was too distracted by the cook's body to notice the killer going into the secret passage (it's worth mentioning that the conservatory/lounge passage opens without making a sound during the scene where the motorist is killed, presumably because he's too focused on his phone call to notice any noise being made), but my question of how [[spoiler: Professor Plum]] knew about the passage still stands.
25th Feb '17 12:30:00 AM Ingonyama
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**** It is noteworthy that Professor Plum and Mrs. Peacock are not shown in the kitchen until sometime into the scene, after Colonel Mustard accuses Mrs. White and then suddenly realizes who had the dagger; prior to this the scene conspicuously shows only Green, Mustard, Scarlet, and White gathered around the Cook's body, and when Mustard turns to demand answers from Wadsworth he is standing alone by the banister near the kitchen door. So there was plenty of time for one of them to have either gone through the passage or down the hall to the study, then return only near the end of the kitchen scene. (Presumably in the third ending Plum must have either gone through the passage or hidden somewhere in the hall until Mrs. Peacock recovered enough to make it to the kitchen, or else she'd have been there to witness him killing Mr. Boddy.) How Plum would know about the passage indeed makes no sense...so I think this is an artifact of the script being written with contradictions to allow for different endings. The secret passage was included as a MythologyGag and works for the other two endings via Yvette and the Cook; the third ending probably didn't use the secret passage at all, but the dialogue had to stay to explain the first two endings, so...
21st Feb '17 7:45:39 PM Sharlee
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** Possibly he'd been sent in with explicit orders to neutralize the security threat posed by Mr. Boddy's blackmail materials - materials, which might have included dirty laundry on other government personnel not present - no matter the cost. He had to keep playing along until he either found the whole stash, or the blackmailer was indisputably confirmed dead. And he couldn't be sure that ''Yvette'' wasn't in on Mr. Boddy's scheme: she'd been recording the incriminating conversation in the study, after all.
19th Feb '17 3:41:18 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Communication with the outside world has largely been cut,
19th Feb '17 3:25:28 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Communication with the outside world has largely been cut,


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*** With respect to the creators, so what? DeathOfTheAuthor, my friend; those schmucks can't tell you what to do. Title cards aren't legally binding and the very fact that there's three possible endings provided to begin with means that the creators are on shaky ground saying what the "right" ending is; otherwise, they'd have just provided that one from the start.
8th Jan '17 3:08:29 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* I'm curious how the movie would've been if they had played it as a more serious thriller or crime drama rather than as a comedy. Any guesses?
** Well, if I had to guess, I'd say that if they'd played it as a more serious thriller or crime drama, rather than a comedy, then it would have been more like a serious thriller or crime drama, rather than a comedy.
** I suspect that it would be hard to take seriously if played straight given the source material, so [[PlayedForLaughs playing it for laughs]] seems reasonable.
** The fourth ending is much darker and serious than the other three, but was left out of the release because test audiences felt it too dark.
** There was a straight-played movie adaptation of Clue, but it is little known.
6th Dec '16 6:39:48 PM QuelleDommage
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** Maybe [[{{WMG}} Wadsworth/Boddy and Green were working together the entire time]]. Green himself could have been one of Wadsworth's informants for someone working in the Bureau, and in setting himself up as a plant for the FBI, suspicions regarding his sexuality would be dropped, a la FictionAsCoverup. Wadsworth, on the other hand, was using the evening to tie up loose ends (perhaps his victims or informants were getting too antsy), and getting Green to shoot him dead in front of a number of witnesses would be a surefire way for him to fake his own death without suspicions arising later. The gun Green fires is his own, it could have easily been filled with blanks, and unlike the other gunshot victims, Wadsworth gets a few last words in before "dying", just the dramatic end one might expect from someone who had orchestrated everything leading up to this.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.Clue