History GrowingTheBeard / Music

21st Jun '16 8:00:28 PM gewunomox
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* While ''Music/{{Paranoid}}'' (1970) is Music/BlackSabbath's greatest commercial success, hardcore fans see ''Master Of Reality'' (1971) as where they hit their stride, in-part due to the band achieving a heaviness the likes of which had never been seen at the time, influencing many metal bands in the process. The band would continue their artistic and commercial success, reaching a peak with ''Sabotage'' (1975), and then a DorkAge followed by a ''second'' Beard in 1980 with the arrival of RonnieJamesDio and ''Heaven And Hell''.

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* While ''Music/{{Paranoid}}'' (1970) is Music/BlackSabbath's greatest commercial success, hardcore fans see ''Master Of Reality'' (1971) as where they hit their stride, in-part due to the band achieving a heaviness the likes of which had never been seen at the time, influencing many metal bands in the process. The band would continue their artistic and commercial success, reaching a peak with ''Sabotage'' (1975), and then a DorkAge followed by a ''second'' Beard in 1980 with the arrival of RonnieJamesDio Music/RonnieJamesDio and ''Heaven And Hell''.
17th Jun '16 7:29:50 PM gewunomox
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* Depending on who you ask, DeepPurple grew the beard either with their self-titled third album, which perfected their brand of psychedelia, or with ''Music/DeepPurpleInRock'', which shifted the band into hard rock territory and brought vocalist Ian Gillan and bassist Roger Glover into the band.

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* Depending on who you ask, DeepPurple Music/DeepPurple grew the beard either with their self-titled third album, which perfected their brand of psychedelia, or with ''Music/DeepPurpleInRock'', which shifted the band into hard rock territory and brought vocalist Ian Gillan and bassist Roger Glover into the band.
10th Jun '16 9:03:45 PM Doug86
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* Music/{{Tool}} had always had a distinct sound. Their first official release was the EP ''Opiate'' in 1992. It was a heavy, rhythm-oriented hard-rock album that gave us the first taste of Tool's heavy-bass sound. Their second album (and first full-length), ''Undertow'', was released in 1996. It was still bass-heavy hard rock, but not quite as heavy, and with a more melody-oriented tone with longer songs on average. By ''Ænima'', they shifted full-blown in to a very distinct, melody-oriented hard rock band. They became more progressive rock oriented with longer songs. Their next three releases (''Salival'', ''Lateralus'' and ''10,000 Days'') were an even further shift, and those three albums sound most similar to each other. While the post-''Ænima'' albums represent their current sound, the album itself is probably where the band had fully grown their beard out.

to:

* Music/{{Tool}} had always had a distinct sound. Their first official release was the EP ''Opiate'' in 1992. It was a heavy, rhythm-oriented hard-rock album that gave us the first taste of Tool's heavy-bass sound. Their second album (and first full-length), ''Undertow'', was released in 1996. It was still bass-heavy hard rock, but not quite as heavy, and with a more melody-oriented tone with longer songs on average. By ''Ænima'', ''[=Æ=]nima'', they shifted full-blown in to a very distinct, melody-oriented hard rock band. They became more progressive rock oriented with longer songs. Their next three releases (''Salival'', ''Lateralus'' and ''10,000 Days'') were an even further shift, and those three albums sound most similar to each other. While the post-''Ænima'' post-''[=Æ=]nima'' albums represent their current sound, the album itself is probably where the band had fully grown their beard out.
27th May '16 4:42:51 AM erforce
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* With ''Blackout'', Dropkick Murphys moved toward a more melodic, folk-influenced sound, more distinct from the rest of the Boston hardcore scene. This is the album that cracked the American market at large, after years of local fame.
** Their real popularity started when the mainstream heard Dropkick Murphys later on because of ''I'm Shipping Up to Boston'', featured in TheDeparted and now a trope in itself in Boston sports. This popularity had nothing to do with the musicianship beard they had started with ''Blackout''.

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* With ''Blackout'', Dropkick Murphys Music/DropkickMurphys moved toward a more melodic, folk-influenced sound, more distinct from the rest of the Boston hardcore scene. This is the album that cracked the American market at large, after years of local fame.
** Their real popularity started when the mainstream heard Dropkick Murphys later on because of ''I'm "I'm Shipping Up to Boston'', Boston", featured in TheDeparted ''Film/TheDeparted'' and now a trope in itself in Boston sports. This popularity had nothing to do with the musicianship beard they had started with ''Blackout''.
7th Feb '16 7:43:03 PM nombretomado
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* Music/PearlJam's first two albums, ''Music/TenAlbum'' and ''Vs'', were popular with critics and fans, but their third album, ''Vitalogy'', is seen as this, as it's when they started to get more experimental and cerebral.

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* Music/PearlJam's first two albums, ''Music/TenAlbum'' ''{{Music/Ten}}'' and ''Vs'', were popular with critics and fans, but their third album, ''Vitalogy'', is seen as this, as it's when they started to get more experimental and cerebral.
6th Feb '16 12:43:57 PM Freshmeat
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** It took 9 more years until they've released the widely acclaimed magnum opus ''The Soft Bulletin''. Their NINTH album.

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** It took 9 more years until they've released the widely acclaimed magnum opus ''The Soft Bulletin''. Their NINTH album.



* Music/NeutralMilkHotel was already a fairly accomplished band, but they really grew the beard in 1998 with ''In the Aeroplane Over the Sea''. Unfortunately, lead singer/songwriter Jeff Mangum suffered CreatorBreakdown and their MagnumOpus would be their last album as well. [[CareerResurrection Or would it?]]

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* Music/NeutralMilkHotel was already a fairly accomplished band, but they really grew the beard in 1998 with ''In the Aeroplane Over the Sea''. Unfortunately, lead singer/songwriter Jeff Mangum suffered CreatorBreakdown and their MagnumOpus it would be their last album as well. [[CareerResurrection Or would it?]]



* Music/FrankSinatra began his career as a TeenIdol, singing SillyLoveSongs that appealed to young girls through the late 1940s and early 1950s. But then, in 1955, he recorded ''Music/InTheWeeSmallHours'', a ConceptAlbum consisting of plaintive ballads about [[DarkerAndEdgier loneliness and heartbreak]], which was both musically and lyrically much more mature than his previous output. It's still considered his MagnumOpus, and signaled to the world his ability to take on anything.

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* Music/FrankSinatra began his career as a TeenIdol, singing SillyLoveSongs that appealed to young girls through the late 1940s and early 1950s. But then, in 1955, he recorded ''Music/InTheWeeSmallHours'', a ConceptAlbum consisting of plaintive ballads about [[DarkerAndEdgier loneliness and heartbreak]], which was both musically and lyrically much more mature than his previous output. It's still considered his MagnumOpus, and It signaled to the world his ability to take on anything.



* Music/SimpleMinds did this with ''Empires And Dance'', where the band's music became more Music/{{Kraftwerk}} influenced and Jim Kerr took on a more militant vocal style. The band also replaced the arpeggiated organ sound featured on their first two albums with more sparse synths, and focused more on the interplay between bass and drums. The previous album's Premonition shows an early example of this. The band got more progressive for Sons And Fascination/Sister Feelings Call and slightly poppier for New Gold Dream, which is often held to be their MagnumOpus.

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* Music/SimpleMinds did this with ''Empires And Dance'', where the band's music became more Music/{{Kraftwerk}} influenced and Jim Kerr took on a more militant vocal style. The band also replaced the arpeggiated organ sound featured on their first two albums with more sparse synths, and focused more on the interplay between bass and drums. The previous album's Premonition shows an early example of this. The band got more progressive for Sons And Fascination/Sister Feelings Call and slightly poppier for New Gold Dream, which is often held to be their MagnumOpus.Dream.



* Music/{{Tool}} had always had a distinct sound. Their first official release was the EP ''Opiate'' in 1992. It was a heavy, rhythm-oriented hard-rock album that gave us the first taste of Tool's heavy-bass sound. Their second album (and first full-length), ''Undertow'', was released in 1996. It was still bass-heavy hard rock, but not quite as heavy, and with a more melody-oriented tone with longer songs on average. ''Ænima'' is widely considered by fans to be their MagnumOpus. By then, they shifted full-blown in to a very distinct, melody-oriented hard rock band. They became more progressive rock oriented with longer songs. Their next three releases (''Salival'', ''Lateralus'' and ''10,000 Days'') were an even further shift, and those three albums sound most similar to each other. While the post-''Ænima'' albums represent their current sound, the album itself is probably where the band had fully grown their beard out.

to:

* Music/{{Tool}} had always had a distinct sound. Their first official release was the EP ''Opiate'' in 1992. It was a heavy, rhythm-oriented hard-rock album that gave us the first taste of Tool's heavy-bass sound. Their second album (and first full-length), ''Undertow'', was released in 1996. It was still bass-heavy hard rock, but not quite as heavy, and with a more melody-oriented tone with longer songs on average. ''Ænima'' is widely considered by fans to be their MagnumOpus. By then, ''Ænima'', they shifted full-blown in to a very distinct, melody-oriented hard rock band. They became more progressive rock oriented with longer songs. Their next three releases (''Salival'', ''Lateralus'' and ''10,000 Days'') were an even further shift, and those three albums sound most similar to each other. While the post-''Ænima'' albums represent their current sound, the album itself is probably where the band had fully grown their beard out.



* Music/{{Yes}} began growing one when guitarist Steve Howe joined in time for their third album (''The Yes Album''), where his presence led the band to delve further into longer compositions such as "Yours Is No Disgrace" and "Starship Trooper". It continued into sessions for the fourth album (''Fragile''), with Hammond organ addict Tony Kaye being replaced by classically-trained synthesizer wizard Rick Wakeman, who was also experienced in longer compositions. It was then topped off by a change of image directed by their record company, abandoning off-the-wall graphics and gurning mug shots in favour of a more chilled and mature presentation, including gatefold sleeves, printed lyrics, and pictures of their homes, families and instrument collections. The band's original sleeve concept for ''Fragile'' (a broken china plate with the title on) was rejected, and they were introduced to artist/designer Roger Dean, who designed the iconic "fragile planet" sleeve along with their logo and many of their subsequent album sleeves and stage sets. The album after ''Fragile'', ''Close to the Edge'', not only is regarded as the MagnumOpus of the band but is often regarded as the magnum opus of ''all of ProgressiveRock'' (it is the highest rated album on Prog Archives, and has been for years).

to:

* Music/{{Yes}} began growing one when guitarist Steve Howe joined in time for their third album (''The Yes Album''), where his presence led the band to delve further into longer compositions such as "Yours Is No Disgrace" and "Starship Trooper". It continued into sessions for the fourth album (''Fragile''), with Hammond organ addict Tony Kaye being replaced by classically-trained synthesizer wizard Rick Wakeman, who was also experienced in longer compositions. It was then topped off by a change of image directed by their record company, abandoning off-the-wall graphics and gurning mug shots in favour of a more chilled and mature presentation, including gatefold sleeves, printed lyrics, and pictures of their homes, families and instrument collections. The band's original sleeve concept for ''Fragile'' (a broken china plate with the title on) was rejected, and they were introduced to artist/designer Roger Dean, who designed the iconic "fragile planet" sleeve along with their logo and many of their subsequent album sleeves and stage sets. The album after ''Fragile'', ''Close to the Edge'', not only is regarded as the MagnumOpus of the band but is often regarded as the magnum opus of ''all of ProgressiveRock'' (it is the highest rated album on Prog Archives, and has been for years).
4th Feb '16 7:43:26 PM Hossmeister
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* Music/PearlJam's first two albums, ''Music/{{Ten}}'' and ''Vs'', were popular with critics and fans, but their third album, ''Vitalogy'', is seen as this, as it's when they started to get more experimental and cerebral.

to:

* Music/PearlJam's first two albums, ''Music/{{Ten}}'' ''Music/TenAlbum'' and ''Vs'', were popular with critics and fans, but their third album, ''Vitalogy'', is seen as this, as it's when they started to get more experimental and cerebral.
4th Feb '16 7:22:06 PM Hossmeister
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* Arguably, the Music/RedHotChiliPeppers have grown the beard ''three'' times in their career. The first time was with ''The Uplift Mofo Party Plan'', their first solid album after two previous ones struggled with inter-band tensions that often verged on ExecutiveMeddling. The second time was on ''Blood Sugar Sex Magik'', where they first united with producer Rick Rubin and broke into the mainstream. The third was ''Music/{{Californication}}'', which started a revival of their career after half a decade of stagnation.
** Well, except for the fact that there is a pretty large contingent of fans who think Californication was the beginning of the end for the band.

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* Arguably, the Music/RedHotChiliPeppers have grown the beard ''three'' times in their career. The first time was with ''The Uplift Mofo Party Plan'', their first solid album after two previous ones struggled with inter-band tensions that often verged on ExecutiveMeddling. The second time was on ''Blood Sugar Sex Magik'', where they first united with producer Rick Rubin and broke into the mainstream. The third was 1999's ''Music/{{Californication}}'', which started a revival of their career after half a decade of stagnation.
** Well, except for the fact that there is a pretty large contingent of fans who think Californication ''Californication'' was the beginning of the end for the band.band. These fans typically believe that 2006's ''Music/StadiumArcadium'' was the band's final hurrah, for that was Music/JohnFrusciante's last record with the band. These fans [[FanonDiscontinuity also like to ignore ''I'm With You'']], released in 2011.
28th Jan '16 1:59:44 PM CassandraLeo
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* The three founding members of Music/{{Rush}} were Jeff Jones, Alex Lifeson and John Rutsey. Jones was quickly replaced by Geddy Lee. They were a decent if generic rock band with some definite promise. Then Rutsey left the band because he could not handle the rigors of the touring schedule. The next album, ''Fly By Night'' introduced the new drummer Neil Peart. Not only is he pretty much the consummate rock drummer, but he wrote the band's lyrics. Goodbye cutesy songs like "I Need Some Love", hello prog rock history. Rush became famous for their concept albums, evolutionary style and incredibly deep lyrics.

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* The three founding members of Music/{{Rush}} were Jeff Jones, Alex Lifeson and John Rutsey. Jones was quickly replaced by Geddy Lee. They were a decent if generic rock band with some definite promise. Then Rutsey left the band because he could not handle the rigors of the touring schedule. The next album, ''Fly By by Night'' introduced the new drummer Neil Peart. Not only is he pretty much the consummate rock drummer, but he wrote the band's lyrics. Goodbye cutesy songs like "I Need Some Love", hello prog rock history. Rush became famous for their concept albums, evolutionary style and incredibly deep lyrics. They continued the beard-growing process with the next few albums after Peart joined, with ''2112'' often being considered their first true classic.



* Music/TalkTalk started out as a typical cheesy, NewWave-y [[TheEighties '80s]] SynthPop band shamelessly ripping off Music/DuranDuran. They grew dramatically over their careers, getting more experimental, culminating in their fantastic final album ''Laughing Stock'', which pioneered the genre of post-rock and really showed off what they could do. Unfortunately, they broke up immediately afterwards...
* Music/ThinLizzy were always a cut above their Irish rock contemporaries, but even with the presence of a hit single (1972's "Whiskey In The Jar") and a solid album (1973's ''Vagabonds Of The Western World'') the band never found its feet until its fifth album (1975's ''Fighting''), by which time it had exchanged its single guitar player Eric Bell and its wishy washy folk-rock quality for duel lead guitarists Brian Robertson and Scott Gorham and a hard rock ethos. Their very next album was ''Jailbreak'', best known for the title track and "The Boys Are Back In Town", beginning a streak of five (or possibly eight, depending on whether you like the Snowy White/John Sykes era) high quality albums that brought them fame and fortune.

to:

* Music/TalkTalk started out as a typical cheesy, NewWave-y [[TheEighties '80s]] SynthPop band shamelessly ripping off Music/DuranDuran. They grew dramatically over their careers, getting more experimental, culminating in their fantastic final album ''Laughing Stock'', ''Music/LaughingStock'', which pioneered the genre of post-rock and really showed off what they could do. Unfortunately, they broke up immediately afterwards...
* Music/ThinLizzy were always a cut above their Irish rock contemporaries, but even with the presence of a hit single (1972's "Whiskey In The in the Jar") and a solid album (1973's ''Vagabonds Of The of the Western World'') the band never found its feet until its fifth album (1975's ''Fighting''), by which time it had exchanged its single guitar player Eric Bell and its wishy washy folk-rock quality for duel lead guitarists Brian Robertson and Scott Gorham and a hard rock ethos. Their very next album was ''Jailbreak'', best known for the title track and "The Boys Are Back In in Town", beginning a streak of five (or possibly eight, depending on whether you like the Snowy White/John Sykes era) high quality albums that brought them fame and fortune.



* Music/{{Tool}} had always had a distinct sound. Their first official release was the EP "Opiate" in 1992. It was a heavy, rhythm-oriented hard-rock album that gave us the first taste of Tool's heavy-bass sound. Their second album, "Undertow" was released in 1996. It was still bass-heavy hard rock, but not quite as heavy, and with a more melody-oriented tone with longer songs on average. Aenima is widely considered by fans to be their magnum opus. By then, they shifted full-blown in to a very distinct, melody-oriented hard rock band. They became more progressive rock oriented with longer songs. They're next three releases (Salival, Lateralus and 10,000 Days) were an even further shift, and those three albums sound most similar to each other. While the post-Aenima albums represent their current sound, the album itself is probably where the band had fully grown their beard out.

to:

* Music/{{Tool}} had always had a distinct sound. Their first official release was the EP "Opiate" ''Opiate'' in 1992. It was a heavy, rhythm-oriented hard-rock album that gave us the first taste of Tool's heavy-bass sound. Their second album, "Undertow" album (and first full-length), ''Undertow'', was released in 1996. It was still bass-heavy hard rock, but not quite as heavy, and with a more melody-oriented tone with longer songs on average. Aenima ''Ænima'' is widely considered by fans to be their magnum opus.MagnumOpus. By then, they shifted full-blown in to a very distinct, melody-oriented hard rock band. They became more progressive rock oriented with longer songs. They're Their next three releases (Salival, Lateralus (''Salival'', ''Lateralus'' and 10,000 Days) ''10,000 Days'') were an even further shift, and those three albums sound most similar to each other. While the post-Aenima post-''Ænima'' albums represent their current sound, the album itself is probably where the band had fully grown their beard out.



* Music/VanDerGraafGenerator's first album, ''The Aerosol Grey Machine'', was more or less a Peter Hammill solo album that was later given the band moniker to get out of their contract with Mercury Records. When they signed to Charisma for ''The Least We Can Do Is Wave To Each Other'', it gave the band more room to breathe, expanding upon the darker concepts in their songs. It also introduced saxophonist/flautist David Jackson, giving the band a jazzier flavor.

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* Music/VanDerGraafGenerator's first album, ''The Aerosol Grey Machine'', was more or less a Peter Hammill solo album that was later given the band moniker to get out of their contract with Mercury Records. When they signed to Charisma for ''The Least We Can Do Is Wave To Each Other'', it gave the band more room to breathe, expanding upon the darker concepts in their songs. It also introduced saxophonist/flautist David Jackson, giving the band a jazzier flavor. The band continued the beard-growing process with their next two releases, culminating in their two best-regarded albums, ''Pawn Hearts'' and ''Godbluff''.



* Music/{{Yes}} began growing one when guitarist Steve Howe joined in time for their third album (''The Yes Album''), where his presence led the band to delve further into longer compositions such as "Yours Is No Disgrace" and "Starship Trooper". It continued into sessions for the fourth album (''Fragile''), with Hammond organ addict Tony Kaye being replaced by classically-trained synthesizer wizard Rick Wakeman, who was also experienced in longer compositions. It was then topped off by a change of image directed by their record company, abandoning off-the-wall graphics and gurning mug shots in favour of a more chilled and mature presentation, including gatefold sleeves, printed lyrics, and pictures of their homes, families and instrument collections. The band's original sleeve concept for ''Fragile'' (a broken china plate with the title on) was rejected, and they were introduced to artist/designer Roger Dean, who designed the iconic "fragile planet" sleeve along with their logo and many of their subsequent album sleeves and stage sets.

to:

* Music/{{Yes}} began growing one when guitarist Steve Howe joined in time for their third album (''The Yes Album''), where his presence led the band to delve further into longer compositions such as "Yours Is No Disgrace" and "Starship Trooper". It continued into sessions for the fourth album (''Fragile''), with Hammond organ addict Tony Kaye being replaced by classically-trained synthesizer wizard Rick Wakeman, who was also experienced in longer compositions. It was then topped off by a change of image directed by their record company, abandoning off-the-wall graphics and gurning mug shots in favour of a more chilled and mature presentation, including gatefold sleeves, printed lyrics, and pictures of their homes, families and instrument collections. The band's original sleeve concept for ''Fragile'' (a broken china plate with the title on) was rejected, and they were introduced to artist/designer Roger Dean, who designed the iconic "fragile planet" sleeve along with their logo and many of their subsequent album sleeves and stage sets. The album after ''Fragile'', ''Close to the Edge'', not only is regarded as the MagnumOpus of the band but is often regarded as the magnum opus of ''all of ProgressiveRock'' (it is the highest rated album on Prog Archives, and has been for years).
28th Jan '16 1:53:03 PM CassandraLeo
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* Music/DavidBowie was in the music business for ''five years'' before "Space Oddity"...and even then, his most iconic "early" (glam) songs (most of them actually VindicatedByHistory after "Ziggy Stardust" brought him back into the public eye) didn't come until his partnership with Mick Ronson. It is Bowie's fourth album, ''Music/HunkyDory'', that is usually regarded as his first great one.

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* Music/DavidBowie was in the music business for ''five years'' before "Space Oddity"...and even then, his most iconic "early" (glam) songs (most of them actually VindicatedByHistory after "Ziggy Stardust" brought him back into the public eye) didn't come until his partnership with Mick Ronson. It is Bowie's fourth album, ''Music/HunkyDory'', that is usually regarded as his first great one. ''Music/TheManWhoSoldTheWorld'' is also a case of this, as it's usually considered a step above his earlier work but a step below ''Hunky Dory'' (and some people still consider it a classic).



** Their second album, ''Trespass'' (before Collins and Hackett joined), is also considered to be a huge step above their first, ''From Genesis to Revelation'', which falls under CanonDiscontinuity.



** It's also fairly well accepted amongst fans that the beard growing process began with the previous album ''Sheer Heart Attack'', moving from a heavier and proggier sound to a more commercial and varied output. (And it had both ''Killer Queen'' and ''Now I'm Here'', fan favourites)

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** It's also fairly well accepted amongst fans that the beard growing process began with the previous album ''Sheer Heart Attack'', moving from a heavier and proggier sound to a more commercial and varied output. (And it had both ''Killer Queen'' and ''Now I'm Here'', fan favourites)favourites). ''Queen II'' is also considered a step above their début album and is a CultClassic among fans of ProgressiveRock (it's actually their highest rated studio album on Prog Archives, even above ''A Night at the Opera'').
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