History Funny / MontyPythonsFlyingCircus

30th Jun '17 7:16:24 PM mlsmithca
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* The Pythons' attempts at longform sketches on the small screen tended to be a bit hit-or-miss, but the "Science Fiction Sketch" from this episode is a wickedly funny parody of British TV science fiction of the time, and uncannily anticipates the sort of material that cropped up regularly in the Creator/JonPertwee era of ''Series/DoctorWho'' six months later. From the very premise - sentient blancmanges from Andromeda who are turning everyone in Britain into Scotsmen (which involves them suddenly wearing kilts and sprouting long red beards - whether man, woman, or child - and then racing off in pixellated motion with one fist raised) so that they become terrible at tennis and the blancmanges can win Wimbledon - to Graham's square-jawed ScienceHero whose flair for the dramatic, including rhetorical questions and waxing metaphorical, causes no end of confusion for his DumbBlonde assistant (whom he eventually knocks out when he tires of her penchant for ComicallyMissingThePoint), to the BrickJoke of the Potters, the couple dismissed as unimportant in the opening narration, returning to Centre Court during the men's singles final to devour the blancmange and allow Michael's Angus Podgorny to win the title (fifteen years later), it is pure hilarity from start to finish.[[note]] And has become even more so since Andy Murray turned the stereotype of Scots being bad at tennis on its ear by winning the Wimbledon men's singles title in 2013.[[/note]]

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* The Pythons' attempts at longform sketches on the small screen tended to be a bit hit-or-miss, but the "Science Fiction Sketch" from this episode is a wickedly funny parody of British TV science fiction of the time, and uncannily anticipates the sort of material that cropped up regularly in the Creator/JonPertwee era of ''Series/DoctorWho'' six months later. From the very premise - sentient blancmanges from Andromeda who are turning everyone in Britain into Scotsmen (which involves them suddenly wearing kilts and sprouting long red beards - whether man, woman, or child - and then racing off in pixellated motion with one fist raised) so that they become terrible at tennis and the blancmanges can win Wimbledon - to Graham's square-jawed ScienceHero whose flair for the dramatic, including rhetorical questions and waxing metaphorical, causes no end of confusion for his DumbBlonde assistant (whom he eventually knocks out when he tires of her penchant for ComicallyMissingThePoint), to the BrickJoke of the Potters, the couple dismissed as unimportant in the opening narration, returning to Centre Court during the men's singles final to devour the blancmange and allow Michael's Angus Podgorny to win the title (fifteen years later), it is pure hilarity from start to finish.a veritable parade of laughs.[[note]] And has become even more so since Andy Murray turned the stereotype of Scots being bad at tennis on its ear by winning the Wimbledon men's singles title in 2013.[[/note]]
30th Jun '17 7:11:30 PM mlsmithca
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%%[[AC:Episode 7: You're No Fun Anymore]]
%%

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%%[[AC:Episode [[AC:Episode 7: You're No Fun Anymore]]
%%* The Pythons' attempts at longform sketches on the small screen tended to be a bit hit-or-miss, but the "Science Fiction Sketch" from this episode is a wickedly funny parody of British TV science fiction of the time, and uncannily anticipates the sort of material that cropped up regularly in the Creator/JonPertwee era of ''Series/DoctorWho'' six months later. From the very premise - sentient blancmanges from Andromeda who are turning everyone in Britain into Scotsmen (which involves them suddenly wearing kilts and sprouting long red beards - whether man, woman, or child - and then racing off in pixellated motion with one fist raised) so that they become terrible at tennis and the blancmanges can win Wimbledon - to Graham's square-jawed ScienceHero whose flair for the dramatic, including rhetorical questions and waxing metaphorical, causes no end of confusion for his DumbBlonde assistant (whom he eventually knocks out when he tires of her penchant for ComicallyMissingThePoint), to the BrickJoke of the Potters, the couple dismissed as unimportant in the opening narration, returning to Centre Court during the men's singles final to devour the blancmange and allow Michael's Angus Podgorny to win the title (fifteen years later), it is pure hilarity from start to finish.[[note]] And has become even more so since Andy Murray turned the stereotype of Scots being bad at tennis on its ear by winning the Wimbledon men's singles title in 2013.[[/note]]



** After them is Mr Freight (Terry Gilliam), a CampGay man whose wife has just died and who is dressed only in a cap, pants, and wellington boots. He has brought along Mr Cook (Michael), who he has "picked up outside the Odeon". Cook has a goat with him, because he couldn't leave it alone, as it is ill.

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** After them is Mr Freight (Terry Gilliam), a CampGay man whose wife has just died and who is dressed only in a cap, cape, pants, and wellington boots. He has brought along Mr Cook (Michael), who whom he has "picked up outside the Odeon". Cook has a goat with him, because he couldn't leave it alone, as it is ill.
12th Jun '17 12:56:18 PM mlsmithca
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* The Creator/AgathaChristie spoof that devolves into obsessive nitpicking about railway timetables is funny enough on its own, but John Cleese's typically manic/maniacal performance as drama critic Gavin Millarrrrrrrrr (not a typo) is the icing on the cake:
-->'''Gavin Millarrrrrrrrr:''' Some people have made the mistake of seeing Shunt's work as a load of rubbish about railway timetables, but clever people like me, who talk loudly in restaurants, see this as a deliberate ambiguity, a plea for understanding in a mechanised world. The points are frozen, the beast is dead. What is the difference? What indeed is the point? The point is frozen, the beast is late out of Paddington. The point is taken. If La Fontaine's elk would spurn Tom Jones the engine must be our head, the dining car our oesophagus, the guard's van our left lung, the cattle truck our shins, the first-class compartment the piece of skin at the nape of the neck and the level crossing an electric elk called Simon. The clarity is devastating. But where is the ambiguity? It's over there in a box. Shunt is saying the 8.15 from Gillingham when in reality he means the 8.''13'' from Gillingham. The train is the same, only the time is altered. Ecce homo, ergo elk. La Fontaine knew his sister and knew her bloody well. The point is taken, the beast is moulting, the fluff gets up your nose. The illusion is complete. It is reality, the reality is illusion, and the ambiguity is the only truth. But is the truth, as Hitchcock observes, in the box? No, there isn't room, the ambiguity has put on weight. The point is taken, the elk is dead, the beast stops at Swindon, Chabrol stops at nothing, I'm having treatment, and La Fontaine can get knotted.\\

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* The Creator/AgathaChristie spoof that devolves into obsessive nitpicking about railway timetables is funny enough on its own, but John Cleese's typically manic/maniacal performance as drama critic Gavin Millarrrrrrrrr (not a typo) Millarrrrrrrrr[[note]] A parody version of Scottish arts critic and TV director Gavin Millar (with one R).[[/note]] is the icing on the cake:
-->'''Gavin Millarrrrrrrrr:''' Some people have made the mistake of seeing Shunt's work as a load of rubbish about railway timetables, but clever people like me, who talk loudly in restaurants, see this as a deliberate ambiguity, a plea for understanding in a mechanised world. The points are frozen, the beast is dead. What is the difference? What indeed is the point? The point is frozen, the beast is late out of Paddington. The point is taken. If La Fontaine's elk would spurn Tom Jones the engine must be our head, the dining car our oesophagus, the guard's van our left lung, the cattle truck our shins, the first-class compartment the piece of skin at the nape of the neck neck, and the level crossing an electric elk called Simon. The clarity is devastating. But where is the ambiguity? It's over there in a box. Shunt is saying the 8.15 from Gillingham when in reality he means the 8.''13'' from Gillingham. The train is the same, only the time is altered. Ecce homo, ergo elk. La Fontaine knew his sister and knew her bloody well. The point is taken, the beast is moulting, the fluff gets up your nose. The illusion is complete. It is reality, the reality is illusion, and the ambiguity is the only truth. But is the truth, as Hitchcock observes, in the box? No, there isn't room, the ambiguity has put on weight. The point is taken, the elk is dead, the beast stops at Swindon, Chabrol stops at nothing, I'm having treatment, and La Fontaine can get knotted.\\
1st Jun '17 11:34:25 PM mlsmithca
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** The vet calls in a professional Confuse-A-Cat service, which operates much like a military operation complete with a harsh drill sergeant ("WAIT FOR IT!") and ranking officer to oversee it. They then put on a bizarre stage act in front of said cat in to shake it out of its moping. Said stage act involves Long John Silver delivering an introduction before vanishing into thin air, followed by a strange boxing match in which different hats appear and disappear on the fighters' heads and a chase scene involving a man in a towel, a man in a penguin suit on a pogo stick, a man dressed as Napoleon, and a policeman.

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** The vet calls in a professional Confuse-A-Cat service, which operates much like a military operation complete with a harsh drill sergeant ("WAIT FOR IT!") and ranking officer to oversee it. They then put on a bizarre stage act in front of said the couple's cat in to shake it out of its moping. Said stage act involves Long John Silver delivering an introduction before vanishing into thin air, followed by a strange boxing match in which different hats appear and disappear on the fighters' heads and a chase scene involving a man in a towel, a man in a penguin suit on a pogo stick, a man dressed as Napoleon, and a policeman. The scene periodically cuts to the reactions of the cat (apparent indifference) and the couple (if their cat isn't confused yet, ''they'' certainly are).
2nd May '17 12:03:04 AM mlsmithca
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'''Art Critic's Wife:''' ''[wails]'' BUT IT'S MY ONLY LINE!...

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'''Art Critic's Wife:''' ''[wails]'' BUT IT'S MY ONLY LINE!...[[note]] A CallBack to a sketch in a previous episode featuring Michael and Katya Wyeth, which ended with the same complaint.[[/note]]



* It may be old ''now'', but everyone remembers the first time they saw the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npjOSLCR2hE Dead Parrot Sketch]].

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* It may be old ''now'', but everyone remembers the first time they saw the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npjOSLCR2hE Dead Parrot Sketch]].
Sketch]]. As is so often the case with Python sketches, what really makes it work is John's smouldering anger as the customer, Mr Praline, and Michael's insistent denial, no matter what the evidence presented to him, that the parrot has been dead since long before he sold it to Mr Praline.



%%[[AC:Episode 10: Untitled]]
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%%[[AC:Episode [[AC:Episode 10: Untitled]]
%%* The Pythons were fond of indulging in meta-humour, and this episode opens with a good example; Eric as a lingerie store clerk and John as an armed robber in BlatantBurglar attire are on a set, muttering impatiently about someone not having arrived. Cut to a kitchen where Frank, a plumber (Michael), is reading a letter from Creator/TheBBC inviting him to be in a sketch; when the sketch begins, he goes out. (His wife (Terry Jones) notes that it's "what they call a walk-on"; Frank insists it's more a "walk-off".) He finally gets over his initial misgivings and shows up on set - just in time for the sketch to be broadcast live on the television as his wife watches. (The rest of the sketch is understatedly funny as well, with John's armed robber stepping through where the window in the door would be, and having to "adopt, adapt, and improve" after the clerk reveals that he's in a lingerie shop and not a bank, while Eric's clerk remains perfectly calm and genial throughout despite having the barrel of a gun pressed against his nose.)
-->'''Wife:''' ''[switches on the TV; the floor manager ushers Frank into position as the robber exits to wait for his cue]'' Dad, Frank's got a television part!\\
''[the floor manager leaves the set; Frank looks off screen for his cue, then nods and immediately exits through the shop door]''\\
'''Wife:''' ''[disappointed]'' You missed him!
* This episode's pet shop sketch with John as a customer and Michael as the shop assistant may not be as widely quoted as the Dead Parrot sketch, but it provides another funny instance of how they couldn't end a sketch on an anti-climactic punchline without lampshading it.
** After initially failing to meet the customer's request for a cat and offering a terrier instead, the shopkeeper tries a bit of misdirection, to no avail:
--->'''Caption:''' [[AC:A PET SHOP SOMEWHERE NEAR MELTON MOWBRAY]][[note]] Which is where Graham Chapman went to school.[[/note]]\\
'''Customer:''' ''[enters shop and approaches counter]'' Good morning!\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' 'Morning!\\
'''Customer:''' I'd like to buy a cat.\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' Certainly sir... got a lovely terrier. ''[indicates a box on the counter]''\\
'''Customer:''' ''[studies box for a moment]'' No, I want a cat really.\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' Oh yeah. ''[looks toward the far wall; the customer looks in the same direction and the shopkeeper takes advantage of his distraction to pick up the box and put it down a few feet away as if it were a different box]'' How about that?\\
'''Cusomer:''' ''[studies box for a moment]'' No, that's the terrier.\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' Well, it's as near as dammit!\\
'''Customer:''' Well, what do you mean? I want a cat!
** The shopkeeper comes up with an unorthodox solution, but the customer isn't satisfied, then switches his request from a cat to a parrot (no Norwegian Blues are mentioned, though):
--->'''Shopkeeper:''' ''[thinks]'' Listen, tell you what. I'll file its legs down a bit, take its snout out, stick a few wires through its cheeks. There you are, a lovely pussy cat!\\
'''Customer:''' Its not a proper cat.\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' What do you mean?\\
'''Customer:''' Well, it wouldn't meow!\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' ''[shrugs]'' Well, it would howl a bit.\\
'''Customer:''' ''[considers this for a moment]'' No... no no no. Er, have you got a parrot?\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' I'm afraid not actually, guv, we're fresh out of parrots... Tell you what though - I'll lop its back legs off, make good, strip the fur, stick a couple of wings on, and staple on a beak of your own choice! ''[takes out small box labelled "BEAKS" and shakes it; we can hear something rattling around inside it]'' No problem, lovely parrot!\\
'''Customer:''' And how long would that take?\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' Oh, let me see - er, stripping the fur off, no legs... Harry?\\
'''Harry:''' ''[off-screen]'' Yeah?\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' Can you do a parrot job on this, er... can you do a parrot job on this terrier straight away?\\
'''Harry:''' No, I'm still putting a tuck in the Airedale, and then I got the frogs to let out!\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' Friday?\\
'''Customer:''' No I need it for tomorrow. It's a present.\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' Oh dear, it's a long job. You see parrot conversion...
** So the shopkeeper comes up with another suggestion, leading into the anti-climactic punchline and attendant lampshading:
--->'''Shopkeeper:''' Tell you what though, for free, terriers make lovely fish. I mean I could do that for you straight away. Legs off, fins on, stick a little pipe through the back of its neck so it can breathe, bit of gold paint, make good...\\
'''Customer:''' You'd need a very big tank!\\
'''Shopkeeper:''' It's a great conversation piece!\\
'''Customer:''' ''[thinks]'' Yes, all right, all right! But, er... ''[sotto voce]'' only if I can watch.\\
''[cut to series of VoxPops]''\\
'''John:''' ''[shakes head]'' Oh, I thought that was a bit predictable...\\
'''Eric:''' ''[shakes head]'' It's been done before!\\
'''Roman Centurion (Terry Jones):''' ''[against studio background of clouds on grey sky]'' Yeah, we did it for Caesar's Christmas Show.\\
'''Caesar (Graham):''' ''[against same background]'' No you didn't, you did ''Jack and the Beanstalk''!
30th Apr '17 3:37:50 PM mlsmithca
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** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eq_0GKqSii8 And in the middle of Palin doing tribute speech for Music/GeorgeHarrison. It counts as the tribute too.]]

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** And in the middle of Palin doing a tribute speech for Music/GeorgeHarrison. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eq_0GKqSii8 And in the middle of Palin doing tribute speech for Music/GeorgeHarrison. It counts as the tribute too.]]
29th Apr '17 9:06:35 PM mlsmithca
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'''Instructor:''' That was self-defense! Come on, I promise I won't shoot you.\\

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'''Instructor:''' That was self-defense! self-defence! Come on, I promise I won't shoot you.\\




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* More than a few Python sketches are self-aware about having good ideas that can't be resolved in a satisfactory way, and so they simply stop abruptly before they have a chance to lose steam. This episode features two such sketches ''in a row'':
** First, there is the bridegroom (Eric) who thinks he can exchange his bride for a better model as if he were exchanging a record player, but the Registrar of Marriages (Terry Jones) is having none of it:
--->'''Bridegroom:''' Good morning.\\
'''Registrar:''' Morning.\\
'''Bridegroom:''' Are you the registrar?\\
'''Registrar:''' I have that function.\\
'''Bridegroom:''' Er, well, I was here on Saturday, getting married to a blond girl, and I'd like to change, please. I'd like to have this one instead, please.\\
'''Registrar:''' What do you mean?\\
'''Bridegroom:''' Er, well, the other one wasn't any good, so I'd like to swap it for this one, please. I have paid. I paid on Saturday. Here's the ticket. ''[gives him the marriage licence]''\\
'''Registrar:''' Ah, er, no. That was when you were married.\\
'''Bridegroom:''' Er, yes. That was when I was married to the wrong one. I didn't like the colour. Er, this is the one I want to have, so if you could just change the forms round I can take this one back with me now.\\
'''Registrar:''' I can't do that!\\
'''Bridegroom:''' Look, make it simpler, I'll pay again.\\
'''Registrar:''' No, you can't do that.\\
'''Bridegroom:''' Look, all I want you to do is change the wife, say the words, blah blah blah, back to my place, no questions asked.\\
'''Registrar:''' I'm sorry sir, but we're not allowed to change.\\
'''Bridegroom:''' You can at Harrods.\\
'''Registrar:''' You ''can't''.\\
'''Bridegroom:''' You can. I changed my record player and there wasn't a grumble!\\
'''Registrar:''' It's different!\\
'''Bridegroom:''' And I changed my pet snake, ''[pounds desk]'' and I changed my Robin Day tie!\\
'''Registrar:''' Well, ''you can't change a bloody wife!''\\
'''Bridegroom:''' Oh, all right! ''[thinks]'' Well, can I borrow one for the weekend?\\
'''Registrar:''' No!\\
'''Bridegroom:''' Oh, blimey, I only wanted a jolly good...\\
''[a whistle blows; the registrar points at the bridegroom as if to say "He started it!" as a referee (John) runs on and takes his book out]''\\
'''Referee:''' All right, break it up. What's your number, then? ''[spins bridegroom around to reveal a number 8 on the back of his blazer]'' All right. Name?\\
'''Bridegroom:''' Cook.
** As the referee books the offending sketch performer, we cut to a doctor (Michael) and a patient (Graham); the doctor shrugs impatiently, and he and the patient both look at their watches. We cut back to the referee, who has finished booking the bridegroom and blows his whistle to start the next sketch - which is cut off even sooner:
--->''[as the whistle is blown, the patient sticks a pipe in his mouth and the doctor makes an exaggerated show of being ready to start taking down patient information]''\\
'''Doctor:''' Next please. Name?\\
'''Watson:''' Er, Watson.\\
'''Doctor:''' ''[writing]'' Mr Watson.\\
'''Watson:''' Er, no, Doctor.\\
'''Doctor:''' ''[changing his notes]'' Ah, Mr Doctor.\\
'''Watson:''' No, not Mr, Doctor.\\
'''Doctor:''' ''[changing his notes again]'' Oh, Doctor Doctor.\\
'''Watson:''' No, Doctor Watson.\\
'''Doctor:''' ''[changing his notes yet again]'' Oh, Doctor Watson Doctor.\\
'''Watson:''' ''[sighs]'' Oh, just call me darling.\\
'''Doctor:''' ''[smiles]'' Hello, Mr Darling.\\
'''Watson:''' ''[impatient]'' No, Doctor!\\
'''Doctor:''' Hello Doctor Darling!\\
''[off-screen, the referee blows his whistle again]''\\
'''Caption:''' [[AC:THAT SKETCH HAS BEEN ABANDONED]]



* The Pythons were not shy about LampshadeHanging their sillier sketches, or about simply abandoning them if they felt there was nowhere to go for a sketch but down. This episode concludes with a fine example in which a history presenter (John) interviews the very silly Mr Badger (Eric) about his new theory about the Magna Carta:

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* The Pythons were not shy about LampshadeHanging [[LampshadeHanging lampshading]] their sillier sketches, or about simply abandoning them if they felt there was nowhere to go for a sketch but down.sketches. This episode concludes with a fine example in which a history presenter (John) interviews the very silly Mr Badger (Eric) about his new theory about the Magna Carta:
29th Apr '17 8:37:49 PM mlsmithca
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'''Badger:''' My wife Maureen ran off with a bottle of Bell's Whisky during the Aberdeen vs. Raith Rovers match which ended in a goalless draw. Robson particularly, in goal, had a magnificent first half, his fine positional sense preventing the build-up of any severe pressure on the suspect Aberdeen defense. [=McLaughlin=] missed an easy chance to clinch the game towards the final whistle but Raith must be well satisfied with their point.\\

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'''Badger:''' My wife Maureen ran off with a bottle of Bell's Whisky during the Aberdeen vs. Raith Rovers match which ended in a goalless draw. Robson particularly, in goal, had a magnificent first half, his fine positional sense preventing the build-up of any severe pressure on the suspect Aberdeen defense.defence. [=McLaughlin=] missed an easy chance to clinch the game towards the final whistle but Raith must be well satisfied with their point.\\
29th Apr '17 8:36:31 PM mlsmithca
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to:

* The Pythons were not shy about LampshadeHanging their sillier sketches, or about simply abandoning them if they felt there was nowhere to go for a sketch but down. This episode concludes with a fine example in which a history presenter (John) interviews the very silly Mr Badger (Eric) about his new theory about the Magna Carta:
-->'''Presenter:''' The Magna Carta - was it a document signed at Runnymede in 1215 by King John pledging independence to the English barons, or was it a piece of chewing gum on a bedspread in Dorset? The latter idea is the brainchild of a man new to the field of historical research. ''[the camera pulls back to reveal said man, Mr Badger, who wears a flat cap, bow tie, and argyle pullover]'' Mr Badger, why... why are you on this programme?\\
'''Badger:''' ''[Scots accent]'' Er, well, I think I can answer this question most successfully in mime. ''[he stands up, then squats down a bit, twirls two fingers in the air, holds out his other arm and taps the fingers against his forearm, then holds them to his ear before sitting down again]''\\
'''Presenter:''' But why Dorset?\\
'''Badger:''' Er, well, I have for a long time been suffering from a species of brain injury which I incurred during the rigours of childbirth, and I'd like to conclude by putting my finger up my nose. ''[does so]''\\
'''Presenter:''' ''[matter-of-factly]'' Mr Badger, I think you're the silliest person we've ever had on this programme, and so I'm going to ask you to have dinner with me.\\
'''Caption:''' [[AC:Later that same sketch]]\\
''[the microphones have been replaced with a restaurant table set for two]''\\
'''Badger:''' My wife Maureen ran off with a bottle of Bell's Whisky during the Aberdeen vs. Raith Rovers match which ended in a goalless draw. Robson particularly, in goal, had a magnificent first half, his fine positional sense preventing the build-up of any severe pressure on the suspect Aberdeen defense. [=McLaughlin=] missed an easy chance to clinch the game towards the final whistle but Raith must be well satisfied with their point.\\
'''Presenter:''' ''[nods, smiling]'' Do please go on, this is the least fascinating conversation I've ever had!\\
'''Waiter (Michael):''' ''[entering]'' Would you like to order, sir?\\
'''Presenter:''' Ah yes, Mr Badger, what would you like to start with?\\
'''Badger:''' ''[takes the menu from the waiter and looks over it]'' Er... I'll have a whisky to start with.\\
'''Waiter:''' ''[confused]'' For first course, sir?\\
'''Badger:''' Aye.\\
'''Waiter:''' ''[shrugs and writes on his pad]'' And for main course, sir?\\
'''Badger:''' Er, I'll have a whisky for main course... ''[the waiter looks put upon]'' And I'll follow that with a whisky for pudding.\\
'''Waiter:''' ''[finishes writing the order on his pad]'' Yes sir, and what would you like with it, sir? A whisky?\\
'''Badger:''' No, a bottle of wine. ''[hands the menu back to the waiter]''\\
'''Michael:''' ''[breaking character]'' Fine, sir, he said between clenched teeth knowing full well it was a most unrewarding part.\\
'''John:''' ''[breaking character]'' This is the silliest sketch I've ever been in.\\
'''Eric:''' ''[breaking character]'' Shall we stop it? ''[Michael looks back and forth between John and Eric]''\\
'''John:''' ... yeah, all right. ''[they all leave the set; "THE END" appears on screen, followed by the closing credits]''
29th Apr '17 11:41:23 AM mlsmithca
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** The film's manic Scottish director, James [=McRettin=] (John), a parody of Joseph [=McGrath=] (with whom Graham and John had worked on ''Film/TheMagicChristian''), speaks at top speed and changes his mind about everything depending on what the last suggestion was ("Lose the lion! Great!... Keep the lion! Great!...") before finally falling over in a frenzy.

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** The film's manic manic, alcoholic Scottish director, James [=McRettin=] (John), a parody of Joseph [=McGrath=] (with whom Graham and John had worked on ''Film/TheMagicChristian''), speaks at top speed and changes his mind about everything depending on what the last suggestion was ("Lose the lion! Great!... Keep the lion! Great!...") before finally falling over in a frenzy.drunken stupor.
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