History FunnyAneurysmMoment / SaturdayNightLive

20th Nov '17 11:11:36 PM AaronHong
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* The sketch featuring Louis C.K. and a teenage girl [[note]]played by Cecily Strong[[/note]] flirting in a '50s soda shop is less funny following Louis C.K.'s sexual assault allegations, especially the end where [[NotIfTheyEnjoyedItRationalization the girl says she likes getting attention from old men.]]

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* The sketch featuring Louis C.K. and a teenage girl [[note]]played by Cecily Strong[[/note]] flirting in a '50s soda shop is less funny following Louis C.K.'s sexual assault allegations, especially the end where [[NotIfTheyEnjoyedItRationalization the girl says she likes getting attention from old men.]]]]
* Speaking of which, the rising torrent of sexual harassment allegations that coincided with the start of season 43 led to a new character, Claire from HR (Cecily again) reviewing the working conditions of her female colleagues, implying that this was taking place within the SNL staff. This came just one week before the accusations reached a ''former'' cast member, Al Franken.
11th Nov '17 9:54:29 PM mightymewtron
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* Combined with EarlyInstallmentWeirdness, one Season 41 episode has unannounced guest Creator/AlecBaldwin, not as Trump but as Democrat presidential candidate hopeful Jim Webb, who's not only boasting all his accomplishments but strangely the ''least'' left-leaning Democrat, what with his NRA certification, and when asked questions suddenly gets all evasive. All this, and going from declaring himself "your future president" to just calling himself "President Webb" by the end.

to:

* Combined with EarlyInstallmentWeirdness, one Season 41 episode has unannounced guest Creator/AlecBaldwin, not as Trump but as Democrat presidential candidate hopeful Jim Webb, who's not only boasting all his accomplishments but strangely the ''least'' left-leaning Democrat, what with his NRA certification, and when asked questions suddenly gets all evasive. All this, and going from declaring himself "your future president" to just calling himself "President Webb" by the end.end.
* The sketch featuring Louis C.K. and a teenage girl [[note]]played by Cecily Strong[[/note]] flirting in a '50s soda shop is less funny following Louis C.K.'s sexual assault allegations, especially the end where [[NotIfTheyEnjoyedItRationalization the girl says she likes getting attention from old men.]]
29th Aug '17 11:01:48 AM ClintEastwood
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* On the season 11 premiere hosted by Music/{{Madonna}}, there was a cold opening where then-Creator/{{NBC}} executive Brandon Tartikoff announces that he's subjecting the 1985-1986 season cast to mandatory urine tests for drugs (this sketch was later EditedForSyndication, as the censors in the 1980s thought that the idea of urine testing was [[ValuesDissonance too taboo for late-night TV at the time]] -- [[HypocriticalHumor never mind that ''SNL'' is supposed to be the vanguard of edgy, late-night TV humor]]). One of the cast members during the 11th season was a 20-year-old Robert Downey, Jr., who would later spend all of the 1990s being more well-known for his drug abuse and arrests than his movies (though it was playing drug addicts that got Downey, Jr. back into stardom in the 2000s. Go figure).

to:

* On the season 11 premiere hosted by Music/{{Madonna}}, there was a cold opening where then-Creator/{{NBC}} executive Brandon Tartikoff announces that he's subjecting the 1985-1986 season cast to mandatory urine tests for drugs (this sketch was later EditedForSyndication, as the censors in the 1980s thought that the idea of urine testing was [[ValuesDissonance too taboo for late-night TV at the time]] -- [[HypocriticalHumor never mind that ''SNL'' is supposed to be the vanguard of edgy, late-night TV humor]]). One of the cast members during the 11th season was a 20-year-old Robert Downey, Jr.Creator/RobertDowneyJr., who would later spend all of the 1990s being more well-known for his drug abuse and arrests than his movies (though it was playing drug addicts that got Downey, Jr. back into stardom in the 2000s. Go figure).



* Then there's that SNL Digital Short where Creator/BillHader plays a man who writes a letter to his sister and his friend (played by Andy Samberg) shoots him, leading to the shooting deaths of another man (played by episode host Creator/ShiaLaBeouf), the sister (played by Kristen Wiig), and two police officers (played by Fred Armisen and Jason Sudeikis). Two days after the sketch aired, the shooting at Virginia Tech happened, which was one of two reasons why the sketch never appeared on NBC's ''Saturday Night Live'' web page, which has video highlights of past and present sketches (the other reason being that NBC never cleared the copyright to the song used in the sketch). What a shame that everyone overreacted to a simple parody of ''Series/TheOC''. As it was, the short became one of the first from the show's to be unofficially popularized on Website/YouTube. MemeticMutation followed; the Imogen Heap song which ''SNL'' couldn't get cleared has now been ''sampled for a hip-hop beat''.

to:

* Then there's that SNL Digital Short where Creator/BillHader plays a man who writes a letter to his sister and his friend (played by Andy Samberg) shoots him, leading to the shooting deaths of another man (played by episode host Creator/ShiaLaBeouf), the sister (played by Kristen Wiig), Creator/KristenWiig), and two police officers (played by Fred Armisen and Jason Sudeikis). Two days after the sketch aired, the shooting at Virginia Tech happened, which was one of two reasons why the sketch never appeared on NBC's ''Saturday Night Live'' web page, which has video highlights of past and present sketches (the other reason being that NBC never cleared the copyright to the song used in the sketch). What a shame that everyone overreacted to a simple parody of ''Series/TheOC''. As it was, the short became one of the first from the show's to be unofficially popularized on Website/YouTube. MemeticMutation followed; the Imogen Heap song which ''SNL'' couldn't get cleared has now been ''sampled for a hip-hop beat''.
29th Aug '17 11:00:46 AM ClintEastwood
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* The infamous "Don't Look Back in Anger" short film that showed an elderly John Belushi as the last living member of the original "Not Ready for Primetime" cast who ends up dancing on his cast mates' graves. (What's more disturbing is that the short film "predicted" that Gilda Radner would be one of the dead cast members)[[http://snltranscripts.jt.org/77/77manger.phtml]] [[http://www.nbc.com/Saturday_Night_Live/video/clips/dont-look-back-in-anger/280567/ you can watch the clip here]].

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* The infamous "Don't Look Back in Anger" short film that showed an elderly John Belushi Creator/JohnBelushi as the last living member of the original "Not Ready for Primetime" cast who ends up dancing on his cast mates' graves. (What's more disturbing is that the short film "predicted" that Gilda Radner would be one of the dead cast members)[[http://snltranscripts.jt.org/77/77manger.phtml]] [[http://www.nbc.com/Saturday_Night_Live/video/clips/dont-look-back-in-anger/280567/ you can watch the clip here]].



* Any time Chris Farley faked a heart attack in the Bill Swerski's Superfans sketches, not to mention the one-off sketch where Farley plays "The Relapse Guy" -- so called because he keeps going on and falling off the wagon.
* The final sketch on the season 19 finale hosted by Heather Locklear where Phil Hartman, in his last episode as a cast member, sings [[Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic "So Long, Farewell"]] to Chris Farley. It was meant to be sweet and signal the end of the season, but with both Farley and Hartman dead (within 6 months of each other!), it's now too depressing to watch.
* On the season 11 premiere hosted by Madonna, there was a cold opening where then-Creator/{{NBC}} executive Brandon Tartikoff announces that he's subjecting the 1985-1986 season cast to mandatory urine tests for drugs (this sketch was later EditedForSyndication, as the censors in the 1980s thought that the idea of urine testing was [[ValuesDissonance too taboo for late-night TV at the time]] -- [[HypocriticalHumor never mind that ''SNL'' is supposed to be the vanguard of edgy, late-night TV humor]]). One of the cast members during the 11th season was a 20-year-old Robert Downey, Jr., who would later spend all of the 1990s being more well-known for his drug abuse and arrests than his movies (though it was playing drug addicts that got Downey, Jr. back into stardom in the 2000s. Go figure).
* When Phil Hartman came back to host for the second time (in season 22 -- the 1996-1997 season), he says in his monologue that he bought his family's affection with the money he makes from being on "Series/NewsRadio" and "TheSimpsons." Apparently, it didn't work, when you consider what happened to Hartman a few months after he hosted.
* The episode hosted by Charlize Theron on the 2000-2001 season had a cold opening called "A Glimpse into Our Possible Future," a sketch showing what would happen to America if George W. Bush were President (and later, if Al Gore were President and if Ralph Nader were President). While the sketch did exaggerate how far George W. Bush (played by Will Ferrell) would run America into the ground (like setting the Great Lakes on fire or giving Texas to Communists), lines like, "I hope I get a war. Wars are like executions supersized," and "I killed Dick Cheney in a hunting accident" (and the fact that his new map of the United States shows several flooded states starting in Louisiana and pooling in the Midwest and California as a flaming wreck) now don't seem so funny.
* On the Seth Rogen/Phoenix episode from season 34, Seth Meyers (the Weekend Update anchor) did a report on how during Michael Jackson's summer world tour, he would bring his son onstage, who would be accompanied by a police officer who would have Michael Jackson arrested. Unfortunately, the concert (and the punchline to the joke) would never come to pass due to Jackson's death two months after the episode originally aired.
* Then there's that SNL Digital Short where Bill Hader plays a man who writes a letter to his sister and his friend (played by Andy Samberg) shoots him, leading to the shooting deaths of another man (played by episode host Shia [=LaBeouf=]), the sister (played by Kristen Wiig), and two police officers (played by Fred Armisen and Jason Sudeikis). Two days after the sketch aired, the shooting at Virginia Tech happened, which was one of two reasons why the sketch never appeared on NBC's ''Saturday Night Live'' web page, which has video highlights of past and present sketches (the other reason being that NBC never cleared the copyright to the song used in the sketch). What a shame that everyone overreacted to a simple parody of ''Series/TheOC''. As it was, the short became one of the first from the show's to be unofficially popularized on Website/YouTube. MemeticMutation followed; the Imogen Heap song which ''SNL'' couldn't get cleared has now been ''sampled for a hip-hop beat''.

to:

* Any time Chris Farley Creator/ChrisFarley faked a heart attack in the Bill Swerski's Superfans sketches, not to mention the one-off sketch where Farley plays "The Relapse Guy" -- so called because he keeps going on and falling off the wagon.
* The final sketch on the season 19 finale hosted by Heather Locklear Creator/HeatherLocklear where Phil Hartman, Creator/PhilHartman, in his last episode as a cast member, sings [[Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic "So Long, Farewell"]] to Chris Farley. It was meant to be sweet and signal the end of the season, but with both Farley and Hartman dead (within 6 months of each other!), it's now too depressing to watch.
* On the season 11 premiere hosted by Madonna, Music/{{Madonna}}, there was a cold opening where then-Creator/{{NBC}} executive Brandon Tartikoff announces that he's subjecting the 1985-1986 season cast to mandatory urine tests for drugs (this sketch was later EditedForSyndication, as the censors in the 1980s thought that the idea of urine testing was [[ValuesDissonance too taboo for late-night TV at the time]] -- [[HypocriticalHumor never mind that ''SNL'' is supposed to be the vanguard of edgy, late-night TV humor]]). One of the cast members during the 11th season was a 20-year-old Robert Downey, Jr., who would later spend all of the 1990s being more well-known for his drug abuse and arrests than his movies (though it was playing drug addicts that got Downey, Jr. back into stardom in the 2000s. Go figure).
* When Phil Hartman came back to host for the second time (in season 22 -- the 1996-1997 season), he says in his monologue that he bought his family's affection with the money he makes from being on "Series/NewsRadio" ''Series/NewsRadio'' and "TheSimpsons." ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''. Apparently, it didn't work, when you consider what happened to Hartman a few months after he hosted.
* The episode hosted by Charlize Theron Creator/CharlizeTheron on the 2000-2001 season had a cold opening called "A Glimpse into Our Possible Future," a sketch showing what would happen to America if George W. Bush UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush were President (and later, if Al Gore were President and if Ralph Nader were President). While the sketch did exaggerate how far George W. Bush (played by Will Ferrell) Creator/WillFerrell) would run America into the ground (like setting the Great Lakes on fire or giving Texas to Communists), lines like, "I hope I get a war. Wars are like executions supersized," and "I killed Dick Cheney in a hunting accident" (and the fact that his new map of the United States shows several flooded states starting in Louisiana and pooling in the Midwest and California as a flaming wreck) now don't seem so funny.
* On the Seth Rogen/Phoenix Creator/SethRogen/Phoenix episode from season 34, Seth Meyers (the Weekend Update anchor) did a report on how during Michael Jackson's summer world tour, he would bring his son onstage, who would be accompanied by a police officer who would have Michael Jackson arrested. Unfortunately, the concert (and the punchline to the joke) would never come to pass due to Jackson's death two months after the episode originally aired.
* Then there's that SNL Digital Short where Bill Hader Creator/BillHader plays a man who writes a letter to his sister and his friend (played by Andy Samberg) shoots him, leading to the shooting deaths of another man (played by episode host Shia [=LaBeouf=]), Creator/ShiaLaBeouf), the sister (played by Kristen Wiig), and two police officers (played by Fred Armisen and Jason Sudeikis). Two days after the sketch aired, the shooting at Virginia Tech happened, which was one of two reasons why the sketch never appeared on NBC's ''Saturday Night Live'' web page, which has video highlights of past and present sketches (the other reason being that NBC never cleared the copyright to the song used in the sketch). What a shame that everyone overreacted to a simple parody of ''Series/TheOC''. As it was, the short became one of the first from the show's to be unofficially popularized on Website/YouTube. MemeticMutation followed; the Imogen Heap song which ''SNL'' couldn't get cleared has now been ''sampled for a hip-hop beat''.



* Here's one that doesn't involve death, but still became controversial after the fact: On the Anne Hathaway/The Killers episode, there was a sketch about the assorted deadbeats and greedy people who would benefit from the economic bailout at the time. One of the people was a couple by the name of Herbert and Marion Sandler (played by long time cast member Darrell Hammond and 2-year feature player Creator/CaseyWilson), who screwed Wachovia Bank out of a lot of money and personally thanked the Congress for not holding them responsible for their corrupt activities. Who would have guessed that Herbert and Marion Sandler were an actual couple that actually did this (according to show creator Lorne Michaels, he and the other writers had no clue about this until after the sketch aired)? Because of this, the Internet video version of the CSPAN Bailout sketch and the NBC rerun of the Anne Hathaway episode edited out the entire part with the Sandler couple. The Netflix version does keep the part, but the lower-third caption describing the Sandlers as "People who should be shot" and Herbert Sandler (Darrell Hammond) thanking the Democratic Party for [[KarmaHoudini letting them get away with what they've done]] were removed (the edits are obvious, but not as blatant as removing the entire scene with the Sandlers, like on the television and Internet versions).

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* Here's one that doesn't involve death, but still became controversial after the fact: On the Anne Hathaway/The Killers Creator/AnneHathaway/Music/TheKillers episode, there was a sketch about the assorted deadbeats and greedy people who would benefit from the economic bailout at the time. One of the people was a couple by the name of Herbert and Marion Sandler (played by long time cast member Darrell Hammond and 2-year feature player Creator/CaseyWilson), who screwed Wachovia Bank out of a lot of money and personally thanked the Congress for not holding them responsible for their corrupt activities. Who would have guessed that Herbert and Marion Sandler were an actual couple that actually did this (according to show creator Lorne Michaels, he and the other writers had no clue about this until after the sketch aired)? Because of this, the Internet video version of the CSPAN Bailout sketch and the NBC rerun of the Anne Hathaway episode edited out the entire part with the Sandler couple. The Netflix version does keep the part, but the lower-third caption describing the Sandlers as "People who should be shot" and Herbert Sandler (Darrell Hammond) thanking the Democratic Party for [[KarmaHoudini letting them get away with what they've done]] were removed (the edits are obvious, but not as blatant as removing the entire scene with the Sandlers, like on the television and Internet versions).



* Even the [[SeasonalRot Jean Doumanian era]] isn't immune to the Funny Aneurysm Moment. At the end of the first episode (hosted by Elliot Gould), Gould introduces the cast again and tells the audience, "We're gonna be around forever!" Eleven episodes later, all but Eddie Murphy and Joe Piscopo were fired after the F-bomb debacle on the episode hosted by Charlene Tilton, and most of the cast members from that season haven't really been in the spotlight since then (with the possible exceptions of vastly-underused cast member at the time Creator/GilbertGottfried, Eddie Murphy [despite the career slump], and Gail Matthius, who did voice acting in a lot of 1980s and 1990s cartoons before becoming an improv and theater teacher).

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* Even the [[SeasonalRot Jean Doumanian era]] isn't immune to the Funny Aneurysm Moment. At the end of the first episode (hosted by Elliot Gould), Gould introduces the cast again and tells the audience, "We're gonna be around forever!" Eleven episodes later, all but Eddie Murphy Creator/EddieMurphy and Joe Piscopo were fired after the F-bomb debacle on the episode hosted by Charlene Tilton, and most of the cast members from that season haven't really been in the spotlight since then (with the possible exceptions of vastly-underused cast member at the time Creator/GilbertGottfried, Eddie Murphy [despite the career slump], and Gail Matthius, who did voice acting in a lot of 1980s and 1990s cartoons before becoming an improv and theater teacher).



* An in-sketch example: "The Carter 'N Sons Barbecue" fake commercial from the Taylor Swift episode (season 35), which was supposedly filmed in 2002 and didn't air until 2009, which was when the [=H1N1=] ("swine flu") virus was much-talked-about. The "commercial" was plastered with disclaimers stating that "swine fever" (an appetite for Carter 'N Sons brand barbecued pork) wasn't associated with the [=H1N1=] virus (followed by a disclaimer reading that the management regrets naming their Sausage and Ribs Sampler platter "S.A.R.S").

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* An in-sketch example: "The Carter 'N Sons Barbecue" fake commercial from the Taylor Swift Music/TaylorSwift episode (season 35), which was supposedly filmed in 2002 and didn't air until 2009, which was when the [=H1N1=] ("swine flu") virus was much-talked-about. The "commercial" was plastered with disclaimers stating that "swine fever" (an appetite for Carter 'N Sons brand barbecued pork) wasn't associated with the [=H1N1=] virus (followed by a disclaimer reading that the management regrets naming their Sausage and Ribs Sampler platter "S.A.R.S").



* In the Colin Firth/Norah Jones episode from season 29, Darrell Hammond as Bill Clinton remarks that John Edwards is like a "boring version" of himself, stating, "This guy might have sex in the Oval Office, but hed probably do it in the missionary position - with his wife." Thanks to the Rielle Hunter affair and the sex tape scandal, that line rings hollow.

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* In the Colin Firth/Norah Creator/ColinFirth/Norah Jones episode from season 29, Darrell Hammond as Bill Clinton remarks that John Edwards is like a "boring version" of himself, stating, "This guy might have sex in the Oval Office, but hed probably do it in the missionary position - with his wife." Thanks to the Rielle Hunter affair and the sex tape scandal, that line rings hollow.



* Back in 1982, there was an episode hosted by Creator/DrewBarrymore - fresh from ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'', all smiles and curls, just seven years old (making Barrymore the youngest host ''SNL'' has ever had, beating out Creator/JodieFoster, who was 14 when she hosted in 1976). In the cold opening, when asked if she wanted a glass of milk, she responds: "Milk? I'm a Barrymore! Get me a drink and make it a double!" Her family legacy of alcoholism and self-destructive behavior would catch up with her for real, and in a big (bad) way; just four years after, she really was drinking alcohol. Subverted in that there is a happy ending to all of this: Drew Barrymore managed to climb out of the same pit of drugs and despair as her ancestors did and has come back to host a few more times, now becoming ''SNL'''s most frequent female host (beating out Candice Bergen, who frequently hosted in the early days of the show) as of October 2009.
* In the ''SNL'' Digital Short on the Gwyneth Paltrow/Cee-Lo Green episode, Andy Samberg has a wild, drunken night out with Pee-Wee Herman (the same one who hosted ''SNL'' in 1985 during its 11th season). During this night out, they break a chair over Anderson Cooper's head in the street (and Cooper comes back later in the short with a bandaged head, complaining that his blue eyes [which he considers one of America's national treasures] almost got destroyed). Less than three weeks after the sketch aired, Anderson Cooper really was brutalized in the streets during his coverage of Cairo's uprising.
* A 1970s episode hosted by Steve Martin had a sketch called ''Jeopardy 1999''. It was basically ''Jeopardy'' in a (then) futuristic setting. One of the answers was, "Comedian whose career fizzled when he left NBC's ''Saturday Night''". The question: "Who is Chevy Chase?" While Chevy had several hit movies and a role on ''Series/{{Community}}'' after leaving ''SNL'', he ''did'' ultimately go through a career decline, making that line eerily prophetic.
* Lindsay Lohan's monologue during her 2005 hosting appearance included a visit from her "future self"[[note]]from 2007[[/note]] played by Amy Poehler, warning her to stay away from her drinking, partying ways. She didn't end up marrying Tommy Lee and hosting a Cinemax show called ''Night Passions'', but what did start happening not too soon after that made this monologue eerily prophetic as well.

to:

* Back in 1982, there was an episode hosted by Creator/DrewBarrymore - fresh from ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'', all smiles and curls, just seven years old (making Barrymore the youngest host ''SNL'' has ever had, beating out Creator/JodieFoster, who was 14 when she hosted in 1976). In the cold opening, when asked if she wanted a glass of milk, she responds: "Milk? I'm a Barrymore! Get me a drink and make it a double!" Her family legacy of alcoholism and self-destructive behavior would catch up with her for real, and in a big (bad) way; just four years after, she really was drinking alcohol. Subverted in that there is a happy ending to all of this: Drew Barrymore managed to climb out of the same pit of drugs and despair as her ancestors did and has come back to host a few more times, now becoming ''SNL'''s most frequent female host (beating out Candice Bergen, Creator/CandiceBergen, who frequently hosted in the early days of the show) as of October 2009.
* In the ''SNL'' Digital Short on the Gwyneth Paltrow/Cee-Lo Creator/GwynethPaltrow/Cee-Lo Green episode, Andy Samberg has a wild, drunken night out with Pee-Wee Herman (the same one who hosted ''SNL'' in 1985 during its 11th season). During this night out, they break a chair over Anderson Cooper's head in the street (and Cooper comes back later in the short with a bandaged head, complaining that his blue eyes [which he considers one of America's national treasures] almost got destroyed). Less than three weeks after the sketch aired, Anderson Cooper really was brutalized in the streets during his coverage of Cairo's uprising.
* A 1970s episode hosted by Steve Martin Creator/SteveMartin had a sketch called ''Jeopardy 1999''. It was basically ''Jeopardy'' in a (then) futuristic setting. One of the answers was, "Comedian whose career fizzled when he left NBC's ''Saturday Night''". The question: "Who is Chevy Chase?" Creator/ChevyChase?" While Chevy had several hit movies and a role on ''Series/{{Community}}'' after leaving ''SNL'', he ''did'' ultimately go through a career decline, making that line eerily prophetic.
* Lindsay Lohan's Creator/LindsayLohan's monologue during her 2005 hosting appearance included a visit from her "future self"[[note]]from 2007[[/note]] played by Amy Poehler, Creator/AmyPoehler, warning her to stay away from her drinking, partying ways. She didn't end up marrying Tommy Lee and hosting a Cinemax show called ''Night Passions'', but what did start happening not too soon after that made this monologue eerily prophetic as well.



* On a 1997 ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' sketch, Burt Reynolds (Norm Macdonald) guesses "Robert Blake" to a question and later tells Alex Trebek (Will Ferrell) that he's a good guy. Four years later, Blake's public image was tarnished when he was accused of shooting his second wife.

to:

* On a 1997 ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' sketch, Burt Reynolds (Norm Macdonald) Creator/BurtReynolds (Creator/NormMacdonald) guesses "Robert Blake" to a question and later tells Alex Trebek (Will Ferrell) that he's a good guy. Four years later, Blake's public image was tarnished when he was accused of shooting his second wife.
5th Jul '17 3:52:07 AM AaronHong
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* Combined with EarlyInstalmentWeirdness, one Season 41 episode has unannounced guest Creator/AlecBaldwin, not as Trump but as Democrat presidential candidate hopeful Jim Webb, who's not only boasting all his accomplishments but strangely the ''least'' left-leaning Democrat, what with his NRA certification, and when asked questions suddenly gets all evasive. All this, and going from declaring himself "your future president" to just calling himself "President Webb" by the end.

to:

* Combined with EarlyInstalmentWeirdness, EarlyInstallmentWeirdness, one Season 41 episode has unannounced guest Creator/AlecBaldwin, not as Trump but as Democrat presidential candidate hopeful Jim Webb, who's not only boasting all his accomplishments but strangely the ''least'' left-leaning Democrat, what with his NRA certification, and when asked questions suddenly gets all evasive. All this, and going from declaring himself "your future president" to just calling himself "President Webb" by the end.
5th Jul '17 3:49:19 AM AaronHong
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* In one of the Trump Administration sketches, President Trump is persuaded by the Grim Reaper/Steve Bannon to call infamous dictator Robert Mugabe (the governor of Zimbabwe) as a way of making himself known to the world. Shortly after Trump's 100-day mark, he announced that he would invite another infamous mass-murdering dictator - Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte - to the White House.

to:

* In one of the Trump Administration sketches, President Trump is persuaded by the Grim Reaper/Steve Bannon to call infamous dictator Robert Mugabe (the governor of Zimbabwe) as a way of making himself known to the world. Shortly after Trump's 100-day mark, he announced that he would invite another infamous mass-murdering dictator - Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte - to the White House.House.
* Combined with EarlyInstalmentWeirdness, one Season 41 episode has unannounced guest Creator/AlecBaldwin, not as Trump but as Democrat presidential candidate hopeful Jim Webb, who's not only boasting all his accomplishments but strangely the ''least'' left-leaning Democrat, what with his NRA certification, and when asked questions suddenly gets all evasive. All this, and going from declaring himself "your future president" to just calling himself "President Webb" by the end.
10th May '17 8:27:02 PM KoopaKid17
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* On a 1997 ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' sketch, Burt Reynolds (Norm Macdonald) guesses "Robert Blake" to a question and later tells Alex Trebek (Will Ferrell) that he's a good guy. Four years later, Blake was accused of shooting his second wife.

to:

* On a 1997 ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' sketch, Burt Reynolds (Norm Macdonald) guesses "Robert Blake" to a question and later tells Alex Trebek (Will Ferrell) that he's a good guy. Four years later, Blake Blake's public image was tarnished when he was accused of shooting his second wife.
30th Apr '17 1:22:12 PM geekgecko
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* In one of the Trump Administration sketches, President Trump is persuaded by the Grim Reaper/Steve Bannon to call infamous dictator Robert Mugabe (the governor of Zimbabwe) as a way of making himself known to the world. Shortly after Trump's 100-day mark, he announced that he would invite another infamous mass-murdering dictator - Phillipines president Rodrigo Duterte - to the White House.

to:

* In one of the Trump Administration sketches, President Trump is persuaded by the Grim Reaper/Steve Bannon to call infamous dictator Robert Mugabe (the governor of Zimbabwe) as a way of making himself known to the world. Shortly after Trump's 100-day mark, he announced that he would invite another infamous mass-murdering dictator - Phillipines Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte - to the White House.
30th Apr '17 1:22:09 PM geekgecko
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* A scene in the HalloweenEpisode of their parody of ''The [=McLaughlin=] Group'' in which John [=McLaughlin=] is killed mid-show by the Grim Reaper, portrayed by the real [=McLaughlin=], became this after [=McLaughlin=]'s death in 2016, just a few days after he missed a taping due to illness, caused his long-running PBS debate program to be cancelled after 34 years.

to:

* A scene in the HalloweenEpisode of their parody of ''The [=McLaughlin=] Group'' in which John [=McLaughlin=] is killed mid-show by the Grim Reaper, portrayed by the real [=McLaughlin=], became this after [=McLaughlin=]'s death in 2016, just a few days after he missed a taping due to illness, caused his long-running PBS debate program to be cancelled after 34 years.years.
* In one of the Trump Administration sketches, President Trump is persuaded by the Grim Reaper/Steve Bannon to call infamous dictator Robert Mugabe (the governor of Zimbabwe) as a way of making himself known to the world. Shortly after Trump's 100-day mark, he announced that he would invite another infamous mass-murdering dictator - Phillipines president Rodrigo Duterte - to the White House.
22nd Mar '17 10:33:53 PM ryanasaurus0077
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-->"Well, Tom, you know, I'm still real young and, well, I've got LOTS to look forward to, you know? [[Music/PaulSimon Unhappy marriages]], household accidents... maybe even a nervous breakdown! You know, I'm really entitled to one!"

to:

-->"Well, Tom, you know, I'm still real young and, well, I've got LOTS to look forward to, you know? [[Music/PaulSimon Unhappy marriages]], household accidents... maybe even a nervous breakdown! You know, I'm really entitled to one!"one!"
* A scene in the HalloweenEpisode of their parody of ''The [=McLaughlin=] Group'' in which John [=McLaughlin=] is killed mid-show by the Grim Reaper, portrayed by the real [=McLaughlin=], became this after [=McLaughlin=]'s death in 2016, just a few days after he missed a taping due to illness, caused his long-running PBS debate program to be cancelled after 34 years.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=FunnyAneurysmMoment.SaturdayNightLive