History Fridge / TheWarOfTheWorlds

10th Jun '17 2:55:48 PM nombretomado
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* The Martian tripods were the scariest, deadliest, most effective weapons that Wells could think of in 1898. [[WorldWarI Just 20 years, humanity would have the weapons technology to reach parity with these weapons]], including some of the very same weapons (chlorine gas being similar to the black smoke). And then, [[TheNineties about a century later]], humanity has invented weapons far more destructive than ''anything'' the Martians ever had in the original novel. Man's capacity to kill itself far outstripped what even science fiction writers could concoct.

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* The Martian tripods were the scariest, deadliest, most effective weapons that Wells could think of in 1898. [[WorldWarI [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI Just 20 years, humanity would have the weapons technology to reach parity with these weapons]], including some of the very same weapons (chlorine gas being similar to the black smoke). And then, [[TheNineties about a century later]], humanity has invented weapons far more destructive than ''anything'' the Martians ever had in the original novel. Man's capacity to kill itself far outstripped what even science fiction writers could concoct.
20th Apr '17 10:12:13 PM DarthRevanFTW
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* Are we suppose to assume the aliens have no doctors or any kind of treatment? I know its in the original novel that germs kill them, but H.G. Wells wrote it at a time when antibiotics let alone effective treatments and isolation were not known. Medical science was not really advanced at the time so Wells could not assume a future were invading armies were free of this risk. An invading army from space would have access to stuff we cannot yet conceive yet they fail to take basic precautions in an alien environment for them.

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* Are we suppose to assume the aliens have no doctors or any kind of treatment? I know its in the original novel that germs kill them, but H.G. Wells wrote it at a time when antibiotics let alone effective treatments and isolation were not known. Medical science was not really advanced at the time so Wells could not assume a future were where invading armies were free of this risk. An invading army from space would have access to stuff we cannot yet conceive yet they fail to take basic precautions in an alien environment for them.
20th Apr '17 10:11:25 PM DarthRevanFTW
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** The [[WatsonianVersusDoylist Doylist]] answer is that the book is an allegory about British colonialism and imperialism at the time, and that the invaders so outmatched the defenders technologically (as the British frequently did) that they were Nigh Invulnerable to military assault, but that each new world (or part of ours) has its own unique diseases and afflictions which can destroy a force attempting ton conquer it (or destroy the people you're trying to conquer). Basically, Welles was saying "Yeah, smallpox is only fun when it's not happening to ''you''." The Watsonian explanation could very well be that Martian medical science was indeed so advanced that paradoxically they were completely unprepared for any significant infections, or that the Earth diseases were so virulent to Martian physiology that there was just no chance of finding a cure before they all dropped dead. If they didn't even realize they were sick until they became symptomatic, and died very shortly after showing symptoms, no one in the Martian command structure would have had any idea what was going on, let alone what to do about it, until it was too late.

to:

** The [[WatsonianVersusDoylist Doylist]] answer is that the book is an allegory about British colonialism and imperialism at the time, and that the invaders so outmatched the defenders technologically (as the British frequently did) that they were Nigh Invulnerable NighInvulnerable to military assault, but that each new world (or part of ours) has its own unique diseases and afflictions which can destroy a force attempting ton conquer it (or destroy the people you're trying to conquer). Basically, Welles was saying "Yeah, smallpox is only fun when it's not happening to ''you''." The Watsonian explanation could very well be that Martian medical science was indeed so advanced that paradoxically they were completely unprepared for any significant infections, or that the Earth diseases were so virulent to Martian physiology that there was just no chance of finding a cure before they all dropped dead. If they didn't even realize they were sick until they became symptomatic, and died very shortly after showing symptoms, no one in the Martian command structure would have had any idea what was going on, let alone what to do about it, until it was too late.
20th Apr '17 10:10:06 PM DarthRevanFTW
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Added DiffLines:

FridgeHorror:
* The Martian tripods were the scariest, deadliest, most effective weapons that Wells could think of in 1898. [[WorldWarI Just 20 years, humanity would have the weapons technology to reach parity with these weapons]], including some of the very same weapons (chlorine gas being similar to the black smoke). And then, [[TheNineties about a century later]], humanity has invented weapons far more destructive than ''anything'' the Martians ever had in the original novel. Man's capacity to kill itself far outstripped what even science fiction writers could concoct.
10th Apr '17 9:14:01 AM YWhateley
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** The [[WatsonianVersusDoylist Doylist]] answer is that the book is an allegory about British colonialism and imperialism at the time, and that the invaders so outmatched the defenders technologically (as the British frequently did) that they were NighInvulnerable to military assault, but that each new world (or part of ours) has its own unique diseases and afflictions which can destroy a force attempting ton conquer it (or destroy the people you're trying to conquer). Basically, Welles was saying "Yeah, smallpox is only fun when it's not happening to ''you''." The Watsonian explanation could very well be that Martian medical science was indeed so advanced that paradoxically they were completely unprepared for any significant infections, or that the Earth diseases were so virulent to Martian physiology that there was just no chance of finding a cure before they all dropped dead. If they didn't even realize they were sick until they became symptomatic, and died very shortly after showing symptoms, no one in the Martian command structure would have had any idea what was going on, let alone what to do about it, until it was too late.

to:

** The [[WatsonianVersusDoylist Doylist]] answer is that the book is an allegory about British colonialism and imperialism at the time, and that the invaders so outmatched the defenders technologically (as the British frequently did) that they were NighInvulnerable Nigh Invulnerable to military assault, but that each new world (or part of ours) has its own unique diseases and afflictions which can destroy a force attempting ton conquer it (or destroy the people you're trying to conquer). Basically, Welles was saying "Yeah, smallpox is only fun when it's not happening to ''you''." The Watsonian explanation could very well be that Martian medical science was indeed so advanced that paradoxically they were completely unprepared for any significant infections, or that the Earth diseases were so virulent to Martian physiology that there was just no chance of finding a cure before they all dropped dead. If they didn't even realize they were sick until they became symptomatic, and died very shortly after showing symptoms, no one in the Martian command structure would have had any idea what was going on, let alone what to do about it, until it was too late.late.
** The first season of the [[Series/WarOfTheWorlds 1988 television series]] (an unofficial sequel to the film) works on the premise that the "Martian" doctors and scientists did realize, too late for the original invasion, that Earth microorganisms are deadly to them, and as a result the surviving aliens tend to be forced to nuke themselves with bacteria-destroying radiation to survive and carry out their next invasion, which provides a couple useful plot devices for the series.
5th Apr '17 8:55:29 AM DoctorNemesis
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** The [[WatsonianVersusDoylist Doylist]] answer is that the book is an allegory about British colonialism and imperialism at the time, and that the invaders so outmatched the defenders technologically (as the British frequently did) that they were NighInvulnerable to military assault, but that each new world (or part of ours) has its own unique diseases and afflictions which can destroy a force attempting ton conquer it (or destroy the people you're trying to conquer). Basically, Welles was saying "Yeah, smallpox is only fun when it's not happening to ''you''." The Watsonian explanation could very well be that Martian medical science was indeed so advanced that paradoxically they were completely unprepared for any significant infections, or that the Earth diseases were so virulent to Martian physiology that there was just no chance of finding a cure before they all dropped dead. If they didn't even realize they were sick until they became symptomatic, and died very shortly after showing symptoms, no one in the Martian command structure would have had any idea what was going on, let alone what to do about it, until it was too late.
** Also, it's worth noting that despite all the technological advancements that humanity has made between the writing of the novel and today, we still get the common cold almost by clockwork every year, bacteria is becoming increasingly resilient towards antibiotics and the presence of a new strain of influenza could potentially result in a devastating lethal global pandemic. Let's not get too smug towards the Martians here; we haven't exactly completely eradicated the threat of virus and bacteria.

to:

** The [[WatsonianVersusDoylist Doylist]] answer is that the book is an allegory about British colonialism and imperialism at the time, and that the invaders so outmatched the defenders technologically (as the British frequently did) that they were NighInvulnerable to military assault, but that each new world (or part of ours) has its own unique diseases and afflictions which can destroy a force attempting ton conquer it (or destroy the people you're trying to conquer). Basically, Welles was saying "Yeah, smallpox is only fun when it's not happening to ''you''." The Watsonian explanation could very well be that Martian medical science was indeed so advanced that paradoxically they were completely unprepared for any significant infections, or that the Earth diseases were so virulent to Martian physiology that there was just no chance of finding a cure before they all dropped dead. If they didn't even realize they were sick until they became symptomatic, and died very shortly after showing symptoms, no one in the Martian command structure would have had any idea what was going on, let alone what to do about it, until it was too late.
** Also, it's worth noting that despite all the technological advancements that humanity has made between the writing of the novel and today, we still get the common cold almost by clockwork every year, bacteria is becoming increasingly resilient towards antibiotics and the presence of a new strain of influenza could potentially result in a devastating lethal global pandemic. Let's not get too smug towards the Martians here; we haven't exactly completely eradicated the threat of virus and bacteria.
late.
5th Apr '17 8:54:49 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Also, it's worth noting that despite all the technological advancements that humanity has made between the writing of the novel and today, we still get the common cold like clockwork every year, bacteria is becoming increasingly resilient towards antibiotics and the presence of a new strain of influenza could potentially result in a devastating lethal global pandemic. Let's not get too smug towards the Martians here.

to:

** Also, it's worth noting that despite all the technological advancements that humanity has made between the writing of the novel and today, we still get the common cold like almost by clockwork every year, bacteria is becoming increasingly resilient towards antibiotics and the presence of a new strain of influenza could potentially result in a devastating lethal global pandemic. Let's not get too smug towards the Martians here.here; we haven't exactly completely eradicated the threat of virus and bacteria.
5th Apr '17 8:53:50 AM DoctorNemesis
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* Wells frequently uses the railway as a symbol of civilization -- and how easily it can be

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* Wells frequently uses the railway as a symbol of civilization -- and civilization, how easily it can be overturned, and how it can be repaired. The human complacency in the face of the Martian threat is represented by trains ferrying people to and from the local railway station despite the arrival of extraterrestrial beings. The attack on Woking is symbolised and discussed in terms of the destruction of the station. The great panic is represented by people crowding London's railways stations desperately trying to board a train to safety, and it's mentioned that some drivers are even ploughing their engines through the crowds in their desperation to flee. And at the very end, when the invasion is defeated and life is rebuilding, the narrator returns home by train.
5th Apr '17 8:48:53 AM DoctorNemesis
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* Wells frequently uses the railway as a symbol of civilization -- and how easily it can be



** The [[WatsonianVersusDoylist Doylist]] answer is that the book is an allegory about British colonialism and imperialism at the time, and that the invaders so outmatched the defenders technologically (as the British frequently did) that they were NighInvulnerable to military assault, but that each new world (or part of ours) has its own unique diseases and afflictions which can destroy a force attempting ton conquer it (or destroy the people you're trying to conquer). Basically, Welles was saying "Yeah, smallpox is only fun when it's not happening to ''you''." The Watsonian explanation could very well be that Martian medical science was indeed so advanced that paradoxically they were completely unprepared for any significant infections, or that the Earth diseases were so virulent to Martian physiology that there was just no chance of finding a cure before they all dropped dead. If they didn't even realize they were sick until they became symptomatic, and died very shortly after showing symptoms, no one in the Martian command structure would have had any idea what was going on, let alone what to do about it, until it was too late.

to:

** The [[WatsonianVersusDoylist Doylist]] answer is that the book is an allegory about British colonialism and imperialism at the time, and that the invaders so outmatched the defenders technologically (as the British frequently did) that they were NighInvulnerable to military assault, but that each new world (or part of ours) has its own unique diseases and afflictions which can destroy a force attempting ton conquer it (or destroy the people you're trying to conquer). Basically, Welles was saying "Yeah, smallpox is only fun when it's not happening to ''you''." The Watsonian explanation could very well be that Martian medical science was indeed so advanced that paradoxically they were completely unprepared for any significant infections, or that the Earth diseases were so virulent to Martian physiology that there was just no chance of finding a cure before they all dropped dead. If they didn't even realize they were sick until they became symptomatic, and died very shortly after showing symptoms, no one in the Martian command structure would have had any idea what was going on, let alone what to do about it, until it was too late.late.
** Also, it's worth noting that despite all the technological advancements that humanity has made between the writing of the novel and today, we still get the common cold like clockwork every year, bacteria is becoming increasingly resilient towards antibiotics and the presence of a new strain of influenza could potentially result in a devastating lethal global pandemic. Let's not get too smug towards the Martians here.
7th Jul '16 5:37:24 PM ErikModi
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to:

** The [[WatsonianVersusDoylist Doylist]] answer is that the book is an allegory about British colonialism and imperialism at the time, and that the invaders so outmatched the defenders technologically (as the British frequently did) that they were NighInvulnerable to military assault, but that each new world (or part of ours) has its own unique diseases and afflictions which can destroy a force attempting ton conquer it (or destroy the people you're trying to conquer). Basically, Welles was saying "Yeah, smallpox is only fun when it's not happening to ''you''." The Watsonian explanation could very well be that Martian medical science was indeed so advanced that paradoxically they were completely unprepared for any significant infections, or that the Earth diseases were so virulent to Martian physiology that there was just no chance of finding a cure before they all dropped dead. If they didn't even realize they were sick until they became symptomatic, and died very shortly after showing symptoms, no one in the Martian command structure would have had any idea what was going on, let alone what to do about it, until it was too late.
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