History Fridge / WilliamShakespeare

8th Nov '17 8:22:39 AM Brigid
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** My experience learning about Shakespeare is an odd mashup of both the fun and the dreaded. See, I was homeschooled starting with seventh grade and my dad is a huge bibliophile. So when I expressed the opinion that Shakespeare was boring and pretentious (an opinion mostly fostered by Loony Tunes) he flew into a rage worthy of any Shakespearian soliloquy, except this one had an audience and ended with him dropping a massive tome into my lap. All of Shakespeare's known works on union skin paper. Not something your average 13-year-old is comfortable reading. So he nearly flew into another rage when I admitted I'd barely made it past the title page a week later. This is when Mom stepped in, reminded Dad that not only am a lot younger than he is, but I'm a different person. Dad more or less went 'oh, right' and apologized. Mom handed me The Twisted Tales of Shakespeare for me to read followed by an introduction to the comedies and a lesson on how the standard method of teaching Shakespeare is all wrong. This lead me to the eventual realization that Shakespeare is a fantastic wordsmith with a cunning wit who can keep people entertained despite the rather generic plots and paper-thin characters. Dad and I can laugh now about how silly the phrase 'it isn't Shakespeare' is. ''Shakespeare'' isn't Shakespeare. He made the Elizabethan equivalent of summer blockbusters.
11th Mar '17 4:04:22 PM nombretomado
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** This troper's school system actually did exactly that. We did one Shakespeare a year starting in 7th grade (...yeah), but we worked our way up the difficulty scale, starting with ''AMidsummerNightsDream'', which is easily the most accessible, then ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'', ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'', and ''Theatre/{{Othello}}'' in that order. The teachers weren't always great, but the language and feel of the plays were never problems after reading them for so long. --{{starshine}}
* I never really had any love for Shakespeare; I knew only the absolute barest plot of ''RomeoAndJuliet'' until 7th grade Drama class, and my 9th grade English class made it practically unbearable. It wasn't until the end of 10th grade, when I played Snout in ''AMidsummerNightsDream'', that I finally had an understanding of Shakespeare and how good the writing was. Seeing what was once horribly boring performed by genuinely funny actors allowed me to see Shakespeare's potential. The rehearsal process for ''Romeo And Juliet'' in the summer of 11th grade was a very emotional, difficult process that had the director pushing acting methods that would make a professional stage actor sweat with exertion and a number of New Age-style meditation and focusing exercises that, in the end, did absolutely nothing to help. When I finally saw ''Hamlet'' performed by professional actors at the Orlando Shakespeare Theatre, I realized how unnecessary all the breathing exercises, yoga, and meditation was to acting; it's all about treating the characters as real people and getting deep into their motivations and emotions. The ensuing production was so good that my girlfriend, who suffers from ADD and has never studied Shakespeare in her life, was enthralled by the performance and absolutely loved it, when I was afraid that she would be bored to tears. Not only has my opinion of Shakespeare changed, so has my opinion of acting. I've begun delving deep into the emotions and minds of my characters, and I've delivered some rather powerful stuff. I once nearly ended up crying during a rehearsal because I was so into my performance as [[Film/RepoTheGeneticOpera Nathan Wallace]] that for a moment, I really felt like I was keeping my life as a sociopathic killer secret from my daughter. Thanks, Will. --{{chitoryu12}}

to:

** This troper's school system actually did exactly that. We did one Shakespeare a year starting in 7th grade (...yeah), but we worked our way up the difficulty scale, starting with ''AMidsummerNightsDream'', ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'', which is easily the most accessible, then ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'', ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'', and ''Theatre/{{Othello}}'' in that order. The teachers weren't always great, but the language and feel of the plays were never problems after reading them for so long. --{{starshine}}
* I never really had any love for Shakespeare; I knew only the absolute barest plot of ''RomeoAndJuliet'' until 7th grade Drama class, and my 9th grade English class made it practically unbearable. It wasn't until the end of 10th grade, when I played Snout in ''AMidsummerNightsDream'', ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'', that I finally had an understanding of Shakespeare and how good the writing was. Seeing what was once horribly boring performed by genuinely funny actors allowed me to see Shakespeare's potential. The rehearsal process for ''Romeo And Juliet'' in the summer of 11th grade was a very emotional, difficult process that had the director pushing acting methods that would make a professional stage actor sweat with exertion and a number of New Age-style meditation and focusing exercises that, in the end, did absolutely nothing to help. When I finally saw ''Hamlet'' performed by professional actors at the Orlando Shakespeare Theatre, I realized how unnecessary all the breathing exercises, yoga, and meditation was to acting; it's all about treating the characters as real people and getting deep into their motivations and emotions. The ensuing production was so good that my girlfriend, who suffers from ADD and has never studied Shakespeare in her life, was enthralled by the performance and absolutely loved it, when I was afraid that she would be bored to tears. Not only has my opinion of Shakespeare changed, so has my opinion of acting. I've begun delving deep into the emotions and minds of my characters, and I've delivered some rather powerful stuff. I once nearly ended up crying during a rehearsal because I was so into my performance as [[Film/RepoTheGeneticOpera Nathan Wallace]] that for a moment, I really felt like I was keeping my life as a sociopathic killer secret from my daughter. Thanks, Will. --{{chitoryu12}}
7th Jun '14 5:40:52 PM vifetoile
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* ''Fridge/Coriolanus''
* ''Fridge/Hamlet''

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* ''Fridge/Coriolanus''
''{{Fridge/Coriolanus}}''
* ''Fridge/Hamlet''''{{Fridge/Hamlet}}''
7th Jun '14 5:40:32 PM vifetoile
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* ''Fridge/Coriolanus''
* ''Fridge/Hamlet''
* ''Fridge/KingLear''
* ''Fridge/MacBeth''
* ''Fridge/TheMerchantOfVenice''
* ''Fridge/MuchAdoAboutNothing''




to:

* ''Fridge/TwelfthNight''

7th Jun '14 5:36:22 PM vifetoile
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Added DiffLines:

[[AC: For Individual Plays]]:
* ''Fridge/RomeoAndJuliet''
10th May '14 8:19:45 AM Pachylad
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** [[SeinfieldIsUnfunny There's an entire trope on that.]]

to:

** [[SeinfieldIsUnfunny [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny There's an entire trope on that.]]
10th May '14 8:19:24 AM Pachylad
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* I found his plots severely overrated and predictable, and kept wondering why people would look up to him as an example of any variety of things, until I realised that this is exactly the reason why his plots seem so over-done by now, because he was held as an example and emulated time and again, until his plots are almost on the same level of cultural osmosis as a fairy tale would be.

to:

* I found his plots severely overrated and predictable, and kept wondering why people would look up to him as an example of any variety of things, until I realised that this is exactly the reason why his plots seem so over-done by now, because he was held as an example and emulated time and again, until his plots are almost on the same level of cultural osmosis as a fairy tale would be.be.
** [[SeinfieldIsUnfunny There's an entire trope on that.]]
7th Jan '14 11:29:39 PM Ianto
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* I never really had any love for Shakespeare; I knew only the absolute barest plot of ''RomeoAndJuliet'' until 7th grade Drama class, and my 9th grade English class made it practically unbearable. It wasn't until the end of 10th grade, when I played Snout in ''AMidsummerNightsDream'', that I finally had an understanding of Shakespeare and how good the writing was. Seeing what was once horribly boring performed by genuinely funny actors allowed me to see Shakespeare's potential. The rehearsal process for ''Romeo And Juliet'' in the summer of 11th grade was a very emotional, difficult process that had the director pushing acting methods that would make a professional stage actor sweat with exertion and a number of New Age-style meditation and focusing exercises that, in the end, did absolutely nothing to help. When I finally saw ''Hamlet'' performed by professional actors at the Orlando Shakespeare Theatre, I realized how unnecessary all the breathing exercises, yoga, and meditation was to acting; it's all about treating the characters as real people and getting deep into their motivations and emotions. The ensuing production was so good that my girlfriend, who suffers from ADD and has never studied Shakespeare in her life, was enthralled by the performance and absolutely loved it, when I was afraid that she would be bored to tears. Not only has my opinion of Shakespeare changed, so has my opinion of acting. I've begun delving deep into the emotions and minds of my characters, and I've delivered some rather powerful stuff. I once nearly ended up crying during a rehearsal because I was so into my performance as [[Film/RepoTheGeneticOpera Nathan Wallace]] that for a moment, I really felt like I was keeping my life as a sociopathic killer secret from my daughter. Thanks, Will. --{{chitoryu12}}

to:

* I never really had any love for Shakespeare; I knew only the absolute barest plot of ''RomeoAndJuliet'' until 7th grade Drama class, and my 9th grade English class made it practically unbearable. It wasn't until the end of 10th grade, when I played Snout in ''AMidsummerNightsDream'', that I finally had an understanding of Shakespeare and how good the writing was. Seeing what was once horribly boring performed by genuinely funny actors allowed me to see Shakespeare's potential. The rehearsal process for ''Romeo And Juliet'' in the summer of 11th grade was a very emotional, difficult process that had the director pushing acting methods that would make a professional stage actor sweat with exertion and a number of New Age-style meditation and focusing exercises that, in the end, did absolutely nothing to help. When I finally saw ''Hamlet'' performed by professional actors at the Orlando Shakespeare Theatre, I realized how unnecessary all the breathing exercises, yoga, and meditation was to acting; it's all about treating the characters as real people and getting deep into their motivations and emotions. The ensuing production was so good that my girlfriend, who suffers from ADD and has never studied Shakespeare in her life, was enthralled by the performance and absolutely loved it, when I was afraid that she would be bored to tears. Not only has my opinion of Shakespeare changed, so has my opinion of acting. I've begun delving deep into the emotions and minds of my characters, and I've delivered some rather powerful stuff. I once nearly ended up crying during a rehearsal because I was so into my performance as [[Film/RepoTheGeneticOpera Nathan Wallace]] that for a moment, I really felt like I was keeping my life as a sociopathic killer secret from my daughter. Thanks, Will. --{{chitoryu12}}--{{chitoryu12}}
* I found his plots severely overrated and predictable, and kept wondering why people would look up to him as an example of any variety of things, until I realised that this is exactly the reason why his plots seem so over-done by now, because he was held as an example and emulated time and again, until his plots are almost on the same level of cultural osmosis as a fairy tale would be.
18th Mar '13 1:28:18 PM Tuckerscreator
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* I never really had any love for Shakespeare; I knew only the absolute barest plot of ''RomeoAndJuliet'' until 7th grade Drama class, and my 9th grade English class made it practically unbearable. It wasn't until the end of 10th grade, when I played Snout in ''AMidsummerNightsDream'', that I finally had an understanding of Shakespeare and how good the writing was. Seeing what was once horribly boring performed by genuinely funny actors allowed me to see Shakespeare's potential. The rehearsal process for ''Romeo And Juliet'' in the summer of 11th grade was a very emotional, difficult process that had the director pushing acting methods that would make a professional stage actor sweat with exertion and a number of New Age-style meditation and focusing exercises that, in the end, did absolutely nothing to help. When I finally saw ''Hamlet'' performed by professional actors at the Orlando Shakespeare Theatre, I realized how unnecessary all the breathing exercises, yoga, and meditation was to acting; it's all about treating the characters as real people and getting deep into their motivations and emotions. The ensuing production was so good that my girlfriend, who suffers from ADD and has never studied Shakespeare in her life, was enthralled by the performance and absolutely loved it, when I was afraid that she would be bored to tears. Not only has my opinion of Shakespeare changed, so has my opinion of acting. I've begun delving deep into the emotions and minds of my characters, and I've delivered some rather powerful stuff. I once nearly ended up crying during a rehearsal because I was so into my performance as [[RepoTheGeneticOpera Nathan Wallace]] that for a moment, I really felt like I was keeping my life as a sociopathic killer secret from my daughter. Thanks, Will. --{{chitoryu12}}

to:

* I never really had any love for Shakespeare; I knew only the absolute barest plot of ''RomeoAndJuliet'' until 7th grade Drama class, and my 9th grade English class made it practically unbearable. It wasn't until the end of 10th grade, when I played Snout in ''AMidsummerNightsDream'', that I finally had an understanding of Shakespeare and how good the writing was. Seeing what was once horribly boring performed by genuinely funny actors allowed me to see Shakespeare's potential. The rehearsal process for ''Romeo And Juliet'' in the summer of 11th grade was a very emotional, difficult process that had the director pushing acting methods that would make a professional stage actor sweat with exertion and a number of New Age-style meditation and focusing exercises that, in the end, did absolutely nothing to help. When I finally saw ''Hamlet'' performed by professional actors at the Orlando Shakespeare Theatre, I realized how unnecessary all the breathing exercises, yoga, and meditation was to acting; it's all about treating the characters as real people and getting deep into their motivations and emotions. The ensuing production was so good that my girlfriend, who suffers from ADD and has never studied Shakespeare in her life, was enthralled by the performance and absolutely loved it, when I was afraid that she would be bored to tears. Not only has my opinion of Shakespeare changed, so has my opinion of acting. I've begun delving deep into the emotions and minds of my characters, and I've delivered some rather powerful stuff. I once nearly ended up crying during a rehearsal because I was so into my performance as [[RepoTheGeneticOpera [[Film/RepoTheGeneticOpera Nathan Wallace]] that for a moment, I really felt like I was keeping my life as a sociopathic killer secret from my daughter. Thanks, Will. --{{chitoryu12}}
14th Aug '12 2:40:58 AM FELH2
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* I ''loathed'' {{Shakespeare}} up until college. I thought he was a terrible writer for using such complicated, incomprehensible language and that the plots themselves were incredibly slow and boring and padded. Eventually, I learned that due to changing times and the effects on language, Early Modern English is ''not'' Modern English, and the playwright wouldn't have sounded incomprehensible to his own audience but clever, and with some help from footnotes and such, I was able to actually appreciate his wordplay and {{Double Entendre}}s and clever use of language. Once I could understand them, I realized the actors I'd seen performing the plays (or heard reading them...) ''weren't'' acting but reciting, so I read them to myself picturing normal voices and acting instead, and I was able to fully appreciate the stories and characters -- try to imagine what's going on in Prince Hamlet's head, cringe at each new atrocity in ''Titus Andronicus'', and cheer when Macbeth was finally killed. Is there AnAesop to be learned here? '''[[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids Shakespeare is NOT for kids!]]''' -- {{Lale}}

to:

* I ''loathed'' {{Shakespeare}} Creator/WilliamShakespeare up until college. I thought he was a terrible writer for using such complicated, incomprehensible language and that the plots themselves were incredibly slow and boring and padded. Eventually, I learned that due to changing times and the effects on language, Early Modern English is ''not'' Modern English, and the playwright wouldn't have sounded incomprehensible to his own audience but clever, and with some help from footnotes and such, I was able to actually appreciate his wordplay and {{Double Entendre}}s and clever use of language. Once I could understand them, I realized the actors I'd seen performing the plays (or heard reading them...) ''weren't'' acting but reciting, so I read them to myself picturing normal voices and acting instead, and I was able to fully appreciate the stories and characters -- try to imagine what's going on in Prince Hamlet's head, cringe at each new atrocity in ''Titus Andronicus'', and cheer when Macbeth was finally killed. Is there AnAesop to be learned here? '''[[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids Shakespeare is NOT for kids!]]''' -- {{Lale}}
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