History Headscratchers / CivilWar

12th Feb '17 8:42:51 PM ErikModi
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** It's also pointed out in-universe that Reed doesn't account for "the human factor" in his new math that proves the SHRA is the only way to avoid things that are even worse. Basically, Reed's new mathematics may be dead-on, but he's forgotten to factor in a huge hell of a variable that can change the whole outcome of the equation. Like if you were doing an algebra problem, and decided to just throw out the 2 because you don't believe 2s can possibly be important. X is not going to equal X.
12th Feb '17 8:33:03 PM ErikModi
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** The "gun control" thing is an analogy in-universe, and the understanding of it here is flawed: The point of gun control isn't to restrict the gun itself, it's to restrict ''who's legally allowed to own and use it''. If you want to (legally) own a gun, you have to prove, to a certain standard, that you are capable of owning and using it responsibly. The same is true of the other analogy Civil War likes to bring up: EMTs, First Responders, and police. You have chosen to provide this service for a community, we require you to prove you are capable of performing the service to the community's satisfaction. It's the same idea for superpowers: You have this ability, we require you to prove you are capable of using it in a manner that is helpful and not harmful. The problem is that most superpowered people didn't ask for their powers, the received them accidentally. Which means that the SHRA ''should'' be about "if you have these kinds of abilities, and you want to use them in this manner, this is what you have to do to do it legally", instead of "you have superpowers, you have to give us total control of your life." Chalk that last part up to public paranoia, outrage, and the socio-political climate of the time. Cap and the Anti-Reg team's ''whole point'' was that the SHRA, as written and enforced, was basically a "superhero slavery act."
12th Feb '17 8:22:27 PM ErikModi
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12th Feb '17 8:03:49 PM ErikModi
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** Peter only unmasked publicly as a publicity stunt for the Registration Act, and it was stated in-universe to be a very ballsy and effective move on Stark's part, since Spider-Man had protected his secret identity most effectively over the years.


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12th Feb '17 7:46:49 PM ErikModi
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** You have to believe the system works on the whole, even if it fails from time to time. Otherwise, might as well go bend the knee to Doctor Freaking Doom.
12th Feb '17 7:41:25 PM ErikModi
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*** [[LampshadeHanging That's actually pointed out on-panel.]] The New Warriors were trying to punch way above their weight on this one, and they screwed up badly. It actually lends weight to the Pro-Reg side of the argument: If the New Warriors had not just had proper combat training, but proper threat assessment and pre-combat tactics and logistics training, Nitro wouldn't have even made it out of the house. As it was, in the chase for something exciting and awesome to put on TV, they let a superfight spill out into an area it should never have been in at all.
12th Feb '17 7:35:39 PM ErikModi
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** Wasn't it pointed out in the comics that the X-Mansion was basically a "Mutant Reservation," where they get to govern themselves more-or-less independent of the US government? So that the SHRA effectively didn't apply to them as long as they were on the property? If that's the case, it makes a lot of sense that the mutant response would pretty much be "Well, have fun with that." And Emma ''did'' call Stark out point-blank on the fact that the SHRA was basically the Mutant Registration Act under a different name with broader powers.
12th Feb '17 7:28:37 PM ErikModi
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** The "secret identity" issue wasn't the ''main'' thrust of Civil War, just one of them. Yeah, it was brought up, but it wasn't the main reason Cap's team was fighting against Registration. It was a side-issue, a symptom of the larger fact that the law itself was ill-conceived from the get-go. The argument basically boiled down to:
--->'''Cap''': The government wants us all to reveal our real names.
--->'''Tony''': Yeah, but the list will be secured, protected, and and encrypted.
--->'''Cap''': Yeah, like Doc Ock can't hack a computer.
--->'''Tony''': He can't hack ''my'' computers.
--->'''Cap''': Ya-huh.
--->'''Tony''': Uh-uh.
** It was basically supposed to be another GreyAndGreyMorality argument: Do you believe the government can keep necessary information secret, or not? Even before the days of Snowden and Wikileaks, it seemed dangerously naieve to believe that any information could be secured so much that anyone who really wanted it couldn't get it. On the other hand, we still have a ton of conspiracy theories about what the governments of the world are ''really'' up to, so. . . well, take your pick.
12th Feb '17 6:00:42 PM ErikModi
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** Uh, the SHRA ''was'' law. There's a very important scene in the comic (a few of them, actually) that shows the law being passed and going into effect at midnight, and at 12:01 a whole bunch of shit goes down (Iron Man fighting. . . I forget, SHIELD showing up to arrest Luke Cage). ''It was a law for most of the series''. The first few issues are about trying to prevent it, the rest are about trying to undo it (if you're Anti-Reg). And the whole point was that, while the ''idea'' behind the law may have been sound, it's execution was ''deeply'' flawed, to the point that superhumans who didn't register were held without charge, trial, or any other due process ''indefinitely'' in a prison located in an alternate universe composed entirely of ''fucking antimatter''. Wanting to punch the people trying to lock you up with no due process in a prison in a godsdamn antimatter universe seems a reasonable reaction.
12th Feb '17 5:53:58 PM ErikModi
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** Speaking of ''Film/CaptainAmericCivilWar'', the point here is the same as it is there. Did the New Warriors/Scarlet Witch do the absolute best the could in that situation to prevent civilian casualties? Maybe. Could they have done better with proper training, situational awareness, and knowledge of basic physics? Maybe. Would those people still have died if they'd done everything perfectly? Maybe. Should superheroes be held accountable for the actions they take? ''Absolutely''. The New Warriors unarguably made a really bad decision to engage this particular group of villains when and where they did, and yes, they had no way of knowing that Nitro had gotten a power-up. But they still maneuvered him into a position where he could maximize his destructive potential and put innocent lives at risk. It's still their fault at the end of the day. If they hadn't been there at all, Nitro wouldn't have exploded. If they'd maneuvered him elsewhere, his explosion wouldn't have claimed those lives. The New Warriors weren't reacting to minimize a catastrophe already in progress, they created one where none existed at the moment. Now, yes, Nitro may have walked across the street tomorrow and blown up the school, but that's all speculative. Right where he was, right at the moment the New Warriors attacked, Nitro was no immediate threat to anyone. If another team had come across the intelligence that these superpowered fugitives were at that location, you bet they would have drawn up a plan of action in advance, rather than rushing in and hoping for the best.

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** Speaking of ''Film/CaptainAmericCivilWar'', ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'', the point here is the same as it is there. Did the New Warriors/Scarlet Witch do the absolute best the could in that situation to prevent civilian casualties? Maybe. Could they have done better with proper training, situational awareness, and knowledge of basic physics? Maybe. Would those people still have died if they'd done everything perfectly? Maybe. Should superheroes be held accountable for the actions they take? ''Absolutely''. The New Warriors unarguably made a really bad decision to engage this particular group of villains when and where they did, and yes, they had no way of knowing that Nitro had gotten a power-up. But they still maneuvered him into a position where he could maximize his destructive potential and put innocent lives at risk. It's still their fault at the end of the day. If they hadn't been there at all, Nitro wouldn't have exploded. If they'd maneuvered him elsewhere, his explosion wouldn't have claimed those lives. The New Warriors weren't reacting to minimize a catastrophe already in progress, they created one where none existed at the moment. Now, yes, Nitro may have walked across the street tomorrow and blown up the school, but that's all speculative. Right where he was, right at the moment the New Warriors attacked, Nitro was no immediate threat to anyone. If another team had come across the intelligence that these superpowered fugitives were at that location, you bet they would have drawn up a plan of action in advance, rather than rushing in and hoping for the best.
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