History HeadScratchers / TheGodfather

21st Jan '17 10:24:41 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Keep in mind that Sollozzo only has Vito shot after Vito tries to send Luca Brasi into his organisation undercover. He probably interpreted that as an overt threat and responded in kind, at which point the priorities changed. And Barzini's overarching goal was to weaken the overall power of the Corleones, with Sollozzo's business being more of a secondary priority.
2nd Jan '17 1:05:02 AM Oddstar6
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* How does Sollozzo's plan make any sense? He wants the Corleones to join his narcotics business so as to gain the political protection that the Corleones can offer. All well and good. But after he has Vito shot, it becomes clear that the political connections are not the assets of the Corleone family as an organization, but are rather the personal assets of Vito Corleone. Tom makes this clear when he tells Santino that if Vito dies, they lose all his political protection. So if Sollozzo succeeds in killing Vito, he destroys the very prize he's hoping to win. The only way to explain it would be that Sollozzo does not know that the political connections are Vito's alone, but surely he would have found that out in the course of researching the Corleones prior to offering them his deal. For that matter, surely Barzini would have known that.
12th Dec '16 6:03:06 PM benda
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*** And the novel makes it very clear that Hagen's position was indeed a major and unique exception:

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*** And the novel makes it very clear that Hagen's position appointment was indeed a major and unique exception:
12th Dec '16 6:02:07 PM benda
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*** And the novel makes it very clear that Hagen's position was indeed a major and unique exception:
--> Hagen had filled the Consigliereís post for the past year, ever since the cancer had imprisoned Genco Abbandando in his hospital bed. Now he waited to hear Don Corleone say the post was his permanently. The odds were against it. So high a position was traditionally given only to a man descended from two Italian parents. There had already been trouble about his temporary performance of the duties. Also, he was only thirty-five, not old enough, supposedly, to have acquired the necessary experience and cunning for a successful Consigliere... The Don had broken a long-standing tradition. The Consigliere was always a full-blooded Sicilian, and the fact that Hagen had been brought up as a member of the Donís family made no difference to that tradition. It was a question of blood. Only a Sicilian born to the ways of ormerta, the law of silence, could be trusted in the key post of Consigliere.
14th Sep '16 2:04:31 PM JC96
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* Does Connie know it was [[spoiler: Carlo, who conspired with Barzini to kill her brother Sonny?]]
** Near the ending of the first movie, She yells at Michael: "You blamed him for Sonny, you always did."
6th Sep '16 2:04:10 AM damnedifiaint
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** So yes, it was Vito's mom trying to get Ciccio to leave her son alone.


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** In the book, Michael threw nearly all the forces of the Corleones against his enemies. He doesn't just kill the heads of the Barzini and Tattaglia families; he completely breaks their power base and takes over what's left. The show of force is supposed to cow the remaining families into submission, but it could also be that he just didn't have any guns left to take on the other two Dons. In the movie, the idea was probably to show a more strategic takedown: cutting off five heads rather than destroying two bodies.
26th Aug '16 7:18:45 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** Most likely it's just a minor fudge from the reality in order to enable an outsider's perspective on events if desired and to introduce a bit of drama and conflict in places. It's still a work of fiction, after all, not a 100%-accurate history of ''la Cosa nostra statunitense'', so we can probably forgive a few detours from the strict reality. If we're looking for a HandWave, we can simply suggest that Vito Corleone was simply a bit more open-minded than some of the other Moustache Petes when it came to matters of family and blood. Furthermore, it's only one guy he's taken a fatherly liking to, not an alliance with a whole other non-Sicilian family, and ultimately, he's the guy in charge, he can do whatever he wants. If the people underneath him don't like it, what are they going to do?

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*** Most likely it's just a minor fudge from the reality in order to enable an outsider's perspective on events if desired and to introduce a bit of drama and conflict in places. It's still a work of fiction, after all, not a 100%-accurate history of ''la Cosa nostra statunitense'', so we can probably forgive a few detours from the strict reality. If we're looking for a HandWave, we can simply suggest that Vito Corleone was simply a bit more open-minded than some of the other Moustache Petes when it came to matters of family and blood. Furthermore, it's only one guy he's taken a fatherly liking to, not an alliance with a whole other non-Sicilian family, Tom's clearly capable, well-liked and respected by the people around him, and ultimately, he's the guy in charge, Vito's reached a position of respect, power and influence that means he can pretty much do whatever he wants. If the people underneath him don't like it, what are they going to do?
26th Aug '16 7:16:47 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** Most likely it's just a minor fudge from the reality in order to enable an outsider's perspective on events if desired and to introduce a bit of drama and conflict in places. It's still a work of fiction, after all, not a 100%-accurate history of ''la Cosa nostra statunitense'', so we can probably forgive a few detours from the strict reality. If we're looking for a HandWave, we can simply suggest that Vito Corleone was simply a bit more open-minded than some of the other Moustache Petes when it came to matters of family and blood. Furthermore, it's only one guy he's taken a fatherly liking to, not an alliance with a whole other non-Sicilian family, and ultimately, he's the guy in charge, he can do whatever he wants. If the people underneath him don't like it, what are they going to do?
26th Aug '16 5:32:37 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** I suppose Francis Ford Coppola thought the image of a mob boss wiping out all his rivals at one fell swoop would be a more striking image / moment than a mob boss wiping out two of his rivals and leaving the other two alone.

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*** Watsonian, I presume a combination of paranoia and making a sweeping gesture. Doylist, I suppose Francis Ford Coppola thought the image scenario of a mob boss wiping out all his rivals at one fell swoop would be a more striking image / moment conclusion than a mob boss wiping out two of his rivals and leaving the other two alone.
26th Aug '16 5:26:27 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** I suppose Francis Ford Coppola thought the image of a mob boss wiping out all his rivals at one fell swoop would be a more striking image / moment than a mob boss wiping out two of his rivals and leaving the other two alone.
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