History Headscratchers / Brave

29th Apr '16 3:12:44 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Not to mention, they didn't name the film based on which house Merida would belong to at Hogwarts, so typing up a big, long analysis saying she should've been sorted into X instead of Y because of W such and such reasons is more than a little redundant. And Merida ''was'' very brave in working so hard both to change her fate and to try and fix it when things went wrong - things like striking a deal with a witch, offering herself willingly to any of the three potential suitors, or riding out into the forest at night to take a stand against her father's men.

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** Not to mention, they didn't name the film based on which house Merida would belong to at Hogwarts, so typing up a big, long analysis saying she should've been sorted into X instead of Y because of W such and such reasons is more than a little redundant. And Merida ''was'' very brave in working so hard both to change her fate and to try and fix it when things went wrong - things like striking a deal with a witch, offering herself willingly to any of the three potential suitors, or riding out into the forest at night to take a stand against her father's men.men...And before you say that a lot of these were due to her own actions, it takes a lot of courage to own up to your mistakes and take responsibility for doing what it takes to correct them.
26th Apr '16 5:59:42 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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I am having a lot of trouble understanding why this movie is called ''Brave''. Putting it simply, if Merida went to [[HarryPotter Hogwarts]], she'd be in Slytherin, not Gryffindor (the house of bravery), for the behaviour she exhibits throughout the entire movie (selfishness in her refusal to even compromise with her mother, ambition in following her own dreams with zero regard for the consequences and by extension that she'll hurt a lot of people, using any means to achieve her own ends without thought or concern for others let alone the person she's using a spell on, touches of shrewdness and cunning, carrying grudges towards her mother that nearly lead to [[ThatManIsDead her]] [[TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody death]], [[NeverMyFault refusal to accept something was her fault]]- all Slytherin traits). I don't recall anyone, Merida or Elinor especially, being particularly cowardly about anything and thus needing to be brave. There was no fear in either deviating from tradition or following it. It wasn't like it was ever said that breaking tradition would bring a curse or anything. The bravery that is shown is against Mor'du, who ultimately isn't all that important because the story is about Merida and Elinor's relationship, not Mor'du. Mor'du is a plot device, not a villain.

to:

* I am having a lot of trouble understanding why this movie is called ''Brave''. Putting it simply, if Merida went to [[HarryPotter Hogwarts]], she'd be in Slytherin, not Gryffindor (the house of bravery), for the behaviour she exhibits throughout the entire movie (selfishness in her refusal to even compromise with her mother, ambition in following her own dreams with zero regard for the consequences and by extension that she'll hurt a lot of people, using any means to achieve her own ends without thought or concern for others let alone the person she's using a spell on, touches of shrewdness and cunning, carrying grudges towards her mother that nearly lead to [[ThatManIsDead her]] [[TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody death]], [[NeverMyFault refusal to accept something was her fault]]- all Slytherin traits). I don't recall anyone, Merida or Elinor especially, being particularly cowardly about anything and thus needing to be brave. There was no fear in either deviating from tradition or following it. It wasn't like it was ever said that breaking tradition would bring a curse or anything. The bravery that is shown is against Mor'du, who ultimately isn't all that important because the story is about Merida and Elinor's relationship, not Mor'du. Mor'du is a plot device, not a villain.


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** Not to mention, they didn't name the film based on which house Merida would belong to at Hogwarts, so typing up a big, long analysis saying she should've been sorted into X instead of Y because of W such and such reasons is more than a little redundant. And Merida ''was'' very brave in working so hard both to change her fate and to try and fix it when things went wrong - things like striking a deal with a witch, offering herself willingly to any of the three potential suitors, or riding out into the forest at night to take a stand against her father's men.
31st Mar '16 5:38:53 PM Kythereia
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** ...She's a young teenager. Who makes poor decisions, but ultimately accepts responsibility and saves her mother's life through the power of character development. Why the hell is everyone here so harsh on her?
1st Mar '16 2:41:27 PM Technicolourtardis
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*** I'm not sure if it is exactly canon, but one of the tie-in books confirms she did not realize it fell into the fireplace.

to:

*** **** I'm not sure if it is exactly canon, but one of the tie-in books confirms she did not realize it fell into the fireplace.



* Why did the treat work on the triplets? Even with the foreshadow I kept thinking (considering how long it took for them to show up and frankly how easily they could have been replaced with...themselves) that the curse must not have worked on them because they didn't have a conflict with Merida but clearly it did. Was the curse entirely tied to Mom cus the conflict between her and the triplets should have solved itself rather quick, hell the one between her and her mom was solved well before the end of the flick unless tears are required.

to:

* * Why did the treat work on the triplets? Even with the foreshadow I kept thinking (considering how long it took for them to show up and frankly how easily they could have been replaced with...themselves) that the curse must not have worked on them because they didn't have a conflict with Merida but clearly it did. Was the curse entirely tied to Mom cus the conflict between her and the triplets should have solved itself rather quick, hell the one between her and her mom was solved well before the end of the flick unless tears are required.



* Why does Merida trust the Will-o-wisps? I figure I'm a little kid, I see a ghosty thing and follow it. MY DAD LOSES HIS LEG. Years later I see the same ghosty thing. I don't follow it because last time I got nothing good and my Dad lost his leg. Still lets say I follow it. My mom turns into a bear! The third time I see these things I'm all "my dad lost a leg, my mom got turned into a bear, lets follow these things and see what happens" hell no! But lets say I do. The third time I get attacked by the same bear that ate my dad's leg. Do I really follow these things a fourth time or is it just very fortunate that Merida doesn't learn from her mistakes?

to:

* * Why does Merida trust the Will-o-wisps? I figure I'm a little kid, I see a ghosty thing and follow it. MY DAD LOSES HIS LEG. Years later I see the same ghosty thing. I don't follow it because last time I got nothing good and my Dad lost his leg. Still lets say I follow it. My mom turns into a bear! The third time I see these things I'm all "my dad lost a leg, my mom got turned into a bear, lets follow these things and see what happens" hell no! But lets say I do. The third time I get attacked by the same bear that ate my dad's leg. Do I really follow these things a fourth time or is it just very fortunate that Merida doesn't learn from her mistakes?



*** The lords don't seem the type to think such things through. They probably thought it gave the whole affair some gravitas. Or it's an actual ancient tradition that they happen to be familiar with, seeing as the clans probably weren't so divided for their entire histories.

to:

*** **** The lords don't seem the type to think such things through. They probably thought it gave the whole affair some gravitas. Or it's an actual ancient tradition that they happen to be familiar with, seeing as the clans probably weren't so divided for their entire histories.



*** The interactions we see between the the clans (probably because it's a Disney Cartoon) doesn't feel like a war is on the edge of breaking out if this doesn't work out. They come across a lot more like sports rivals than bitter enemies held together under a shaky alliance. Even when the fighting broke out it seemed a lot more like classic boys will be boys (mind you with swords and axes) than people honestly trying to kill each other. Certainly enough that when the Queen basically marched in like Mom everybody dropped what they were doing immediately. It's easy to think Merida didn't think of it as a legit concern, the movie doesn't really make it look like a legit concern.
*** To me, Merida never came off as joking or goofing off - it was just sort of her imitating the clans' reaction. And of course, if the queen is a bear who can't break up the fighting, no matter how slapstick-y the movie portrays it as, then that's still a problem, isn't it? Adding to this is the idea that the clans have spent many long years building up not just alliances, but true ''friendships'' - descending into war and shattering these bonds just because a princess isn't willing to marry herself off to someone would be a truly tragic loss, which, as the ending shows, could have been avoided if Merida and her mother were to ''listen'' to each other and learn to compromise.
*** Also, rewatching that scene, Merida starts by pretending to talk to and for her mother in a serious tone, but when she gets to the part about declaring war, you can see that her voice dies down and sounds more desperate at the end. This indicates that she ''knew'' her mother couldn't just call off the betrothal without consequence and that war ''was'' a possibility, unless she found a way to bend the rules and get herself out of the arrangement "legally".

to:

*** **** The interactions we see between the the clans (probably because it's a Disney Cartoon) doesn't feel like a war is on the edge of breaking out if this doesn't work out. They come across a lot more like sports rivals than bitter enemies held together under a shaky alliance. Even when the fighting broke out it seemed a lot more like classic boys will be boys (mind you with swords and axes) than people honestly trying to kill each other. Certainly enough that when the Queen basically marched in like Mom everybody dropped what they were doing immediately. It's easy to think Merida didn't think of it as a legit concern, the movie doesn't really make it look like a legit concern.
*** **** To me, Merida never came off as joking or goofing off - it was just sort of her imitating the clans' reaction. And of course, if the queen is a bear who can't break up the fighting, no matter how slapstick-y the movie portrays it as, then that's still a problem, isn't it? Adding to this is the idea that the clans have spent many long years building up not just alliances, but true ''friendships'' - descending into war and shattering these bonds just because a princess isn't willing to marry herself off to someone would be a truly tragic loss, which, as the ending shows, could have been avoided if Merida and her mother were to ''listen'' to each other and learn to compromise.
*** **** Also, rewatching that scene, Merida starts by pretending to talk to and for her mother in a serious tone, but when she gets to the part about declaring war, you can see that her voice dies down and sounds more desperate at the end. This indicates that she ''knew'' her mother couldn't just call off the betrothal without consequence and that war ''was'' a possibility, unless she found a way to bend the rules and get herself out of the arrangement "legally".



* Has the witch ever gotten a request that ''couldn't'' be fulfilled by turning someone or other into a bear? "I want to have the strength of ten men" is pretty straightforward (if a bit JerkassGenie-ish). Merida's request is way more of a stretch. What if she got something like "I want to soar like the eagles!" "One winged bear, coming right up!" "I want to be as powerful as [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Sephiroth]]!" "[[OneWingedAngel One-winged bear]], coming right up!"

to:

* * Has the witch ever gotten a request that ''couldn't'' be fulfilled by turning someone or other into a bear? "I want to have the strength of ten men" is pretty straightforward (if a bit JerkassGenie-ish). Merida's request is way more of a stretch. What if she got something like "I want to soar like the eagles!" "One winged bear, coming right up!" "I want to be as powerful as [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Sephiroth]]!" "[[OneWingedAngel One-winged bear]], coming right up!"



I am having a lot of trouble understanding why this movie is called _Brave_. Putting it simply, if Merida went to [[HarryPotter Hogwarts]], she'd be in Slytherin, not Gryffindor (the house of bravery), for the behaviour she exhibits throughout the entire movie (selfishness in her refusal to even compromise with her mother, ambition in following her own dreams with zero regard for the consequences and by extension that she'll hurt a lot of people, using any means to achieve her own ends without thought or concern for others let alone the person she's using a spell on, touches of shrewdness and cunning, carrying grudges towards her mother that nearly lead to [[ThatManIsDead her]] [[TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody death]], [[NeverMyFault refusal to accept something was her fault]]- all Slytherin traits). I don't recall anyone, Merida or Elinor especially, being particularly cowardly about anything and thus needing to be brave. There was no fear in either deviating from tradition or following it. It wasn't like it was ever said that breaking tradition would bring a curse or anything. The bravery that is shown is against Mor'du, who ultimately isn't all that important because the story is about Merida and Elinor's relationship, not Mor'du. Mor'du is a plot device, not a villain.

to:

I am having a lot of trouble understanding why this movie is called _Brave_.''Brave''. Putting it simply, if Merida went to [[HarryPotter Hogwarts]], she'd be in Slytherin, not Gryffindor (the house of bravery), for the behaviour she exhibits throughout the entire movie (selfishness in her refusal to even compromise with her mother, ambition in following her own dreams with zero regard for the consequences and by extension that she'll hurt a lot of people, using any means to achieve her own ends without thought or concern for others let alone the person she's using a spell on, touches of shrewdness and cunning, carrying grudges towards her mother that nearly lead to [[ThatManIsDead her]] [[TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody death]], [[NeverMyFault refusal to accept something was her fault]]- all Slytherin traits). I don't recall anyone, Merida or Elinor especially, being particularly cowardly about anything and thus needing to be brave. There was no fear in either deviating from tradition or following it. It wasn't like it was ever said that breaking tradition would bring a curse or anything. The bravery that is shown is against Mor'du, who ultimately isn't all that important because the story is about Merida and Elinor's relationship, not Mor'du. Mor'du is a plot device, not a villain.
1st Mar '16 2:40:48 PM Technicolourtardis
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*** I'm not sure if it is exactly canon, but one of the tie-in books confirms she did not realize it fell into the fireplace.

to:

*** **** I'm not sure if it is exactly canon, but one of the tie-in books confirms she did not realize it fell into the fireplace.



* Why did the treat work on the triplets? Even with the foreshadow I kept thinking (considering how long it took for them to show up and frankly how easily they could have been replaced with...themselves) that the curse must not have worked on them because they didn't have a conflict with Merida but clearly it did. Was the curse entirely tied to Mom cus the conflict between her and the triplets should have solved itself rather quick, hell the one between her and her mom was solved well before the end of the flick unless tears are required.

to:

* * Why did the treat work on the triplets? Even with the foreshadow I kept thinking (considering how long it took for them to show up and frankly how easily they could have been replaced with...themselves) that the curse must not have worked on them because they didn't have a conflict with Merida but clearly it did. Was the curse entirely tied to Mom cus the conflict between her and the triplets should have solved itself rather quick, hell the one between her and her mom was solved well before the end of the flick unless tears are required.



* Why does Merida trust the Will-o-wisps? I figure I'm a little kid, I see a ghosty thing and follow it. MY DAD LOSES HIS LEG. Years later I see the same ghosty thing. I don't follow it because last time I got nothing good and my Dad lost his leg. Still lets say I follow it. My mom turns into a bear! The third time I see these things I'm all "my dad lost a leg, my mom got turned into a bear, lets follow these things and see what happens" hell no! But lets say I do. The third time I get attacked by the same bear that ate my dad's leg. Do I really follow these things a fourth time or is it just very fortunate that Merida doesn't learn from her mistakes?

to:

* * Why does Merida trust the Will-o-wisps? I figure I'm a little kid, I see a ghosty thing and follow it. MY DAD LOSES HIS LEG. Years later I see the same ghosty thing. I don't follow it because last time I got nothing good and my Dad lost his leg. Still lets say I follow it. My mom turns into a bear! The third time I see these things I'm all "my dad lost a leg, my mom got turned into a bear, lets follow these things and see what happens" hell no! But lets say I do. The third time I get attacked by the same bear that ate my dad's leg. Do I really follow these things a fourth time or is it just very fortunate that Merida doesn't learn from her mistakes?



*** The lords don't seem the type to think such things through. They probably thought it gave the whole affair some gravitas. Or it's an actual ancient tradition that they happen to be familiar with, seeing as the clans probably weren't so divided for their entire histories.

to:

*** **** The lords don't seem the type to think such things through. They probably thought it gave the whole affair some gravitas. Or it's an actual ancient tradition that they happen to be familiar with, seeing as the clans probably weren't so divided for their entire histories.



*** The interactions we see between the the clans (probably because it's a Disney Cartoon) doesn't feel like a war is on the edge of breaking out if this doesn't work out. They come across a lot more like sports rivals than bitter enemies held together under a shaky alliance. Even when the fighting broke out it seemed a lot more like classic boys will be boys (mind you with swords and axes) than people honestly trying to kill each other. Certainly enough that when the Queen basically marched in like Mom everybody dropped what they were doing immediately. It's easy to think Merida didn't think of it as a legit concern, the movie doesn't really make it look like a legit concern.
*** To me, Merida never came off as joking or goofing off - it was just sort of her imitating the clans' reaction. And of course, if the queen is a bear who can't break up the fighting, no matter how slapstick-y the movie portrays it as, then that's still a problem, isn't it? Adding to this is the idea that the clans have spent many long years building up not just alliances, but true ''friendships'' - descending into war and shattering these bonds just because a princess isn't willing to marry herself off to someone would be a truly tragic loss, which, as the ending shows, could have been avoided if Merida and her mother were to ''listen'' to each other and learn to compromise.
*** Also, rewatching that scene, Merida starts by pretending to talk to and for her mother in a serious tone, but when she gets to the part about declaring war, you can see that her voice dies down and sounds more desperate at the end. This indicates that she ''knew'' her mother couldn't just call off the betrothal without consequence and that war ''was'' a possibility, unless she found a way to bend the rules and get herself out of the arrangement "legally".

to:

*** **** The interactions we see between the the clans (probably because it's a Disney Cartoon) doesn't feel like a war is on the edge of breaking out if this doesn't work out. They come across a lot more like sports rivals than bitter enemies held together under a shaky alliance. Even when the fighting broke out it seemed a lot more like classic boys will be boys (mind you with swords and axes) than people honestly trying to kill each other. Certainly enough that when the Queen basically marched in like Mom everybody dropped what they were doing immediately. It's easy to think Merida didn't think of it as a legit concern, the movie doesn't really make it look like a legit concern.
*** **** To me, Merida never came off as joking or goofing off - it was just sort of her imitating the clans' reaction. And of course, if the queen is a bear who can't break up the fighting, no matter how slapstick-y the movie portrays it as, then that's still a problem, isn't it? Adding to this is the idea that the clans have spent many long years building up not just alliances, but true ''friendships'' - descending into war and shattering these bonds just because a princess isn't willing to marry herself off to someone would be a truly tragic loss, which, as the ending shows, could have been avoided if Merida and her mother were to ''listen'' to each other and learn to compromise.
*** **** Also, rewatching that scene, Merida starts by pretending to talk to and for her mother in a serious tone, but when she gets to the part about declaring war, you can see that her voice dies down and sounds more desperate at the end. This indicates that she ''knew'' her mother couldn't just call off the betrothal without consequence and that war ''was'' a possibility, unless she found a way to bend the rules and get herself out of the arrangement "legally".



* Has the witch ever gotten a request that ''couldn't'' be fulfilled by turning someone or other into a bear? "I want to have the strength of ten men" is pretty straightforward (if a bit JerkassGenie-ish). Merida's request is way more of a stretch. What if she got something like "I want to soar like the eagles!" "One winged bear, coming right up!" "I want to be as powerful as [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Sephiroth]]!" "[[OneWingedAngel One-winged bear]], coming right up!"

to:

* * Has the witch ever gotten a request that ''couldn't'' be fulfilled by turning someone or other into a bear? "I want to have the strength of ten men" is pretty straightforward (if a bit JerkassGenie-ish). Merida's request is way more of a stretch. What if she got something like "I want to soar like the eagles!" "One winged bear, coming right up!" "I want to be as powerful as [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Sephiroth]]!" "[[OneWingedAngel One-winged bear]], coming right up!"



I am having a lot of trouble understanding why this movie is called _Brave_. Putting it simply, if Merida went to [[HarryPotter Hogwarts]], she'd be in Slytherin, not Gryffindor (the house of bravery), for the behaviour she exhibits throughout the entire movie (selfishness in her refusal to even compromise with her mother, ambition in following her own dreams with zero regard for the consequences and by extension that she'll hurt a lot of people, using any means to achieve her own ends without thought or concern for others let alone the person she's using a spell on, touches of shrewdness and cunning, carrying grudges towards her mother that nearly lead to [[ThatManIsDead her]] [[TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody death]], [[NeverMyFault refusal to accept something was her fault]]- all Slytherin traits). I don't recall anyone, Merida or Elinor especially, being particularly cowardly about anything and thus needing to be brave. There was no fear in either deviating from tradition or following it. It wasn't like it was ever said that breaking tradition would bring a curse or anything. The bravery that is shown is against Mor'du, who ultimately isn't all that important because the story is about Merida and Elinor's relationship, not Mor'du. Mor'du is a plot device, not a villain.

to:

I am having a lot of trouble understanding why this movie is called _Brave_. Putting it simply, if Merida went to [[HarryPotter Hogwarts]], she'd be in Slytherin, not Gryffindor (the house of bravery), for the behaviour she exhibits throughout the entire movie (selfishness in her refusal to even compromise with her mother, ambition in following her own dreams with zero regard for the consequences and by extension that she'll hurt a lot of people, using any means to achieve her own ends without thought or concern for others let alone the person she's using a spell on, touches of shrewdness and cunning, carrying grudges towards her mother that nearly lead to [[ThatManIsDead her]] [[TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody death]], [[NeverMyFault refusal to accept something was her fault]]- all Slytherin traits). I don't recall anyone, Merida or Elinor especially, being particularly cowardly about anything and thus needing to be brave. There was no fear in either deviating from tradition or following it. It wasn't like it was ever said that breaking tradition would bring a curse or anything. The bravery that is shown is against Mor'du, who ultimately isn't all that important because the story is about Merida and Elinor's relationship, not Mor'du. Mor'du is a plot device, not a villain.villain.
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1st Mar '16 2:40:25 PM Technicolourtardis
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[[folder: What's so Brave about it?]]
I am having a lot of trouble understanding why this movie is called _Brave_. Putting it simply, if Merida went to [[HarryPotter Hogwarts]], she'd be in Slytherin, not Gryffindor (the house of bravery), for the behaviour she exhibits throughout the entire movie (selfishness in her refusal to even compromise with her mother, ambition in following her own dreams with zero regard for the consequences and by extension that she'll hurt a lot of people, using any means to achieve her own ends without thought or concern for others let alone the person she's using a spell on, touches of shrewdness and cunning, carrying grudges towards her mother that nearly lead to [[ThatManIsDead her]] [[TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody death]], [[NeverMyFault refusal to accept something was her fault]]- all Slytherin traits). I don't recall anyone, Merida or Elinor especially, being particularly cowardly about anything and thus needing to be brave. There was no fear in either deviating from tradition or following it. It wasn't like it was ever said that breaking tradition would bring a curse or anything. The bravery that is shown is against Mor'du, who ultimately isn't all that important because the story is about Merida and Elinor's relationship, not Mor'du. Mor'du is a plot device, not a villain.
26th Dec '15 5:52:32 PM whisperstar13
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[[folder: Mis-aimed marketing]]
* The marketing for this film frequently implied that Merida would accomplish something that ended up "changing her fate", and I got the feeling this would be in some mysterious, mystical way...But in the final film, all she does, really, is feed an enchanted bear-cake to her mother, which doesn't in and of itself have any very mystical impact on the plot - it only serves to cause the kinds of conflicts and misunderstandings one would expect from such a development. So why all the advertisements that implied Merida would embark on some epic adventure to alter her fate in a way she truly hadn't expected and such? This type of marketing gimmick could just as easily be applied to any other Disney film - Aladdin is a street rat who finds a magic lamp and changes his fate, becoming the Sultan's heir. Ariel is a mermaid who wants to be human, and she changes her fate by meeting a sea witch who grants her this wish. Merida wants to be free and not be married off to someone, and so feeds her mother a cake that turns her into a bear, and ends up changing her fate by learning to compromise with her and getting out of the marriage until she feels ready for it. Yes, she still "changed her fate" in a way she hadn't expected to, but it's still not much different from a lot of other Disney films, so why is there so much focus on the "Fate" thing?
[[/folder]]
23rd Nov '15 9:00:57 AM MrDeath
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** Elinor's bear-behavior is quite interesting- even in the first incidence she doesn't respond to Merida violently as a bear could, she just gives her a strong warning to back of. Later her behavior is like that of a dog meeting a familiar human (which makes sense as bears are related to dogs). Noticeably in the second, when Fergus gets aggressive she responds primarily by trying to get between him and Merida- she may still be somehow aware that Merida is her own offspring, even if she is 'a bear inside'. (If she were it wouldn't matter if she knew Fergus to be a previous mate, anyway- a female bear would no more tolerate a cub's father approaching it than any other animal.)
23rd Nov '15 9:00:16 AM MrDeath
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[[spoiler: * Elinor's bear-behavior is quite interesting- even in the first incidence she doesn't respond to Merida violently as a bear could, she just gives her a strong warning to back of. Later her behavior is like that of a dog meeting a familiar human (which makes sense as bears are related to dogs). Noticeably in the second, when Fergus gets aggressive she responds primarily by trying to get between him and Merida- she may still be somehow aware that Merida is her own offspring, even if she is 'a bear inside'. (If she were it wouldn't matter if she knew Fergus to be a previous mate, anyway- a female bear would no more tolerate a cub's father approaching it than any other animal.)]]
23rd Nov '15 6:59:01 AM LittleZelina
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** A bit of actual Scottish history: this may take place in the period where the kingship of Scotland was not directly hereditary. In early Medieval Scotland a small group of noble families would elect the king from the worthiest candidate of the group (the break with this tradition by a family who started passing it from father to son caused the real-life schism on which [[Theatre/Macbeth Macbeth]] is based.) It's explicitly said that this is how Fergus became king. That does explain the importance of the four families intermarrying each other- it would keep the number of candidates relatively small, and reinforce their group cohesion, by the next generation all being in-laws and the generation after that all being cousins.
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