1 Days Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

History GuideDangIt / Pokemon

12th May '16 7:02:40 AM Blackie
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* Before all of this, there was the ''original'' guide dang it of the series: physical versus special moves. You can hammer your way through the game without knowing the difference, but if you want to fight well, it's the very first thing you have to understand. But ''nowhere'' in the first ''three generations'' of Pokémon games are the nine physical and eight special types actually listed -- not even at the trainer schools! It does get listed in Earl's Academy in ''Pokémon Stadium 2'', but it's fair to assume not that many people delved too deeply into what was a pretty minor part of the game. Generation IV uncoupled physical/special from move types and added icons to each move showing which of the two it was, so it's no longer an issue.

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* Before all of this, there was the ''original'' guide dang it of the series: physical versus special moves. You can hammer your way through the game without knowing the difference, but if you want to fight well, it's the very first thing you have to understand. But ''nowhere'' in the first ''three generations'' of Pokémon games are the nine physical and eight special types actually listed -- not even at the trainer schools! It does get listed in Earl's Academy in ''Pokémon Stadium 2'', but it's fair to assume not that many people delved too deeply into what was a pretty minor part of the game.game, and the help menu in FR/LG while in battle, as described below. Generation IV uncoupled physical/special from move types and added icons to each move showing which of the two it was, so it's no longer an issue.
17th Apr '16 9:38:59 PM OmegaMetroid
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** Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire have brought back the original evolution method, but it's now much easier, since not only has the Pokeblock-making process been heavily simplified, but now your Pokemon are able to eat an unlimited number of Pokeblocks. In addition, it's easier to find Feebas in this game; they have a 5% chance of appearing when you fish in any Route 119 water tile with any rod. What's more, if you fish underneath the bridge on that route, Feebas will always appear.

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** Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire have brought back the original evolution method, but it's now much easier, since not only has the Pokeblock-making process been heavily simplified, but now your Pokemon are able to eat an unlimited number of Pokeblocks. In addition, it's easier to find Feebas in this game; they have a 5% chance of appearing when you fish in any Route 119 water tile with any rod. What's more, if you fish underneath the bridge on that route, route[[note]]or near a large rock in the water at night[[/note]], Feebas will always appear.
15th Apr '16 10:56:00 AM Dattix
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* Many abilities have extremely vague or meaningless in-battle descriptions. One particular example is Mold Breaker, who's in-battle pop-up description proclaims the Pokémon "breaks the mold!" If you've never owned a Pokémon with Mold Breaker and so have never seen the ability's actual description on that Pokémon's profile, you wouldn't know it negates abilities which affect whether or not a move would work until your Gengar is killed in one hit with Earthquake from Haxorus when its ability, Levitate, [[ScissorsCutsRock is supposed to make it immune to Ground-type moves.]] Other examples include the Pokémon "exerting its pressure" (doubles PP usages on all attacks that target it), or the Pokémon "emitting a Blaxing/Bursting aura!" (Turboblaze and Teravolt function identically to Mold Breaker)
15th Apr '16 2:56:11 AM PDL
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** It can usually be inferred that Pokémon of similar body shape can breed with each other (for example, its easy to see that Houndoom and Manectric can breed with each other since they are both based on dogs). However, the game does throw a few curve balls here and there. For example: Gardevoir looks like a woman in a dress so it should be able to breed with other Pokémon that look like people (the Human-like egg group). Right? ''Wrong''. Its actually in the Amorphous egg group. Meaning that it breeds with things such as greasy piles of sludge, ghosts and flatfish. Becomes more bizarre when Jynx and Gothitelle (the other two Humanoid Pokémon in a dress) ''are'' in the Human-like group. Archeops is said to be the ancestor of other bird Pokémon, and indeed it can breed with them... But it can also breed with things such as crabs, barnacles and jellyfish. Aggron is an 800 lb. steel-plated ''Triceratops'', so it would be logical that it could be bred with similar monstrous beasts... and also sheep, living icebergs, and frilled lizards. Eelektross is a giant ocean-dwelling lamprey, which would seemingly indicate it belongs at least one of the three vague "Water" Egg Groups. Nope, it's none of them at all, instead being in the Amorphous Egg Group along with Gardevoir. Learning from Eelektross, you'd think that Malamar, a Pokemon based on an squid that lives on land and isn't a water type itself is also in the Amorphous egg group. Nope. Turns out it ''is'' in the Water egg groups (1 and 2 specifically). The system gets very strange at times, bordering on trolling territory.

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** It can usually be inferred that Pokémon of similar body shape can breed with each other (for example, its easy to see that Houndoom and Manectric can breed with each other since they are both based on dogs). However, the game does throw a few curve balls here and there. For example: Gardevoir looks like a woman in a dress so it should be able to breed with other Pokémon that look like people (the Human-like egg group).group, which includes similar looking Pokémon like Jynx and Gothetelle). Right? ''Wrong''. Its actually in the Amorphous egg group. Meaning that it breeds with things such as greasy piles of sludge, ghosts and flatfish. Becomes more bizarre when Jynx and Gothitelle (the other two Humanoid Pokémon in a dress) ''are'' in the Human-like group. Archeops is said to be the ancestor of other bird Pokémon, and indeed it can breed with them... But it can also breed with things such as crabs, barnacles and jellyfish. Aggron is an 800 lb. steel-plated ''Triceratops'', so it would be logical that it could be bred with similar monstrous beasts... and also sheep, living icebergs, and frilled lizards. Eelektross is a giant ocean-dwelling lamprey, which would seemingly indicate it belongs at least one of the three vague "Water" Egg Groups. Nope, it's none of them at all, instead being in the Amorphous Egg Group along with Gardevoir. Learning from Eelektross, you'd think that Malamar, a Pokemon based on an squid that lives on land and isn't a water type itself is also in the Amorphous egg group. Nope. Turns out it ''is'' in the Water egg groups (1 and 2 specifically). The system gets very strange at times, bordering on trolling territory.
11th Mar '16 3:12:17 AM MayIncon
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** Rotom. Without the guide letting you know you can only catch it in the Old Chateau at night, and that you need a certain key (which can only be obtained during a limited Wi-Fi event) to unlock its various forms...you'd pretty much have no idea it even exists. Later generations made accessing Rotom's forms easier by not making it a one-time event.

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** Rotom. Without the guide letting you know you can only catch it in the Old Chateau at night, and that you need a certain key (which can only be obtained during a limited Wi-Fi event) to unlock its various forms...you'd pretty much have no idea it even exists. Later generations made accessing Rotom's forms easier by not making it a one-time event. It is even an easy-to-find NPC trade in Generation V.
11th Mar '16 3:01:36 AM MayIncon
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** It can usually be inferred that Pokémon of similar body shape can breed with each other (for example, its easy to see that Houndoom and Manectric can breed with each other since they are both based on dogs). However, the game does throw a few curve balls here and there. For example: Gardevoir looks like a woman in a dress so it should be able to breed with other Pokémon that look like people (the Human-like egg group). Right? ''Wrong''. Its actually in the Amorphous egg group. Meaning that it breeds with things such as greasy piles of sludge, ghosts and flatfish. Archeops is said to be the ancestor of other bird Pokémon, and indeed it can breed with them... But it can also breed with things such as crabs, barnacles and jellyfish. Aggron is an 800 lb. steel-plated ''Triceratops'', so it would be logical that it could be bred with similar monstrous beasts... and also sheep, living icebergs, and frilled lizards. Eelektross is a giant ocean-dwelling lamprey, which would seemingly indicate it belongs at least one of the three "Water" Egg Groups. Nope, it's none of them at all, instead being in the Amorphous Egg Group along with Gardevoir. Learning from Eelektross, you'd think that Malamar, a Pokemon based on an squid that lives on land and isn't a water type itself is also in the Amorphous egg group. Nope. Turns out it ''is'' in the Water egg groups (1 and 2 specifically). The system gets very strange at times, bordering on trolling territory.

to:

** It can usually be inferred that Pokémon of similar body shape can breed with each other (for example, its easy to see that Houndoom and Manectric can breed with each other since they are both based on dogs). However, the game does throw a few curve balls here and there. For example: Gardevoir looks like a woman in a dress so it should be able to breed with other Pokémon that look like people (the Human-like egg group). Right? ''Wrong''. Its actually in the Amorphous egg group. Meaning that it breeds with things such as greasy piles of sludge, ghosts and flatfish. Becomes more bizarre when Jynx and Gothitelle (the other two Humanoid Pokémon in a dress) ''are'' in the Human-like group. Archeops is said to be the ancestor of other bird Pokémon, and indeed it can breed with them... But it can also breed with things such as crabs, barnacles and jellyfish. Aggron is an 800 lb. steel-plated ''Triceratops'', so it would be logical that it could be bred with similar monstrous beasts... and also sheep, living icebergs, and frilled lizards. Eelektross is a giant ocean-dwelling lamprey, which would seemingly indicate it belongs at least one of the three vague "Water" Egg Groups. Nope, it's none of them at all, instead being in the Amorphous Egg Group along with Gardevoir. Learning from Eelektross, you'd think that Malamar, a Pokemon based on an squid that lives on land and isn't a water type itself is also in the Amorphous egg group. Nope. Turns out it ''is'' in the Water egg groups (1 and 2 specifically). The system gets very strange at times, bordering on trolling territory.
17th Feb '16 12:16:15 AM gyorokpeter2
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* A more mild example. While one can muddle through by trial and error, Berry growth in Generation IV has driven some tropers to create cheat sheets of Berry growth. As silly as a full-blown spreadsheet sounds, the developers got rather enthusiastic with their Berry system. Each Berry plant has a total growth time between 8 and 96 hours and a moisture rate (between 4 and 35) that is deducted from the soil moisture count each hour. This count is set to 100 at planting and reset to 100 whenever the plant is watered; the final yield of the plant decreases by one berry for every hour the plant spends at zero moisture. Thus, each plant has to be watered with a certain easily calculated frequency to ensure maximum yield. To keep things from being too simple, the dev team added Mulches to either reduce the water requirement while increasing growth time, or decrease growth time in exchange for more frequent watering. With this twist, Berry plants now have three different growth times, and three different minimum watering frequencies; the guide dang it kicks in when you realize that the moisture consumption rates aren't even listed on the more popular Pokémon wikis, and are instead found exclusively in obscure internet forums.

to:

* A more mild example. While one can muddle through by trial and error, Berry growth in Generation IV has driven some tropers to create cheat sheets of Berry growth. As silly as a full-blown spreadsheet sounds, the developers got rather enthusiastic with their Berry system. Each Berry plant has a total growth time between 8 and 96 hours and a moisture rate (between 4 and 35) that is deducted from the soil moisture count each hour. This count is set to 100 at planting and reset to 100 whenever the plant is watered; the final yield of the plant decreases by one berry for every hour the plant spends at zero moisture. Thus, each plant has to be watered with a certain easily calculated frequency to ensure maximum yield. To keep things from being too simple, the dev team added Mulches to either reduce the water requirement while increasing growth time, or decrease growth time in exchange for more frequent watering. With this twist, Berry plants now have three different growth times, and three different minimum watering frequencies; the guide dang it kicks in when you realize that the moisture consumption rates aren't even listed on the more popular Pokémon wikis, and are instead found exclusively in obscure internet forums.frequencies.
3rd Feb '16 2:34:02 PM CommanderPeepidot
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** There's also the fact that Sliggoo can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, but that still isn't helpful, given that the rain created with this move won't appear in the overworked after the battle is over. There's also the fact that, unlike one might think, ''multiple'' Pokémon can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, including Blastoise, Lugia, and ''Raikou.''

to:

** There's also the fact that Sliggoo can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, but that still isn't helpful, given that the rain created with this move won't appear in the overworked after the battle is over. overworld. There's also the fact that, unlike despite what one might think, ''multiple'' Pokémon can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, including Blastoise, Lugia, and ''Raikou.''
26th Jan '16 1:00:16 PM CommanderPeepidot
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** There's also the fact that Sliggoo can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, but that still isn't helpful, given that the rain created with this move won't appear in the overworked after the battle is over. There's also the fact that, unlike one might think, ''multiple'' Pokémon can learn Rain Dance by leveling up, including Blastoise, Lugia, and ''Raikou.''
25th Jan '16 8:21:36 AM PDL
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** It can usually be inferred that Pokémon of similar body shape can breed with each other (for example, its easy to see that Houndoom and Manectric can breed with each other since they are both based on dogs). However, the game does throw a few curve balls here and there. For example: Gardevoir looks like a woman in a dress so it should be able to breed with other Pokémon that look like people (the Human-like egg group). Right? ''Wrong''. Its actually in the Amorphous egg group. Meaning that it breeds with things such as greasy piles of sludge, ghosts and flatfish. Archeops is said to be the ancestor of other bird Pokémon, and indeed it can breed with them... But it can also breed with things such as crabs, barnacles and jellyfish. Aggron is an 800 lb. steel-plated ''Triceratops'', so it would be logical that it could be bred with similar monstrous beasts... and also sheep, living icebergs, and frilled lizards. Eelektross is a giant ocean-dwelling lamprey, which would seemingly indicate it belongs to the three "Water" Egg Groups. Nope, it's none of them at all, instead being in the Amorphous Egg Group along with Gardevoir. The system gets very strange at times, bordering on trolling territory.

to:

** It can usually be inferred that Pokémon of similar body shape can breed with each other (for example, its easy to see that Houndoom and Manectric can breed with each other since they are both based on dogs). However, the game does throw a few curve balls here and there. For example: Gardevoir looks like a woman in a dress so it should be able to breed with other Pokémon that look like people (the Human-like egg group). Right? ''Wrong''. Its actually in the Amorphous egg group. Meaning that it breeds with things such as greasy piles of sludge, ghosts and flatfish. Archeops is said to be the ancestor of other bird Pokémon, and indeed it can breed with them... But it can also breed with things such as crabs, barnacles and jellyfish. Aggron is an 800 lb. steel-plated ''Triceratops'', so it would be logical that it could be bred with similar monstrous beasts... and also sheep, living icebergs, and frilled lizards. Eelektross is a giant ocean-dwelling lamprey, which would seemingly indicate it belongs to at least one of the three "Water" Egg Groups. Nope, it's none of them at all, instead being in the Amorphous Egg Group along with Gardevoir. Learning from Eelektross, you'd think that Malamar, a Pokemon based on an squid that lives on land and isn't a water type itself is also in the Amorphous egg group. Nope. Turns out it ''is'' in the Water egg groups (1 and 2 specifically). The system gets very strange at times, bordering on trolling territory.
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