History GuideDangIt / EasternRPG

21st May '17 6:15:59 PM Adbot
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* Many a gamer had their journey come to an end shortly after getting the boat in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII''. Finding almost a dozen plot-essential items scattered across a humongous world is almost impossible without some sort of help (on top of that, some of the most evil dungeon designs in video game history - namely, the Sea Cave, which requires you to walk through damaging lava in order to look for staircases that may or may not lead you to the item you're looking for, and the Road to Rhone, which has several pitfalls that send you to a lower level and repeating rooms that look exactly the same, some of which indistinguishably loop around). While the [=NPC=]s generally do give useful advice, they don't point out everything. On top of that, the NPC that tells you where to find the Watergate Key is locked inside a jail cell; to open the cell, you need the Jailer's Key, which you need the Golden Key to acquire!

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* Many a gamer had their journey come to an end shortly after getting the boat in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII''. Finding almost a dozen plot-essential items scattered across a humongous world is almost impossible without some sort of help (on top of that, some of the most evil dungeon designs in video game history - namely, the Sea Cave, which requires you to walk through damaging lava in order to look for staircases that may or may not lead you to the item you're looking for, and the Road to Rhone, which has several pitfalls that send you to a lower level and repeating rooms that look exactly the same, some of which indistinguishably loop around). While the [=NPC=]s generally do give useful advice, they don't point out everything. On top of that, the NPC that tells you where to find the Watergate Key is locked inside a jail cell; to open the cell, you need the Jailer's Key, which you need the Golden GoldeWn Key to acquire!


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** The EX File keys in ''VideoGame/WildArms3''. Some are easy to find, but others are a real pain, including one that involves fighting a BonusBoss at the end of a gruellingly long BonusLevel, one that requires the player to [[LastLousyPoint find and open every chest in the game]] and one that is found [[HiddenInPlainSight on the world screen]] in an area that is a pain to reach, and stops being relevant to the game around half-way through.
13th May '17 9:05:54 AM mario0987
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** ''Color Splash'' might have avoided most of this thanks to the above mentioned Toad but he is not perfect. He will only tell you if multiple Things are required to complete a level if they are all used for the same puzzle. So he will tell you the Disco Ball and the Ice Pick Things to defeat Lemmy but he will not tell you a Cork is needed to defeat Larry unless the Megaphone has already been used to wake up the Thwomp earlier in the level. Thankfully, this only happens twice in the entire game.

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** ''Color Splash'' might have avoided most of this thanks to the above mentioned Toad but he is not perfect. He will only tell you if multiple Things are required to complete a level if they are all used for the same puzzle. So he will tell you the Disco Ball and the Ice Pick Things are needed to defeat Lemmy but he will not tell you a Cork is needed to defeat Larry unless the Megaphone has already been used to wake up the Thwomp earlier in the level. Thankfully, this only happens twice in the entire game.
13th May '17 8:58:11 AM mario0987
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** ''Color Splash'' might have avoided most of this thanks to the above mentioned Toad but he is not perfect. He will only tell you if multiple Things are required to complete a level if they are all used for the same puzzle. So he will tell you the Disco Ball and the Ice Pick Things to defeat Lemmy but he will not tell you a Cork is needed to defeat Larry unless the Megaphone has already been used to wake up the Thwomp earlier in the level. Thankfully, this only happens twice in the entire game.
11th May '17 11:32:48 PM infernape612
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*** The worst part of this is that you actually [[spoiler:have to give the most vague, indecisive wuss-ass answers, instead of telling them no. There's a no option, but if you push that, bad end. You have to sit there stalling for time, with choices like "uh..." "Something's up..." "We don't know everything."]] Even Yosuke gets pissed and calls you out for it. Even then, [[spoiler:You have to take the vague route, instead of the simple yes or no]].

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*** The worst part of this is that you actually [[spoiler:have to give the most vague, indecisive wuss-ass answers, instead of telling them no. There's a no option, but if you push that, bad end. You have to sit there stalling for time, with choices like "uh..." "Something's up..." "We don't know everything."]] Even Yosuke gets pissed and calls you out for it. Even then, [[spoiler:You [[spoiler:you have to take the vague route, instead of the simple yes or no]].



* The first ''VideoGame/{{Persona}}'' game had one (if not a couple) of these, too. on top of the whole contacting thing. Good luck doing all ''that'' without a guide, but at least you can probably experiment. However, the ''next'' example is just a ''very'' blatant example of GuideDangIt at its worst. In this game, you had a set party of 4 characters, and could take a different 5th member. You could only have one, however. There were three other characters to choose from (normally, but see later) , but the game didn't tell you to get the others you had to refuse the character before them; you couldn't take them, meet the other character, and then DITCH them to take the other one. This was only the start, however, and was actually minor and eventually understandable by a prudent gamer, unlike the next instance. There was yet another character who redefines 'hidden.' You see this character at a few points in the story, and there's even a point (if you have five characters by a certain point), where he helps you in a battle, and the game drops a SMALL hint that 'maybe this guy is playable.' However, the hints VERY MUCH stop there. To get this character, one had to first do several steps, involving some that were pretty out there in even GUESSING what they were(go here, do this, meet with character once, go back here, meet him again). One step involved meeting with the characters mother, answering a question, and then NOT TALKING TO HER AGAIN after this, because it would ruin your chances to get said character. Then, you have to refuse all three of the other characters (after even more steps), and THEN proceed with the game as normal, actually being a rather difficult dungeon with only 4 characters. THEN, after one particular plot point, said hidden character joins your party.

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* The first ''VideoGame/{{Persona}}'' game had one (if not a couple) of these, too. on top of the whole contacting thing. Good luck doing all ''that'' without a guide, but at least you can probably experiment. However, the ''next'' example is just a ''very'' blatant example of GuideDangIt at its worst. In this game, you had a set party of 4 characters, and could take a different 5th member. You could only have one, however. There were three other characters to choose from (normally, but see later) , but the game didn't tell you to get the others you had to refuse the character before them; you couldn't take them, meet the other character, and then DITCH them to take the other one. This was only the start, however, and was actually minor and eventually understandable by a prudent gamer, unlike the next instance. There was yet another character who redefines 'hidden.' You see this character at a few points in the story, and there's even a point (if you have five characters by a certain point), where he helps you in a battle, and the game drops a SMALL hint that 'maybe this guy is playable.' However, the hints VERY MUCH stop there. To get this character, one had to first do several steps, involving some that were pretty out there in even GUESSING what they were(go were (go here, do this, meet with character once, go back here, meet him again). One step involved meeting with the characters character's mother, answering a question, and then NOT TALKING TO HER AGAIN after this, because it would ruin your chances to get said character. Then, you have to refuse all three of the other characters (after even more steps), and THEN proceed with the game as normal, actually being a rather difficult dungeon with only 4 characters. THEN, after one particular plot point, said hidden character joins your party.
27th Apr '17 3:52:56 PM LordXamwethOudeis
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** Also from Kingdom Hearts I: in the penultimate level Hollow Bastion, there is a treasure chest that seemingly cannot be reached. Turns out the bubbles that used to transport you to different areas can be frozen with Blizzard to create temporary platforms. This is stated ABSOLUTELY NOWHERE IN THE GAME, leaving many players scratching their heads as to [[Main/LastLousyPoint how to get that one chest]].
11th Apr '17 7:13:27 PM Willbyr
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* At the beginning of ''KingdomHearts'', the character is asked a few questions by some of his friends during a dream sequence. The game doesn't tell you that your answers to these questions affect the rate at which you level up during the game. Pick the bottom answers to each question? Congratulations, you now level up slowly. Fortunately, it actually makes the game easier in the long run, because after around level 40 you start levelling up faster.

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* At the beginning of ''KingdomHearts'', ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI'', the character is asked a few questions by some of his friends during a dream sequence. The game doesn't tell you that your answers to these questions affect the rate at which you level up during the game. Pick the bottom answers to each question? Congratulations, you now level up slowly. Fortunately, it actually makes the game easier in the long run, because after around level 40 you start levelling up faster.
7th Apr '17 7:23:31 PM Mineboot45
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*** Sparing their life is not cowardly, but just like Regal's title from ToS, you never hold back, and that is a heroic trait. In other words, you're not going easy on them.

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*** Sparing their life is not cowardly, but just like Regal's title from ToS, [=ToS=], you never hold back, and that is a heroic trait. In other words, you're not going easy on them.



** If you miss the status protection rings, you're in for a world of hurt. They're the only way to protect against multiple status effects for about half the game, you only get one of each, and they're usually in out-of-the-way places (particularly the Ring of the Viper and the Ring of the Cobra, which involve some backtracking). They're also the ''only'' way to protect against stat downs, period. They can't be {{Permanently Missable|Content}}, but there are a lot of [[PointOfNoReturn Points of No Return]] in the childhood arc, which is where you need them most.
* ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'':
** The fight with Undyne during the [[SheatheYourSword Pacifist run]]. Every boss battle (in fact, every battle ''period'') up to this point could be completed through selecting the "Spare" option after enough [[PuzzleBoss Act menu trickery]]. Undyne, however, continually refuses to accept your mercy and won't react to any attempts to spare her. ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption? Nope, that'll ruin the Pacifist run. It's essentially a HopelessBossFight - [[RunOrDie you have to run away after she stops talking, once your soul heart turns red.]]
** Likewise, Mettaton EX can only be spared by getting the ratings for the show over 10000. There is no indication of this beyond the subtle rising stats under the ratings, it just kind of... happens.
** Another Pacifist Run example, the fight against [[spoiler: Asgore]] can be really confusing, specifically ''because'' ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption. Up until that point every boss could be spared without any physical violence. After a while, the game will say "All you can do is FIGHT" but ignoring any calls to violence and being persistently pacifistic is completely ''necessary'' until that point, so it's easy to assume it's just a trap. It also explicitly goes against any [[PlayerPunch hard lessons]] the player might have learned from the very first boss battle, which is meant to harshly dissuade you from using the TechnicalPacifist "hit until they give up" strategy.

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** If you miss the status protection rings, you're in for a world of hurt. They're the only way to protect against multiple status effects for about half the game, you only get one of each, and they're usually in out-of-the-way places (particularly the Ring of the Viper and the Ring of the Cobra, which involve some backtracking). They're also the ''only'' way to protect against stat downs, period. They can't be {{Permanently Missable|Content}}, PermanentlyMissableContent, but there are a lot of [[PointOfNoReturn Points of No Return]] in the childhood arc, which is where you need them most.
* ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'':
** The fight with Undyne during the [[SheatheYourSword Pacifist run]]. Every boss battle (in fact, every battle ''period'') up to this point could be completed through selecting the "Spare" option after enough [[PuzzleBoss Act menu trickery]]. Undyne, however, continually refuses to accept your mercy and won't react to any attempts to spare her. ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption? Nope, that'll ruin the Pacifist run. It's essentially a HopelessBossFight - [[RunOrDie you have to run away after she stops talking, once your soul heart turns red.]]
** Likewise, Mettaton EX can only be spared by getting the ratings for the show over 10000. There is no indication of this beyond the subtle rising stats under the ratings, it just kind of... happens.
** Another Pacifist Run example, the fight against [[spoiler: Asgore]] can be really confusing, specifically ''because'' ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption. Up until that point every boss could be spared without any physical violence. After a while, the game will say "All you can do is FIGHT" but ignoring any calls to violence and being persistently pacifistic is completely ''necessary'' until that point, so it's easy to assume it's just a trap. It also explicitly goes against any [[PlayerPunch hard lessons]] the player might have learned from the very first boss battle, which is meant to harshly dissuade you from using the TechnicalPacifist "hit until they give up" strategy.
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4th Apr '17 3:07:16 PM Antronach
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* In ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline'', there was a very rare random drop called the Sealed J-Sword. As the name implies, under a certain circumstance, the sword could become unsealed to become the InfinityPlusOneSword Tsumikiri J-Sword. Nobody actually knew ''what that circumstance was''. Despite this, thanks to rampant item-duping, the Tsumikiri J-Sword was actually quite common, resulting in the bizarre yet common circumstance where all four randomly selected players in your game would be equipped with an ultimate weapon that none of them actually knew how to obtain. [[spoiler:As it turned out, the unsealing method didn't actually exist until the release of ''Episode I & II'', at which point it was the grindy yet simple "kill 23,000 enemies with it".]]

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* In ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline'', there was a very rare random drop called the Sealed J-Sword. As the name implies, under a certain circumstance, the sword could become unsealed to become the InfinityPlusOneSword Tsumikiri J-Sword. Nobody actually knew ''what that circumstance was''. Despite this, thanks to rampant item-duping, the Tsumikiri J-Sword was actually quite common, resulting in the bizarre yet common circumstance where all four randomly selected players in your game would be equipped with an ultimate weapon that none of them actually knew how to obtain. [[spoiler:As As it turned out, the unsealing method didn't actually exist until the release of ''Episode I & II'', at which point it was the grindy yet simple "kill you had to kill 23,000 enemies with it".]]it without unequiping it.
** Not once does the game mention what Section [=IDs=] are, why you got a specific one and what they do. Depending on the characters your Hunter's name is, they'll be assigned a colour that determines their drop table. Oh, did you get the pink one with a Hunter or Ranger? Too bad, that's the one that drops Wands and Tech Disks, both of which you'll have no use for with those classes. The best part? Each Section [=ID=] comes with their own unique rare items, some of which have abysmally low droprates and are obviously the best gear in the game.
** Item combinations are a screwy thing in this game because there's no hints to any of them. Tech Amplifiers are the most basic but are still confusing without a guide. You have to equip a Red, Blue, Yellow, Recover or Assist Barrier, all of which are difficult to find and are also dependent on your Section [=ID=] and then use the appropriate Amplifier, also dependent on Section [=IDs=], to create a "Merge" that boosts the effect of specific techs. And yes, those are the ''easiest'' combinations.
** Enemy Parts, those weird rare items that seem to have no meaning? Yeah, after completing a certain number of quests in Episode 1, you can talk to Dr. Montague in the Dr. Osto's Research quest or Unsealed Door quest to turn Enemy Parts into gear you can actually use. Quite a few of which are perfectly viable for Ultimate.
** There's also Photon Drops. You can use them in the Galleon's Shop quest to get items, customize S-Rank weapons and add percentages to weapons, the latter two require you to finish the East Tower and West Tower in favor of Galleon respectively. None of which is available to you offline, of course.
26th Mar '17 2:04:34 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/TacticsOgre''. Actually, a lot of ''OgreBattle'' games love this trope. In ''VideoGame/TacticsOgre'':

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* ''VideoGame/TacticsOgre''. Actually, a lot of ''OgreBattle'' ''VideoGame/OgreBattle'' games love this trope. In ''VideoGame/TacticsOgre'':
23rd Mar '17 5:15:43 PM Bugfragged
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* In ''VideoGame/NocturneRebirth'', the {{Final Boss}}'s Illusory Barrier manages to combine this with ViolationOfCommonSense. Unlike most other boss barriers, which must be broken by specific elemental attacks, the only way to break this barrier is to cast Eye of Souls, which is normally a skill that causes instant death to those who aren't completely immune to it. Absolutely nothing in the game hints this and most players using RPG logic wouldn't even ''consider'' using an instant death move on the FinalBoss, making this trick easy to miss.

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* In ''VideoGame/NocturneRebirth'', the {{Final Boss}}'s Illusory Barrier manages to combine this with ViolationOfCommonSense. Unlike most other boss barriers, which must be broken by specific elemental attacks, the only way to break this barrier is to cast Eye of Souls, which is normally a skill that causes instant death to those who aren't completely immune to it. Absolutely nothing in the game hints this and most players using RPG logic wouldn't even ''consider'' using an instant death move on the FinalBoss, making this trick easy to miss.
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