History GuideDangIt / Pokemon

17th Apr '18 7:45:53 AM OrangenChan
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* Mew. This is an unique example, as ''only one person on the development team was even aware the monster was put into the game at all'' until weeks after the game hit stores. Also, it was rumors of its existence, plus the GoodBadBugs (which bordered on UrbanLegendOfZelda in terms of execution) that allowed players to get Mew, that actually helped the first Pokémon games quickly go from a poorly-selling JRPG to one of the biggest pop culture phenomenons of the late 1990s. (The only legitimate way to get Mew was through [[NoExportForYou Japan-exclusive events]], but Mewtwo, a normal legendary made available after beating the main storyline, implied there had to be a "mew one.") Of course, it also paved the way for the rest of these Guide Dang Its...

to:

* Mew. This is an a unique example, as ''only one person on the development team was even aware the monster was put into the game at all'' until weeks after the game hit stores. Also, it was rumors of its existence, plus the GoodBadBugs (which bordered on UrbanLegendOfZelda in terms of execution) that allowed players to get Mew, that actually helped the first Pokémon games quickly go from a poorly-selling JRPG to one of the biggest pop culture phenomenons of the late 1990s. (The only legitimate way to get Mew was through [[NoExportForYou Japan-exclusive events]], but Mewtwo, a normal legendary made available after beating the main storyline, implied there had to be a "mew one.") Of course, it also paved the way for the rest of these Guide Dang Its...



* After acquiring the Poké Radar in Generations IV and VI, you can find coveted [[PaletteSwap shiny Pokémon]] by using the latter. The actual method, called "chaining", would take at least ten pages or so to explain, so here's the simple version: if you KO or catch a Pokémon in a Radar encounter, the Radar will continue to trigger Pokémon; by traveling to the correct patch of shaking grass [[note]]identifying this is what takes ten pages[[/note]] without any extra encounters, you can find that species again, and the Radar will continue to trigger encounters with the same species of Pokémon this way (making this also an useful trick for Effort Value training, which requires headhunting certain species of Pokémon). None of this is mentioned beyond "sometimes if you use the Poke Radar, differently-colored Pokémon appear". Even then you can still be screwed by the RNG.

to:

* After acquiring the Poké Radar in Generations IV and VI, you can find coveted [[PaletteSwap shiny Pokémon]] by using the latter. The actual method, called "chaining", would take at least ten pages or so to explain, so here's the simple version: if you KO or catch a Pokémon in a Radar encounter, the Radar will continue to trigger Pokémon; by traveling to the correct patch of shaking grass [[note]]identifying this is what takes ten pages[[/note]] without any extra encounters, you can find that species again, and the Radar will continue to trigger encounters with the same species of Pokémon this way (making this also an a useful trick for Effort Value training, which requires headhunting certain species of Pokémon). None of this is mentioned beyond "sometimes if you use the Poke Radar, differently-colored Pokémon appear". Even then you can still be screwed by the RNG.



** And while it might occur to some people that if a move can be bred into one species, it could then be bred into another, the extent of chain breeding moves might not be so apparent. Some Pokemon can only learn certain moves if you go through multiple steps to get it. For example, say you're battling a friend who uses a Mamoswine (Ground/Ice), and you try to take advantage of its Water weakness, only to have your Water type one-shotted by a move you didn't know existed: Freeze-Dry (an Ice-type move that has the special bonus of being super-effective against water). You might wonder when Mamoswine learns such a counter-intuitive move. Well it had to be bred from a Delibird. How did Delibird learn it? It was bred from a Lapras. Which in turn was bred from Aurorus, the ONLY Pokémon in an useful Egg Group that can learn the move naturally. This specific chain is one of the only ways the move gets passed on (the other is breeding Swinub with Smeargle, if you can get Smeargle to [[PowerCopying Sketch]] the move). An extreme example of chain-breeding, but sometimes the move you want takes more work than you'd think to put in, or wouldn't know could even be learned by your mon, so good luck without a guide. Even worse is chain-breeding Wide Guard onto Honedge, who used to require at least ''five different Pokémon, two of which are starters'', and Smeargle can't help here. [[note]]Mantine, Tirtouga, Carracosta, or Alomomola to Mudkip to Turtwig to Paras to Dwebble to Honedge[[/note]]. Thankfully this was changed when Probopass (who can breed with Honedge directly) was given Wide Guard as a level up move.

to:

** And while it might occur to some people that if a move can be bred into one species, it could then be bred into another, the extent of chain breeding moves might not be so apparent. Some Pokemon can only learn certain moves if you go through multiple steps to get it. For example, say you're battling a friend who uses a Mamoswine (Ground/Ice), and you try to take advantage of its Water weakness, only to have your Water type one-shotted by a move you didn't know existed: Freeze-Dry (an Ice-type move that has the special bonus of being super-effective against water). You might wonder when Mamoswine learns such a counter-intuitive move. Well it had to be bred from a Delibird. How did Delibird learn it? It was bred from a Lapras. Which in turn was bred from Aurorus, the ONLY Pokémon in an a useful Egg Group that can learn the move naturally. This specific chain is one of the only ways the move gets passed on (the other is breeding Swinub with Smeargle, if you can get Smeargle to [[PowerCopying Sketch]] the move). An extreme example of chain-breeding, but sometimes the move you want takes more work than you'd think to put in, or wouldn't know could even be learned by your mon, so good luck without a guide. Even worse is chain-breeding Wide Guard onto Honedge, who used to require at least ''five different Pokémon, two of which are starters'', and Smeargle can't help here. [[note]]Mantine, Tirtouga, Carracosta, or Alomomola to Mudkip to Turtwig to Paras to Dwebble to Honedge[[/note]]. Thankfully this was changed when Probopass (who can breed with Honedge directly) was given Wide Guard as a level up move.



* Speaking of the Itemfinder, in its original incarnation in Generations I and II, it only indicated the presence of a hidden item, but did not drop hints as to where it was. Happy easter egg hunt! Thankfully later incarnations of the Item Finder/Dowser make it more user-friendly by letting it indicate which direction the hidden item was. Even so, there is still yet ''another'' undocumented Item Finder behaviour in [=FireRed=] and [=LeafGreen=] - At certain special locations (Where Mr Fuji, the two Snorlax, Giovanni (in Viridian Gym) used to stand before leaving their location, as well as tiny patch of land by the Cape Brink's pond [[spoiler:and Navel Rock]]), standing exactly where these folks used to be and using the Itemfinder will produce an unique reaction that reveals a special item ([[spoiler:Mr Fuji's spot in Lavender Tower has a Soothe Bell, there are Leftovers where the two Snorlax used to be, Giovanni was standing over a Macho Brace the whole time, that tiny patch of land by the pond has PP Max, and if you had access to it, you could find Sacred Ash on Navel Rock, in addition to the one Ho-Oh holds in Emerald.]]).

to:

* Speaking of the Itemfinder, in its original incarnation in Generations I and II, it only indicated the presence of a hidden item, but did not drop hints as to where it was. Happy easter egg hunt! Thankfully later incarnations of the Item Finder/Dowser make it more user-friendly by letting it indicate which direction the hidden item was. Even so, there is still yet ''another'' undocumented Item Finder behaviour in [=FireRed=] and [=LeafGreen=] - At certain special locations (Where Mr Fuji, the two Snorlax, Giovanni (in Viridian Gym) used to stand before leaving their location, as well as tiny patch of land by the Cape Brink's pond [[spoiler:and Navel Rock]]), standing exactly where these folks used to be and using the Itemfinder will produce an a unique reaction that reveals a special item ([[spoiler:Mr Fuji's spot in Lavender Tower has a Soothe Bell, there are Leftovers where the two Snorlax used to be, Giovanni was standing over a Macho Brace the whole time, that tiny patch of land by the pond has PP Max, and if you had access to it, you could find Sacred Ash on Navel Rock, in addition to the one Ho-Oh holds in Emerald.]]).
3rd Apr '18 12:35:38 PM PDL
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* Shedinja. Shedinja cannot be found in the wild and despite appearing in the Pokédex after Nincada and Ninjask and obviously being from the same evolution line, doesn't evolve from anything. To get it, the player must raise a Nincada to Level 20 and let it evolve with at least one empty slot in their party and (in Generation IV and later) at least one standard red-and-white Poké Ball with them. Having the Poké Ball is pretty likely already, but most players go around with a full party for the entire game as soon as they are able to do so. Shedinja is also used only by ''four'' Trainers in the '''entire series''': Greta while battling her for Silver Symbol, Bugsy in his rematch team, Inver as one of his possible Pokémon in the Inverse Battle, and an Ace Trainer in Mauville's food court.

to:

* Shedinja. Shedinja cannot be found in the wild and despite appearing in the Pokédex after Nincada and Ninjask and obviously being from the same evolution line, doesn't evolve from anything. To get it, the player must raise a Nincada to Level 20 and let it evolve with at least one empty slot in their party and (in Generation IV and later) at least one standard red-and-white Poké Ball with them. Having the Poké Ball is pretty likely already, but most players go around with a full party for the entire game as soon as they are able to do so. Shedinja is also used only by ''four'' Trainers in the '''entire series''': series'''[[note]]The main reason for this is to prevent an unwinnable situation where the player is caught without a way to get past Shedinja's Wonder Guard.[[/note]]: Greta while battling her for Silver Symbol, Bugsy in his rematch team, Inver as one of his possible Pokémon in the Inverse Battle, and an Ace Trainer in Mauville's food court.
20th Mar '18 5:39:26 PM GuiRitter
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* Mew. This is a unique example, as ''only one person on the development team was even aware the monster was put into the game at all'' until weeks after the game hit stores. Also, it was rumors of its existence, plus the GoodBadBugs (which bordered on UrbanLegendOfZelda in terms of execution) that allowed players to get Mew, that actually helped the first Pokémon games quickly go from a poorly-selling JRPG to one of the biggest pop culture phenomenons of the late 1990s. (The only legitimate way to get Mew was through [[NoExportForYou Japan-exclusive events]], but Mewtwo, a normal legendary made available after beating the main storyline, implied there had to be a "mew one.") Of course, it also paved the way for the rest of these Guide Dang Its...

to:

* Mew. This is a an unique example, as ''only one person on the development team was even aware the monster was put into the game at all'' until weeks after the game hit stores. Also, it was rumors of its existence, plus the GoodBadBugs (which bordered on UrbanLegendOfZelda in terms of execution) that allowed players to get Mew, that actually helped the first Pokémon games quickly go from a poorly-selling JRPG to one of the biggest pop culture phenomenons of the late 1990s. (The only legitimate way to get Mew was through [[NoExportForYou Japan-exclusive events]], but Mewtwo, a normal legendary made available after beating the main storyline, implied there had to be a "mew one.") Of course, it also paved the way for the rest of these Guide Dang Its...



* After acquiring the Poké Radar in Generations IV and VI, you can find coveted [[PaletteSwap shiny Pokémon]] by using the latter. The actual method, called "chaining", would take at least ten pages or so to explain, so here's the simple version: if you KO or catch a Pokémon in a Radar encounter, the Radar will continue to trigger Pokémon; by traveling to the correct patch of shaking grass [[note]]identifying this is what takes ten pages[[/note]] without any extra encounters, you can find that species again, and the Radar will continue to trigger encounters with the same species of Pokémon this way (making this also a useful trick for Effort Value training, which requires headhunting certain species of Pokémon). None of this is mentioned beyond "sometimes if you use the Poke Radar, differently-colored Pokémon appear". Even then you can still be screwed by the RNG.

to:

* After acquiring the Poké Radar in Generations IV and VI, you can find coveted [[PaletteSwap shiny Pokémon]] by using the latter. The actual method, called "chaining", would take at least ten pages or so to explain, so here's the simple version: if you KO or catch a Pokémon in a Radar encounter, the Radar will continue to trigger Pokémon; by traveling to the correct patch of shaking grass [[note]]identifying this is what takes ten pages[[/note]] without any extra encounters, you can find that species again, and the Radar will continue to trigger encounters with the same species of Pokémon this way (making this also a an useful trick for Effort Value training, which requires headhunting certain species of Pokémon). None of this is mentioned beyond "sometimes if you use the Poke Radar, differently-colored Pokémon appear". Even then you can still be screwed by the RNG.



** And while it might occur to some people that if a move can be bred into one species, it could then be bred into another, the extent of chain breeding moves might not be so apparent. Some Pokemon can only learn certain moves if you go through multiple steps to get it. For example, say you're battling a friend who uses a Mamoswine (Ground/Ice), and you try to take advantage of its Water weakness, only to have your Water type one-shotted by a move you didn't know existed: Freeze-Dry (an Ice-type move that has the special bonus of being super-effective against water). You might wonder when Mamoswine learns such a counter-intuitive move. Well it had to be bred from a Delibird. How did Delibird learn it? It was bred from a Lapras. Which in turn was bred from Aurorus, the ONLY Pokémon in a useful Egg Group that can learn the move naturally. This specific chain is one of the only ways the move gets passed on (the other is breeding Swinub with Smeargle, if you can get Smeargle to [[PowerCopying Sketch]] the move). An extreme example of chain-breeding, but sometimes the move you want takes more work than you'd think to put in, or wouldn't know could even be learned by your mon, so good luck without a guide. Even worse is chain-breeding Wide Guard onto Honedge, who used to require at least ''five different Pokémon, two of which are starters'', and Smeargle can't help here. [[note]]Mantine, Tirtouga, Carracosta, or Alomomola to Mudkip to Turtwig to Paras to Dwebble to Honedge[[/note]]. Thankfully this was changed when Probopass (who can breed with Honedge directly) was given Wide Guard as a level up move.

to:

** And while it might occur to some people that if a move can be bred into one species, it could then be bred into another, the extent of chain breeding moves might not be so apparent. Some Pokemon can only learn certain moves if you go through multiple steps to get it. For example, say you're battling a friend who uses a Mamoswine (Ground/Ice), and you try to take advantage of its Water weakness, only to have your Water type one-shotted by a move you didn't know existed: Freeze-Dry (an Ice-type move that has the special bonus of being super-effective against water). You might wonder when Mamoswine learns such a counter-intuitive move. Well it had to be bred from a Delibird. How did Delibird learn it? It was bred from a Lapras. Which in turn was bred from Aurorus, the ONLY Pokémon in a an useful Egg Group that can learn the move naturally. This specific chain is one of the only ways the move gets passed on (the other is breeding Swinub with Smeargle, if you can get Smeargle to [[PowerCopying Sketch]] the move). An extreme example of chain-breeding, but sometimes the move you want takes more work than you'd think to put in, or wouldn't know could even be learned by your mon, so good luck without a guide. Even worse is chain-breeding Wide Guard onto Honedge, who used to require at least ''five different Pokémon, two of which are starters'', and Smeargle can't help here. [[note]]Mantine, Tirtouga, Carracosta, or Alomomola to Mudkip to Turtwig to Paras to Dwebble to Honedge[[/note]]. Thankfully this was changed when Probopass (who can breed with Honedge directly) was given Wide Guard as a level up move.



* Speaking of the Itemfinder, in its original incarnation in Generations I and II, it only indicated the presence of a hidden item, but did not drop hints as to where it was. Happy easter egg hunt! Thankfully later incarnations of the Item Finder/Dowser make it more user-friendly by letting it indicate which direction the hidden item was. Even so, there is still yet ''another'' undocumented Item Finder behaviour in [=FireRed=] and [=LeafGreen=] - At certain special locations (Where Mr Fuji, the two Snorlax, Giovanni (in Viridian Gym) used to stand before leaving their location, as well as tiny patch of land by the Cape Brink's pond [[spoiler:and Navel Rock]]), standing exactly where these folks used to be and using the Itemfinder will produce a unique reaction that reveals a special item ([[spoiler:Mr Fuji's spot in Lavender Tower has a Soothe Bell, there are Leftovers where the two Snorlax used to be, Giovanni was standing over a Macho Brace the whole time, that tiny patch of land by the pond has PP Max, and if you had access to it, you could find Sacred Ash on Navel Rock, in addition to the one Ho-Oh holds in Emerald.]]).

to:

* Speaking of the Itemfinder, in its original incarnation in Generations I and II, it only indicated the presence of a hidden item, but did not drop hints as to where it was. Happy easter egg hunt! Thankfully later incarnations of the Item Finder/Dowser make it more user-friendly by letting it indicate which direction the hidden item was. Even so, there is still yet ''another'' undocumented Item Finder behaviour in [=FireRed=] and [=LeafGreen=] - At certain special locations (Where Mr Fuji, the two Snorlax, Giovanni (in Viridian Gym) used to stand before leaving their location, as well as tiny patch of land by the Cape Brink's pond [[spoiler:and Navel Rock]]), standing exactly where these folks used to be and using the Itemfinder will produce a an unique reaction that reveals a special item ([[spoiler:Mr Fuji's spot in Lavender Tower has a Soothe Bell, there are Leftovers where the two Snorlax used to be, Giovanni was standing over a Macho Brace the whole time, that tiny patch of land by the pond has PP Max, and if you had access to it, you could find Sacred Ash on Navel Rock, in addition to the one Ho-Oh holds in Emerald.]]).
15th Mar '18 1:35:09 AM Gravityman
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** Similarly, Crabrawler can only evolve into Crabominable by leveling it up at Mount Lanakila... which is the final area of the story. Putting aside that Crabrawler simply isn't really equipped to go through the entire game unevolved, the player never sees a Crabominable until the very end of the game [[spoiler: where it's used by one of the Elite Four members]], so unless they knew about it beforehand they likely would have no reason to guess Crabrawler's evolved form would be part Ice-type at all, much less that it would require such an extra step in evolving it.



** Although it's not available in the main game in either ''Sun and Moon'' or the ''Ultra'' versions, evolving Gligar into Gliscor is almost as much of a pain as Sneasel. Much like Sneasel, it can only evolve by leveling up at night while holding a Razor Fang, which in both releases can only be found 5% of the time on wild Bruxish. While Bruxish is more common overall than Jangmo-o, it can only be found by fishing in certain areas and if you either find something that isn't a Bruxish or find a Bruxish that isn't holding the item, you have to leave the area and come back for a reasonable chance of finding another Bruxish.



* Trying to figure out which Pokémon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules at all as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for [=TMs=], Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own type is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable to just impossible. Generation VI does make it easier by selecting Item on any Pokemon in the party, and switching over to the TM tab can show which TM moves are incompatible with that Pokemon.

to:

* Trying to figure out which Pokémon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules at all as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all.learn. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for [=TMs=], Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own type is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable to just impossible. Generation VI does make it easier by selecting Item on any Pokemon in the party, and switching over to the TM tab can show which TM moves are incompatible with that Pokemon.



* Trying to figure out which Pokemon learn which moves can be frustrating because sometimes there seem to be no rules as to what moves a Pokemon can learn at all. Moves learned by leveling up are fairly predictable and tend to be within the Pokemon's own type. As for [=TMs=], Pokemon understandably can learn almost any TM move that is the same elemental type as they are. TM moves outside of a Pokemon's own typing is where it really gets confusing. They can be anywhere from reasonable to unreasonable and sometimes just impossible. Generation VI makes stuff easier by selecting either "Restore" or "Use Item" on a Pokemon and switch to the TM tabs, all the incompatible TM moves for that Pokemon will be grayed out.
27th Feb '18 4:17:25 PM Kotomikun
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* Mew. This is a unique example, as ''only one person on the development team was even aware the monster was put into the game at all'' until weeks after the game hit stores. Also, it was rumors of its existence, plus the GoodBadBugs (which bordered on UrbanLegendOfZelda in terms of execution) that allowed players to get Mew, that actually helped the first Pokémon games quickly go from a poorly-selling JRPG to one of the biggest pop culture phenomenons of the late 1990s. Of course, it also paved the way for the rest of these Guide Dang Its...

to:

* Mew. This is a unique example, as ''only one person on the development team was even aware the monster was put into the game at all'' until weeks after the game hit stores. Also, it was rumors of its existence, plus the GoodBadBugs (which bordered on UrbanLegendOfZelda in terms of execution) that allowed players to get Mew, that actually helped the first Pokémon games quickly go from a poorly-selling JRPG to one of the biggest pop culture phenomenons of the late 1990s. (The only legitimate way to get Mew was through [[NoExportForYou Japan-exclusive events]], but Mewtwo, a normal legendary made available after beating the main storyline, implied there had to be a "mew one.") Of course, it also paved the way for the rest of these Guide Dang Its...
27th Feb '18 3:42:43 PM Kotomikun
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* Feebas only appears in 6 unmarked water tiles (out of 436 total) on Route 119. They're randomized for every player, so you can't just look up their locations. Nothing in the game hints at this--all other Pokémon appear in any tile on the route specified in the Pokédex. Inexplicably, the tiles re-randomize whenever you give a new catchphrase to a man in Dewford Town, a location NOWHERE NEAR the route Feebas appears on; knowing this is of little use, however, since setting a specific catchphrase will not put the tiles in specific locations. Feebas doesn't even have a 100% chance of showing up if you're fishing in one of the correct tiles, so there's a good chance of missing it unless you fish in each tile two or three times.

to:

* Feebas only appears in 6 unmarked water tiles (out of 436 total) on Route 119. They're randomized for every player, so you can't just look up their locations.locations; and you have to ''fish'' in the tile, not surf over it, so wandering aimlessly won't help, you have to meticulously fish in ''every single square''. Nothing in the game hints at this--all other Pokémon appear in any tile on the route specified in the Pokédex. Inexplicably, the tiles re-randomize whenever you give a new catchphrase to a man in Dewford Town, a location NOWHERE NEAR the route Feebas appears on; knowing this is of little use, however, since setting a specific catchphrase will not put the tiles in specific locations. Feebas doesn't even have a 100% chance of showing up Even if you're fishing in on one of the correct special tiles, you only have a 50% chance of reeling in a Feebas, so there's a good chance of missing it unless you fish in each tile two or three times.
27th Feb '18 3:34:51 PM Kotomikun
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* Finding Feebas was difficult in Generation III, if only because the tiles Feebas appeared on were, for some inexplicable reason, tied to what phrase you tell a man in Dewford Town, a location NOWHERE NEAR the route Feebas appears on, and changing the phrase re-randomizes the tiles Feebas is on. There's no given reason for ''why'' Feebas was tied to this catchphrase, and nothing in game to even tell you that Feebas is connected to it at all to begin with. If you want a Milotic, do not listen to the man in Dewford. And even then, it's a handful of random water tiles in what otherwise seems to be a completely normal river, and Feebas doesn't have a 100% chance of showing up in them. Even if someone did tell you there was a unique Water-type on that route, you'd never find it, unless you went out of your way to fish repeatedly in every tile (and in every other water route, one tile is as good as any other).

to:

* Finding Feebas was difficult in Generation III, if only because appears in 6 unmarked water tiles (out of 436 total) on Route 119. They're randomized for every player, so you can't just look up their locations. Nothing in the game hints at this--all other Pokémon appear in any tile on the route specified in the Pokédex. Inexplicably, the tiles Feebas appeared on were, for some inexplicable reason, tied to what phrase re-randomize whenever you tell give a new catchphrase to a man in Dewford Town, a location NOWHERE NEAR the route Feebas appears on, and changing the phrase re-randomizes on; knowing this is of little use, however, since setting a specific catchphrase will not put the tiles Feebas is on. There's no given reason for ''why'' Feebas was tied to this catchphrase, and nothing in game to even tell you that Feebas is connected to it at all to begin with. If you want a Milotic, do not listen to the man in Dewford. And even then, it's a handful of random water tiles in what otherwise seems to be a completely normal river, and specific locations. Feebas doesn't even have a 100% chance of showing up if you're fishing in them. Even if someone did tell you there was one of the correct tiles, so there's a unique Water-type on that route, you'd never find it, good chance of missing it unless you went out of your way to fish repeatedly in every each tile (and in every other water route, one tile is as good as any other).two or three times.
12th Feb '18 5:19:57 AM Retloclive
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* Obtaining Porygon may look simple at first glance since you just need to speak to an NPC within Route 15's Aether House, and they provide ya the Pokémon. Unfortunately, it's only possible to initiate the NPC conversation of obtaining Porygon ''after'' the player has become the Alola Champion. As a result, this can be easily forgotten about after the player finishes the game.

to:

* Obtaining Porygon may look simple at first glance since you just need to speak to an NPC within Route 15's Aether House, and they provide ya the Pokémon. Unfortunately, it's only possible to initiate the NPC conversation of obtaining Porygon ''after'' the player has become the Alola Champion. As a result, this can be easily forgotten about after the player finishes the game. ''Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon'' makes you wait even further by having to complete the "Episode RR" post-game content first.



* Evolving Poipole in ''Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon'' requires the Pokémon to level-up ''while'' knowing Dragon Pulse, which is a move that Poipole doesn't have when you first receive one at level-40. Unfortunately, Dragon Pulse is a level-1 starter move that has to be relearned from the Move Reminder, who you can't meet until reaching the final Pokémon Center on Mount Lanakila. The game never hints at you requiring Dragon Pulse to evolve, so it's very easily to end up skipping over this, and level-up Poipole to a high level until ''finally'' catching on that some other component is required for Poipole's evolution.

to:

* Evolving Poipole in ''Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon'' requires the Pokémon to level-up ''while'' knowing Dragon Pulse, which is a move that Poipole doesn't have when you first receive one at level-40. Unfortunately, Dragon Pulse is a level-1 starter move that has to be relearned from the Move Reminder, who you can't meet until reaching the final Pokémon Center on Mount Lanakila. The game never hints at you requiring Dragon Pulse to evolve, so it's very easily easy to end up skipping over this, and level-up Poipole to a high level until ''finally'' catching on that some other component is required for Poipole's evolution.
10th Feb '18 12:03:46 PM SkeeterMania
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* So it looks like there's a hole in your Hoenn Dex at No. 151. Turns out it is Chimecho. It can only be encountered in one place, the top of Mt. Pyre, which the player will probably only visit when they need to progress the story. And even when the player is in the area, the grass is out of the way. And even if the player goes to the grass, the chance of encountering a Chimecho is only 1%. So you've got a very rare non-legendary who no one in the game uses or seems to know about hiding in a very out-of-the-way area with no hints that it's there. And it's only good for completion purposes, as its stats are horrendous.

to:

* So it looks like there's a hole in your Hoenn Dex at No. 151. Turns out it is Chimecho. It can only be encountered in one place, the top of Mt. Pyre, which the player will probably only visit when they need to progress the story. And even when the player is in the area, the grass is out of the way. And even if the player goes to the grass, the chance of encountering a Chimecho is only 1%.2%. So you've got a very rare non-legendary who no one in the game uses or seems to know about hiding in a very out-of-the-way area with no hints that it's there. And it's only good for completion purposes, as its stats are horrendous.
9th Feb '18 10:30:24 AM AceOfScarabs
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** From Generation VI onward, Destiny Knot has an additional effect when a Pokemon holds it and is put in a Day Care, five of the parents Individual Values will be passed down to its child.

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** From Generation VI onward, Destiny Knot has an additional effect when a Pokemon holds it and is put in a Day Care, five of the parents Individual Values will be passed down to its child. In addition, the Power Bracer, Weight, Lens, Anklet, Band, and Belt will guarantee that their specific IV will be inherited by the child if a parent holds it.
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