History GameBreaker / MagicTheGathering

12th Jan '17 10:47:22 PM mrpanda
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*While Conspiracy: Take the Crown (the follow-up to the original Conspiracy draft set) reprinted several Legacy staples, the set gave the format its own gamebreaker with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=416834 Leovold, Emissary of Trest]]. His first ability prevents all of your opponents from drawing more than one card each turn. This made Windfall, Day's Undoing, Timetwister and other cards with a similar effect more powerful hand destruction that was difficult to recover from. Even if your opponent was able to cast a powerful spell, Leovold's colors allowed you to answer anything your opponent threw at you (counters in blue, artifact and enchantment destruction in green, and creature removal in black). To add insult to injury, even if your opponent manages to kill him, his second ability lets you draw an additional card if the removal was targeted (this applies not only to him, but to ''every permanent you control''). As of this writing, he currently goes for $50-$60 on average. To compare, ''[[UptoEleven you can buy a full playset of the Conspiracy printing of Show and Tell (a staple in many Legacy decks) for the same price]].''
**What made Leovold even more broken was his interaction with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83294 Teferi's Puzzle Box]]. The official ruling states that you conduct your normal draw first before the Puzzle Box's ability is put onto the stack. If either the Puzzle Box or Leovold weren't countered or aren't destroyed with instant-speed removal, then your opponent no longer has a hand ''for the rest of the game!''
9th Jan '17 10:14:11 PM Gadjiltron
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Power Nine]]




to:

[[/folder]]



[[folder:Combos]]



* Perhaps the most powerful card-drawing card ever printed is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1147 Contract From Below]]. This references an old mechanic called "ante" where players set aside cards at the start of the game and the winner took them at the end, which was axed after falling foul of anti-gambling laws in some US states. The Contract is a ''ridiculous'' card; sure, you ante up an additional card and discard your hand (the latter of which could be ''beneficial'' in the right deck), but you get 7 cards for only one mana. Like all ante cards, it's illegal in all formats; even if this wasn't so, it's staggeringly overpowered and would likely ''still'' be banned.
* Sometimes a card does not have to be overly powerful to get banned; it just has to lengthen and complicate the game enough to make it virtually unplayable. Enter [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=980 Shahrazad]], which makes players play a game within a game, with the losers of the subgame losing half of their life points, rounded up. Running four of these meant potentially playing a game within a game within a game within a game within a game, which would make almost any match end in a 0-0 draw.
** On a similar note, there's [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=603 Chaos Orb]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1571 Falling Star]], which as part of their effects are flipped over from above the playing field and then do something to anything they land on: Chaos Orb destroys any permanent it touches, and Falling Star deals damage to and taps creatures that it touches. What that did to complicate the game was that it made players space all of their cards as far apart as possible, to ensure that those cards couldn't affect too many of their cards, which tended to make actually playing the game a lot more difficult as it was more difficult to see what players actually controlled. It also led to arguments and time-wasting rulings by judges about such things as what exactly constituted a flip, how far it had to be above the table, whether it was actually touching something, and when cards could be moved around (supposedly, at least one tournament player attempted to cut his card into confetti so it would hit the whole table, although this is probably an urban legend.) As a result, they both ended up being banned in all formats, making Chaos Orb, Falling Star, and Shahrazad the only 3 cards that aren't ante cards, promo cards, or un-set cards that are banned in all formats. Every other card in the game is playable in at least Vintage, even if that card is on Vintage's Restricted List.



* "Tutor" is a name for a series of cards, but also a more general name for any card which has the ability to draw a specific card from your library. The ability is often gamebreaking, since there are some ''very'' powerful cards you can go looking for. The original, and possibly most powerful, is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202628 Demonic Tutor]].
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15393 Vampiric Tutor]], which appeared in ''Visions'', is arguably ''more'' broken. While it causes you to lose two life and puts the card on the top of your deck rather than directly in your hand, it also costs only ''one'' mana to cast and comes at ''instant'' speed. And like Demonic Tutor, it's spent some time on the banned/restricted list.
** Even Demonic Tutor's terrible offspring [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201409 Grim Tutor]] can be found enabling degenerate combo decks in Legacy and Vintage. Seeing as it's really the best option that isn't banned or restricted, it's really a player's only choice if they just gotta do something broken.
** In Legacy [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107308 Infernal Tutor]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3255 Lion's Eye Diamond]] do a reasonable impression of Demonic Tutor and Black Lotus in combo decks. Unsurprisingly, they (especially Lion's Eye Diamond) tend to be the poster children of degenerate combo in Legacy.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=26422 Diabolic Intent]] is another cheap black tutor, offering any card in your deck for the low price of 1B and a creature. The "sacrifice a creature" cost makes it a bad fit for combo decks which tend to be light on expendable creatures, but it's still positively broken in control & aggro decks. Unlike most other tutors, it also isn't restricted or banned in any format.

to:

* "Tutor" is a name for a series of cards, but also a more general name for any card which has the ability to draw a specific card from your library. The ability is often gamebreaking, since there are some ''very'' powerful cards you can go looking for. The original, and possibly most powerful, is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202628 Demonic Tutor]].
aspx?multiverseid=35056 Worldgorger Dragon]] ended up banned in several formats due to the way it interacted with enchantments like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3621 Necromancy]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159249 Animate Dead]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=184612 Dance of the Dead]]. The general idea was to get the Dragon into a graveyard, then get it back into play with one of these enchantments; the Dragon would remove the Enchantment that bought it to life from the game as it came into play, killing itself and bringing back all your other permanents...untapped. Along with them, the enchantment would return, ready to target the Dragon again, and in response you tap the lands for mana. This could be repeated indefinitely, and would result in a draw unless it could be interrupted somehow. The simplest win condition for such decks was to channel the mana into a massive instant-speed spell like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=23086 Ghitu Fire]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5677 Stroke of Genius]], but later versions would graveyard a card like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129913 Ambassador Laquatus]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=130538 Shivan Hellkite]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5233 Sliver Queen]] with an infinitely repeatable ability, then have the enchantment target it instead of the Dragon to break the loop. A third version was to use cards with powerful comes-into-play effects which triggered every time the cycle ran; one variant used [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=51628 Eternal Witness]] to endlessly recycle and use [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=692 Ancestral Recall]] on the other player until they ran out of cards.
** The interaction between Dragon and Animate Dead is also notorious for being one heck of a rules headache. Even though Dragon is no longer the dominant force it once was (although it still shows up and places from time to time) it's been suggested (although not proven) that it remains of the Legacy banned list because of the rules problems it creates. The combo has been called a "rules glitch" and when it was commonly played judges noted that they got inordinate amounts of rules questions regarding interactions with the combo. In addition, players tend to dislike playing against the deck because without a [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201220 Bazaar of Baghdad]] in play or a win condition in hand or the graveyard casting a reanimate enchantment on Dragon ends the game in a draw because there is no way to break the loop. This is a common tactic employed by Dragon players in the face of defeat (Necromancy even let them do at instant speed so they could respond to lethal damage by forcing a draw) and so it was not too uncommon to see matches with Dragon decks go to 4, 5 or more rounds.
* Some Eternal deck archetypes are built on quirky instawin combos; [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=146022 Painter]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4610 Grindstone]] comes to mind as one of the more prolific, mainly due to the satisfaction of milling someone's entire deck in one go. These cards are rarely banned on the grounds that getting the cards ''out'' is the real challenge of combo decks.
** Another popular instawin combo has been broadly termed "Hulk Flash," which worked by comboing [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107598 Protean Hulk]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=16440 Flash]] to assemble a suite of game-winning creatures. Some variants of the deck could win on the opponent's upkeep of the first turn when going second using [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Gemstone%20Caverns Gemstone Caverns]] and either [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=124474 Simian Spirit Guide]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Elvish%20Spirit%20Guide Elvish Spirit Guide]] to get the mana to cast Flash. There are a lot of sets of creatures that can be gotten with this that will give an insta-win if all come into play simultaneously- 4 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=49090 Disciple of the Vaults]], 4 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3599 Phyrexian Marauders]], and 4 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5222 Shifting Walls]], for instance, since the Marauders and Walls come in with no counters and instantly die, each causing all 4 Disciples to go off for a total of 32 points of life loss, all on your opponent's first upkeep.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15393 Vampiric Tutor]], which appeared in ''Visions'', aspx?multiverseid=121155 Dark Depths]] is arguably ''more'' broken. While it causes you one of those cards that combo players study intently to lose two life figure out how they can make them go off quickly, and puts the card on the top of your deck rather than directly in your hand, it also costs only ''one'' mana to cast and comes at ''instant'' speed. And like Demonic Tutor, it's spent some for a long time on the banned/restricted list.
** Even Demonic Tutor's terrible offspring
they couldn't. But sure enough, with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201409 Grim Tutor]] can be found enabling degenerate combo decks in Legacy aspx?multiverseid=131005 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth]] to make Dark Depths produce mana and Vintage. Seeing as it's really the best option that isn't banned or restricted, it's really a player's only choice if they just gotta do something broken.
** In Legacy
[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107308 Infernal Tutor]] and aspx?multiverseid=192232 Vampire Hexmage]] to yank the counters off it, it's possible to have a 20/20 creature in play as early as turn 1 (using [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3255 Lion's Eye Diamond]] do a reasonable impression of Demonic Tutor aspx?multiverseid=202529 Fastbond]]), and Black Lotus in combo decks. Unsurprisingly, they (especially Lion's Eye Diamond) tend turn 2 otherwise.
*** The Magic 2014 legend rules added a new way
to be the poster children of degenerate combo in Legacy.
**
cheat around Dark Depth's enormous cost with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=26422 Diabolic Intent]] is another cheap black tutor, offering any card in your deck for aspx?multiverseid=366353 Thespian's Stage]]: When Thespian's Stage becomes a copy of Dark Depths, it will have no ice counters on it and the low price of 1B and new legend rules allow you to remove the original Dark Depths while leaving the new one intact.
** Vampire Hexmage itself could be considered
a creature. The "sacrifice a creature" cost makes Game Breaker. Aside from having First Strike, it also has a bad fit for combo decks which tend very specific-sounding ability but is in fact extremely versatile, able to be light on expendable do things like remove +1/+1 or -1/-1 counters from creatures, but it's reset cumulative upkeeps, set back several enchantments using "quest" counters, cure you from Phyrexian infection, and most importantly, '''instantly gib planeswalkers''', all for 2 mana.
* There have always been a lot of possible [[http://www.westley.org/infinite.html infinite combos]] in the game.
** The manual for the ''Mirage'' expansion even had an entry for "Loop, Continuous" in the index. The entry would refer to three ''Magic'' cards hidden in the index that formed an infinite combo. The same joke was reprinted in the ''Fifth Edition'' manual.
** And it should be noted that that Website is more than a decade out of date, and plenty of new infinite combos have been made possible since then. Though Wizards has generally gotten better about not allowing them (or at least making them harder to pull off), there are
still positively broken in control & aggro decks. Unlike most many decks build around exploting them. Some examples of infinite loops:
*** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220364 Myr Galvanizer]] can, for one colorless mana, untap all
other tutors, it also Myrs you control. Some Myrs are capable of producing mana, so if you have 2 Myr Galvanizers and at least 2 of the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194063 Mana-Producing]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194168 Myrs]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194204 that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194378 generate]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194384 one]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214344 mana]] when tapped (or one [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=212251 Palladium Myr]], which generates two colorless mana), then you can tap the Mana Myrs for 2 mana, pay 1 to tap one of the Galvanizers and untap them, tap them for two more Mana, tap the other Myr Galvanizer to untap the Mana Myrs again and the other Myr Galvanizer, and repeat to get as much mana as you want that those artifacts can produce.
*** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=240134 Exquisite Blood]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=190190 Sanguine Bond]] basically have the opposite effects- Exquisite Blood heals you whenever one of your opponents takes damage, and Sanguine Bond damages your opponents whenever you get healed. Neither is terribly overpowered on their own, but when you have both at the same time, anything that triggers the effect of Exquisite Blood will cause Sanguine Bond's effect to trigger when Exquisite Blood's effect resolves, and vice versa, creating an infinite loop that instantly kills all of your opponents as soon as either you heal so much as one life or any of your opponents takes so much as one damage.
*** The Shadowmoor Block introduced a number of cards that ''untap'' rather than tap as part of an activated ability cost. Sure, all of the abilities cost a bit of mana, and you have to get them tapped to use the ability, but tapping them
isn't restricted too difficult, especially if you use a card like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=73558 Paradise Mantle]] or banned [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=131004 Utopia Vow]] to make the card in question continously tap for mana, effectively cheapening the cost of their ability and letting you repeat it as long as you have enough mana. This limitation was lowered a bit by [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5164 Heartstone]], and basically removed once [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Discussion.aspx?multiverseid=193490 Training Grounds]] appeared, which can reduce almost all of the untap cards' ability costs to 1- or 0, if you find a way to tap them for mana, thus allowing such things as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=157210 infinite 1/1 tokens]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=147381 infinite mana]], or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=151106 a +infinity power boost to all of your creatures]]. Or how about [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=152046 infinite counters]]? As long as you have at least one counter of any format.kind on something, you can use that to get as many of them as you want. This can also enable infinite mana and the like with cards such as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=240135 Druids' Repository]], or perhaps you'd like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=380491 infinite turns]] instead (as long as you always have a way to put at least one counter back on)? And this ''also'' includes loyalty counters, so...why not get out a planeswalker and spam their ultimate ability every turn? These cards also combo ''very'' nicely with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=292757 Quicksilver Dagger]] (which is powerful in itself for a card of common rarity), allowing you to repeatedly do damage, draw a card, and add counters/spawn tokens/buff your creatures for as long as you have mana. Put that enchantment on Pili-Pala with a Training Grounds out, and you have an infinite damage/card-drawing combo, pinging your opponents until either they all reach 0 life or you run out of cards to draw (if they don't counter the ability or prevent the damage).
*** The [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366328 Duskmantle Guildmage]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=233078 Mindcrank]] combo. Duskmantle Guildmage makes your opponent lose life every time they mill cards from their deck, while Mindcrank makes them mill cards every time they lose life. For that matter, Duskmantle Guildmage's ability can make them lose life if a card goes to their graveyard from ''anywhere''. Discarded a card? Combo goes off, they lose. Card on their field goes to the graveyard? Combo goes off, they lose. Even casting an instant or sorcery that doesn't destroy Mindcrank causes them to lose when that spell resolves! Mindcrank can also combo with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=197892 Bloodchief Ascension]] although that requires you to get three required quest counters on Bloodchief Ascension. On the other hand, Bloodchief costs less, is an enchantment (and thus harder to remove), and once it gets the counters, the ability is always active instead of requiring 3 mana to activate.
*** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=386571 Jeskai Ascendancy]] forms an instant-win combo too: With enough mana-producing creatures, noncreature spells ''add'' mana to your pool & can dig up your entire library; from there, spend the surplus mana on your win condition of choice.
* May be a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]] example compared to some of the other insanity possible in the game, but...[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=402100 Zada, Hedron Grinder]] has the ability to make any instant or sorcery spell you cast that targets her affect every creature you control that is a legal target of that spell (as do [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414435 Mirrorwing Dragon]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107092 Ink-Treader Nephilim]], though your opponents can also take advantage of those). This can be pretty powerful in itself with the right cards (any cantrips, for instance, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389456 Cackling Counterpart]] gives you a copy of each creature you control for 1UU), but what ''really'' breaks Zada is pairing her with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=276199 Wild Defiance]], which gives creatures you control +3/+3 whenever they become the target of an instant or sorcery spell. This results in such things as, essentially, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=393898 Giant Growth]] becoming "G: Creatures you control get +6/+6 until end of turn", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407557 Slip Through Space]] becoming "U: Creatures you control get +3/+3 and can't be blocked this turn. Draw a card for each creature you control.", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366233 Predator's Rapport]] becoming "2G: You gain (at least) 7 life for each creature you control", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398416 Chandra's Ignition]] becoming "3RR: Each creature you control deals (at least) 3 damage to each other creature and each opponent" (particularly potent with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366385 Boros Reckoner]]), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220291 Hunter's Insight]] becoming "2G: Draw (at least) three cards for each creature not blocked this turn"...and those are just a few possibilities. Multiple copies of Wild Defiance also ''stack'', so having two of them out will give all of your creatures '''+6/+6''' if you target Zada with an instant or sorcery spell. You can also combine them with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=370670 Strionic Resonator]] to get ''two'' copies of the spell for each creature (except Zada herself...and yes, the second set of copies also trigger Wild Defiance), or with the aforementioned Isochron Scepter to have a relevant spell to cast every turn.
** Alternatively, use the Ink-Treader with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=290526 Nivmagus Elemental]], which allows you to exile an instant or sorcery spell you control to give itself two +1/+1 counters. Suddenly, every single-target instant or sorcery spell you have that can target a creature targets anything and everything you want (short of creatures with shroud or hexproof); you can either use a beneficial spell or a harmful one (or a potentially double-sided one such as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=417690 Harnessed Lightning]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=195630 Rite of Replication]]) and simply exile the copies that are targeting things you don't want to hit, buffing the Elemental up massively in the process. Of course, getting the Ink-Treader out in the first place requires 4 different colors of mana, preventing it from being ''that'' broken....
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Impactful Cards]]
* Perhaps the most powerful card-drawing card ever printed is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1147 Contract From Below]]. This references an old mechanic called "ante" where players set aside cards at the start of the game and the winner took them at the end, which was axed after falling foul of anti-gambling laws in some US states. The Contract is a ''ridiculous'' card; sure, you ante up an additional card and discard your hand (the latter of which could be ''beneficial'' in the right deck), but you get 7 cards for only one mana. Like all ante cards, it's illegal in all formats; even if this wasn't so, it's staggeringly overpowered and would likely ''still'' be banned.



* And, since it's been mentioned, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201311 Mind Twist]] itself. An obscenely undercosted discard spell, it was so loathed that it won a player poll of cards to be excluded from ''Fifth Edition'' by a substantial margin. It proved particularly unpleasant when pulled out early in the game using Dark Rituals and combined with one or more copies of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=109725 The Rack]]. It was the third card to be banned outright in all tournaments for being overpowered (Time Vault and Channel being the first two), and the first to be banned entirely for what it could do by itself, rather than any combos including the card. Nowadays it is unrestricted in Vintage and is banned in Legacy. It occupies a rather strange place in terms of power level - in Vintage, there are better things to do with Dark Ritual than getting rid of three cards from your opponent's hand, but in legacy, an early game mind twist off of fast mana can completely ruin many decks. Hymn to Tourach is a slightly less unfair version - while it is still deeply unfair at two mana and can easily mana screw an opponent by making them discard two mana sources, it is not nearly as devastating in conjunction with fast mana, and can't wipe out their entire hand out of nowhere later on.



* And, since it's been mentioned, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201311 Mind Twist]] itself. An obscenely undercosted discard spell, it was so loathed that it won a player poll of cards to be excluded from ''Fifth Edition'' by a substantial margin. It proved particularly unpleasant when pulled out early in the game using Dark Rituals and combined with one or more copies of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=109725 The Rack]]. It was the third card to be banned outright in all tournaments for being overpowered (Time Vault and Channel being the first two), and the first to be banned entirely for what it could do by itself, rather than any combos including the card. Nowadays it is unrestricted in Vintage and is banned in Legacy. It occupies a rather strange place in terms of power level - in Vintage, there are better things to do with Dark Ritual than getting rid of three cards from your opponent's hand, but in legacy, an early game mind twist off of fast mana can completely ruin many decks. Hymn to Tourach is a slightly less unfair version - while it is still deeply unfair at two mana and can easily mana screw an opponent by making them discard two mana sources, it is not nearly as devastating in conjunction with fast mana, and can't wipe out their entire hand out of nowhere later on.



* It's sometimes said the only reason turbo-mana instant [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=205422 Dark Ritual]] seemed fair was because it's always been around; it's powered numerous superfast combo decks over the years, and was once banned during the attempts to cripple Necropotence decks.
** Dark Rit was also thematically inappropriate; as the [[CompetitiveBalance Color Pie]] was re-defined, the decision was made to limit bursts of mana to Red.
** Speaking of ''Red'' turbo-mana, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=243487 Seething Song]] is currently banned in Modern because it fuels some degenerate combos, in particular Storm decks. Having a net profit of 2 red mana is already very good, but adding cost reducers like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=405244 Goblin Electromancer]] just pushed the value beyond what is comfortable.
* White had its own turn at being broken, with the combination of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159277 Winter Orb]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221108 Icy Manipulator]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=228262 Armageddon]] allowing them to shut down the entire game and win by default when their opponent ran out of cards. Such "prison decks" lost some degree of potency when the rules for Artifacts were changed (under the old rules, an Artifact's effect was "turned off" when it was tapped, meaning Winter Orb only affected the owner when they wanted it to), and largely disappeared with the advent of fast combo decks that won long before the board could be locked down, being replaced by much quicker "control" decks. [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=21304 Rising Waters]] is a more modern variant of Winter Orb.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159752 Zuran Orb]] is an extremely powerful card for any deck which needs life more than it needs Lands; Balance decks and Necrodecks love it equally, and it's especially powerful when combined with Fastbond.

to:

* It's sometimes said the only reason turbo-mana instant [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=205422 Dark Ritual]] seemed fair was because it's always been around; it's powered numerous superfast combo decks over the years, and was once banned during the attempts to cripple Necropotence decks.
** Dark Rit was also thematically inappropriate; as the [[CompetitiveBalance Color Pie]] was re-defined, the decision was made to limit bursts of mana to Red.
** Speaking of ''Red'' turbo-mana, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=243487 Seething Song]] is currently banned in Modern because it fuels some degenerate combos, in particular Storm decks. Having a net profit of 2 red mana is already very good, but adding cost reducers like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=405244 Goblin Electromancer]] just pushed the value beyond what is comfortable.
* White had its own turn at being broken, with the combination of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159277 Winter Orb]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221108 Icy Manipulator]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=228262 Armageddon]] allowing them to shut down the entire game and win by default when their opponent ran out of cards. Such "prison decks" lost some degree of potency when the rules for Artifacts were changed (under the old rules, an Artifact's effect was "turned off" when it was tapped, meaning Winter Orb only affected the owner when they wanted it to), and largely disappeared with the advent of fast combo decks that won long before the board could be locked down, being replaced by much quicker "control" decks. [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=21304 Rising Waters]] is a more modern variant of Winter Orb.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159752 Zuran Orb]] aspx?multiverseid=46424 Mind's Desire]] was restricted in Vintage and banned in Legacy before it was even tournament-legal. It was one of only two cards to get such a preemptive ban, the other being Memory Jar, owing to the number of disgustingly powerful things that can be done with as many free spells as you've played spells this turn; the typical play was to use Mind's Desire to build up the storm count further for a lethal [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45842 Tendrils of Agony]]. This ''was'' the metagame in Standard when it came out.
** 4UU might seem like a prohibitively high cost, especially since Mind's Desire must be played after many other spells to become a GameBreaker (Yawgmoth's Bargain
is the only other 6 converted mana cost card that gets used without being cheated into play), but with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=46016 spells that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=11588 cost nothing]] available, this problem is easily worked around.
** Counterspells, normally the bane of combo decks, can't do much to stop Mind's Desire, since countering the original does nothing to counter the copies created with Storm. [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=46558 Stifle]] was released in the same set as Mind's Desire; it probably would have been
an unused niche card if not for its ability to counter Storm.
** Mark Rosewater has said that Storm is extremely overpowered and may be the most broken ability or mechanic in the entire game, including everything from the Rath, Urza and Mirrodin blocks. His tumblr account, [[http://markrosewater.tumblr.com/ Blogatog]], frequently references the "Storm Scale", rating how likely a mechanic is to ever return to Standard, with 1 being "pretty much guaranteed" and 10 being "no way in hell we would ever risk it"; it is named this because Storm is located at 10.
** Tendrils was also a game breaker on its own-a deck could use tutors, draw spells, or Yawgmoth's Bargain, plus any of the above-mentioned free cards, to get a large enough Storm count to kill an opponent in one shot.
* While the Kamigawa block was otherwise fairly low-powered, it did have [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194971 Gifts Ungiven]]. This
extremely powerful tutor card essentially made your opponent pick how they were going to die; it was restricted in Vintage before January 19,2015, and is banned in several other formats.
** There was also [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=81979 Umezawa's Jitte]]. Not quite as game-breaking as the likes of Skullclamp, but severely undercosted
for its powerful abilities. Some commentors on the Gatherer website treat it as the "First Colourless Planeswalker" (an actual colorless planeswalker, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214350 Karn Liberated]], was later printed). The Jitte is currently banned in Modern because of its terrifyingly powerful and flexible abilities.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129898 Time Stop]] is a counterspell on crazy steroids. It doesn't just prevent a spell from resolving, even those immune to countermagic, it also wipes the stack and exiles
any deck spells still on it, preventing recursion by graveyard diving players. While fairly costly to cast, it's the ultimate lategame stopper for many a dangerous board situation.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=50461 Heartbeat of Spring]] is a green Mana Flare. Mana Flare always sucked, so they figured that printing it in the right color couldn't hurt anything. Turns out that Mana Flare just hadn't had the right environment. While a seemingly symmetrical effect, instead the card allowed for a very asymmetrical effect as it was only cast on the turn the player would win. A large amount of mana accelleration would be used, Heartbeat of Spring would come out, then a spell that untapped all your lands, followed by transmute cards like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=87994 Drift of Phantasms]],
which needs could be used to tutor not only for Heartbeat of Spring, but also for [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=84541 Early Harvest]] to untap your lands, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=88802 Maga, Traitor to Mortals]] and similar win conditions that cost three mana base plus X, where X could easily be 20 or more, allowing for an instant kill. It generated a top tier combo deck, and neither Early Harvest nor Heartbeat of Spring have ever been reprinted, very likely as a direct result of its existence.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194972 Sensei's Divining Top]]'s subtle yet powerful draw-manipulation (pay 1 mana to see and rearrange the top 3 cards of your library; tap: draw a card and put the Top on the top of your library) is incredibly powerful in the non-Vintage formats, being an inexpensive draw-fixer that lets you control your future draws, even after deck-shuffling tutoring. Its ability to draw a card also gives it the ability to dodge hatred, as it can draw a card and jump on top of your library to evade targeted destruction. In many cases it ''effectively lets you extend your "hand" to include the top three cards of your library''! Currently the Top is banned in Modern, both because of its disproportionate power/utility to cost ratio and because it simply makes games take too long.
*** In Legacy, the Top forms a nasty combo with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=121159 Counterbalance]]: Activate its first ability in response to an opponent's spell, rearrange cards so that a card with the same converted mana cost is on-top, counter the spell-all for a total of just 1 mana.
*** Another Legacy deck focused around Sensei's Divining Top is [[http://www.channelfireball.com/articles/legacy-miracles-deck-guide/ the Miracles deck]]. Cards with the Miracle mechanic can be cast at a greatly reduced cost, but only if they're the first card you drew this turn. With the Top, you can keep a card with Miracle from being drawn until you can cast it; the typical win condition is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=401634 Entreat the Angels]].
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Glimpse+of+Nature Glimpse of Nature]] got itself banned in Modern too. Much like Skullclamp, Glimpse can easily refill a ZergRush player's hand to keep up momentum, or to help a player draw a key part of a combo. If combined with lots of cheap or free creatures and a card like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=152556 Heritage Druid]] that can get you mana from those creatures the turn that they're played, you can just keep playing more creatures and drawing more cards and using the already-played creatures to get more mana to play more creatures to draw more cards...
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74441 Blazing Shoal]] got banned for its interaction with Infect: Using its alternate casting cost, a 9- or 10- mana creature would be fed to the Shoal to power up an unblockable creature, usually [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214383 Blighted Agent]], and win the game on the spot. Even without Infect, you can still essentially wipe out your opponent with pure damage in two hits from as early as turn two if your Shoal deck packs manlands like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=39439 Blinkmoth Nexus]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=213731 Inkmoth Nexus]].
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/pages/card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=195297 Jace, the Mind Sculptor]] has the distinction of being the first of the planeswalker card type to be banned, and while still in Standard too, the format which is both the most heavily scrutinized for card interactions and the one in which they are most reluctant to ban cards. In April, [[http://www.starcitygames.com/magic/standard/21641_The_Magic_Show_229_Ban_Jace_the_Mind_Sculptor.html one tournament]] saw ''every top 8 finisher'' running the maximum 4 copies of Jace, The Mind Sculptor. There were 32 copies of Jace and 32 copies of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=205019 Preordain]] in the top 8 - something almost unheard of in Magic history. At the time of the ban Jace was selling for between $80 and $100, a shocking cost for a card in a set released so soon.
** Jace also caused a rewriting of the Legendary rules on the basis that players were using ''other'' Jace Planeswalker cards to remove the Mind Sculptor version from the table.
* From the same set as Jace, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=198383 Stoneforge Mystic]], a card that allows you to fetch any Equipment, then later put it into play for two mana rather than what it actually costs. It was "merely" good for awhile, but then a card called [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214070 Sword of Feast and Famine]] came along to make it awesome, especially in combination with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=177545 man]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=213731 lands]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=208279 Squadron Hawk]], all of which have evasion, making repeated equips more bearable. ''Then'' a card called [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=233055 Batterskull]] was released in the New Phyrexia set, giving the Stoneforge Mystic an ''even better'' equipment to put on the table (essentially casting an uncounterable 4/4 creature with vigilance and lifelink for 2 mana as early as the third turn- or even the second turn, if you were lucky enough to have in your opening hand a Stoneforge Mystic, a Plains, a [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=208248 Mox Opal]], and two other zero-cost artifacts, and there were [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194078 several]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=206331 decent]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=218067 ones]] at the time). This was also banned at the same time as Jace, the [[http://www.wizards.com/magic/magazine/article.aspx?x=mtg%2Fdaily%2Ffeature%2F148 article explaining why]] commenting that the two were dominating tournament play to a degree possibly unprecedented in Magic history.
** Stoneforge Mystic also allows you to hasten the "Equip Avacyn, Angel of Hope with the Worldslayer sword, poke somebody, win game" process.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=239995 Griselbrand]]. He's not considered much of a thing in Standard, where eight mana is a pretty tall order (though he does show up in Standard decks from time to time). In Legacy, however, this guy is very powerful, being a Yawgmoth's Bargain attached to a 7/7 flier with lifelink. And once he resolves, the nature of the deck makes him hard to get rid of, as you have to beat not only your opponent's hand, but the top seven in their deck (though sneak and show's other creature, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=193452 Emrakul]] is even harder to kill). And with free counterspells like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159092 Force of Will]] commonplace in Legacy, that's difficult even with a counterspell of your own. Some even argue that he be banned for giving sneak and show too much consistency.
** Moving out of Sneak and Show, he now enables Tin Fins, a black storm combo deck that can go off turn 1 pretty often and turn 3 at the absolute latest thanks to his synergy with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=110525 Children of Korlis]]. Burn 14
life to draw 14 cards, play Children of Korlis, regain 14 life, burn that 14 to draw 14 more cards, play a second Children of Korlis and gain 28 life, draw out the rest of your deck and then storm [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45842 Tendrils of Agony]] with practically your whole deck in hand.
** He was banned in Commander, another game format where players have 40 life instead of 20... making his ability essentially free.
* Innistrad managed to bring its own headache in [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=227676 Snapcaster Mage]]. Combined with ways to flicker it--which were
more than it needs Lands; Balance decks a little profuse in Avacyn Restored--counterspells quickly became overly profuse on their own. Return to Ravnica is already filled with ways to contend with him...which are themselves so unnervingly powerful that players are already asking why Snapcaster wasn't just banned. The clincher is that he's not entirely R&D's fault--Pro Tour winners get a prize of designing a card of their own for a future set, ''and this is one of them.''
* One of those ways of dealing with Snapcaster Mage was [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=290529 Deathrite Shaman]], which can exile instants
and Necrodecks love sorceries from any graveyard while damaging your opponents at the same time. And it equally, also gets two other useful graveyard-exiling abilities, one for creatures that heals you life, and one for lands that gives you mana. Oh, and did we mention it also only costs one mana, that can be paid from either of two colors thanks to hybrid mana, and it's also a 1/2 creature? It's effectively a combination of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221896 Birds of Paradise]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Grim%20Lavamancer Grim Lavamancer]] (both of which are themselves considered pretty good cards) with a third ability to boot, and it's tougher to kill than either of those two cards. It has an amazing amount of utility and versatility in what it can do- it can mana-ramp, it can make your fetchlands even more useful by exiling them for mana after they're in the graveyard, it can hate on your opponent's graveyard to prevent them from reusing their cards with flashback or reanimation spells, it can deal damage, it can lifegain, and it's even an above-curve creature in black, being a 1/2 with no drawbacks for 1 mana. It's been referred to as the "first one-mana planeswalker", and many consider it to be the best one-mana creature ever printed. It was a fairly dominating force in every format it existed in, eventually being banned in Modern. In Standard it was considerably weaker thanks to the lack of fetchlands, but it was still a very powerful card.
* From the Commander 2013 set, we were given [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=376562 True-Name Nemesis]], lovingly nicknamed Progenifish due to being able to NoSell a player entirely. In the multiplayer style of Commander/EDH, he's not a big of a deal and encourages table politics and alliances. However, he's legal in Legacy and Vintage, where once he's on the battlefield he's pretty much there to stay barring someone being forced to sacrifice him or a board wipe. Due to his ability, just him alone will force the opponent to lose in 7 turns (the damage he does cannot be stopped at all, so he only needs to attack 7 times), however he also happens to be a blue merfolk; one of the most powerful tribal decks in Legacy (which happens to have 8 "lords" that can pump his strength and a slew of counterspells to avoid other shenanigans, meaning that more realistically the opponent only has about 3 turns to do something about him). He's the reason the Grixis Commander 2013 deck goes for almost triple the price of the others at most stores.
* While less powerful than Necropotence or Yawgmoth's Bargain, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83771 Dark Confidant]] is still one of Black's best draw cards, providing a second draw step every turn in exchange for life. In formats like Vintage, where most spells cost 3 mana or less, the drawback is so small that it might as well not exist.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=136142 Tarmogoyf]] can easily become a 3/4 or even bigger for just 2 mana, and gets bigger if the opponent tries to kill or counter it. It also doubles as a great comeback from Wrath of God-type effects, since board clearing doesn't affect its size or cost & the opponent will still be struggling to rebuild his or her own board.
* When they were originally printed in the Zendikar block, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=197881 Eye of Ugin]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=198312 Eldrazi Temple]] were fairly reasonable cards. At the time, there weren't very many Colorless Eldrazi spells and all of them cost at least 7 mana; you could use them to ramp up to the huge Eldrazi spells and get them out a few turns earlier but they didn't do much early on in the game. But then when the game returned to the plane of Zendikar years later in Battle for Zendikar, it gave the Eldrazi Lands a lot of new toys to play with- the Devoid mechanic let Eldrazi spells be Colorless even while they had Colored Mana in their costs, meaning they could be affected by Eye of Ugin and Eldrazi Temple, and there were many low-cost Eldrazi, allowing Eldrazi decks to become a force to be reckoned with in Modern, and then they got even better in ''Oath of the Gatewatch'' thanks to cards like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407512 Eldrazi Mimic]] (free to cast with Eye of Ugin out), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407519 Thought-Knot Seer]] (which could hose whatever answer your opponent might have for your plans before they ever got a chance to cast it), and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407517 Reality Smasher]] that could let a player easily flood the board with Eldrazi and win before his or her opponent can respond; it was not uncommon to see Eldrazi decks win on turn 3 (or even turn 2 with a perfect opening hand) in Modern if they got multiple free Eldrazi Mimics out on their first turn. Eldrazi Temple tapping for 2 mana every turn made it almost as good as a Sol Ring, and Eye of Ugin could sometimes effectively give ''even more of a mana advantage than that'' by casting lots of cheap or free spells very quickly. The complete dominance of Eldrazi decks in Modern got Eye of Ugin banned a few months after Oath of the Gatewatch was released; while it was legal, Eldrazi decks were an outright majority of top decks & 43% of all decks played at PT Atlanta 2016, one of the most lopsided Pro Tours in ''Magic'' history.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=373635 Prophet of Kruphix]] had its fair amount of play in Standard, but Elder Dragon Highlander was where the card truly shined. While it doesn't give itself any protection from threats on its own, being able to untap your lands and creatures and giving creatures in your hand flash on top of it gave any deck running blue or green an insane advantage: the two colors that loves creatures that could tap and bounce or counter threats outright. Which naturally meant that any deck that could run it did. About two years after it was introduced, the card was eventually banned in EDH.
* You better not be playing a mono-color deck if your opponent slaps [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=401636 Iona, Shield of Emeria]] on the field. Even with its big, scary mana cost there's always plenty of reanimate spells around.
** What really broke Iona is Commander; Your deck in Commander can never have a card of a different color than one printed on your chosen Commander. This is NOT restricted to their mana cost, but anywhere on the card. As most commander decks are around 2-3 colors, this essentially gave the controller of Iona the ability to shut down 1/3rd to 1/2 of the enemy deck,
especially in multiplayer since most people will share colors.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=386666 Siege Rhino]]: it's a Leatherback Baloth with Trample that activates Blood Tithe when it hits the battlefield for just 4 mana. Obviously undercosted and overpowered, but gets unfair really quickly when you start dropping multiples of it on your hapless opponent via clones, and ensuring it hits the battlefield as soon as possible via Bring to Light turns it into a Game Breaker.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394519 Collected Company]]. The card advantage it offered is nasty, especially given that it was in Standard alongside a lot of cheap,
powerful when creatures, such as the five [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398429 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398435 that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398442 transformed]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398423 into]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398432 planeswalkers]]. Not to mention the tempo advantage (6 mana worth of creatures for 4 mana), and the fact that itís instant speed, allowing you to cast it on your opponent's turn and/or leave open some mana for other powerful card you have. One use of casting it to summon creatures on your opponent's turn is that you can use it on your opponent's end step to pull out a werewolf that can only transform if no spells are cast during a turn (like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409976 this]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409961 this]]), and transform it immediately if your opponent didn't cast any spells during their turn, or transform it right after your next turn by not casting any spells yourself. One of its only weakness is that has a good degree of randomness and it doesnít summon the aforementioned Siege Rhino. It also powered many decks that became [[TierInducedScrappy top tier]], notably many variations of G/W or Bant that combined Collected Company with Fastbond.powerful but cheap creatures like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407654 Sylvan Advocate]] and other useful green and white spells like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394558 Dromoka's Command]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=391901 Rally the Ancestors]]. The Bant Collected Company deck only got more powerful in the Battle for Zendikar and Shadows over Innistrad blocks, when it got lots more cheap hate cards to work with, like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407667 Reflector Mage]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414338 Thalia, Heretic Cathar]]. Bant Company made up more than 40% of the top decks in standard in Eldritch Moon, before Collected Company rotated out of the format with the release of Kaladesh.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414295 Emrakul, the Promised End]]. While a strong card with an otherwise reasonable cost reduction mechanic, and a very strong cast trigger, Emrakul didn't quite break Standard until the release of Kaladesh and one other card: [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=417766 Aetherworks Marvel]]. Emrakul and the Marvel resulted in players conceding often as early as turn 4 due to having their board state trashed by their opponent controlling them, and still having a 13/13 flying creature that's immune to instants left over. This proved to be enough of an issue that resulted in a change on how banlist announcements are handled AND the first Standard banning in over five years.
* Also getting banned from Standard in January 2017: [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=417808 Smuggler's Copter]]. It's cheap, completely generic flyer with a solid 3/3 body, has the low cost of Crew 1 meaning anything stronger than a Wall can man it, is largely immune to sorcery-speed removal, and offers a loot when it goes into combat, allowing for any deck to filter through their draws. There was ''no'' incentive to not run it, thus reducing the diversity of decks in Standard. Simply waiting for it to rotate will do no good with the new rotation schedule, so Wizards decided to simply ban it.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Rath and Urza block]]



** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383012 Memory Jar]] was unique in being banned ''before'' it became tournament-legal; though it's an enormously depowered version of Contract From Below, drawing a new hand is still far, far too powerful an ability to have floating around in an environment full of other power cards.
*** What makes Memory Jar broken is that it's an artifact so it can be cast off be [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202578 Mishra's Workshop]], played in any deck and most importantly [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Tinker Tinkered]] for (just in case you couldn't draw any of your [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=247532 other]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202558 3 mana]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=729 draw sevens]]). [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=245187 Time Reversal]] has the same casting cost as Memory Jar but is utter trash simply because it is not an artifact, though it also has the disadvantage that if you don't win that turn, your opponent gets to keep their new hand of seven cards. It also isn't quite as abusable in some other respects, such as not being able to be recast under Yawgmoth's Will quite as easily.
** The above-mentioned [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5629 Yawgmoth's Will]] is one of the most powerful cards ever printed: just get a lot of cards into your graveyard (something Black is good at), especially multiple copies of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=382906 Dark Ritual]], then drop the Will and you suddenly have obscene card advantage, usually enough to win the game outright. Restricting it, uniquely, doesn't really help, since it's rare a player will ''want'' to draw it early on before they've had a chance to fill up their graveyard. [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/feature/245 A particularly nasty Vintage deck called Long.Dec]] (scroll down) used [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=34403 Burning Wish]] to abuse a sideboarded copy; with a 60% first-turn kill rate, it was one of the most powerful decks in the format's history and duly got Burning Wish (and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Lion%27s%20Eye%20Diamond Lion's Eye Diamond]], a card once thought completely useless) a place on the Restricted list alongside Yawgmoth's Will itself.
*** To give an idea of how broken Yawgmoth's Will is, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=227676 a creature which gives the same effect]] to just one card, and only an instant or sorcery at that, is one of the most powerful cards in Modern & even sees Legacy and Vintage[[note]]Creatures are very rare in Vintage because they're generally too underpowered for the format[[/note]] play.
*** Yawgmoth's Will may in fact be the most broken card in Magic: in the one format in which it's legal (and there only as a singleton), it manages to warp the format enough that [[http://www.starcitygames.com/magic/vintage/10071_Fine_Just_Ban_It_Already.html at least one article]] has been written calling for its ''outright banning''. In ''Vintage''. Again: there are people who wanted to ban a card from a format whose claim to fame is that it never bans card for being too powerful, for being ''[[BeyondTheImpossible too powerful for the rest of the format]].''
** Yawgie got another broken card to his name, in the form of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15193 Yawgmoth's Bargain]]. This is ''turbo Necropotence'', skipping that whole annoying part where you have to actually wait to get the cards. On the one hand, it's expensive. On the other hand, it's in the same block as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5851 Skirge Familiar.]] This did not end well; in fact, the Bargain was banned in the Extended format before it had even rotated into it.
*** There's a common joke that Yawgmoth's Bargain is "I'll take your common, useless [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220959 Healing Salve]] and give you an out-of-print, rare, Vintage-restricted, game-breaking [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=382841 Ancestral Recall]]." Far worse was that the Ineffable comboed with "spellshaper" cards in the next block, meaning you essentially had "Pay 1 life: Do whatever the hell you want."
*** Mark Rosewater has referenced Yawgmoth's Bargain a couple times when talking about mistakes he made in card design and this taught him that that anything that will exchange 1 card for 1 life and is reasonably costed is going to be broken. Interestingly, in another article, he implied that they justified the card by reasoning that 6 mana was too expensive for it to be broken (in all fairness, six mana is a lot).
*** "As an additional cost to cast Yawgmoth's Bargain, pay 19 life. Draw 19 cards."
** One of the best lands ever printed, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383133 Tolarian Academy]]. It's known for being the centerpiece to dozens of broken decks and infinite mana combos, including:
*** The [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=12626 Grim Monolith]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383133 Tolarian Academy]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=206332 Voltaic Key]] combo.
*** The [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383133 Tolarian Academy]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202627 Candelabra of Tawnos]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=397492 Capsize]] combo. This is a little harder to see since the main rule isn't actually on Candelabra of Tawnos. Old Artifacts were ''always'' assumed to tap to use their abilities. With at least nine Artifacts in play, you tap the Academy for nine blue mana, use the Candelabra to untap the Academy (cost 1), then use Capsize (with Buyback, cost 6) to return the Candelabra to your hand, casting it again afterwards (cost 1). The board is now back to how it was, except you have one blue mana. Repeat until you have more mana than you know what to do with.
** Somewhat similar to Tolarian Academy, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10422 Gaea's Cradle]]. Now, remember there are lands that are creatures, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=207334 mana source creatures]], cards that make ''lots'' of token creatures, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=233305 Living Lands]]. So, this can work out as a zero-cost, one-way [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159264 Mana Flare]] which also turns every creature into a Forest you don't need to tap.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=12626 Grim Monolith]] itself is also broken when combined with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202566 Power Artifact]], allowing it to untap for one less mana than is generated by tapping it.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=397553 Dream Halls]] is a powerful card which allows any coloured card to be played by simply discarding another. It was at it's most powerful when played with 'free' creatures like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10682 Great Whale]]; you could throw down a Great Whale and untap all your Lands, even though you hadn't actually tapped any lands to pay for it. Errata were issued quickly saying that such creatures could only untap lands if they came into play from your hand, though these have since been removed.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194980 Tinker]]. Combined tutoring with automatic casting, all for three mana and sacrificing an artifact. Since artifacts exist that cost nothing, as long as it was around it was impossible to balance any artifact with a high casting cost; all artifacts could be cast for three mana. Resulted in the so-called Pro Tour Tinker in 2003, where seven of the top eight decks had four copies of the spell. Currently banned in Legacy and Commander, and restricted in Vintage.
*** The card's original (pre-October 2004) wording had the player sacrifice an artifact as Tinker was cast. Since that wasn't considered an additional cost to the spell, a player with no artifacts to sacrifice could still cast Tinker.
*** Not to mention that Mirrodin Besieged "blessed" us with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221563 Blightsteel Colossus]] so now blue mages can win in one swing instead of two or, God forbid, three like the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=191312 old]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=189641 crappy]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=154081 robots]] of yore.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=397441 Recurring Nightmare]], a ''repeatable'' way to put creatures from your graveyard into play, thanks to having zero-cost automatic buyback. Combos with, among others things, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10682 Great Whale]]; endlessly Recurring a pair of Great Whales (one in the graveyard and one in play, constantly swapping which is which) creates an infinite mana loop. The killing blow from this deck was to shift Recurring Nightmare to a graveyarded [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=206719 Triskelion]], which was then Recurred until it had shot the other player to death; if you have it deal the last hit to itself, Triskelion has the advantage of killing itself, allowing it to return anew.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6150 Survival of the Fittest]] is a reusable, super cheap tutor which practically makes it broken by default. Once upon a time Vintage players feared a deck called German Tools 'N Tubbies or simply TNT that used Survival alongside [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202578 Mishra's Workshop]] to do lots of hideously broken things. The deck would get [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=247289 Anger]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=34833 Genesis]], and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=106473 Squee, Goblin Nabob]] into its graveyard in order to tutor up a hasty [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=13001 Goblin Welder]] who would procede to cheat [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221109 Juggernauts]] into play (they were the Tubbies; Juggernauts were credible threats back in the day, surprisingly). Also, it played singleton creatures who did something specialized to help them swing matchups that otherwise might be not so hot.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6151 Oath of Druids]] is another "balancing" card, and another one that turned out to be hideously broken if a deck was built around it. Continuing the Balance tradition of being ridiculously cheap, it ruled tournaments in various forms for a long time prior to being variously banned and restricted; an Oath deck simply plays control while it digs up the Oath, then goes off almost instantly. A classic combination was for players to use [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=79252 Forbidden Orchard]] to give their opponent creatures, allowing them to bust out huge creatures from their own deck as early as turn 2. These days it's potentially even ''more'' powerful, since the Oath works out as paying 2 mana for huge creatures like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=193452 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn]].
*** Oath also continues the proud tradition of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=692 Ancestral Recall]]: namely, ridiculous power disparity within cycles. Oath of Druids was part of a cycle of Enchantments in Exodus that provided a each player a benefit during their upkeep provided they have less of a specific resource than their opponent. The rest range from "unplayable trash" to "I might have seen it in Block Constructed". Here's the rest of the cycle: [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6098 Oath of Ghouls]] (black), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6048 Oath of Lieges]] (white), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6124 Oath of Mages]] (red) and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6072 Oath of Scholars]] (blue).
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4601 Cursed Scroll]] looks like a bluffing card, until you start emptying your hand before using it. When your opponent can only choose the one card you drew that turn, it works out as a colourless [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129732 Shock]]. For a while, you could reasonably expect to see four of these in every top-level deck which didn't like holding cards.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194975 Lotus Petal]] does exactly one third of what Black Lotus does, and ''still'' proved too powerful. Zvi Mowshowitz once defined a broken combo deck as one that would use Lotus Petal if it could.
** And Stronghold got in on the act with a Mox, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=212634 Mox Diamond]]. While not as powerful as its brothers in the Power Nine, it's still spent time on the restricted list.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4707 Intuition]] is much like Kamigawa's [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194971 Gifts Ungiven]], save that you only get one card; however, it has the huge advantage that you can search for three copies of the ''same'' card with it and give your opponent no choice at all as to what you end up getting. It's also powerful in reanimation decks, since it can be used to make your opponent put big creatures into your graveyard.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5166 Hermit Druid]] was killed off by bannings almost as soon as decks using it appeared; the general idea of "Angry Druid" decks was to have few or no basic lands, allowing the Druid to dump the entire library, filled with powerful creatures, into the graveyard. A reanimation spell would then be pulled back into the library with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=36113 Krosan Reclaimation]] and used to pull [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29944 Sutured Ghoul]] from the graveyard (usually picking up [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220473 Dragon Breath]] along the way); the resulting trampling mega-Ghoul, typically powered by multiple [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=109684 Krosan Cloudscrapers]], would generally easily win the game.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383011 Masticore]], an efficient creature that regenerates and most importantly gives your deck the ability to burn down creatures no matter what color you're playing.

to:

** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383012 Memory Jar]] was unique in being banned ''before'' it became tournament-legal; though it's an enormously depowered version of Contract From Below, drawing a new hand is still far, far too powerful an ability to have floating around in an environment full of other power cards.
*** ** What makes Memory Jar broken is that it's an artifact so it can be cast off be [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202578 Mishra's Workshop]], played in any deck and most importantly [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Tinker Tinkered]] for (just in case you couldn't draw any of your [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=247532 other]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202558 3 mana]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=729 draw sevens]]). [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=245187 Time Reversal]] has the same casting cost as Memory Jar but is utter trash simply because it is not an artifact, though it also has the disadvantage that if you don't win that turn, your opponent gets to keep their new hand of seven cards. It also isn't quite as abusable in some other respects, such as not being able to be recast under Yawgmoth's Will quite as easily.
** * The above-mentioned [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5629 Yawgmoth's Will]] is one of the most powerful cards ever printed: just get a lot of cards into your graveyard (something Black is good at), especially multiple copies of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=382906 Dark Ritual]], then drop the Will and you suddenly have obscene card advantage, usually enough to win the game outright. Restricting it, uniquely, doesn't really help, since it's rare a player will ''want'' to draw it early on before they've had a chance to fill up their graveyard. [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/feature/245 A particularly nasty Vintage deck called Long.Dec]] (scroll down) used [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=34403 Burning Wish]] to abuse a sideboarded copy; with a 60% first-turn kill rate, it was one of the most powerful decks in the format's history and duly got Burning Wish (and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Lion%27s%20Eye%20Diamond Lion's Eye Diamond]], a card once thought completely useless) a place on the Restricted list alongside Yawgmoth's Will itself.
*** ** To give an idea of how broken Yawgmoth's Will is, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=227676 a creature which gives the same effect]] to just one card, and only an instant or sorcery at that, is one of the most powerful cards in Modern & even sees Legacy and Vintage[[note]]Creatures are very rare in Vintage because they're generally too underpowered for the format[[/note]] play.
*** ** Yawgmoth's Will may in fact be the most broken card in Magic: in the one format in which it's legal (and there only as a singleton), it manages to warp the format enough that [[http://www.starcitygames.com/magic/vintage/10071_Fine_Just_Ban_It_Already.html at least one article]] has been written calling for its ''outright banning''. In ''Vintage''. Again: there are people who wanted to ban a card from a format whose claim to fame is that it never bans card for being too powerful, for being ''[[BeyondTheImpossible too powerful for the rest of the format]].''
** * Yawgie got another broken card to his name, in the form of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15193 Yawgmoth's Bargain]]. This is ''turbo Necropotence'', skipping that whole annoying part where you have to actually wait to get the cards. On the one hand, it's expensive. On the other hand, it's in the same block as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5851 Skirge Familiar.]] This did not end well; in fact, the Bargain was banned in the Extended format before it had even rotated into it.
*** ** There's a common joke that Yawgmoth's Bargain is "I'll take your common, useless [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220959 Healing Salve]] and give you an out-of-print, rare, Vintage-restricted, game-breaking [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=382841 Ancestral Recall]]." Far worse was that the Ineffable comboed with "spellshaper" cards in the next block, meaning you essentially had "Pay 1 life: Do whatever the hell you want."
*** ** Mark Rosewater has referenced Yawgmoth's Bargain a couple times when talking about mistakes he made in card design and this taught him that that anything that will exchange 1 card for 1 life and is reasonably costed is going to be broken. Interestingly, in another article, he implied that they justified the card by reasoning that 6 mana was too expensive for it to be broken (in all fairness, six mana is a lot).
*** ** "As an additional cost to cast Yawgmoth's Bargain, pay 19 life. Draw 19 cards."
** * One of the best lands ever printed, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383133 Tolarian Academy]]. It's known for being the centerpiece to dozens of broken decks and infinite mana combos, including:
*** ** The [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=12626 Grim Monolith]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383133 Tolarian Academy]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=206332 Voltaic Key]] combo.
*** ** The [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383133 Tolarian Academy]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202627 Candelabra of Tawnos]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=397492 Capsize]] combo. This is a little harder to see since the main rule isn't actually on Candelabra of Tawnos. Old Artifacts were ''always'' assumed to tap to use their abilities. With at least nine Artifacts in play, you tap the Academy for nine blue mana, use the Candelabra to untap the Academy (cost 1), then use Capsize (with Buyback, cost 6) to return the Candelabra to your hand, casting it again afterwards (cost 1). The board is now back to how it was, except you have one blue mana. Repeat until you have more mana than you know what to do with.
** * Somewhat similar to Tolarian Academy, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10422 Gaea's Cradle]]. Now, remember there are lands that are creatures, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=207334 mana source creatures]], cards that make ''lots'' of token creatures, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=233305 Living Lands]]. So, this can work out as a zero-cost, one-way [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159264 Mana Flare]] which also turns every creature into a Forest you don't need to tap.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=12626 Grim Monolith]] itself is also broken when combined with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202566 Power Artifact]], allowing it to untap for one less mana than is generated by tapping it.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=397553 Dream Halls]] is a powerful card which allows any coloured card to be played by simply discarding another. It was at it's most powerful when played with 'free' creatures like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10682 Great Whale]]; you could throw down a Great Whale and untap all your Lands, even though you hadn't actually tapped any lands to pay for it. Errata were issued quickly saying that such creatures could only untap lands if they came into play from your hand, though these have since been removed.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194980 Tinker]]. Combined tutoring with automatic casting, all for three mana and sacrificing an artifact. Since artifacts exist that cost nothing, as long as it was around it was impossible to balance any artifact with a high casting cost; all artifacts could be cast for three mana. Resulted in the so-called Pro Tour Tinker in 2003, where seven of the top eight decks had four copies of the spell. Currently banned in Legacy and Commander, and restricted in Vintage.
*** ** The card's original (pre-October 2004) wording had the player sacrifice an artifact as Tinker was cast. Since that wasn't considered an additional cost to the spell, a player with no artifacts to sacrifice could still cast Tinker.
*** ** Not to mention that Mirrodin Besieged "blessed" us with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221563 Blightsteel Colossus]] so now blue mages can win in one swing instead of two or, God forbid, three like the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=191312 old]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=189641 crappy]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=154081 robots]] of yore.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=397441 Recurring Nightmare]], a ''repeatable'' way to put creatures from your graveyard into play, thanks to having zero-cost automatic buyback. Combos with, among others things, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10682 Great Whale]]; endlessly Recurring a pair of Great Whales (one in the graveyard and one in play, constantly swapping which is which) creates an infinite mana loop. The killing blow from this deck was to shift Recurring Nightmare to a graveyarded [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=206719 Triskelion]], which was then Recurred until it had shot the other player to death; if you have it deal the last hit to itself, Triskelion has the advantage of killing itself, allowing it to return anew.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6150 Survival of the Fittest]] is a reusable, super cheap tutor which practically makes it broken by default. Once upon a time Vintage players feared a deck called German Tools 'N Tubbies or simply TNT that used Survival alongside [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202578 Mishra's Workshop]] to do lots of hideously broken things. The deck would get [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=247289 Anger]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=34833 Genesis]], and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=106473 Squee, Goblin Nabob]] into its graveyard in order to tutor up a hasty [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=13001 Goblin Welder]] who would procede to cheat [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221109 Juggernauts]] into play (they were the Tubbies; Juggernauts were credible threats back in the day, surprisingly). Also, it played singleton creatures who did something specialized to help them swing matchups that otherwise might be not so hot.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6151 Oath of Druids]] is another "balancing" card, and another one that turned out to be hideously broken if a deck was built around it. Continuing the Balance tradition of being ridiculously cheap, it ruled tournaments in various forms for a long time prior to being variously banned and restricted; an Oath deck simply plays control while it digs up the Oath, then goes off almost instantly. A classic combination was for players to use [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=79252 Forbidden Orchard]] to give their opponent creatures, allowing them to bust out huge creatures from their own deck as early as turn 2. These days it's potentially even ''more'' powerful, since the Oath works out as paying 2 mana for huge creatures like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=193452 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn]].
*** ** Oath also continues the proud tradition of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=692 Ancestral Recall]]: namely, ridiculous power disparity within cycles. Oath of Druids was part of a cycle of Enchantments in Exodus that provided a each player a benefit during their upkeep provided they have less of a specific resource than their opponent. The rest range from "unplayable trash" to "I might have seen it in Block Constructed". Here's the rest of the cycle: [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6098 Oath of Ghouls]] (black), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6048 Oath of Lieges]] (white), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6124 Oath of Mages]] (red) and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6072 Oath of Scholars]] (blue).
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4601 Cursed Scroll]] looks like a bluffing card, until you start emptying your hand before using it. When your opponent can only choose the one card you drew that turn, it works out as a colourless [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129732 Shock]]. For a while, you could reasonably expect to see four of these in every top-level deck which didn't like holding cards.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194975 Lotus Petal]] does exactly one third of what Black Lotus does, and ''still'' proved too powerful. Zvi Mowshowitz once defined a broken combo deck as one that would use Lotus Petal if it could.
** * And Stronghold got in on the act with a Mox, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=212634 Mox Diamond]]. While not as powerful as its brothers in the Power Nine, it's still spent time on the restricted list.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4707 Intuition]] is much like Kamigawa's [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194971 Gifts Ungiven]], save that you only get one card; however, it has the huge advantage that you can search for three copies of the ''same'' card with it and give your opponent no choice at all as to what you end up getting. It's also powerful in reanimation decks, since it can be used to make your opponent put big creatures into your graveyard.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5166 Hermit Druid]] was killed off by bannings almost as soon as decks using it appeared; the general idea of "Angry Druid" decks was to have few or no basic lands, allowing the Druid to dump the entire library, filled with powerful creatures, into the graveyard. A reanimation spell would then be pulled back into the library with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=36113 Krosan Reclaimation]] and used to pull [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29944 Sutured Ghoul]] from the graveyard (usually picking up [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220473 Dragon Breath]] along the way); the resulting trampling mega-Ghoul, typically powered by multiple [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=109684 Krosan Cloudscrapers]], would generally easily win the game.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=383011 Masticore]], an efficient creature that regenerates and most importantly gives your deck the ability to burn down creatures no matter what color you're playing.



** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=247532 Windfall]], similar to Timetwister in its ability to refill your hand while giving your opponent nothing. This was during "Combo Winter" when every competitive deck was built around some kind of turn 1-2 cheese; players commonly dumped an entire hand of broken mana accelerators onto the board on their first turn and then played Windfall, drawing up to 7 new cards. Worse, your opponent probably had a similar deck and hopefully went through several mulligans to assemble it, leaving them with a small but devastatingly powerful hand. [[ShameIfSomethingHappened It would suck if they just had to throw it and draw an equally small hand of random cards, wouldn't it?]]
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5806 Fluctuator]]. Cycling is a mechanic which allows you to discard a card in your hand to draw a new one, by paying the cycling cost. All cycling costs at the time were the same as the amount this card reduces them by. In other words, if you don't like your hand, just throw out cards and draw more until you do, all for nothing.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10423 Time Spiral]] was broken for pretty much the same reasons as the original Timetwister. Of course, it's more expensive. But came out in the same format as Tolarian Academy. Oh, and because Tolarian Academy can be among the lands you untap, you can quite easily ''gain'' mana by casting it.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6076 Mind Over Matter]], one of the most versatile combo enablers in magic. Among many many others, see Tolarian Academy. Again.
*** The card has become somewhat of a bane in Elder Dragon Highlander format, as pairing it with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=205058 Temple Bell]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=240052 Otherwodl Atlas]], or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=376379 Jace's Archivist]] while having [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194911 Ulamog the Infinite Gyre]] in your deck means that you can deck out all your opponents without decking yourself out. Pairing it with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=376254 Azami, Lady of Scrolls]] creates an infinite draw mechanic immediately, while pairing it with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=106426 Arcanis the Omnipotent]] gives you a net gain of 2 cards every time you tap and discard to untap; both combine with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=230788 Laboratory Maniac]] to win you the game instantly. All these are made all the worse because Mind Over Matter also lets you untap LANDS, meaning you can dump excess cards to untap lands to add mana to pay for Counterspells; generally, once Mind Over Matter is on the field with one of the other Combo pieces out, it's all-but unstoppable except for [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=376394 Krosan Grip]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=110499 Trickbind]].
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389662 Sapphire Medallion]]. Because blue has such problems getting hold of mana in the Urza Block they needed a special card to make all their spells cheaper. Presumably the card letting you set your opponent's deck on fire wasn't powerful enough.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15246 Metalworker]], a hideously undercosted creature that dovetailed right into the "have loads of artifacts" Tolarian Academy decks to give them even more fast mana. These days it can produce ''infinite'' mana when combined with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=48141 Voltaic Construct]]; all you need to do is have more than one Artifact in your hand.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5863 Morphling]], because creatures that can't do absolutely everything are so dull. Any two of its abilities would make it undercosted; with all five, there's little wonder how it earned the nickname "Superman." Morphling's silver-bordered sibling, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74296 Greater Morphling]], [[SerialEscalation dials up the size of its ability pool and does even more]].
*** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Discussion.aspx?multiverseid=43581 Pemmin's Aura]] can give any creature all of Morphling's abilities, for only 3 mana! You can even stick it on one of your opponent's creatures and use it's +1/-1 effect to kill it! Amusingly, Pemmin's Aura is an anagram of "I am Superman," a reference to the nickname of the Morphling whose abilities it granted.
*** Morphling was even more powerful under the old rules when combat damage was on the stack, because players with excessive amounts of mana could pump Morphling to 5/1, let the 5 damage go on the stack, then shift back to -1/7, effectively making it 5/7 that combat. The theoretical disadvantage of this is that it costs 14 mana, but in a blue-heavy [[MightyGlacier control deck]] with artifact mana and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=thawing+glaciers Thawing Glaciers]], this was almost never a problem. It didn't hurt that this was before Wizards had started power creeping most creatures, so a 3/3 for 5 mana with flying by itself wasn't far behind the curve to begin with.
** If it's just big creatures you want, then Tinker for a [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=207888 Phyrexian Processor]]. The ability to put Minions into play for 4 mana no matter how big they are is powerful in itself, nevermind all the ways to make it activate more cheaply or use it multiple times in a single turn.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15143 Replenish]] auto-casts every Enchantment in your graveyard for 4 mana. Bear in mind that [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15138 Academy Rector]] costs the same, only gets one Enchantment into play, and has to die first, and is regarded as one of White's best cards. The Replenish deck would sit back loading the Graveyard with Enchantments using [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5596 Attunement]], then throw out expensive, powerful Enchantments like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=22028 Parallax Wave]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15142 Opalescence]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=21259 Seal of Clensing]] all at the same time. It was duly banned or restricted in every format.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4881 Humility]]. There are cards that hose colours, cards that hose types, but only one hoses "creatures that do anything" to this scale. To add to the fun, if you can turn your opponent's lands into creatures they can't tap for mana anymore. Play it with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15142 Opalescence]] in play to make your opponent's head explode as they try in vain to figure out how the two cards interact with each other (just look at the errata on Humility - hey, you just lost D6 SAN and gained ten Cthulhu mythos. Congrats!). Depending on the order of casting, day of the week, phase of the moon, position of the [[AlienSky five suns]], and whether your human sacrifices have pleased benevolent Yawgmoth, Humility can actually end up removing its own effect and becoming a 4/4 creature.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389697 Stroke of Genius]] is one of the most powerful card-drawing cards, to the point at one Pro Tour a player in a tournament match resigned after asking to read the card text. It was typically the killing card of any Urza-block blue deck; making the other player draw 54 cards being auto-lose. This was often preceded by the player using it to dig out most of their own library, a procedure perhaps inevitably called "stroking yourself."
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=35056 Worldgorger Dragon]] ended up banned in several formats due to the way it interacted with enchantments like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3621 Necromancy]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159249 Animate Dead]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=184612 Dance of the Dead]]. The general idea was to get the Dragon into a graveyard, then get it back into play with one of these enchantments; the Dragon would remove the Enchantment that bought it to life from the game as it came into play, killing itself and bringing back all your other permanents...untapped. Along with them, the enchantment would return, ready to target the Dragon again, and in response you tap the lands for mana. This could be repeated indefinitely, and would result in a draw unless it could be interrupted somehow. The simplest win condition for such decks was to channel the mana into a massive instant-speed spell like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=23086 Ghitu Fire]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5677 Stroke of Genius]], but later versions would graveyard a card like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129913 Ambassador Laquatus]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=130538 Shivan Hellkite]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5233 Sliver Queen]] with an infinitely repeatable ability, then have the enchantment target it instead of the Dragon to break the loop. A third version was to use cards with powerful comes-into-play effects which triggered every time the cycle ran; one variant used [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=51628 Eternal Witness]] to endlessly recycle and use [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=692 Ancestral Recall]] on the other player until they ran out of cards.
** The interaction between Dragon and Animate Dead is also notorious for being one heck of a rules headache. Even though Dragon is no longer the dominant force it once was (although it still shows up and places from time to time) it's been suggested (although not proven) that it remains of the Legacy banned list because of the rules problems it creates. The combo has been called a "rules glitch" and when it was commonly played judges noted that they got inordinate amounts of rules questions regarding interactions with the combo. In addition, players tend to dislike playing against the deck because without a [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201220 Bazaar of Baghdad]] in play or a win condition in hand or the graveyard casting a reanimate enchantment on Dragon ends the game in a draw because there is no way to break the loop. This is a common tactic employed by Dragon players in the face of defeat (Necromancy even let them do at instant speed so they could respond to lethal damage by forcing a draw) and so it was not too uncommon to see matches with Dragon decks go to 4, 5 or more rounds.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=46424 Mind's Desire]] was restricted in Vintage and banned in Legacy before it was even tournament-legal. It was one of only two cards to get such a preemptive ban, the other being Memory Jar, owing to the number of disgustingly powerful things that can be done with as many free spells as you've played spells this turn; the typical play was to use Mind's Desire to build up the storm count further for a lethal [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45842 Tendrils of Agony]]. This ''was'' the metagame in Standard when it came out.
** 4UU might seem like a prohibitively high cost, especially since Mind's Desire must be played after many other spells to become a GameBreaker (Yawgmoth's Bargain is the only other 6 converted mana cost card that gets used without being cheated into play), but with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=46016 spells that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=11588 cost nothing]] available, this problem is easily worked around.
** Counterspells, normally the bane of combo decks, can't do much to stop Mind's Desire, since countering the original does nothing to counter the copies created with Storm. [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=46558 Stifle]] was released in the same set as Mind's Desire; it probably would have been an unused niche card if not for its ability to counter Storm.
** Mark Rosewater has said that Storm is extremely overpowered and may be the most broken ability or mechanic in the entire game, including everything from the Rath, Urza and Mirrodin blocks. His tumblr account, [[http://markrosewater.tumblr.com/ Blogatog]], frequently references the "Storm Scale", rating how likely a mechanic is to ever return to Standard, with 1 being "pretty much guaranteed" and 10 being "no way in hell we would ever risk it"; it is named this because Storm is located at 10.
** Tendrils was also a game breaker on its own-a deck could use tutors, draw spells, or Yawgmoth's Bargain, plus any of the above-mentioned free cards, to get a large enough Storm count to kill an opponent in one shot.

to:

** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=247532 Windfall]], similar to Timetwister in its ability to refill your hand while giving your opponent nothing. This was during "Combo Winter" when every competitive deck was built around some kind of turn 1-2 cheese; players commonly dumped an entire hand of broken mana accelerators onto the board on their first turn and then played Windfall, drawing up to 7 new cards. Worse, your opponent probably had a similar deck and hopefully went through several mulligans to assemble it, leaving them with a small but devastatingly powerful hand. [[ShameIfSomethingHappened It would suck if they just had to throw it and draw an equally small hand of random cards, wouldn't it?]]
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5806 Fluctuator]]. Cycling is a mechanic which allows you to discard a card in your hand to draw a new one, by paying the cycling cost. All cycling costs at the time were the same as the amount this card reduces them by. In other words, if you don't like your hand, just throw out cards and draw more until you do, all for nothing.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10423 Time Spiral]] was broken for pretty much the same reasons as the original Timetwister. Of course, it's more expensive. But came out in the same format as Tolarian Academy. Oh, and because Tolarian Academy can be among the lands you untap, you can quite easily ''gain'' mana by casting it.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6076 Mind Over Matter]], one of the most versatile combo enablers in magic. Among many many others, see Tolarian Academy. Again.
*** ** The card has become somewhat of a bane in Elder Dragon Highlander format, as pairing it with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=205058 Temple Bell]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=240052 Otherwodl Atlas]], or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=376379 Jace's Archivist]] while having [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194911 Ulamog the Infinite Gyre]] in your deck means that you can deck out all your opponents without decking yourself out. Pairing it with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=376254 Azami, Lady of Scrolls]] creates an infinite draw mechanic immediately, while pairing it with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=106426 Arcanis the Omnipotent]] gives you a net gain of 2 cards every time you tap and discard to untap; both combine with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=230788 Laboratory Maniac]] to win you the game instantly. All these are made all the worse because Mind Over Matter also lets you untap LANDS, meaning you can dump excess cards to untap lands to add mana to pay for Counterspells; generally, once Mind Over Matter is on the field with one of the other Combo pieces out, it's all-but unstoppable except for [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=376394 Krosan Grip]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=110499 Trickbind]].
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389662 Sapphire Medallion]]. Because blue has such problems getting hold of mana in the Urza Block they needed a special card to make all their spells cheaper. Presumably the card letting you set your opponent's deck on fire wasn't powerful enough.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15246 Metalworker]], a hideously undercosted creature that dovetailed right into the "have loads of artifacts" Tolarian Academy decks to give them even more fast mana. These days it can produce ''infinite'' mana when combined with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=48141 Voltaic Construct]]; all you need to do is have more than one Artifact in your hand.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5863 Morphling]], because creatures that can't do absolutely everything are so dull. Any two of its abilities would make it undercosted; with all five, there's little wonder how it earned the nickname "Superman." Morphling's silver-bordered sibling, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74296 Greater Morphling]], [[SerialEscalation dials up the size of its ability pool and does even more]].
*** ** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Discussion.aspx?multiverseid=43581 Pemmin's Aura]] can give any creature all of Morphling's abilities, for only 3 mana! You can even stick it on one of your opponent's creatures and use it's +1/-1 effect to kill it! Amusingly, Pemmin's Aura is an anagram of "I am Superman," a reference to the nickname of the Morphling whose abilities it granted.
*** ** Morphling was even more powerful under the old rules when combat damage was on the stack, because players with excessive amounts of mana could pump Morphling to 5/1, let the 5 damage go on the stack, then shift back to -1/7, effectively making it 5/7 that combat. The theoretical disadvantage of this is that it costs 14 mana, but in a blue-heavy [[MightyGlacier control deck]] with artifact mana and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=thawing+glaciers Thawing Glaciers]], this was almost never a problem. It didn't hurt that this was before Wizards had started power creeping most creatures, so a 3/3 for 5 mana with flying by itself wasn't far behind the curve to begin with.
** * If it's just big creatures you want, then Tinker for a [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=207888 Phyrexian Processor]]. The ability to put Minions into play for 4 mana no matter how big they are is powerful in itself, nevermind all the ways to make it activate more cheaply or use it multiple times in a single turn.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15143 Replenish]] auto-casts every Enchantment in your graveyard for 4 mana. Bear in mind that [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15138 Academy Rector]] costs the same, only gets one Enchantment into play, and has to die first, and is regarded as one of White's best cards. The Replenish deck would sit back loading the Graveyard with Enchantments using [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5596 Attunement]], then throw out expensive, powerful Enchantments like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=22028 Parallax Wave]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15142 Opalescence]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=21259 Seal of Clensing]] all at the same time. It was duly banned or restricted in every format.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4881 Humility]]. There are cards that hose colours, cards that hose types, but only one hoses "creatures that do anything" to this scale. To add to the fun, if you can turn your opponent's lands into creatures they can't tap for mana anymore. Play it with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15142 Opalescence]] in play to make your opponent's head explode as they try in vain to figure out how the two cards interact with each other (just look at the errata on Humility - hey, you just lost D6 SAN and gained ten Cthulhu mythos. Congrats!). Depending on the order of casting, day of the week, phase of the moon, position of the [[AlienSky five suns]], and whether your human sacrifices have pleased benevolent Yawgmoth, Humility can actually end up removing its own effect and becoming a 4/4 creature.
** * [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389697 Stroke of Genius]] is one of the most powerful card-drawing cards, to the point at one Pro Tour a player in a tournament match resigned after asking to read the card text. It was typically the killing card of any Urza-block blue deck; making the other player draw 54 cards being auto-lose. This was often preceded by the player using it to dig out most of their own library, a procedure perhaps inevitably called "stroking yourself."
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=35056 Worldgorger Dragon]] ended up banned in several formats due to the way it interacted with enchantments like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3621 Necromancy]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159249 Animate Dead]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=184612 Dance of the Dead]]. The general idea was to get the Dragon into a graveyard, then get it back into play with one of these enchantments; the Dragon would remove the Enchantment that bought it to life from the game as it came into play, killing itself and bringing back all your other permanents...untapped. Along with them, the enchantment would return, ready to target the Dragon again, and in response you tap the lands for mana. This could be repeated indefinitely, and would result in a draw unless it could be interrupted somehow. The simplest win condition for such decks was to channel the mana into a massive instant-speed spell like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=23086 Ghitu Fire]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5677 Stroke of Genius]], but later versions would graveyard a card like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129913 Ambassador Laquatus]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=130538 Shivan Hellkite]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5233 Sliver Queen]] with an infinitely repeatable ability, then have the enchantment target it instead of the Dragon to break the loop. A third version was to use cards with powerful comes-into-play effects which triggered every time the cycle ran; one variant used [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=51628 Eternal Witness]] to endlessly recycle and use [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=692 Ancestral Recall]] on the other player until they ran out of cards.
** The interaction between Dragon and Animate Dead is also notorious for being one heck of a rules headache. Even though Dragon is no longer the dominant force it once was (although it still shows up and places from time to time) it's been suggested (although not proven) that it remains of the Legacy banned list because of the rules problems it creates. The combo has been called a "rules glitch" and when it was commonly played judges noted that they got inordinate amounts of rules questions regarding interactions with the combo. In addition, players tend to dislike playing against the deck because without a [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201220 Bazaar of Baghdad]] in play or a win condition in hand or the graveyard casting a reanimate enchantment on Dragon ends the game in a draw because there is no way to break the loop. This is a common tactic employed by Dragon players in the face of defeat (Necromancy even let them do at instant speed so they could respond to lethal damage by forcing a draw) and so it was not too uncommon to see matches with Dragon decks go to 4, 5 or more rounds.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=46424 Mind's Desire]] was restricted in Vintage and banned in Legacy before it was even tournament-legal. It was one of only two cards to get such a preemptive ban, the other being Memory Jar, owing to the number of disgustingly powerful things that can be done with as many free spells as you've played spells this turn; the typical play was to use Mind's Desire to build up the storm count further for a lethal [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45842 Tendrils of Agony]]. This ''was'' the metagame in Standard when it came out.
** 4UU might seem like a prohibitively high cost, especially since Mind's Desire must be played after many other spells to become a GameBreaker (Yawgmoth's Bargain is the only other 6 converted mana cost card that gets used without being cheated into play), but with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=46016 spells that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=11588 cost nothing]] available, this problem is easily worked around.
** Counterspells, normally the bane of combo decks, can't do much to stop Mind's Desire, since countering the original does nothing to counter the copies created with Storm. [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=46558 Stifle]] was released in the same set as Mind's Desire; it probably would have been an unused niche card if not for its ability to counter Storm.
** Mark Rosewater has said that Storm is extremely overpowered and may be the most broken ability or mechanic in the entire game, including everything from the Rath, Urza and Mirrodin blocks. His tumblr account, [[http://markrosewater.tumblr.com/ Blogatog]], frequently references the "Storm Scale", rating how likely a mechanic is to ever return to Standard, with 1 being "pretty much guaranteed" and 10 being "no way in hell we would ever risk it"; it is named this because Storm is located at 10.
** Tendrils was also a game breaker on its own-a deck could use tutors, draw spells, or Yawgmoth's Bargain, plus any of the above-mentioned free cards, to get a large enough Storm count to kill an opponent in one shot.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Mirrodin]]



* While the Kamigawa block was otherwise fairly low-powered, it did have [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194971 Gifts Ungiven]]. This extremely powerful tutor card essentially made your opponent pick how they were going to die; it was restricted in Vintage before January 19,2015, and is banned in several other formats.
** There was also [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=81979 Umezawa's Jitte]]. Not quite as game-breaking as the likes of Skullclamp, but severely undercosted for its powerful abilities. Some commentors on the Gatherer website treat it as the "First Colourless Planeswalker" (an actual colorless planeswalker, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214350 Karn Liberated]], was later printed). The Jitte is currently banned in Modern because of its terrifyingly powerful and flexible abilities.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129898 Time Stop]] is a counterspell on crazy steroids. It doesn't just prevent a spell from resolving, even those immune to countermagic, it also wipes the stack and exiles any spells still on it, preventing recursion by graveyard diving players. While fairly costly to cast, it's the ultimate lategame stopper for many a dangerous board situation.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=50461 Heartbeat of Spring]] is a green Mana Flare. Mana Flare always sucked, so they figured that printing it in the right color couldn't hurt anything. Turns out that Mana Flare just hadn't had the right environment. While a seemingly symmetrical effect, instead the card allowed for a very asymmetrical effect as it was only cast on the turn the player would win. A large amount of mana accelleration would be used, Heartbeat of Spring would come out, then a spell that untapped all your lands, followed by transmute cards like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=87994 Drift of Phantasms]], which could be used to tutor not only for Heartbeat of Spring, but also for [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=84541 Early Harvest]] to untap your lands, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=88802 Maga, Traitor to Mortals]] and similar win conditions that cost three mana base plus X, where X could easily be 20 or more, allowing for an instant kill. It generated a top tier combo deck, and neither Early Harvest nor Heartbeat of Spring have ever been reprinted, very likely as a direct result of its existence.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194972 Sensei's Divining Top]]'s subtle yet powerful draw-manipulation (pay 1 mana to see and rearrange the top 3 cards of your library; tap: draw a card and put the Top on the top of your library) is incredibly powerful in the non-Vintage formats, being an inexpensive draw-fixer that lets you control your future draws, even after deck-shuffling tutoring. Its ability to draw a card also gives it the ability to dodge hatred, as it can draw a card and jump on top of your library to evade targeted destruction. In many cases it ''effectively lets you extend your "hand" to include the top three cards of your library''! Currently the Top is banned in Modern, both because of its disproportionate power/utility to cost ratio and because it simply makes games take too long.
*** In Legacy, the Top forms a nasty combo with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=121159 Counterbalance]]: Activate its first ability in response to an opponent's spell, rearrange cards so that a card with the same converted mana cost is on-top, counter the spell-all for a total of just 1 mana.
*** Another Legacy deck focused around Sensei's Divining Top is [[http://www.channelfireball.com/articles/legacy-miracles-deck-guide/ the Miracles deck]]. Cards with the Miracle mechanic can be cast at a greatly reduced cost, but only if they're the first card you drew this turn. With the Top, you can keep a card with Miracle from being drawn until you can cast it; the typical win condition is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=401634 Entreat the Angels]].
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Glimpse+of+Nature Glimpse of Nature]] got itself banned in Modern too. Much like Skullclamp, Glimpse can easily refill a ZergRush player's hand to keep up momentum, or to help a player draw a key part of a combo. If combined with lots of cheap or free creatures and a card like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=152556 Heritage Druid]] that can get you mana from those creatures the turn that they're played, you can just keep playing more creatures and drawing more cards and using the already-played creatures to get more mana to play more creatures to draw more cards...
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74441 Blazing Shoal]] got banned for its interaction with Infect: Using its alternate casting cost, a 9- or 10- mana creature would be fed to the Shoal to power up an unblockable creature, usually [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214383 Blighted Agent]], and win the game on the spot. Even without Infect, you can still essentially wipe out your opponent with pure damage in two hits from as early as turn two if your Shoal deck packs manlands like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=39439 Blinkmoth Nexus]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=213731 Inkmoth Nexus]].
* Some Eternal deck archetypes are built on quirky instawin combos; [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=146022 Painter]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4610 Grindstone]] comes to mind as one of the more prolific, mainly due to the satisfaction of milling someone's entire deck in one go. These cards are rarely banned on the grounds that getting the cards ''out'' is the real challenge of combo decks.
** Another popular instawin combo has been broadly termed "Hulk Flash," which worked by comboing [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107598 Protean Hulk]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=16440 Flash]] to assemble a suite of game-winning creatures. Some variants of the deck could win on the opponent's upkeep of the first turn when going second using [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Gemstone%20Caverns Gemstone Caverns]] and either [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=124474 Simian Spirit Guide]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Elvish%20Spirit%20Guide Elvish Spirit Guide]] to get the mana to cast Flash. There are a lot of sets of creatures that can be gotten with this that will give an insta-win if all come into play simultaneously- 4 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=49090 Disciple of the Vaults]], 4 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3599 Phyrexian Marauders]], and 4 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5222 Shifting Walls]], for instance, since the Marauders and Walls come in with no counters and instantly die, each causing all 4 Disciples to go off for a total of 32 points of life loss, all on your opponent's first upkeep.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=121155 Dark Depths]] is one of those cards that combo players study intently to figure out how they can make them go off quickly, and for a long time they couldn't. But sure enough, with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=131005 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth]] to make Dark Depths produce mana and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=192232 Vampire Hexmage]] to yank the counters off it, it's possible to have a 20/20 creature in play as early as turn 1 (using [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202529 Fastbond]]), and turn 2 otherwise.
*** The Magic 2014 legend rules added a new way to cheat around Dark Depth's enormous cost with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366353 Thespian's Stage]]: When Thespian's Stage becomes a copy of Dark Depths, it will have no ice counters on it and the new legend rules allow you to remove the original Dark Depths while leaving the new one intact.
** Vampire Hexmage itself could be considered a Game Breaker. Aside from having First Strike, it also has a very specific-sounding ability but is in fact extremely versatile, able to do things like remove +1/+1 or -1/-1 counters from creatures, reset cumulative upkeeps, set back several enchantments using "quest" counters, cure you from Phyrexian infection, and most importantly, '''instantly gib planeswalkers''', all for 2 mana.

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Others]]
* While the Kamigawa block was otherwise fairly low-powered, it did Sometimes a card does not have to be overly powerful to get banned; it just has to lengthen and complicate the game enough to make it virtually unplayable. Enter [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194971 Gifts Ungiven]]. This extremely powerful tutor card essentially made your opponent pick how they were going to die; it was restricted aspx?multiverseid=980 Shahrazad]], which makes players play a game within a game, with the losers of the subgame losing half of their life points, rounded up. Running four of these meant potentially playing a game within a game within a game within a game within a game, which would make almost any match end in Vintage before January 19,2015, and is banned in several other formats.
a 0-0 draw.
** There was also On a similar note, there's [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=81979 Umezawa's Jitte]]. Not quite as game-breaking as the likes of Skullclamp, but severely undercosted for its powerful abilities. Some commentors on the Gatherer website treat it as the "First Colourless Planeswalker" (an actual colorless planeswalker, aspx?multiverseid=603 Chaos Orb]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214350 Karn Liberated]], aspx?multiverseid=1571 Falling Star]], which as part of their effects are flipped over from above the playing field and then do something to anything they land on: Chaos Orb destroys any permanent it touches, and Falling Star deals damage to and taps creatures that it touches. What that did to complicate the game was later printed). The Jitte that it made players space all of their cards as far apart as possible, to ensure that those cards couldn't affect too many of their cards, which tended to make actually playing the game a lot more difficult as it was more difficult to see what players actually controlled. It also led to arguments and time-wasting rulings by judges about such things as what exactly constituted a flip, how far it had to be above the table, whether it was actually touching something, and when cards could be moved around (supposedly, at least one tournament player attempted to cut his card into confetti so it would hit the whole table, although this is currently probably an urban legend.) As a result, they both ended up being banned in Modern because all formats, making Chaos Orb, Falling Star, and Shahrazad the only 3 cards that aren't ante cards, promo cards, or un-set cards that are banned in all formats. Every other card in the game is playable in at least Vintage, even if that card is on Vintage's Restricted List.
* "Tutor" is a name for a series
of its terrifyingly cards, but also a more general name for any card which has the ability to draw a specific card from your library. The ability is often gamebreaking, since there are some ''very'' powerful cards you can go looking for. The original, and flexible abilities.
possibly most powerful, is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202628 Demonic Tutor]].
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129898 Time Stop]] aspx?multiverseid=15393 Vampiric Tutor]], which appeared in ''Visions'', is a counterspell arguably ''more'' broken. While it causes you to lose two life and puts the card on crazy steroids. It doesn't just prevent a spell from resolving, even those immune to countermagic, the top of your deck rather than directly in your hand, it also wipes the stack costs only ''one'' mana to cast and exiles any spells still on it, preventing recursion by graveyard diving players. While fairly costly to cast, comes at ''instant'' speed. And like Demonic Tutor, it's spent some time on the ultimate lategame stopper for many banned/restricted list.
** Even Demonic Tutor's terrible offspring [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201409 Grim Tutor]] can be found enabling degenerate combo decks in Legacy and Vintage. Seeing as it's really the best option that isn't banned or restricted, it's really
a dangerous board situation.
player's only choice if they just gotta do something broken.
** In Legacy [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107308 Infernal Tutor]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3255 Lion's Eye Diamond]] do a reasonable impression of Demonic Tutor and Black Lotus in combo decks. Unsurprisingly, they (especially Lion's Eye Diamond) tend to be the poster children of degenerate combo in Legacy.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=50461 Heartbeat of Spring]] aspx?multiverseid=26422 Diabolic Intent]] is a green Mana Flare. Mana Flare always sucked, so they figured that printing it in the right color couldn't hurt anything. Turns out that Mana Flare just hadn't had the right environment. While a seemingly symmetrical effect, instead the another cheap black tutor, offering any card allowed in your deck for the low price of 1B and a very asymmetrical effect as creature. The "sacrifice a creature" cost makes it was a bad fit for combo decks which tend to be light on expendable creatures, but it's still positively broken in control & aggro decks. Unlike most other tutors, it also isn't restricted or banned in any format.
* It's sometimes said the
only cast on the turn the player would win. A large amount of mana accelleration would be used, Heartbeat of Spring would come out, then a spell that untapped all your lands, followed by transmute cards like reason turbo-mana instant [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=87994 Drift of Phantasms]], which could be used aspx?multiverseid=205422 Dark Ritual]] seemed fair was because it's always been around; it's powered numerous superfast combo decks over the years, and was once banned during the attempts to tutor not only for Heartbeat of Spring, but cripple Necropotence decks.
** Dark Rit was
also for thematically inappropriate; as the [[CompetitiveBalance Color Pie]] was re-defined, the decision was made to limit bursts of mana to Red.
** Speaking of ''Red'' turbo-mana,
[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=84541 Early Harvest]] to untap your lands, and aspx?multiverseid=243487 Seething Song]] is currently banned in Modern because it fuels some degenerate combos, in particular Storm decks. Having a net profit of 2 red mana is already very good, but adding cost reducers like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=88802 Maga, Traitor to Mortals]] and similar win conditions that cost three mana base plus X, where X could easily be 20 or more, allowing for an instant kill. It generated a top tier combo deck, and neither Early Harvest nor Heartbeat of Spring have ever been reprinted, very likely as a direct result of aspx?multiverseid=405244 Goblin Electromancer]] just pushed the value beyond what is comfortable.
* White had
its existence.
**
own turn at being broken, with the combination of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194972 Sensei's Divining Top]]'s subtle yet powerful draw-manipulation (pay 1 mana to see and rearrange the top 3 cards of your library; tap: draw a card and put the Top on the top of your library) is incredibly powerful in the non-Vintage formats, being an inexpensive draw-fixer that lets you control your future draws, even after deck-shuffling tutoring. Its ability to draw a card also gives it the ability to dodge hatred, as it can draw a card and jump on top of your library to evade targeted destruction. In many cases it ''effectively lets you extend your "hand" to include the top three cards of your library''! Currently the Top is banned in Modern, both because of its disproportionate power/utility to cost ratio and because it simply makes games take too long.
*** In Legacy, the Top forms a nasty combo with
aspx?multiverseid=159277 Winter Orb]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=121159 Counterbalance]]: Activate its first ability in response to an opponent's spell, rearrange cards so that a card with the same converted mana cost is on-top, counter the spell-all for a total of just 1 mana.
*** Another Legacy deck focused around Sensei's Divining Top is [[http://www.channelfireball.com/articles/legacy-miracles-deck-guide/ the Miracles deck]]. Cards with the Miracle mechanic can be cast at a greatly reduced cost, but only if they're the first card you drew this turn. With the Top, you can keep a card with Miracle from being drawn until you can cast it; the typical win condition is
aspx?multiverseid=221108 Icy Manipulator]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=401634 Entreat aspx?multiverseid=228262 Armageddon]] allowing them to shut down the Angels]].
**
entire game and win by default when their opponent ran out of cards. Such "prison decks" lost some degree of potency when the rules for Artifacts were changed (under the old rules, an Artifact's effect was "turned off" when it was tapped, meaning Winter Orb only affected the owner when they wanted it to), and largely disappeared with the advent of fast combo decks that won long before the board could be locked down, being replaced by much quicker "control" decks. [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Glimpse+of+Nature Glimpse aspx?multiverseid=21304 Rising Waters]] is a more modern variant of Nature]] got itself banned in Modern too. Much like Skullclamp, Glimpse can easily refill a ZergRush player's hand to keep up momentum, or to help a player draw a key part of a combo. If combined with lots of cheap or free creatures and a card like Winter Orb.
*
[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=152556 Heritage Druid]] that can get you mana from those creatures the turn that they're played, you can just keep playing more creatures and drawing more cards and using the already-played creatures to get more mana to play more creatures to draw more cards...
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74441 Blazing Shoal]] got banned
aspx?multiverseid=159752 Zuran Orb]] is an extremely powerful card for its interaction with Infect: Using its alternate casting cost, a 9- or 10- mana creature would be fed to the Shoal to power up an unblockable creature, usually [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214383 Blighted Agent]], and win the game on the spot. Even without Infect, you can still essentially wipe out your opponent with pure damage in two hits from as early as turn two if your Shoal any deck packs manlands like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=39439 Blinkmoth Nexus]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=213731 Inkmoth Nexus]].
* Some Eternal deck archetypes are built on quirky instawin combos; [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=146022 Painter]] / [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4610 Grindstone]] comes to mind as one of the more prolific, mainly due to the satisfaction of milling someone's entire deck in one go. These cards are rarely banned on the grounds that getting the cards ''out'' is the real challenge of combo decks.
** Another popular instawin combo has been broadly termed "Hulk Flash,"
which worked by comboing [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107598 Protean Hulk]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=16440 Flash]] to assemble a suite of game-winning creatures. Some variants of the deck could win on the opponent's upkeep of the first turn when going second using [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Gemstone%20Caverns Gemstone Caverns]] and either [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=124474 Simian Spirit Guide]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Elvish%20Spirit%20Guide Elvish Spirit Guide]] to get the mana to cast Flash. There are a lot of sets of creatures that can be gotten with this that will give an insta-win if all come into play simultaneously- 4 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=49090 Disciple of the Vaults]], 4 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3599 Phyrexian Marauders]], and 4 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5222 Shifting Walls]], for instance, since the Marauders and Walls come in with no counters and instantly die, each causing all 4 Disciples to go off for a total of 32 points of needs life loss, all on your opponent's first upkeep.
** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=121155 Dark Depths]] is one of those cards that combo players study intently to figure out how they can make them go off quickly,
more than it needs Lands; Balance decks and for a long time they couldn't. But sure enough, with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=131005 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth]] to make Dark Depths produce mana Necrodecks love it equally, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=192232 Vampire Hexmage]] to yank the counters off it, it's possible to have a 20/20 creature in play as early as turn 1 (using [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202529 Fastbond]]), and turn 2 otherwise.
*** The Magic 2014 legend rules added a new way to cheat around Dark Depth's enormous cost
especially powerful when combined with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366353 Thespian's Stage]]: When Thespian's Stage becomes a copy of Dark Depths, it will have no ice counters on it and the new legend rules allow you to remove the original Dark Depths while leaving the new one intact.
** Vampire Hexmage itself could be considered a Game Breaker. Aside from having First Strike, it also has a very specific-sounding ability but is in fact extremely versatile, able to do things like remove +1/+1 or -1/-1 counters from creatures, reset cumulative upkeeps, set back several enchantments using "quest" counters, cure you from Phyrexian infection, and most importantly, '''instantly gib planeswalkers''', all for 2 mana.
Fastbond.



* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/pages/card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=195297 Jace, the Mind Sculptor]] has the distinction of being the first of the planeswalker card type to be banned, and while still in Standard too, the format which is both the most heavily scrutinized for card interactions and the one in which they are most reluctant to ban cards. In April, [[http://www.starcitygames.com/magic/standard/21641_The_Magic_Show_229_Ban_Jace_the_Mind_Sculptor.html one tournament]] saw ''every top 8 finisher'' running the maximum 4 copies of Jace, The Mind Sculptor. There were 32 copies of Jace and 32 copies of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=205019 Preordain]] in the top 8 - something almost unheard of in Magic history. At the time of the ban Jace was selling for between $80 and $100, a shocking cost for a card in a set released so soon.
** Jace also caused a rewriting of the Legendary rules on the basis that players were using ''other'' Jace Planeswalker cards to remove the Mind Sculptor version from the table.
* From the same set as Jace, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=198383 Stoneforge Mystic]], a card that allows you to fetch any Equipment, then later put it into play for two mana rather than what it actually costs. It was "merely" good for awhile, but then a card called [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214070 Sword of Feast and Famine]] came along to make it awesome, especially in combination with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=177545 man]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=213731 lands]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=208279 Squadron Hawk]], all of which have evasion, making repeated equips more bearable. ''Then'' a card called [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=233055 Batterskull]] was released in the New Phyrexia set, giving the Stoneforge Mystic an ''even better'' equipment to put on the table (essentially casting an uncounterable 4/4 creature with vigilance and lifelink for 2 mana as early as the third turn- or even the second turn, if you were lucky enough to have in your opening hand a Stoneforge Mystic, a Plains, a [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=208248 Mox Opal]], and two other zero-cost artifacts, and there were [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194078 several]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=206331 decent]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=218067 ones]] at the time). This was also banned at the same time as Jace, the [[http://www.wizards.com/magic/magazine/article.aspx?x=mtg%2Fdaily%2Ffeature%2F148 article explaining why]] commenting that the two were dominating tournament play to a degree possibly unprecedented in Magic history.
** Stoneforge Mystic also allows you to hasten the "Equip Avacyn, Angel of Hope with the Worldslayer sword, poke somebody, win game" process.
* There have always been a lot of possible [[http://www.westley.org/infinite.html infinite combos]] in the game.
** The manual for the ''Mirage'' expansion even had an entry for "Loop, Continuous" in the index. The entry would refer to three ''Magic'' cards hidden in the index that formed an infinite combo. The same joke was reprinted in the ''Fifth Edition'' manual.
** And it should be noted that that Website is more than a decade out of date, and plenty of new infinite combos have been made possible since then. Though Wizards has generally gotten better about not allowing them (or at least making them harder to pull off), there are still many decks build around exploting them. Some examples of infinite loops:
*** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220364 Myr Galvanizer]] can, for one colorless mana, untap all other Myrs you control. Some Myrs are capable of producing mana, so if you have 2 Myr Galvanizers and at least 2 of the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194063 Mana-Producing]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194168 Myrs]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194204 that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194378 generate]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194384 one]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=214344 mana]] when tapped (or one [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=212251 Palladium Myr]], which generates two colorless mana), then you can tap the Mana Myrs for 2 mana, pay 1 to tap one of the Galvanizers and untap them, tap them for two more Mana, tap the other Myr Galvanizer to untap the Mana Myrs again and the other Myr Galvanizer, and repeat to get as much mana as you want that those artifacts can produce.
*** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=240134 Exquisite Blood]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=190190 Sanguine Bond]] basically have the opposite effects- Exquisite Blood heals you whenever one of your opponents takes damage, and Sanguine Bond damages your opponents whenever you get healed. Neither is terribly overpowered on their own, but when you have both at the same time, anything that triggers the effect of Exquisite Blood will cause Sanguine Bond's effect to trigger when Exquisite Blood's effect resolves, and vice versa, creating an infinite loop that instantly kills all of your opponents as soon as either you heal so much as one life or any of your opponents takes so much as one damage.
*** The Shadowmoor Block introduced a number of cards that ''untap'' rather than tap as part of an activated ability cost. Sure, all of the abilities cost a bit of mana, and you have to get them tapped to use the ability, but tapping them isn't too difficult, especially if you use a card like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=73558 Paradise Mantle]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=131004 Utopia Vow]] to make the card in question continously tap for mana, effectively cheapening the cost of their ability and letting you repeat it as long as you have enough mana. This limitation was lowered a bit by [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5164 Heartstone]], and basically removed once [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Discussion.aspx?multiverseid=193490 Training Grounds]] appeared, which can reduce almost all of the untap cards' ability costs to 1- or 0, if you find a way to tap them for mana, thus allowing such things as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=157210 infinite 1/1 tokens]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=147381 infinite mana]], or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=151106 a +infinity power boost to all of your creatures]]. Or how about [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=152046 infinite counters]]? As long as you have at least one counter of any kind on something, you can use that to get as many of them as you want. This can also enable infinite mana and the like with cards such as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=240135 Druids' Repository]], or perhaps you'd like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=380491 infinite turns]] instead (as long as you always have a way to put at least one counter back on)? And this ''also'' includes loyalty counters, so...why not get out a planeswalker and spam their ultimate ability every turn? These cards also combo ''very'' nicely with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=292757 Quicksilver Dagger]] (which is powerful in itself for a card of common rarity), allowing you to repeatedly do damage, draw a card, and add counters/spawn tokens/buff your creatures for as long as you have mana. Put that enchantment on Pili-Pala with a Training Grounds out, and you have an infinite damage/card-drawing combo, pinging your opponents until either they all reach 0 life or you run out of cards to draw (if they don't counter the ability or prevent the damage).
*** The [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366328 Duskmantle Guildmage]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=233078 Mindcrank]] combo. Duskmantle Guildmage makes your opponent lose life every time they mill cards from their deck, while Mindcrank makes them mill cards every time they lose life. For that matter, Duskmantle Guildmage's ability can make them lose life if a card goes to their graveyard from ''anywhere''. Discarded a card? Combo goes off, they lose. Card on their field goes to the graveyard? Combo goes off, they lose. Even casting an instant or sorcery that doesn't destroy Mindcrank causes them to lose when that spell resolves! Mindcrank can also combo with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=197892 Bloodchief Ascension]] although that requires you to get three required quest counters on Bloodchief Ascension. On the other hand, Bloodchief costs less, is an enchantment (and thus harder to remove), and once it gets the counters, the ability is always active instead of requiring 3 mana to activate.
*** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=386571 Jeskai Ascendancy]] forms an instant-win combo too: With enough mana-producing creatures, noncreature spells ''add'' mana to your pool & can dig up your entire library; from there, spend the surplus mana on your win condition of choice.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=239995 Griselbrand]]. He's not considered much of a thing in Standard, where eight mana is a pretty tall order (though he does show up in Standard decks from time to time). In Legacy, however, this guy is very powerful, being a Yawgmoth's Bargain attached to a 7/7 flier with lifelink. And once he resolves, the nature of the deck makes him hard to get rid of, as you have to beat not only your opponent's hand, but the top seven in their deck (though sneak and show's other creature, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=193452 Emrakul]] is even harder to kill). And with free counterspells like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159092 Force of Will]] commonplace in Legacy, that's difficult even with a counterspell of your own. Some even argue that he be banned for giving sneak and show too much consistency.
** Moving out of Sneak and Show, he now enables Tin Fins, a black storm combo deck that can go off turn 1 pretty often and turn 3 at the absolute latest thanks to his synergy with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=110525 Children of Korlis]]. Burn 14 life to draw 14 cards, play Children of Korlis, regain 14 life, burn that 14 to draw 14 more cards, play a second Children of Korlis and gain 28 life, draw out the rest of your deck and then storm [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45842 Tendrils of Agony]] with practically your whole deck in hand.
** He was banned in Commander, another game format where players have 40 life instead of 20... making his ability essentially free.
* Innistrad managed to bring its own headache in [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=227676 Snapcaster Mage]]. Combined with ways to flicker it--which were more than a little profuse in Avacyn Restored--counterspells quickly became overly profuse on their own. Return to Ravnica is already filled with ways to contend with him...which are themselves so unnervingly powerful that players are already asking why Snapcaster wasn't just banned. The clincher is that he's not entirely R&D's fault--Pro Tour winners get a prize of designing a card of their own for a future set, ''and this is one of them.''
* One of those ways of dealing with Snapcaster Mage was [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=290529 Deathrite Shaman]], which can exile instants and sorceries from any graveyard while damaging your opponents at the same time. And it also gets two other useful graveyard-exiling abilities, one for creatures that heals you life, and one for lands that gives you mana. Oh, and did we mention it also only costs one mana, that can be paid from either of two colors thanks to hybrid mana, and it's also a 1/2 creature? It's effectively a combination of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221896 Birds of Paradise]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Grim%20Lavamancer Grim Lavamancer]] (both of which are themselves considered pretty good cards) with a third ability to boot, and it's tougher to kill than either of those two cards. It has an amazing amount of utility and versatility in what it can do- it can mana-ramp, it can make your fetchlands even more useful by exiling them for mana after they're in the graveyard, it can hate on your opponent's graveyard to prevent them from reusing their cards with flashback or reanimation spells, it can deal damage, it can lifegain, and it's even an above-curve creature in black, being a 1/2 with no drawbacks for 1 mana. It's been referred to as the "first one-mana planeswalker", and many consider it to be the best one-mana creature ever printed. It was a fairly dominating force in every format it existed in, eventually being banned in Modern. In Standard it was considerably weaker thanks to the lack of fetchlands, but it was still a very powerful card.



* From the Commander 2013 set, we were given [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=376562 True-Name Nemesis]], lovingly nicknamed Progenifish due to being able to NoSell a player entirely. In the multiplayer style of Commander/EDH, he's not a big of a deal and encourages table politics and alliances. However, he's legal in Legacy and Vintage, where once he's on the battlefield he's pretty much there to stay barring someone being forced to sacrifice him or a board wipe. Due to his ability, just him alone will force the opponent to lose in 7 turns (the damage he does cannot be stopped at all, so he only needs to attack 7 times), however he also happens to be a blue merfolk; one of the most powerful tribal decks in Legacy (which happens to have 8 "lords" that can pump his strength and a slew of counterspells to avoid other shenanigans, meaning that more realistically the opponent only has about 3 turns to do something about him). He's the reason the Grixis Commander 2013 deck goes for almost triple the price of the others at most stores.
* While less powerful than Necropotence or Yawgmoth's Bargain, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83771 Dark Confidant]] is still one of Black's best draw cards, providing a second draw step every turn in exchange for life. In formats like Vintage, where most spells cost 3 mana or less, the drawback is so small that it might as well not exist.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=136142 Tarmogoyf]] can easily become a 3/4 or even bigger for just 2 mana, and gets bigger if the opponent tries to kill or counter it. It also doubles as a great comeback from Wrath of God-type effects, since board clearing doesn't affect its size or cost & the opponent will still be struggling to rebuild his or her own board.
* When they were originally printed in the Zendikar block, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=197881 Eye of Ugin]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=198312 Eldrazi Temple]] were fairly reasonable cards. At the time, there weren't very many Colorless Eldrazi spells and all of them cost at least 7 mana; you could use them to ramp up to the huge Eldrazi spells and get them out a few turns earlier but they didn't do much early on in the game. But then when the game returned to the plane of Zendikar years later in Battle for Zendikar, it gave the Eldrazi Lands a lot of new toys to play with- the Devoid mechanic let Eldrazi spells be Colorless even while they had Colored Mana in their costs, meaning they could be affected by Eye of Ugin and Eldrazi Temple, and there were many low-cost Eldrazi, allowing Eldrazi decks to become a force to be reckoned with in Modern, and then they got even better in ''Oath of the Gatewatch'' thanks to cards like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407512 Eldrazi Mimic]] (free to cast with Eye of Ugin out), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407519 Thought-Knot Seer]] (which could hose whatever answer your opponent might have for your plans before they ever got a chance to cast it), and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407517 Reality Smasher]] that could let a player easily flood the board with Eldrazi and win before his or her opponent can respond; it was not uncommon to see Eldrazi decks win on turn 3 (or even turn 2 with a perfect opening hand) in Modern if they got multiple free Eldrazi Mimics out on their first turn. Eldrazi Temple tapping for 2 mana every turn made it almost as good as a Sol Ring, and Eye of Ugin could sometimes effectively give ''even more of a mana advantage than that'' by casting lots of cheap or free spells very quickly. The complete dominance of Eldrazi decks in Modern got Eye of Ugin banned a few months after Oath of the Gatewatch was released; while it was legal, Eldrazi decks were an outright majority of top decks & 43% of all decks played at PT Atlanta 2016, one of the most lopsided Pro Tours in ''Magic'' history.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=373635 Prophet of Kruphix]] had its fair amount of play in Standard, but Elder Dragon Highlander was where the card truly shined. While it doesn't give itself any protection from threats on its own, being able to untap your lands and creatures and giving creatures in your hand flash on top of it gave any deck running blue or green an insane advantage: the two colors that loves creatures that could tap and bounce or counter threats outright. Which naturally meant that any deck that could run it did. About two years after it was introduced, the card was eventually banned in EDH.
* You better not be playing a mono-color deck if your opponent slaps [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=401636 Iona, Shield of Emeria]] on the field. Even with its big, scary mana cost there's always plenty of reanimate spells around.
** What really broke Iona is Commander; Your deck in Commander can never have a card of a different color than one printed on your chosen Commander. This is NOT restricted to their mana cost, but anywhere on the card. As most commander decks are around 2-3 colors, this essentially gave the controller of Iona the ability to shut down 1/3rd to 1/2 of the enemy deck, especially in multiplayer since most people will share colors.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=386666 Siege Rhino]]: it's a Leatherback Baloth with Trample that activates Blood Tithe when it hits the battlefield for just 4 mana. Obviously undercosted and overpowered, but gets unfair really quickly when you start dropping multiples of it on your hapless opponent via clones, and ensuring it hits the battlefield as soon as possible via Bring to Light turns it into a Game Breaker.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394519 Collected Company]]. The card advantage it offered is nasty, especially given that it was in Standard alongside a lot of cheap, powerful creatures, such as the five [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398429 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398435 that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398442 transformed]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398423 into]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398432 planeswalkers]]. Not to mention the tempo advantage (6 mana worth of creatures for 4 mana), and the fact that itís instant speed, allowing you to cast it on your opponent's turn and/or leave open some mana for other powerful card you have. One use of casting it to summon creatures on your opponent's turn is that you can use it on your opponent's end step to pull out a werewolf that can only transform if no spells are cast during a turn (like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409976 this]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409961 this]]), and transform it immediately if your opponent didn't cast any spells during their turn, or transform it right after your next turn by not casting any spells yourself. One of its only weakness is that has a good degree of randomness and it doesnít summon the aforementioned Siege Rhino. It also powered many decks that became [[TierInducedScrappy top tier]], notably many variations of G/W or Bant that combined Collected Company with powerful but cheap creatures like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407654 Sylvan Advocate]] and other useful green and white spells like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394558 Dromoka's Command]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=391901 Rally the Ancestors]]. The Bant Collected Company deck only got more powerful in the Battle for Zendikar and Shadows over Innistrad blocks, when it got lots more cheap hate cards to work with, like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407667 Reflector Mage]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414338 Thalia, Heretic Cathar]]. Bant Company made up more than 40% of the top decks in standard in Eldritch Moon, before Collected Company rotated out of the format with the release of Kaladesh.
* May be a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]] example compared to some of the other insanity possible in the game, but...[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=402100 Zada, Hedron Grinder]] has the ability to make any instant or sorcery spell you cast that targets her affect every creature you control that is a legal target of that spell (as do [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414435 Mirrorwing Dragon]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107092 Ink-Treader Nephilim]], though your opponents can also take advantage of those). This can be pretty powerful in itself with the right cards (any cantrips, for instance, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389456 Cackling Counterpart]] gives you a copy of each creature you control for 1UU), but what ''really'' breaks Zada is pairing her with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=276199 Wild Defiance]], which gives creatures you control +3/+3 whenever they become the target of an instant or sorcery spell. This results in such things as, essentially, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=393898 Giant Growth]] becoming "G: Creatures you control get +6/+6 until end of turn", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407557 Slip Through Space]] becoming "U: Creatures you control get +3/+3 and can't be blocked this turn. Draw a card for each creature you control.", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366233 Predator's Rapport]] becoming "2G: You gain (at least) 7 life for each creature you control", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398416 Chandra's Ignition]] becoming "3RR: Each creature you control deals (at least) 3 damage to each other creature and each opponent" (particularly potent with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366385 Boros Reckoner]]), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220291 Hunter's Insight]] becoming "2G: Draw (at least) three cards for each creature not blocked this turn"...and those are just a few possibilities. Multiple copies of Wild Defiance also ''stack'', so having two of them out will give all of your creatures '''+6/+6''' if you target Zada with an instant or sorcery spell. You can also combine them with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=370670 Strionic Resonator]] to get ''two'' copies of the spell for each creature (except Zada herself...and yes, the second set of copies also trigger Wild Defiance), or with the aforementioned Isochron Scepter to have a relevant spell to cast every turn.
** Alternatively, use the Ink-Treader with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=290526 Nivmagus Elemental]], which allows you to exile an instant or sorcery spell you control to give itself two +1/+1 counters. Suddenly, every single-target instant or sorcery spell you have that can target a creature targets anything and everything you want (short of creatures with shroud or hexproof); you can either use a beneficial spell or a harmful one (or a potentially double-sided one such as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=417690 Harnessed Lightning]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=195630 Rite of Replication]]) and simply exile the copies that are targeting things you don't want to hit, buffing the Elemental up massively in the process. Of course, getting the Ink-Treader out in the first place requires 4 different colors of mana, preventing it from being ''that'' broken....
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414295 Emrakul, the Promised End]]. While a strong card with an otherwise reasonable cost reduction mechanic, and a very strong cast trigger, Emrakul didn't quite break Standard until the release of Kaladesh and one other card: [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=417766 Aetherworks Marvel]]. Emrakul and the Marvel resulted in players conceding often as early as turn 4 due to having their board state trashed by their opponent controlling them, and still having a 13/13 flying creature that's immune to instants left over. This proved to be enough of an issue that resulted in a change on how banlist announcements are handled AND the first Standard banning in over five years.

to:

* From the Commander 2013 set, we were given [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=376562 True-Name Nemesis]], lovingly nicknamed Progenifish due to being able to NoSell a player entirely. In the multiplayer style of Commander/EDH, he's not a big of a deal and encourages table politics and alliances. However, he's legal in Legacy and Vintage, where once he's on the battlefield he's pretty much there to stay barring someone being forced to sacrifice him or a board wipe. Due to his ability, just him alone will force the opponent to lose in 7 turns (the damage he does cannot be stopped at all, so he only needs to attack 7 times), however he also happens to be a blue merfolk; one of the most powerful tribal decks in Legacy (which happens to have 8 "lords" that can pump his strength and a slew of counterspells to avoid other shenanigans, meaning that more realistically the opponent only has about 3 turns to do something about him). He's the reason the Grixis Commander 2013 deck goes for almost triple the price of the others at most stores.
* While less powerful than Necropotence or Yawgmoth's Bargain, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83771 Dark Confidant]] is still one of Black's best draw cards, providing a second draw step every turn in exchange for life. In formats like Vintage, where most spells cost 3 mana or less, the drawback is so small that it might as well not exist.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=136142 Tarmogoyf]] can easily become a 3/4 or even bigger for just 2 mana, and gets bigger if the opponent tries to kill or counter it. It also doubles as a great comeback from Wrath of God-type effects, since board clearing doesn't affect its size or cost & the opponent will still be struggling to rebuild his or her own board.
* When they were originally printed in the Zendikar block, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=197881 Eye of Ugin]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=198312 Eldrazi Temple]] were fairly reasonable cards. At the time, there weren't very many Colorless Eldrazi spells and all of them cost at least 7 mana; you could use them to ramp up to the huge Eldrazi spells and get them out a few turns earlier but they didn't do much early on in the game. But then when the game returned to the plane of Zendikar years later in Battle for Zendikar, it gave the Eldrazi Lands a lot of new toys to play with- the Devoid mechanic let Eldrazi spells be Colorless even while they had Colored Mana in their costs, meaning they could be affected by Eye of Ugin and Eldrazi Temple, and there were many low-cost Eldrazi, allowing Eldrazi decks to become a force to be reckoned with in Modern, and then they got even better in ''Oath of the Gatewatch'' thanks to cards like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407512 Eldrazi Mimic]] (free to cast with Eye of Ugin out), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407519 Thought-Knot Seer]] (which could hose whatever answer your opponent might have for your plans before they ever got a chance to cast it), and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407517 Reality Smasher]] that could let a player easily flood the board with Eldrazi and win before his or her opponent can respond; it was not uncommon to see Eldrazi decks win on turn 3 (or even turn 2 with a perfect opening hand) in Modern if they got multiple free Eldrazi Mimics out on their first turn. Eldrazi Temple tapping for 2 mana every turn made it almost as good as a Sol Ring, and Eye of Ugin could sometimes effectively give ''even more of a mana advantage than that'' by casting lots of cheap or free spells very quickly. The complete dominance of Eldrazi decks in Modern got Eye of Ugin banned a few months after Oath of the Gatewatch was released; while it was legal, Eldrazi decks were an outright majority of top decks & 43% of all decks played at PT Atlanta 2016, one of the most lopsided Pro Tours in ''Magic'' history.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=373635 Prophet of Kruphix]] had its fair amount of play in Standard, but Elder Dragon Highlander was where the card truly shined. While it doesn't give itself any protection from threats on its own, being able to untap your lands and creatures and giving creatures in your hand flash on top of it gave any deck running blue or green an insane advantage: the two colors that loves creatures that could tap and bounce or counter threats outright. Which naturally meant that any deck that could run it did. About two years after it was introduced, the card was eventually banned in EDH.
* You better not be playing a mono-color deck if your opponent slaps [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=401636 Iona, Shield of Emeria]] on the field. Even with its big, scary mana cost there's always plenty of reanimate spells around.
** What really broke Iona is Commander; Your deck in Commander can never have a card of a different color than one printed on your chosen Commander. This is NOT restricted to their mana cost, but anywhere on the card. As most commander decks are around 2-3 colors, this essentially gave the controller of Iona the ability to shut down 1/3rd to 1/2 of the enemy deck, especially in multiplayer since most people will share colors.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=386666 Siege Rhino]]: it's a Leatherback Baloth with Trample that activates Blood Tithe when it hits the battlefield for just 4 mana. Obviously undercosted and overpowered, but gets unfair really quickly when you start dropping multiples of it on your hapless opponent via clones, and ensuring it hits the battlefield as soon as possible via Bring to Light turns it into a Game Breaker.
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394519 Collected Company]]. The card advantage it offered is nasty, especially given that it was in Standard alongside a lot of cheap, powerful creatures, such as the five [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398429 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398435 that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398442 transformed]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398423 into]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398432 planeswalkers]]. Not to mention the tempo advantage (6 mana worth of creatures for 4 mana), and the fact that itís instant speed, allowing you to cast it on your opponent's turn and/or leave open some mana for other powerful card you have. One use of casting it to summon creatures on your opponent's turn is that you can use it on your opponent's end step to pull out a werewolf that can only transform if no spells are cast during a turn (like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409976 this]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409961 this]]), and transform it immediately if your opponent didn't cast any spells during their turn, or transform it right after your next turn by not casting any spells yourself. One of its only weakness is that has a good degree of randomness and it doesnít summon the aforementioned Siege Rhino. It also powered many decks that became [[TierInducedScrappy top tier]], notably many variations of G/W or Bant that combined Collected Company with powerful but cheap creatures like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407654 Sylvan Advocate]] and other useful green and white spells like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394558 Dromoka's Command]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=391901 Rally the Ancestors]]. The Bant Collected Company deck only got more powerful in the Battle for Zendikar and Shadows over Innistrad blocks, when it got lots more cheap hate cards to work with, like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407667 Reflector Mage]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414338 Thalia, Heretic Cathar]]. Bant Company made up more than 40% of the top decks in standard in Eldritch Moon, before Collected Company rotated out of the format with the release of Kaladesh.
* May be a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]] example compared to some of the other insanity possible in the game, but...[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=402100 Zada, Hedron Grinder]] has the ability to make any instant or sorcery spell you cast that targets her affect every creature you control that is a legal target of that spell (as do [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414435 Mirrorwing Dragon]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107092 Ink-Treader Nephilim]], though your opponents can also take advantage of those). This can be pretty powerful in itself with the right cards (any cantrips, for instance, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389456 Cackling Counterpart]] gives you a copy of each creature you control for 1UU), but what ''really'' breaks Zada is pairing her with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=276199 Wild Defiance]], which gives creatures you control +3/+3 whenever they become the target of an instant or sorcery spell. This results in such things as, essentially, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=393898 Giant Growth]] becoming "G: Creatures you control get +6/+6 until end of turn", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407557 Slip Through Space]] becoming "U: Creatures you control get +3/+3 and can't be blocked this turn. Draw a card for each creature you control.", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366233 Predator's Rapport]] becoming "2G: You gain (at least) 7 life for each creature you control", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398416 Chandra's Ignition]] becoming "3RR: Each creature you control deals (at least) 3 damage to each other creature and each opponent" (particularly potent with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366385 Boros Reckoner]]), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220291 Hunter's Insight]] becoming "2G: Draw (at least) three cards for each creature not blocked this turn"...and those are just a few possibilities. Multiple copies of Wild Defiance also ''stack'', so having two of them out will give all of your creatures '''+6/+6''' if you target Zada with an instant or sorcery spell. You can also combine them with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=370670 Strionic Resonator]] to get ''two'' copies of the spell for each creature (except Zada herself...and yes, the second set of copies also trigger Wild Defiance), or with the aforementioned Isochron Scepter to have a relevant spell to cast every turn.
** Alternatively, use the Ink-Treader with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=290526 Nivmagus Elemental]], which allows you to exile an instant or sorcery spell you control to give itself two +1/+1 counters. Suddenly, every single-target instant or sorcery spell you have that can target a creature targets anything and everything you want (short of creatures with shroud or hexproof); you can either use a beneficial spell or a harmful one (or a potentially double-sided one such as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=417690 Harnessed Lightning]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=195630 Rite of Replication]]) and simply exile the copies that are targeting things you don't want to hit, buffing the Elemental up massively in the process. Of course, getting the Ink-Treader out in the first place requires 4 different colors of mana, preventing it from being ''that'' broken....
* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414295 Emrakul, the Promised End]]. While a strong card with an otherwise reasonable cost reduction mechanic, and a very strong cast trigger, Emrakul didn't quite break Standard until the release of Kaladesh and one other card: [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=417766 Aetherworks Marvel]]. Emrakul and the Marvel resulted in players conceding often as early as turn 4 due to having their board state trashed by their opponent controlling them, and still having a 13/13 flying creature that's immune to instants left over. This proved to be enough of an issue that resulted in a change on how banlist announcements are handled AND the first Standard banning in over five years.
[[/folder]]
9th Jan '17 2:35:06 PM ultimania92
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414295 Emrakul, the Promised End]]. While a strong card with an otherwise reasonable cost reduction mechanic, and a very strong cast trigger, Emrakul didn't quite break Standard until the release of Kaladesh and one other card: [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=417766 Aetherworks Marvel]]. Emrakul and the Marvel resulted in players conceding often as early as turn 4 due to having their board state trashed by their opponent controlling them, and still having a 13/13 flying creature that's immune to instants left over. This proved to be enough of an issue that resulted in a change on how banlist announcements are handled AND the first Standard banning in over five years.
7th Jan '17 2:05:29 PM TheMartianGeek1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* May be a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]] example compared to some of the other insanity possible in the game, but...[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=402100 Zada, Hedron Grinder]] has the ability to make any instant or sorcery spell you cast that targets her affect every creature you control that is a legal target of that spell (as do [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414435 Mirrorwing Dragon]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107092 Ink-Treader Nephilim]], though your opponents can also take advantage of those). This can be pretty powerful in itself with the right cards (any cantrips, for instance, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389456 Cackling Counterpart]] gives you a copy of each creature you control for 1UU), but what ''really'' breaks Zada is pairing her with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=276199 Wild Defiance]], which gives creatures you control +3/+3 whenever they become the target of an instant or sorcery spell. This results in such things as, essentially, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=393898 Giant Growth]] becoming "G: Creatures you control get +6/+6 until end of turn", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407557 Slip Through Space]] becoming "U: Creatures you control get +3/+3 and can't be blocked this turn. Draw a card for each creature you control.", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366233 Predator's Rapport]] becoming "2G: You gain (at least) 7 life for each creature you control", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398416 Chandra's Ignition]] becoming "3RR: Each creature you control deals (at least) 3 damage to each other creature and player", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220291 Hunter's Insight]] becoming "2G: Draw (at least) three cards for each creature not blocked this turn"...and those are just a few possibilities. Multiple copies of Wild Defiance also ''stack'', so having two of them out will give all of your creatures '''+6/+6''' if you target Zada with an instant or sorcery spell. You can also combine them with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=370670 Strionic Resonator]] to get ''two'' copies of the spell for each creature (except Zada herself...and yes, the second set of copies also trigger Wild Defiance), or with the aforementioned Isochron Scepter to have a relevant spell to cast every turn.

to:

* May be a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]] example compared to some of the other insanity possible in the game, but...[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=402100 Zada, Hedron Grinder]] has the ability to make any instant or sorcery spell you cast that targets her affect every creature you control that is a legal target of that spell (as do [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414435 Mirrorwing Dragon]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107092 Ink-Treader Nephilim]], though your opponents can also take advantage of those). This can be pretty powerful in itself with the right cards (any cantrips, for instance, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389456 Cackling Counterpart]] gives you a copy of each creature you control for 1UU), but what ''really'' breaks Zada is pairing her with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=276199 Wild Defiance]], which gives creatures you control +3/+3 whenever they become the target of an instant or sorcery spell. This results in such things as, essentially, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=393898 Giant Growth]] becoming "G: Creatures you control get +6/+6 until end of turn", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407557 Slip Through Space]] becoming "U: Creatures you control get +3/+3 and can't be blocked this turn. Draw a card for each creature you control.", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366233 Predator's Rapport]] becoming "2G: You gain (at least) 7 life for each creature you control", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398416 Chandra's Ignition]] becoming "3RR: Each creature you control deals (at least) 3 damage to each other creature and player", each opponent" (particularly potent with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366385 Boros Reckoner]]), [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220291 Hunter's Insight]] becoming "2G: Draw (at least) three cards for each creature not blocked this turn"...and those are just a few possibilities. Multiple copies of Wild Defiance also ''stack'', so having two of them out will give all of your creatures '''+6/+6''' if you target Zada with an instant or sorcery spell. You can also combine them with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=370670 Strionic Resonator]] to get ''two'' copies of the spell for each creature (except Zada herself...and yes, the second set of copies also trigger Wild Defiance), or with the aforementioned Isochron Scepter to have a relevant spell to cast every turn.
7th Jan '17 2:02:31 PM TheMartianGeek1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* May be a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]] example compared to some of the other insanity possible in the game, but...[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=402100 Zada, Hedron Grinder]] has the ability to make any instant or sorcery spell you cast that targets her affect every creature you control that is a legal target of that spell (as do [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414435 Mirrorwing Dragon]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107092 Ink-Treader Nephilim]], though your opponents can also take advantage of those). This can be pretty powerful in itself with the right cards (any cantrips, for instance, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389456 Cackling Counterpart]] gives you a copy of each creature you control for 1UU), but what ''really'' breaks Zada is pairing her with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=276199 Wild Defiance]], which gives creatures you control +3/+3 whenever they become the target of an instant or sorcery spell. This results in such things as, essentially, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=393898 Giant Growth]] becoming "G: Creatures you control get +6/+6 until end of turn", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407557 Slip Through Space]] becoming "U: Creatures you control get +3/+3 and can't be blocked this turn. Draw a card for each creature you control.", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366233 Predator's Rapport]] becoming "2G: You gain (at least) 7 life for each creature you control", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=174951 Soul's Fire]] becoming "2R: Each creature you control deals (at least) 3 damage to target creature or player", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220291 Hunter's Insight]] becoming "2G: Draw (at least) three cards for each creature not blocked this turn"...and those are just a few possibilities. Multiple copies of Wild Defiance also ''stack'', so having two of them out will give all of your creatures '''+6/+6''' if you target Zada with an instant or sorcery spell. You can also combine them with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=370670 Strionic Resonator]] to get ''two'' copies of the spell for each creature (except Zada herself...and yes, the second set of copies also trigger Wild Defiance), or with the aforementioned Isochron Scepter to have a relevant spell to cast every turn.

to:

* May be a [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]] example compared to some of the other insanity possible in the game, but...[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=402100 Zada, Hedron Grinder]] has the ability to make any instant or sorcery spell you cast that targets her affect every creature you control that is a legal target of that spell (as do [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414435 Mirrorwing Dragon]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107092 Ink-Treader Nephilim]], though your opponents can also take advantage of those). This can be pretty powerful in itself with the right cards (any cantrips, for instance, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=389456 Cackling Counterpart]] gives you a copy of each creature you control for 1UU), but what ''really'' breaks Zada is pairing her with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=276199 Wild Defiance]], which gives creatures you control +3/+3 whenever they become the target of an instant or sorcery spell. This results in such things as, essentially, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=393898 Giant Growth]] becoming "G: Creatures you control get +6/+6 until end of turn", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407557 Slip Through Space]] becoming "U: Creatures you control get +3/+3 and can't be blocked this turn. Draw a card for each creature you control.", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366233 Predator's Rapport]] becoming "2G: You gain (at least) 7 life for each creature you control", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=174951 Soul's Fire]] aspx?multiverseid=398416 Chandra's Ignition]] becoming "2R: "3RR: Each creature you control deals (at least) 3 damage to target each other creature or and player", [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=220291 Hunter's Insight]] becoming "2G: Draw (at least) three cards for each creature not blocked this turn"...and those are just a few possibilities. Multiple copies of Wild Defiance also ''stack'', so having two of them out will give all of your creatures '''+6/+6''' if you target Zada with an instant or sorcery spell. You can also combine them with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=370670 Strionic Resonator]] to get ''two'' copies of the spell for each creature (except Zada herself...and yes, the second set of copies also trigger Wild Defiance), or with the aforementioned Isochron Scepter to have a relevant spell to cast every turn.
21st Dec '16 1:09:09 AM InfinityPlusTwo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Jace also caused a rewriting of the Legendary rules on the basis that players were using ''other'' Jace Plainswalker cards to remove the Mind Sculptor version from the table.

to:

** Jace also caused a rewriting of the Legendary rules on the basis that players were using ''other'' Jace Plainswalker Planeswalker cards to remove the Mind Sculptor version from the table.



*** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=366411 Enter the Infinite]] has a few nasty combos if one is able to cast it (and blue has a few ways of doing so without paying the mana cost on top of that) for a variety of reasons. The most obvious being [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=288937 Omniscience]] (being able to play out your entire deck) and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=230788 Laboratory Maniac]] (have a draw effect handy? You win!).



* One of those ways of dealing with Snapcaster Mage was [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=290529 Deathrite Shaman]], which can exile instants and sorceries from any graveyard while damaging your opponents at the same time. And it also gets two other useful graveyard-exiling abilities, one for creatures that heals you life, and one for lands that gives you mana. Oh, and did we mention it also only costs one mana, that can be paid from either of two colors thanks to hybrid mana, and it's also a 1/2 creature? It's effectively a combination of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221896 Birds of Paradise]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Grim%20Lavamancer Grim Lavamancer]] (both of which are themselves considered pretty good cards) with a third ability to boot, and it's tougher to kill than either of those two cards. It has an amazing amount of utility and versatility in what it can do- it can mana-ramp, it can make your fetchlands even more useful by exiling them for mana after they're in the graveyard, it can hate on your opponent's graveyard to prevent them from reusing their cards with flashback or reanimation spells, it can deal damage, it can lifegain, and it's even an above-curve creature in black, being a 1/2 with no drawbacks for 1 mana. It's been referred to as the "first one-mana planeswalker", and many consider it to be the best one-mana creature ever printed. It was a fairly dominating force in every format it existed in, eventually being banned in Modern, although in Standard it was considerably weaker thanks to the lack of fetchlands, but still a very powerful card.

to:

* One of those ways of dealing with Snapcaster Mage was [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=290529 Deathrite Shaman]], which can exile instants and sorceries from any graveyard while damaging your opponents at the same time. And it also gets two other useful graveyard-exiling abilities, one for creatures that heals you life, and one for lands that gives you mana. Oh, and did we mention it also only costs one mana, that can be paid from either of two colors thanks to hybrid mana, and it's also a 1/2 creature? It's effectively a combination of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=221896 Birds of Paradise]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?name=Grim%20Lavamancer Grim Lavamancer]] (both of which are themselves considered pretty good cards) with a third ability to boot, and it's tougher to kill than either of those two cards. It has an amazing amount of utility and versatility in what it can do- it can mana-ramp, it can make your fetchlands even more useful by exiling them for mana after they're in the graveyard, it can hate on your opponent's graveyard to prevent them from reusing their cards with flashback or reanimation spells, it can deal damage, it can lifegain, and it's even an above-curve creature in black, being a 1/2 with no drawbacks for 1 mana. It's been referred to as the "first one-mana planeswalker", and many consider it to be the best one-mana creature ever printed. It was a fairly dominating force in every format it existed in, eventually being banned in Modern, although in Modern. In Standard it was considerably weaker thanks to the lack of fetchlands, but it was still a very powerful card.



* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394519 Collected Company]]. The card advantage it offered is nasty, especially given that it was in Standard alongside a lot of cheap, powerful creatures (especially with the five creature that transformed into planeswalker) . Not to mention the tempo advantage (6 mana worth of creature for 4 mana). And the fact that itís instant speed, allowing you to open some mana for other powerful card you have (especially with creature with flash), and to transform any werewolf ( like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409976 this]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409961 this]]), since you donít need to cast it in your turn. Some says it only weakness is that itís random and it doesnít summon aforementioned Siege Rhino. It also powered many deck that become [[TierInducedScrappy top tier]] :
** The earliest deck exploit green and white strong but cheap creature, only adding Company and itís partner in crime, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394558 Dromokaís Command]], that for just measly 2 mana, you can get 2 of these effect: remove opponent annoying enchantment, strengthen your creature, protect yourself from burn spell, and kill opponent creature. Just one of these effect already made it powerful, not to mention that itís instant speed. This wil evolve into the dreaded Collected Bant later on.
** Then it used to fuel combo deck revolving around [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=391901 Rally the Ancestor]]. The card that intended to summon temporary blocker, were used to fuel [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398440 Nantuko Husk]] with creature that create/replaced itself with token, and for [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394075 card advantage]]/[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=401839 consistency]]. Later iteration of the deck donít even need to attack, with multiple [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=402101 Cutthroats]] as win condition.
** It reach it peak power in Eldritch Moon Expansion. Since it first appearance at Tarkir block, it got 2 [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407654 strong]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409997 aggresive]] green creature to overpower the opponent, the werewolf above for card advantage, and a [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407667 bouncer]], now Collected Bant gain [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414494 flying counterspell]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409742 Serra Angel++]], and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414338 Kismet with legs]]. A different flavor of Bant Company deck will appear that focused more on green-white human beatdown or blue-white spirit that splash green for Company, with total aggregate of >40% deck in Standard Eldritch Moon, dominating the format as the sole champion. It would have been banned if it isnít rotating out in 2 months.

to:

* [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394519 Collected Company]]. The card advantage it offered is nasty, especially given that it was in Standard alongside a lot of cheap, powerful creatures (especially with creatures, such as the five creature that transformed into planeswalker) . Not to mention the tempo advantage (6 mana worth of creature for 4 mana). And the fact that itís instant speed, allowing you to open some mana for other powerful card you have (especially with creature with flash), and to transform any werewolf ( like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409976 this]] and aspx?multiverseid=398429 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409961 this]]), since you donít need to cast it in your turn. Some says it only weakness is that itís random and it doesnít summon aforementioned Siege Rhino. It also powered many deck that become [[TierInducedScrappy top tier]] :
** The earliest deck exploit green and white strong but cheap creature, only adding Company and itís partner in crime,
aspx?multiverseid=398435 that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394558 Dromokaís Command]], that for just measly 2 mana, you can get 2 of these effect: remove opponent annoying enchantment, strengthen your creature, protect yourself from burn spell, and kill opponent creature. Just one of these effect already made it powerful, not to mention that itís instant speed. This wil evolve into the dreaded Collected Bant later on.
** Then it used to fuel combo deck revolving around
aspx?multiverseid=398442 transformed]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=391901 Rally the Ancestor]]. The card that intended to summon temporary blocker, were used to fuel aspx?multiverseid=398423 into]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=398440 Nantuko Husk]] with creature aspx?multiverseid=398432 planeswalkers]]. Not to mention the tempo advantage (6 mana worth of creatures for 4 mana), and the fact that create/replaced itself with token, and itís instant speed, allowing you to cast it on your opponent's turn and/or leave open some mana for other powerful card you have. One use of casting it to summon creatures on your opponent's turn is that you can use it on your opponent's end step to pull out a werewolf that can only transform if no spells are cast during a turn (like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=394075 card advantage]]/[[http://gatherer.aspx?multiverseid=409976 this]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=401839 consistency]]. Later iteration aspx?multiverseid=409961 this]]), and transform it immediately if your opponent didn't cast any spells during their turn, or transform it right after your next turn by not casting any spells yourself. One of its only weakness is that has a good degree of randomness and it doesnít summon the deck donít even need to attack, aforementioned Siege Rhino. It also powered many decks that became [[TierInducedScrappy top tier]], notably many variations of G/W or Bant that combined Collected Company with multiple powerful but cheap creatures like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=402101 Cutthroats]] as win condition.
** It reach it peak power in Eldritch Moon Expansion. Since it first appearance at Tarkir block, it got 2
aspx?multiverseid=407654 Sylvan Advocate]] and other useful green and white spells like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407654 strong]] aspx?multiverseid=394558 Dromoka's Command]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409997 aggresive]] green creature to overpower aspx?multiverseid=391901 Rally the opponent, Ancestors]]. The Bant Collected Company deck only got more powerful in the werewolf above Battle for card advantage, Zendikar and a Shadows over Innistrad blocks, when it got lots more cheap hate cards to work with, like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=407667 bouncer]], now Collected Bant gain Reflector Mage]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414494 flying counterspell]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=409742 Serra Angel++]], and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=414338 Kismet with legs]]. A different flavor of Thalia, Heretic Cathar]]. Bant Company deck will appear that focused made up more on green-white human beatdown or blue-white spirit that splash green for Company, with total aggregate than 40% of >40% deck the top decks in Standard standard in Eldritch Moon, dominating before Collected Company rotated out of the format as with the sole champion. It would have been banned if it isnít rotating out in 2 months.release of Kaladesh.
20th Dec '16 6:19:33 PM TheMartianGeek1
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Alternatively, use the Ink-Treader with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=290526 Nivmagus Elemental]], which allows you to exile an instant or sorcery spell you control to give itself two +1/+1 counters. Suddenly, every single-target instant or sorcery spell you have that can target a creature targets anything and everything you want (short of creatures with shroud or hexproof); you can either use a beneficial spell or a harmful one (or a potentially double-sided one such as [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=417690 Harnessed Lightning]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=195630 Rite of Replication]]) and simply exile the copies that are targeting things you don't want to hit, buffing the Elemental up massively in the process. Of course, getting the Ink-Treader out in the first place requires 4 different colors of mana, preventing it from being ''that'' broken....
10th Dec '16 9:26:27 PM SenorYee
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=292751 Brainstorm]] was supposed to be a "fixed" version of Ancestral Recall. It was hideously powerful and eventually got itself restricted in Vintage due to its sheer power; it doesn't help that it combos very well with saclands, which shuffle your deck (and thus shuffle away the cards you put back on top - this allowed it to effectively give card advantage by trading useless cards for useful ones, then shuffling them back into your deck).

to:

** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=292751 Brainstorm]] was supposed to be a "fixed" version of Ancestral Recall. It was hideously powerful and eventually got itself restricted in Vintage due to its sheer power; it doesn't help that it combos very well with saclands, fetchlands, which shuffle your deck (and thus shuffle away the cards you put back on top - this allowed it to effectively give card advantage by trading useless cards for useful ones, then shuffling them back into your deck).
7th Dec '16 2:19:10 PM GuiRitter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15246 Metalworker]], a hideously undercosted creature that dovetailed right into the "have loads of artifacts" Tolarian Academy decks to give them even more fast mana. These days it can produce ''infinite'' mana when combined with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=48141 Voltaic Construct]]; all you need to do is have more then one Artifact in your hand.

to:

** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15246 Metalworker]], a hideously undercosted creature that dovetailed right into the "have loads of artifacts" Tolarian Academy decks to give them even more fast mana. These days it can produce ''infinite'' mana when combined with [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=48141 Voltaic Construct]]; all you need to do is have more then than one Artifact in your hand.
6th Dec '16 2:21:38 PM GuiRitter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=22998 Fact or Fiction]] from Invasion was another attempt at at fixing Ancestral Recall, and it was so powerful it was banned for 10 years: You have to put two cards into your graveyard, but you get access to the top 5 cards of your library in exchange & some control over which pile you get.

to:

** [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=22998 Fact or Fiction]] from Invasion was another attempt at at fixing Ancestral Recall, and it was so powerful it was banned for 10 years: You have to put two cards into your graveyard, but you get access to the top 5 cards of your library in exchange & some control over which pile you get.
This list shows the last 10 events of 452. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=GameBreaker.MagicTheGathering