History GuideDangIt / Pokemon

28th Aug '16 9:04:12 AM MayIncon
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* In ''[=HeartGold=]'' and ''[=SoulSilver=]'', we have a few Pokémon of the third and fourth generations hiding in trees. Now, there are a handful of specimens that are found in very specific trees (and every single tree in the game can be headbutted, so we're talking about thousands of trees). One example: Taillow is found at Cherrygrove, the first city you visit in the game, after a pool of water and over a pile of rocks that can be only climbed after you beat all the 16 Gyms. There are four trees, and you need to headbutt the lower left tree. Even then you can still fight other Pokémon.

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* In ''[=HeartGold=]'' and ''[=SoulSilver=]'', we have a few Pokémon of the third and fourth generations hiding in trees. Now, there are a handful of specimens that are found in very specific trees (and every single tree in the game can be headbutted, so we're talking about thousands of trees). One example: Taillow is found at Cherrygrove, the first city you visit in the game, after a pool of water and over a pile of rocks that can be only climbed after you beat all the 16 Gyms. There are four trees, and you need to headbutt the lower left tree. Even then you can still fight other Pokémon.Pokémon or yield nothing at all even after dozens of tries.
20th Aug '16 6:00:05 PM MayIncon
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* In Generation V, you can get Regirock after deciphering an odd but fairly easy puzzle. You may think that you need to solve a puzzle of similar means to find the other two, but no. Registeel is in Black 2 and Regice is in White 2. You need to go to the title screen to your Unova Link settings, manually change the location of the Rock Chamber to either the Ice Chamber or Steel Chamber, and then go capture the mon. Then, you need to trade over the correct key using the Unova Link settings and two DS systems to get the other mon you don't have. MUCH easier than all that malarkey in Gen III, but nothing in the game mentions anything about Unova Link, besides the whole flashback thing.

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* In Generation V, you can get Regirock after deciphering an odd but fairly easy puzzle. You may think that you need to solve a puzzle of similar means to find the other two, but no. Registeel is in Black 2 ''Black 2'' and Regice is in White 2.''White 2''. You need to go to the title screen to your Unova Link settings, manually change the location of the Rock Chamber to either the Ice Chamber or Steel Chamber, and then go capture the mon. Then, you need to trade over the correct key using the Unova Link settings and two DS systems to get the other mon you don't have. MUCH easier than all that malarkey in Gen III, but nothing in the game mentions anything about Unova Link, besides the whole flashback thing.



* In 'Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'' there's a locked room in the Sea Mauville that tells you you're being watched when you enter, and reading through some files mentions the Odd Keystone (an item related to Spiritomb). You can encounter a Spiritomb by opening and closing your bag after reading the document about the Old Keystone, but the game never gives a hint about taking that course of action.



*** Although even that analysis isn't quite true. On the one hand, there's Manaphy and its psudeo-baby form[[note]]Unlike every other baby Pokémon, Phione can never evolve into Manaphy[[/note]], the two legendaries that can breed ''at all''. On the other, there's the baby-stage Pokémon, which ([[ChildrenAreInnocent rather]] [[AbsurdlyYouthfulMother thankfully]]) are unable to. Unown, likely due to how unique they are. And, [[AscendedGlitch for some reason]], Nidorina and Nidoqueen, whose flavor text entries [[GameplayAndStorySegregation explicitly mention them taking care of their young]].
* On that matter, egg groups, which indicate what Pokémon species can breed with one another. Like elemental types, a Pokémon can have up to two egg groups, but they're quite independent from types: two Pokémon can share a type, yet belong to different egg groups; conversely, two Pokémon can be in the same egg group(s) while having no type in common. Like IVs and EVs initially, they are not visible to the player and nobody in-game mentions its existence.
** It can usually be inferred that Pokémon of similar body shape can breed with each other (for example, its easy to see that Houndoom and Manectric can breed with each other since they are both based on dogs). However, the game does throw a few curve balls here and there. For example: Gardevoir looks like a woman in a dress so it should be able to breed with other Pokémon that look like people (the Human-like egg group, which includes similar looking Pokémon like Jynx and Gothetelle). Right? ''Wrong''. Its actually in the Amorphous egg group. Meaning that it breeds with things such as greasy piles of sludge, ghosts and flatfish. Archeops is said to be the ancestor of other bird Pokémon, and indeed it can breed with them... But it can also breed with things such as crabs, barnacles and jellyfish. Aggron is an 800 lb. steel-plated ''Triceratops'', so it would be logical that it could be bred with similar monstrous beasts... and also sheep, living icebergs, and frilled lizards. Eelektross is a giant ocean-dwelling lamprey, which would seemingly indicate it belongs at least one of the three vague "Water" Egg Groups. Nope, it's none of them at all, instead being in the Amorphous Egg Group along with Gardevoir. Learning from Eelektross, you'd think that Malamar, a Pokemon based on an squid that lives on land and isn't a water type itself is also in the Amorphous egg group. Nope. Turns out it ''is'' in the Water egg groups (1 and 2 specifically). The system gets very strange at times, bordering on trolling territory.

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*** Although even that analysis isn't quite true. On the one hand, there's Manaphy and its psudeo-baby pseudo-baby form[[note]]Unlike every other baby Pokémon, Phione can never evolve into Manaphy[[/note]], the two legendaries that can breed ''at all''. On the other, there's the baby-stage Pokémon, which ([[ChildrenAreInnocent rather]] [[AbsurdlyYouthfulMother thankfully]]) are unable to. Unown, likely due to how unique they are. And, [[AscendedGlitch for some reason]], Nidorina and Nidoqueen, whose flavor text entries [[GameplayAndStorySegregation explicitly mention them taking care of their young]].
* On that matter, egg Egg groups, which indicate what Pokémon species can breed with one another. Like elemental types, a Pokémon can have up to two egg groups, but they're quite independent from types: two Pokémon can share a type, yet belong to different egg groups; conversely, two Pokémon can be in the same egg group(s) while having no type in common. Like IVs Despite its importance in breeding and EVs initially, passing down egg moves, they are not visible to the player and nobody in-game mentions its existence.
**
existence. It can usually be inferred that Pokémon of similar body shape can breed with each other (for example, its easy to see that Houndoom and Manectric can breed with each other since they are both based on dogs). However, the game does throw a few curve balls here and there. For example: Gardevoir looks like a woman in a dress so it should be able to breed with other Pokémon that look like people (the Human-like egg group, which includes similar looking Pokémon like Jynx and Gothetelle). Right? ''Wrong''. Its actually in the Amorphous egg group. Meaning that it breeds with things such as greasy piles of sludge, ghosts and flatfish. Archeops is said to be the ancestor of other bird Pokémon, and indeed it can breed with them... But it can also breed with things such as crabs, barnacles and jellyfish. Aggron is an 800 lb. steel-plated ''Triceratops'', so it would be logical that it could be bred with similar monstrous beasts... and also sheep, living icebergs, and frilled lizards. Eelektross is a giant ocean-dwelling lamprey, which would seemingly indicate it belongs at least one of the three vague "Water" Egg Groups. Nope, it's none of them at all, instead being in the Amorphous Egg Group along with Gardevoir. Learning from Eelektross, you'd think that Malamar, a Pokemon based on an squid that lives on land and isn't a water type itself is also in the Amorphous egg group. Nope. Turns out it ''is'' in the Water egg groups (1 and 2 specifically). The system gets very strange at times, bordering on trolling territory.



** HGSS also have the Gym Leader rematches. You can rematch any Gym Leader in the game, with a souped-up team...if you have their phone number. Talking to them in their Gyms won't get you the number. For most of them, you have to find them outside their Gyms, and then they'll give them to you. Most of them have either a tiny window of time in which they're available (Jasmine, Lt. Surge), while others appear well off the beaten path or in places you aren't likely to revisit (Morty, Bugsy). But the absolute worst is Blue. You can scour the world and you'll never find him. To get Blue's number, you have to have his sister massage one of your Pokémon seven times, while said Pokémon is at maximum happiness, then she will give you Blue's number.

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** * HGSS also have the Gym Leader rematches. You can rematch any Gym Leader in the game, with a souped-up team...if you have their phone number.numbers. Talking to them in their Gyms won't get you the number. For most of them, you have to find them outside their Gyms, and then they'll give them to you. Most of them have either a tiny window of time in which they're available (Jasmine, Lt. Surge), while others appear well off the beaten path or in places you aren't likely to revisit (Morty, Bugsy). But the absolute worst is Blue. You can scour the world and you'll never find him. To get Blue's number, you have to have his sister massage one of your Pokémon seven times, while said Pokémon is at maximum happiness, then she will give you Blue's number.



* ''Black & White 2'': The Dropped Item sidequest. You may even miss picking up the key item on your way through the game, not even knowing it was there. The item in question is a Xtransceiver that belongs to a person named Yancy (if you chose the male Trainer) or Curtis (if you chose the female Trainer). You have to scour the main hexagon of Unova, for ''15 specific areas, and on a specific tile'' to trigger a call from them. After that (getting called ten times by Yancy/Curtis), comes the second part of the quest. You have to call them in the above mentioned 15 areas (not on the same tile, just being in the route/town counts this time). Where you can call them is randomized, meaning you have to run/fly around Unova to the designated areas, and their number will disappear after every call (and you need to either wait a day or go to a different area)...and it takes a total of '''50''' phone calls to get your ultimate reward: unlimited daily trades in which Yancy/Curtis will trade a Lv. 50 'mon (with its Hidden/Dream World ability) for ''any'' 'mon. Good luck trying to figure all of this out without the aid of an online guide.

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* ''Black 2 & White 2'': The Dropped Item sidequest. You may even miss picking up the key item on your way through the game, not even knowing it was there. The item in question is a Xtransceiver that belongs to a person named Yancy (if you chose the male Trainer) or Curtis (if you chose the female Trainer). You have to scour the main hexagon of Unova, for ''15 specific areas, and on a specific tile'' to trigger a call from them. After that (getting called ten times by Yancy/Curtis), comes the second part of the quest. You have to call them in the above mentioned 15 areas (not on the same tile, just being in the route/town counts this time). Where you can call them is randomized, meaning you have to run/fly around Unova to the designated areas, and their number will disappear after every call (and you need to either wait a day or go to a different area)...and it takes a total of '''50''' phone calls to get your ultimate reward: unlimited daily trades in which Yancy/Curtis will trade a Lv. 50 'mon (with its Hidden/Dream World ability) for ''any'' 'mon. Good luck trying to figure all of this out without the aid of an online guide.



** On a similar note, a number of other services are unlocked or have their prices reduced as your style rating goes up. That old guy in the stone shop selling Mega Stones for 500,000 Pokédollars? Get your style rating up high enough and it drops to ''10,000''. The Art Mueseum? ''Gives you the Audio Guide to the gallery's pieces for free'' rather than require a token small payment of 200 Pokédollars. The Hairdresser? For girls, she'll eventually treat you as a regular customer ([[LesYay and get ...distracted... by how enchanting you look]]), which unlocks a few more options of hair customisation.

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** On a similar note, a number of other services are unlocked or have their prices reduced as your style rating goes up. That old guy in the stone shop selling Mega Stones for 500,000 Pokédollars? Get your style rating up high enough and it drops to ''10,000''. The Art Mueseum? ''Gives you the Audio Guide to the gallery's pieces for free'' rather than require a token small payment of 200 Pokédollars. The Hairdresser? For girls, she'll eventually treat you as a regular customer ([[LesYay and get ...distracted... by how enchanting you look]]), which unlocks a few more options of hair customisation.customization.
20th Aug '16 5:45:37 PM MayIncon
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* [[OneHundredAndEight Spiritomb]]. The part about putting the Odd Keystone into the Ruined Tower is intuitive enough, as examining the latter suggests that something could be put in there and hints at what it is, but the other requirement involves interacting with other people in the Underground at least 32 times. There is one trainer on a nearby route who gives you a hint when you talk to him after beating him, though. The person who gives you your first Odd Keystone does give you some hints on what to do with it... Although he's fairly vague, and ''nowhere'' does the game specify exactly how many people you're supposed to talk to while in the Underground.

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* [[OneHundredAndEight Spiritomb]]. The part about putting the Odd Keystone into the Ruined Tower is intuitive enough, as examining the latter suggests that something could be put in there and hints at what it is, but the other requirement involves interacting with other people in the Underground at least 32 times. There is one trainer on a nearby route who gives you a hint when you talk to him after beating him, though. The person who gives you your first Odd Keystone does give you some hints on what to do with it... Although he's fairly vague, and ''nowhere'' does the game specify exactly how many people you're supposed to talk to while in the Underground. And with the discontinuation of Wi-Fi services for the Generation IV and V games, [[LostForever obtaining Spiritomb this way is now impossible]].



** It's the one hour of the day when Mega Stones can be obtained. Where can they be found? It turns out that the locations of most of them have ''nothing'' to do with the Pokémon they're used with. Are the Houndoomite and Manectite found in the route that Houndour or Electrike can be encountered? Nope, they're on the other side of Kalos. Mawilite isn't found in Glittering Cave where Mawile is normally found; rather, it's hiding in a place you have no reason to return to. Becomes even more misleading when Kangaskhan and Kangaskhanite are both found in said cave. Tyranitarite and Aggronite are only found in a dead-end of a Gym (but at least that makes retroactive sense considering the Gym's type specialty). Scizorite is located in a cave filled with mostly ice Pokemon, just behind that Abomasnow. It might be easier to name the Mega Stones that are in logical places.

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** It's the one hour of the day when Mega Stones can be obtained. Where Regarding their locations, where can they be found? It turns out that the locations of most of them have ''nothing'' to do with the Pokémon they're used with. Are the Houndoomite and Manectite found in the route that Houndour or Electrike can be encountered? Nope, they're on the other side of Kalos. Mawilite isn't found in Glittering Cave where Mawile is normally found; rather, it's hiding in a place you have no reason to return to. Becomes even more misleading when Kangaskhan and Kangaskhanite are both found in said cave. Tyranitarite and Aggronite are only found in a dead-end of a Gym (but at least that makes retroactive sense considering the Gym's type specialty). Scizorite is located in a cave filled with mostly ice Pokemon, just behind that Abomasnow. It might be easier to name the Mega Stones that are in logical places.



** There are also several moves that seem a lot less useful than they actually are if you only go by the in-game description. Sacred Fire, for example, is Ho-oh's SignatureMove. Checking its description, "a fire attack that may leave the target with a burn", and it seems to just be Flamethrower with 5 more power and 5 less accuracy. How is that worthy of being the SignatureMove of an [[OlympusMons Olympus Mon]]? Well that's because it has a whopping ''50% chance of inflicting a burn'', while most other Fire moves only have 10%. Only ''Statium 2'' lists the exact chance. Even worse is [[NinjaLog Substitute]]. None of its in-game descriptions come anywhere ''close'' to describing everything it can do, probably because doing so would require muliple ''pages'' of info. (All only mention it being a "copy that serves as the user's decoy". They fail to mention that it makes you immune to Status moves while it's acive, can be passed to others via Baton Pass, and retains the HP used to create it even if transfered to a Pokemon with more or less maximum HP)

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** There are also several moves that seem a lot less useful than they actually are if you only go by the in-game description. Sacred Fire, for example, is Ho-oh's SignatureMove. Checking its description, "a fire attack that may leave the target with a burn", and it seems to just be Flamethrower with 5 more power and 5 less accuracy. How is that worthy of being the SignatureMove of an [[OlympusMons Olympus Mon]]? Well that's because it has a whopping ''50% chance of inflicting a burn'', while most other Fire moves only have 10%. Only ''Statium ''Stadium 2'' lists the exact chance. Even worse is [[NinjaLog Substitute]]. None of its in-game descriptions come anywhere ''close'' to describing everything it can do, probably because doing so would require muliple ''pages'' of info. (All only mention it being a "copy that serves as the user's decoy". They fail to mention that it makes you immune to Status moves while it's acive, active, can be passed to others via Baton Pass, and retains the HP used to create it even if transfered to a Pokemon with more or less maximum HP)



** And while it might occur to some people that if a move can be bred into one species, it could then be bred into another, the extent of chain breeding moves might not be so apparent. Some Pokemon can only learn certain moves if you go through multiple steps to get it. For example, say you're battling a friend who uses a Mamoswine (ground/ice), and you try to take advantage of its water-weakness, only to have your water type one-shot by a move you didn't know existed: Freeze-Dry (an ice-type move that has the special bonus of being super-effective against water). You might wonder when Mamoswine learns such a counter-intuitive move. Well it had to be bred from a Delibird. How did Delibird learn it? It was bred from a Lapras. Which in turn was bred from Aurorus, the ONLY breedable Pokemon that can learn the move naturally. And yes this specific chain is the only way the move gets passed on. An extreme example of chain-breeding, but sometimes the move you want takes more work than you'd think to put in, or wouldn't know could even be learned by your mon, so good luck without a guide. Even worse is chain-breeding Wide Guard onto Honedge, which requires at least ''five different Pokémon, two of which are starters'', and Smeargle can't help here. [[note]]Mantine, Tirtouga, Carracosta, or Alomomola to Mudkip to Turtwig to Paras to Dwebble to Honedge[[/note]]

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** And while it might occur to some people that if a move can be bred into one species, it could then be bred into another, the extent of chain breeding moves might not be so apparent. Some Pokemon can only learn certain moves if you go through multiple steps to get it. For example, say you're battling a friend who uses a Mamoswine (ground/ice), (Ground/Ice), and you try to take advantage of its water-weakness, Water weakness, only to have your water Water type one-shot one-shotted by a move you didn't know existed: Freeze-Dry (an ice-type Ice-type move that has the special bonus of being super-effective against water). You might wonder when Mamoswine learns such a counter-intuitive move. Well it had to be bred from a Delibird. How did Delibird learn it? It was bred from a Lapras. Which in turn was bred from Aurorus, the ONLY breedable Pokemon that can learn the move naturally. And yes this specific chain is the only way the move gets passed on. An extreme example of chain-breeding, but sometimes the move you want takes more work than you'd think to put in, or wouldn't know could even be learned by your mon, so good luck without a guide. Even worse is chain-breeding Wide Guard onto Honedge, which requires at least ''five different Pokémon, two of which are starters'', and Smeargle can't help here. [[note]]Mantine, Tirtouga, Carracosta, or Alomomola to Mudkip to Turtwig to Paras to Dwebble to Honedge[[/note]]
20th Aug '16 11:29:11 AM MayIncon
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* Natures were introduced in Generation III. One might think nature doesn’t affect anything at all, but it actually will raise a particular stat by 10% in exchange for lowering another stat. Unless the Pokemon has a Serious, Bashful, Hardy, Docile or Quirky Nature, which doesn’t affect stats at all. From ‘’Heart Gold and Soul Silver onward’’, there’s a red text for stats that increase and blue text for stats that decrease. But some might think it’s the opposite. In Generation VI, the box system does have a search system that not only allows the player to search for a specific Nature of a Pokemon, but also details which stats are increased or decreased by Nature.
* Generation IV introduced Characteristic, which varies for each Pokemon, including the same species. Some might think it’s merely FlavorTest, but Characteristic actually vaguely indicates one of the stats contain the highest Individual Value.

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* Natures were introduced in Generation III. One might think nature doesn’t affect anything at all, but it actually will raise a particular stat by 10% in exchange for lowering another stat. Unless the Pokemon has a Serious, Bashful, Hardy, Docile or Quirky Nature, which doesn’t affect stats at all. From ‘’Heart ''Heart Gold and Soul Silver onward’’, Silver'' onwards, there’s a red text for stats that increase and blue text for stats that decrease. But some might think it’s the opposite. In Generation VI, the box system does have a search system that not only allows the player to search for a specific Nature of a Pokemon, but also details which stats are increased or decreased by Nature.
* Generation IV introduced Characteristic, which varies for each Pokemon, including the same species. Some might think it’s merely FlavorTest, FlavorText, but Characteristic actually vaguely indicates one of the stats contain the highest Individual Value.
15th Aug '16 5:52:43 AM flamemario12
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* Milotic in Generations III and IV. If you're exceptionally lucky on Route 119 (see above), you've found some ugly brown fish called Feebas which your Pokédex urges you to ignore and cannot do anything but Splash around. At this point one expects to go through the [[MagikarpPower painful process of equipping it with Exp. Share and leveling it up, waiting in anticipation until the moment it evolves]]. Except, it doesn't. Even if you've raised it to Lv. 100. You should then realize that making Feebas evolve is not just a matter of leveling, but also of beauty, a stat you only ever need for Pokémon Contests, and try to feed it blue [=PokéBlocks=] (in Generation III) or Poffins (in Generation IV). If you were to feed it [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins that were not of high enough quality, or you were unlucky enough to have reeled up a Feebas that just hates blue [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins for whatever reason, you'll end up with a not quite sufficiently beautiful ugly brown fish which will get you nowhere, and even if it might occur to you that something has gone wrong, you would have to go back and fish up another one. Now, given that you have acquired this brown fish, and GIVEN that you have managed to feed it beautifying [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins of sufficient quality, the next time you level up your ugly brown fish it should evolve into Milotic (and if you happened to level the Feebas to 100 for whatever reason...well, it sucks to be you).
** ''Emerald'' was somewhat kind to you on this matter, with the inclusion of the Blend Master; a [=PokéBlock=] blending opponent who always uses the very best Berries in the game (Spelon, Watmel, Belue, Durin and Pamtre, if you were interested) and always scores perfect hits on the Berry Blender ... but is only unlocked after you beat the Elite Four, and whose presence is only announced on the television, so if you don't watch the television, odds are you'll miss him. If not, the only way for you to get those ultimate Berries yourself is to tell one of five ''incredibly'' bizarre and unintuitive phrases to the Berry Master's wife, and even then you only get one of each. Want to grow some more? They take many, many hours to grow, and require lots of watering. Hard enough? Until Generation V, this was one of the easiest ways to get Milotic. Yeah.
** Fortunately, when all is said and done, Generation V has greatly simplified the process: Feebas can be found on ''any'' tile in its route, there are special tiles you can fish on ''but they're marked this time'', and they include better chances at Feebas and even a chance at wild Milotic, and (as contest stats are no more) Feebas now evolves by being traded with the Prism Scale, which even mimics Milotic's color scheme (trade-with-item evolutions are still guide dang it material in most cases, but they're a lot less annoying than dealing with the contest stats, provided you have someone to trade with). However, (hardcore) gamers still can evolve the Feebas via the old way in this generation, if one trades a Feebas with maxed Beauty into one of these games.
** Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire have brought back the original evolution method, but it's now much easier, since not only has the Pokeblock-making process been heavily simplified, but now your Pokemon are able to eat an unlimited number of Pokeblocks. In addition, it's easier to find Feebas in this game; they have a 5% chance of appearing when you fish in any Route 119 water tile with any rod. What's more, if you fish underneath the bridge on that route[[note]]or near a large rock in the water at night[[/note]], Feebas will always appear.
* Shedinja. Shedinja cannot be found in the wild and despite appearing in the Pokédex after Nincada and Ninjask and obviously being from the same evolution line, doesn't evolve from anything. To get it, the player must raise a Nincada to Level 20 and let it evolve with at least one empty slot in their party and (in Generation IV and later) at least one standard red-and-white Poké Ball with them. Having the Poké Ball is pretty likely already, but most players go around with a full party for the entire game as soon as they are able to do so. Shedinja is also used only by ''four'' Trainers in the '''entire series''': Greta while battling her for Silver Symbol, Bugsy in his rematch team, Inver as one of his possible Pokémon in the Inverse Battle, and an Ace Trainer in Mauville's food court (if you ordered the Magnemite Croquette).

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* Milotic in Generations III and IV. If you're the player is exceptionally lucky on Route 119 (see above), you've found the player can encounter some ugly brown fish called Feebas which your the Pokédex urges you to ignore and cannot do anything but Splash around. At this point one expects to go through the [[MagikarpPower painful process of equipping How does it evolve? Level up with Exp. Share and leveling it up, waiting in anticipation until max Beauty stat, one of the moment it evolves]]. Except, it doesn't. Even if you've raised it to Lv. 100. You should then realize that making Feebas evolve is not just a matter of leveling, but also of beauty, a stat you only ever need stats for Pokémon Contests, and try Contests. In order to raise its Beauty stat, feed it with blue [=PokéBlocks=] (in Generation III) or Poffins (in Generation IV). If you were to feed It's actually harder than it [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins that were not of high enough quality, or you were unlucky enough to have reeled up a Feebas that just hates blue [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins for whatever reason, you'll end up with a not quite sufficiently beautiful ugly brown fish which will get you nowhere, and even if it might occur to you that something has gone wrong, you would have to go back and fish up another one. Now, given that you have acquired this brown fish, and GIVEN that you have managed to feed it beautifying [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins of sufficient quality, the next time you level up your ugly brown fish it should evolve into Milotic (and if you happened to level the Feebas to 100 for whatever reason...well, it sucks to be you).
** ''Emerald'' was somewhat kind to you on this matter, with the inclusion of the Blend Master; a [=PokéBlock=] blending opponent who always uses the very best Berries in the game (Spelon, Watmel, Belue, Durin and Pamtre, if you were interested) and always scores perfect hits on the Berry Blender ... but is only unlocked after you beat the Elite Four, and whose presence is only announced on the television, so if you don't watch the television, odds are you'll miss him. If not, the only way for you to get those ultimate Berries yourself is to tell one of five ''incredibly'' bizarre and unintuitive phrases to the Berry Master's wife, and even then you only get one of each. Want to grow some more? They take many, many hours to grow, and require lots of watering. Hard enough? Until Generation V, this was one of the easiest ways to get Milotic. Yeah.
** Fortunately, when all is said and done,
sounds. Generation V has greatly simplified the process: that by making Feebas can be found on ''any'' tile in its route, there are special tiles you can fish on ''but they're marked this time'', way easier to encounter, and they include better chances at Feebas and even a chance at wild Milotic, and (as contest stats are no more) Feebas now evolves by being traded with the Prism Scale, Scale as there's no contest in Unova, which even mimics Milotic's color scheme (trade-with-item evolutions are still guide dang it material in most cases, but they're a lot less annoying than dealing with the contest stats, provided you have someone to trade with). However, (hardcore) gamers still can evolve the Feebas via the old way in this generation, if one trades a Feebas with maxed Beauty into one of these games.
**
scheme. Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire have brought back the original evolution method, but it's now much easier, since not only has the Pokeblock-making process been heavily simplified, but now your Pokemon are able to eat an unlimited number of Pokeblocks. In addition, it's easier to find Feebas in this game; they have a 5% chance of appearing when you fish in any Route 119 water tile with any rod. What's more, if you fish underneath the bridge on that route[[note]]or near a large rock in the water at night[[/note]], Feebas will always appear.
* Shedinja. Shedinja cannot be found in the wild and despite appearing in the Pokédex after Nincada and Ninjask and obviously being from the same evolution line, doesn't evolve from anything. To get it, the player must raise a Nincada to Level 20 and let it evolve with at least one empty slot in their party and (in Generation IV and later) at least one standard red-and-white Poké Ball with them. Having the Poké Ball is pretty likely already, but most players go around with a full party for the entire game as soon as they are able to do so. Shedinja is also used only by ''four'' Trainers in the '''entire series''': Greta while battling her for Silver Symbol, Bugsy in his rematch team, Inver as one of his possible Pokémon in the Inverse Battle, and an Ace Trainer in Mauville's food court (if you ordered the Magnemite Croquette).court.



* As of Generation IV, some Pokémon only evolve if they know a specific move when they level up. Some of them make sense - Mime Jr. and Bonsly need to learn Mimic to evolve, and they are known for mimicking things. Yanma and Piloswine need to learn Ancient Power to evolve, and as their evolutions have prehistoric basis, that makes sense. Tangela into Tangrowth with Ancient Power, not so much. Evolving Lickitung into Lickilicky makes no sense whatsoever, as it needs to know ''Rollout'' to evolve, and that has absolutely nothing to do with any of the evolutionary line's abilities. But with Piloswine, it's worse than that; the only way it can learn Ancient Power to begin with is via the Move Relearner, so if you don't know about how to evolve it, you'll very likely never teach it that move to begin with!
** One better to add to the induced confusion: Piloswine can learn Ancient Power in the earlier games, but it didn't evolve then even if it had the attack, as Mamoswine did not yet exist.
* Magneton and Nosepass only evolve if leveled up in Mt. Coronet, which apparently exudes a magnetic field that affects the two magnet-based Pokémon. Tragically, ''nowhere in the game is it mentioned that Mt. Coronet is magnetic''! An NPC in ''Platinum'' tells you that certain Pokémon evolve when leveled up at Mt. Coronet, but they never hint as to which Pokémon or that Mt. Coronet is magnetic.
** In ''Platinum'', you ''can'' catch Nosepass in Mt. Coronet, which could possibly be seen as a hint... though that's still a pretty darn vague hint.
*** The tradition continues in Generation V, where they evolve if leveled up in Chargestone Cave. Luckily, Chargestone Cave is obviously magnetic this time, but there is still nothing anywhere to suggest leveling your mon up there will do anything. Black/White 2 does add Nosepass to Chargestone Cave, at least implying an association.
** Kalos' analogue to Coronet and Chargestone is Kalos Route 13. The only hints we really get are the nearby Power Plants and some lines by a worker of an electrical disturbance irritating the local mons. It certainly doesn't help that the local mons were ''all'' Ground types (two of which have a high probability of having [[YouWillNotEvadeMe Arena Trap]]), making it basically impossible to grind the Ground-vulnerable Magneton/Nosepass without the Exp. Share.

to:

* As of Generation IV, some Pokémon only evolve if they know a specific move when they level up. Some of them make sense - Mime Jr. and Bonsly need to learn Mimic to evolve, and they are known for mimicking things. Yanma and Piloswine need to learn Ancient Power to evolve, and as their evolutions have prehistoric basis, that makes sense. Tangela into Tangrowth with Ancient Power, not so much. Evolving Lickitung into Lickilicky makes no sense whatsoever, as it needs to know ''Rollout'' to evolve, and that has absolutely nothing to do with any of the evolutionary line's abilities. But with Piloswine, it's worse than that; the only way it can learn Ancient Power to begin with is via the Move Relearner, so if you don't know about how to evolve it, you'll very likely never teach it that move to begin with!
** One better to add to the induced confusion: Piloswine can learn Ancient Power in the earlier games, but it didn't evolve then even if it had the attack, as Mamoswine did not yet exist.
Relearner.
* Magneton and Nosepass only evolve if leveled up in Mt. Coronet, which apparently exudes a magnetic field that affects the two magnet-based Pokémon. Tragically, Unfortunately, ''nowhere in the game is it mentioned that Mt. Coronet is magnetic''! An NPC in ''Platinum'' tells you the player that certain Pokémon evolve when leveled up at Mt. Coronet, but they never hint as to which Pokémon or that Mt. Coronet is magnetic.
** In ''Platinum'', you ''can'' catch Nosepass in Mt. Coronet, which could possibly be seen as a hint... though that's still a pretty darn vague hint.
*** The tradition continues in Generation V, where they evolve if leveled up in Chargestone Cave. Luckily, Chargestone Cave is obviously magnetic this time, but there is still nothing anywhere to suggest leveling your mon up there will do anything. Black/White 2 does add Nosepass to Chargestone Cave, at least implying an association.
** Kalos' analogue to Coronet and Chargestone is Kalos Route 13. The only hints we really get are the nearby Power Plants and some lines by a worker of an electrical disturbance irritating the local mons. It certainly doesn't help that the local mons were ''all'' Ground types (two of which have a high probability of having [[YouWillNotEvadeMe Arena Trap]]), making it basically impossible to grind the Ground-vulnerable Magneton/Nosepass without the Exp. Share.
magnetic.



* In order to fully evolve Sliggoo into Goodra, you have to reach level 50. Sounds simple, except it has to be ''raining in the overworld'' for it to evolve. The only hints we get are that Route 14 (the first time you encounter Goomy) is raining often and an Advance Tip at Route 17 that indicates one Pokemon evolves in the rain but never says which or it must be raining overworld.
** There's also the fact that Sliggoo can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, but that still isn't helpful, given that the rain created with this move won't appear in the overworld. There's also the fact that, despite what one might think, ''multiple'' Pokémon can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, including Blastoise, Lugia, and ''Raikou.''

to:

* In order to fully evolve Sliggoo into Goodra, you have to reach level 50. Sounds simple, except it has to be ''raining in the overworld'' for it to evolve. The only hints we get are that Route 14 (the first time you encounter Goomy) is raining often and an Advance Tip at Route 17 that indicates one Pokemon evolves in the rain but never says which or it must be raining overworld.
**
overworld. There's also the fact that Sliggoo can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, but that still isn't helpful, given that the rain created with this move won't appear in the overworld. There's also the fact that, despite what one might think, ''multiple'' Pokémon can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, including Blastoise, Lugia, and ''Raikou.''



* Trying to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules at all as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for [=TMs=], Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own type is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable to just impossible. Generation VI does make it easier by selecting Item on any Pokemon in the party and switching over to the TM tab can show which TM moves are incompatible with that Pokemon.

to:

* Trying to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules at all as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for [=TMs=], Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own type is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable to just impossible. Generation VI does make it easier by selecting Item on any Pokemon in the party party, and switching over to the TM tab can show which TM moves are incompatible with that Pokemon.
15th Aug '16 5:25:36 AM flamemario12
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[[folder: Game Mechanics]]*Trying to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules at all as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for [=TMs=], Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own type is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable to just impossible. Generation VI does make it easier by selecting Item on any Pokemon in the party and switching over to the TM tab can show which TM moves are incompatible with that Pokemon.

to:

[[folder: Game Mechanics]]*Trying Mechanics]]
* Trying
to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules at all as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for [=TMs=], Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own type is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable to just impossible. Generation VI does make it easier by selecting Item on any Pokemon in the party and switching over to the TM tab can show which TM moves are incompatible with that Pokemon.
15th Aug '16 5:25:06 AM flamemario12
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[[folder: Game Mechanics]]
* Wonder why a crucial stat of your Pokémon's seems weak for no justifiable reason? That's because of poor Individual Values (essentially, genes), and/or bad Effort Values (essentially, stat-based experience gained when you battle different Pokémon). The existence of these stats is only vaguely alluded to in-game, and fully understanding the process and its various formulas by oneself without hacking and digging deep into the game files is likely an impossible task. Knowing these stats and understanding them is essential for breeding Pokémon for competitive battling. In fact, this is specifically an Internet Guide Dang It, as even Nintendo's official guides include only very vague information on [=IVs=] or [=EVs=]. It's worth noting that being aware of the EV and IV systems isn't required to beat the core game and even achieve HundredPercentCompletion, but considering that the game alludes to and references the hidden stat systems, it would appear that Game Freak expected some players to know about them at some point.
** Bradygames and Prima Guides in Gen IV, particularly for Pokémon Battle Revolution, allude vaguely and indirectly to the EV training system, complete with hints on what to fight for what kind of [=EVs=].
** In ''Black 2'' and ''White 2'', you can call Bianca after defeating the champion to determine if any given Pokémon in your party has hit its EV limit. It's not much, but it's something.
*** There are [=NPCs=] in games dating back to at least Generation III that will give you relatively oblique indications of your Pokemon's [=IVs=] and [=EVs=] if you know how to interpret their replies. One such NPC will tell you whether your lead Pokemon has maxed out its [=EVs=], saying that it has "put in a great effort" or something to that effect if it has (and giving it an "Effort Ribbon" pre-Generation V, which eliminates ribbons altogether). Another, usually found somewhere in the resident Battle Tower/Frontier/Subway, will tell you whether your lead Pokemon has any maxed-out [=IVs=] and what its total [=IVs=] are--not directly or even exactly, but by using a set of code phrases. Finding those [=NPCs=] and interpreting their dialogue is a guide dang it in and of itself, but it's better than nothing.
*** Ever since the Battle Frontiers were introduced in Emerald and Platinum, there has always been an expert breeder who can and will appraise your Pokémon. He does not tell the exact [=IVs=], but will give you a vague average of your Pokémon's stat potential from "rather decent" to "outstanding", and will tell you which stat is highest, or which stats are tied for highest. In Generation VI, he'll also warn if it has 0 [=IVs=] in any stat.
-->This Pokémon has relatively superior potential overall. That's how I judge it, anyway. Incidentally, I would say the best potential lies in its HP. Although its Special Attack is equally good. Stats like those... can't be beat! But you won't get anywhere fast with this low of a Speed stat...
** The Macho Brace introduced in Ruby and Sapphire ''doubles'' the rate at which your Pokémon gain Effort from battling. However, the games never exactly specify the mechanics behind it.
*** As of Platinum, the Battle Frontier has several Power Trainer held items that are like specialized Macho Braces. They give 4 EV in the stat they embody, and their description explicitly says which stat they help to raise. However, it is not mentioned exactly how much they improve your stat training/growth.
-->Power Lens: A Pokémon held item that promotes Special Attack gain on leveling, but reduces the Speed stat.
** This has been somewhat 'resolved' in X and Y, as Super Training more or less explicitly shows your Effort Value spread and gain as you play it or fight Pokémon with the Training app loaded to your touchscreen.
** The move Hidden Power is a huge pain because of [=IVs=]. Why, you ask? Because the move's type and damage are both determined by the user's [=IVs=]. Granted, Hidden Power isn't that great of a move overall, with a maximum base power of 70 if your Pokémon was somehow blessed with the best possible [=IVs=]... but when you consider that nearly every Pokémon can learn it and the move's type can be anything except Normal and Fairy, you kind of understand why it's used a lot as type coverage in competitive battling. On the other hand, ever since Ruby and Sapphire there has always been a Hidden Power specialist in every region who will appraise your Pokémon and tell you the type of your Pokémon's Hidden Power. However he still doesn't tell exactly ''how strong'' that Hidden Power is. The "how strong" part was changed in X and Y, now that Hidden Power's BP was fixed at 60. The type of Hidden Power is still determined by [=IVs=], though.
* On that note... So you just booted up a new game of Pokémon Sapphire Version, and you're experiencing it for the first time. You check out the new "SUMMARY" screens, which are incredibly detailed when compared to the "STATS" screens of the previous games. And what's this? "JOLLY Nature"? If you're instead playing a game of a later generation, this will be accompanied by something like "Loves to eat". Well, isn't that adorable? FlavorText is so cute. ...Except this ''[[SubvertedTrope isn't]]'' Flavor Text. These are what are called Natures (introduced in Generation III) and Characteristics (introduced in Gen IV). Natures will raise a particular stat by 10% in exchange for lowering another one (with the exception of five natures known as 'neutral' natures). Characteristics, on the other hand, don't change or affect anything and are simply informative. They let you know what a Pokémon's highest stat is (measured by [=IVs=], themselves a Guide Dang It). You'll absolutely need to know them in order to have any kind of success in high-skilled battle institutions or competitive play.
** Here's where the nature (heh) of the Guide Dang It gets really ridiculous: Not only are you never told what any of this means, Natures aren't even self-defining or intuitive on their own. Sometimes they can be reasoned out. The "Timid" nature raises Speed but lowers Attack. Others are impossible to guess (Modest? Raises Sp. Atk and lowers Attack, obviously). Though once you've figured out one, you can usually figure out its opposite. The opposite of Timid is Brave, and sure enough the Brave Nature lowers Speed and raises Attack.
** Characteristics, on the other hand, are even worse. If a Pokémon's Speed stat is as high as it can be, what would you expect it to say? "Likes to run"? Close! That's second best. The absolute best Speed stat is accompanied by the text... ''Alert to sounds.'' Unfortunately, you could ''also'' get the latter text with a speed stat of ''1''... if the other stats are all zeros![[note]]The texts are based on the highest stat's ''remainder when divided by 5. Not 4 or 8, ''5''.[[/note]] Unless you look up [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Characteristic a whole chart]], don't expect to figure this all out any time soon.
** To their credit, from [=HeartGold=] and [=SoulSilver=] onward, Game Freak added a (very) slight tint to a Pokémon's stats screen showing which stats were being raised (in red) and which were being lowered (in blue). (A Pokémon with a neutral nature will not have this, of course.) Of course, noticing them and figuring out what they meant (you might think red was bad and blue was good) still has shades of this trope, but it seems this was added in for players who already knew what Natures were and simply saved them the trouble of memorizing which one did which.

to:

[[folder: Game Mechanics]]
Mechanics]]*Trying to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules at all as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for [=TMs=], Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own type is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable to just impossible. Generation VI does make it easier by selecting Item on any Pokemon in the party and switching over to the TM tab can show which TM moves are incompatible with that Pokemon.
* Wonder why a crucial stat two or more same of your Pokémon's seems weak for no justifiable reason? That's because of poor the Pokemon will have different stats at the same level? That has to do with Individual Values (essentially, genes), and/or bad Effort Values (essentially, stat-based experience gained when you battle different Pokémon). Values.The existence of these stats is only vaguely alluded to in-game, in-game outside of a stats judge, and fully understanding the process and its various formulas by oneself without hacking and digging deep into the game files is likely an impossible task. Knowing these stats and understanding them is essential for breeding Pokémon for competitive battling. In fact, this is specifically an Internet Guide Dang It, as even Nintendo's official guides include only very vague information on [=IVs=] or [=EVs=]. It's worth noting that being aware of the EV and IV systems isn't required to beat the core game and even achieve HundredPercentCompletion, but considering that the game alludes to and references the hidden stat systems, it would appear that Game Freak expected some players to know about them at some point.
** Bradygames and Prima Guides in Gen IV, particularly for Pokémon Battle Revolution, allude vaguely and indirectly to the EV training system, complete with hints on what to fight for what kind of [=EVs=].
** In ''Black 2'' and ''White 2'', you can call Bianca after defeating the champion to determine if any given Pokémon in your party has hit its EV limit. It's not much, but it's something.
*** There are [=NPCs=] in games dating back to at least
[=IVs=].
* Before
Generation III that will give you relatively oblique indications of your Pokemon's [=IVs=] and [=EVs=] if you know how to interpret their replies. One such NPC will tell you whether your lead VI introduced Super Training, there’s Effort Value (officially called Base Stats). After defeating a Pokemon, the Pokemon has maxed out its [=EVs=], saying that it has "put in a great effort" or something to that effect if it has (and giving it an "Effort Ribbon" pre-Generation V, which eliminates ribbons altogether). Another, usually found somewhere in the resident Battle Tower/Frontier/Subway, will tell you whether your lead add 1 to 3 EV to a particular stat (usually the highest stat of the defeated Pokemon). Gaining a certain amount will raise its stat depending on the Pokemon’s level. Pokemon has any maxed-out [=IVs=] can have a maximum 252 EV per stat and what its total [=IVs=] are--not directly or even exactly, but by using a set of code phrases. Finding those [=NPCs=] and interpreting their dialogue is a guide dang it 510 EV in and of itself, but it's better than nothing.
*** Ever since
total. However, the Battle Frontiers system is barely mentioned in the games prior to Generation VI.
* Natures
were introduced in Emerald and Platinum, there has always been an expert breeder who can and will appraise your Pokémon. He does not tell the exact [=IVs=], but will give you a vague average of your Pokémon's stat potential from "rather decent" to "outstanding", and will tell you which stat is highest, or which stats are tied for highest. In Generation VI, he'll also warn if it has 0 [=IVs=] in any stat.
-->This Pokémon has relatively superior potential overall. That's how I judge it, anyway. Incidentally, I would say the best potential lies in its HP. Although its Special Attack is equally good. Stats like those... can't be beat! But you won't get anywhere fast with this low of a Speed stat...
** The Macho Brace introduced in Ruby and Sapphire ''doubles'' the rate at which your Pokémon gain Effort from battling. However, the games never exactly specify the mechanics behind it.
*** As of Platinum, the Battle Frontier has several Power Trainer held items that are like specialized Macho Braces. They give 4 EV in the stat they embody, and their description explicitly says which stat they help to raise. However, it is not mentioned exactly how much they improve your stat training/growth.
-->Power Lens: A Pokémon held item that promotes Special Attack gain on leveling, but reduces the Speed stat.
** This has been somewhat 'resolved' in X and Y, as Super Training more or less explicitly shows your Effort Value spread and gain as you play it or fight Pokémon with the Training app loaded to your touchscreen.
** The move Hidden Power is a huge pain because of [=IVs=]. Why, you ask? Because the move's type and damage are both determined by the user's [=IVs=]. Granted, Hidden Power isn't that great of a move overall, with a maximum base power of 70 if your Pokémon was somehow blessed with the best possible [=IVs=]... but when you consider that nearly every Pokémon can learn it and the move's type can be
III. One might think nature doesn’t affect anything except Normal and Fairy, you kind of understand why it's used a lot as type coverage in competitive battling. On the other hand, ever since Ruby and Sapphire there has always been a Hidden Power specialist in every region who will appraise your Pokémon and tell you the type of your Pokémon's Hidden Power. However he still doesn't tell exactly ''how strong'' that Hidden Power is. The "how strong" part was changed in X and Y, now that Hidden Power's BP was fixed at 60. The type of Hidden Power is still determined by [=IVs=], though.
* On that note... So you just booted up a new game of Pokémon Sapphire Version, and you're experiencing
all, but it for the first time. You check out the new "SUMMARY" screens, which are incredibly detailed when compared to the "STATS" screens of the previous games. And what's this? "JOLLY Nature"? If you're instead playing a game of a later generation, this will be accompanied by something like "Loves to eat". Well, isn't that adorable? FlavorText is so cute. ...Except this ''[[SubvertedTrope isn't]]'' Flavor Text. These are what are called Natures (introduced in Generation III) and Characteristics (introduced in Gen IV). Natures actually will raise a particular stat by 10% in exchange for lowering another one (with stat. Unless the exception of five natures known as 'neutral' natures). Characteristics, on the other hand, don't change Pokemon has a Serious, Bashful, Hardy, Docile or Quirky Nature, which doesn’t affect anything stats at all. From ‘’Heart Gold and are simply informative. They let you know what Soul Silver onward’’, there’s a Pokémon's highest stat is (measured by [=IVs=], themselves a Guide Dang It). You'll absolutely need to know them in order to have any kind of success in high-skilled battle institutions or competitive play.
** Here's where
red text for stats that increase and blue text for stats that decrease. But some might think it’s the nature (heh) of the Guide Dang It gets really ridiculous: Not only are you never told what any of this means, Natures aren't even self-defining or intuitive on their own. Sometimes they can be reasoned out. The "Timid" nature raises Speed but lowers Attack. Others are impossible to guess (Modest? Raises Sp. Atk and lowers Attack, obviously). Though once you've figured out one, you can usually figure out its opposite. The opposite of Timid is Brave, and sure enough In Generation VI, the Brave box system does have a search system that not only allows the player to search for a specific Nature lowers Speed and raises Attack.
** Characteristics, on the other hand, are even worse. If a Pokémon's Speed stat is as high as it can be, what would you expect it to say? "Likes to run"? Close! That's second best. The absolute best Speed stat is accompanied by the text... ''Alert to sounds.'' Unfortunately, you could ''also'' get the latter text with a speed stat
of ''1''... if the other a Pokemon, but also details which stats are all zeros![[note]]The texts are based on increased or decreased by Nature.
* Generation IV introduced Characteristic, which varies for each Pokemon, including the same species. Some might think it’s merely FlavorTest, but Characteristic actually vaguely indicates one of the stats contain
the highest stat's ''remainder when divided by 5. Not 4 or 8, ''5''.[[/note]] Unless you look up [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Characteristic a whole chart]], don't expect to figure this all out any time soon.
** To their credit, from [=HeartGold=] and [=SoulSilver=] onward, Game Freak added a (very) slight tint to a Pokémon's stats screen showing which stats were being raised (in red) and which were being lowered (in blue). (A Pokémon with a neutral nature will not have this, of course.) Of course, noticing them and figuring out what they meant (you might think red was bad and blue was good) still has shades of this trope, but it seems this was added in for players who already knew what Natures were and simply saved them the trouble of memorizing which one did which.
Individual Value.
10th Aug '16 10:46:43 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* Milotic in Generations III and IV. If you're exceptionally lucky on Route 119 (see above), you've found some ugly brown fish called Feebas which your Pokédex urges you to ignore and cannot do anything but Splash around. At this point if you have an ounce of GenreSavvy in you you'll go through the [[MagikarpPower painful process of equipping it with Exp. Share and leveling it up, waiting in anticipation until the moment it evolves]]. Except, it doesn't. Even if you've raised it to Lv. 100. You should then realize that making Feebas evolve is not just a matter of leveling, but also of beauty, a stat you only ever need for Pokémon Contests, and try to feed it blue [=PokéBlocks=] (in Generation III) or Poffins (in Generation IV). If you were to feed it [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins that were not of high enough quality, or you were unlucky enough to have reeled up a Feebas that just hates blue [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins for whatever reason, you'll end up with a not quite sufficiently beautiful ugly brown fish which will get you nowhere, and even if it might occur to you that something has gone wrong, you would have to go back and fish up another one. Now, given that you have acquired this brown fish, and GIVEN that you have managed to feed it beautifying [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins of sufficient quality, the next time you level up your ugly brown fish it should evolve into Milotic (and if you happened to level the Feebas to 100 for whatever reason...well, it sucks to be you).

to:

* Milotic in Generations III and IV. If you're exceptionally lucky on Route 119 (see above), you've found some ugly brown fish called Feebas which your Pokédex urges you to ignore and cannot do anything but Splash around. At this point if you have an ounce of GenreSavvy in you you'll one expects to go through the [[MagikarpPower painful process of equipping it with Exp. Share and leveling it up, waiting in anticipation until the moment it evolves]]. Except, it doesn't. Even if you've raised it to Lv. 100. You should then realize that making Feebas evolve is not just a matter of leveling, but also of beauty, a stat you only ever need for Pokémon Contests, and try to feed it blue [=PokéBlocks=] (in Generation III) or Poffins (in Generation IV). If you were to feed it [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins that were not of high enough quality, or you were unlucky enough to have reeled up a Feebas that just hates blue [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins for whatever reason, you'll end up with a not quite sufficiently beautiful ugly brown fish which will get you nowhere, and even if it might occur to you that something has gone wrong, you would have to go back and fish up another one. Now, given that you have acquired this brown fish, and GIVEN that you have managed to feed it beautifying [=PokéBlocks=] or Poffins of sufficient quality, the next time you level up your ugly brown fish it should evolve into Milotic (and if you happened to level the Feebas to 100 for whatever reason...well, it sucks to be you).
6th Aug '16 5:56:57 AM Saronith
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* Finding the Seven Sages in ''Black & White'', most of them are in places where you fought [[AnimalWrongsGroup Team Plasma]] in main game but two of them are in out of the way areas that have nothing to do with Team Plasma.



* Trying to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for TMs, Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own typing is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable (Weavile can learn Shadow Claw) to a bit of a stretch (Charizard can also learn Shadow Claw for some reason) to unreasonable (''Geodude'' can learn ''Flamethrower''? Emboar, a Fire/Fighting combo, can learn the '''Water'''-type move ''Scald''!!) and sometimes just impossible (Alakazam, who is tailless, can learn '''Iron Tail''', and Beheeyem can learn Steel Wing in Gen VI thanks to an oversight.). You can't know what moves someone might have without looking it up.

to:

* Trying to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for TMs, [=TMs=], Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own typing is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable (Weavile can learn Shadow Claw) to a bit of a stretch (Charizard can also learn Shadow Claw for some reason) to unreasonable (''Geodude'' can learn ''Flamethrower''? Emboar, a Fire/Fighting combo, can learn the '''Water'''-type move ''Scald''!!) and sometimes just impossible (Alakazam, who is tailless, can learn '''Iron Tail''', and Beheeyem can learn Steel Wing in Gen VI thanks to an oversight.). You can't know what moves someone might have without looking it up.



* Although a good chunk of TM are this, the worst of them all is Energy Ball in Generation VI. In ''X and Y'', it's found in Route 20. Said Route have paths that usually lead to area the players won't expect and you need Cut in order to get that TM. In ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', you require ''both'' bikes, which is already a huge Guide Dang It in itself, and it's found in the Safari Zone, also well off the beaten path. It doesn't exactly help Energy Ball is actually a very useful move, either.
* The Mirage Islands of ''Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire''. The open up once you've gotten the Eon Flute after calming Groudon or Kyogre. However, which islands you can access is random and they change daily. More of them can be accessed at a time when you streepass people, but usually you'll only have access to one of them. Many of these islands have species have rare Pokémon that cannot be obtained anywhere else in the Gen VI games (not even in the Friend Safari Zones of ''X and Y''). Many islands also have rare items, including TMs. One of the islands even has a Cresselia, but unlike other islands that have legendaries, this one also appears and disappears at random. Also in order to fully explore some of the islands, you need both bikes.

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* Getting to the Pokémon Village in ''X and Y''. You need to head west into a roughly t-shaped part of the forest, [[AlienGeometries go back the way you came which now leads somewhere completely different]], then turn around again to enter a part of the forest that looks similar (but not identical to) the first t-shaped area. Now you are free to head west to the Pokémon Village.
* Although a good chunk of TM [=TMs=] are this, the worst of them all is Energy Ball in Generation VI. In ''X and Y'', it's found in Route 20. Said Route have has paths that usually lead to area areas the players won't player wouldn't expect and you need Cut in order to get that TM. In ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', you require ''both'' bikes, which is already a huge Guide Dang It in itself, and it's found in the Safari Zone, also well off the beaten path. It doesn't exactly help Energy Ball is actually a very useful move, either.
* The Mirage Islands of ''Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire''. The open up once you've gotten the Eon Flute after calming Groudon or Kyogre. However, which islands you can access is random and they change daily. More of them can be accessed at a time when you streepass people, but usually you'll only have access to one of them. Many of these islands have species have rare Pokémon that cannot be obtained anywhere else in the Gen VI games (not even in the Friend Safari Zones of ''X and Y''). Many islands also have rare items, including TMs.[=TMs=]. One of the islands even has a Cresselia, but unlike other islands that have legendaries, this one also appears and disappears at random. Also in order to fully explore some of the islands, you need both bikes.
10th Jul '16 7:43:16 PM AmethystLeslie
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* Trying to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by levelling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for TMs, Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own typing is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable (Weavile can learn Shadow Claw) to a bit of a stretch (Charizard can also learn Shadow Claw for some reason) to unreasonable (''Geodude'' can learn ''Flamethower''? Emboar, a Fire/Fighting combo, can learn the '''Water'''-type move ''Scald''!!) and sometimes just impossible (Alakazam, who is tailless, can learn '''Iron Tail'''.). You can't know what moves someone might have without looking it up.

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* Trying to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by levelling leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for TMs, Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own typing is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable (Weavile can learn Shadow Claw) to a bit of a stretch (Charizard can also learn Shadow Claw for some reason) to unreasonable (''Geodude'' can learn ''Flamethower''? ''Flamethrower''? Emboar, a Fire/Fighting combo, can learn the '''Water'''-type move ''Scald''!!) and sometimes just impossible (Alakazam, who is tailless, can learn '''Iron Tail'''.Tail''', and Beheeyem can learn Steel Wing in Gen VI thanks to an oversight.). You can't know what moves someone might have without looking it up.up.
** In Generation VI, selecting Restore on any Pokemon in your party and switching over to the TM tab can show you what moves are compatible with your Pokemon.
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