History Fridge / TheOrderOfTheStick

23rd Sep '17 6:32:39 AM Thecommander236
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** From a story standpoint and from an out of story perspective, this makes sense. Both In-Universe and out-of-universe, bards are notorious for being weak. While, yes, bards increase the attack of other characters, it comes at a cost of not being able to attack him or herself. If the empowered attacks don't make up for the bards lack of attack, then the exchange is useless. [[note]]Coincidentally this is why the bard in Final Fantasy IV [[SpoonyBard was so spoony]]. The bard would only increase skills by a set amount, but the increase wasn't enough to make up for the fact he couldn't attack and his skills were useless.[[/note]] If anyone raises the question of why the Order didn't give Elan a lute given that they are cheap, it's easy to explain: everyone, including Elan, thinks Bards are useless. They wouldn't think of helping Elan act like a bard because they are biased against bards and, at the time, Elan was more focused on being a cool action hero instead of being a support character like he was built for. This would come back around when he had to fight hiis father. Elan acted like a support to stick it to his father.
** Really, though, this all leads back to Elan's deposition. He doesn't ever fight to be effective. In fact, he enjoys being overshadowed because it's relaxing to him. Elan never lives up to his full potential as a combatant because of this, but it makes sense from a pure story perspective. It's a combination of society's bias against bards, his love of narrative, his low intelligence, and his own goofy complacency. Elan is never going to grow as a true hero until he can put all of that behind and fight effectively. Honestly, that basically applies to every member of the Order of the Stick: casual ineffectiveness.
24th Aug '17 7:51:14 AM GMantis
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* With an extra heaping of horror, imagine if Tarquin's wife Penelope had delivered that baby. if she had, that would have made Tarquin of her blood, and by extension, [[spoiler: Elan and Nale.]] V could have [[spoiler:killed Elan if that baby came slightly earlier!]]
12th Aug '17 12:23:55 PM whatdoesntkillyou
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* For a person who's apparently aware on some level how their world follows the rules of Dungeons and Dragons Tarquin doesn't seem to possess a very good build. Assuming he's a fighter (possibly with some multiclassing) he's spent feats on being able to catch arrows, grapple with opponents, throw them, use improvised weapons, and be proficient with a whip. Then when you consider he has a high enough Will save to resist enchantments, illusions, despite being a fighter (who have the worst will saves) he more than likely had to spend feats on things like iron will. He also has a tendency to use a variety of different weapons (daggers, axes, aforementioned whip, Roy's greatsword) which isn't really the best idea since it lessens the usefulness of feats such as weapon focus, weapon specialization, or improved critical. All of this adds up to a fighting style that is flashy, and definitely looks cool to the readers, but is ultimately ineffective...which is the point. Tarquin ultimately doesn't care if he wins or loses so long as it ends with a story that makes him look like a cool memorable villain. As a result focusing his entire build on visually appealing techniques with little mechanical effectiveness suits him perfectly.

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* For a person who's apparently aware on some level how their world follows the rules of Dungeons and Dragons Tarquin doesn't seem to possess a very good build. Assuming he's a fighter (possibly with some multiclassing) he's spent feats on being able to catch arrows, grapple with opponents, throw them, use improvised weapons, and be proficient with a whip. Then when you consider he has a high enough Will save to resist enchantments, illusions, despite being a fighter (who have the worst will saves) he more than likely had to spend feats on things like iron will. He also has a tendency to use a variety of different weapons (daggers, axes, aforementioned whip, Roy's greatsword) which isn't really the best idea since it lessens the usefulness of feats such as weapon focus, weapon specialization, or improved critical. All of this adds up to a fighting style that is flashy, and definitely looks cool to the readers, but is ultimately ineffective... which is the point. Tarquin ultimately doesn't care if he wins or loses so long as it ends with a story that makes him look like a cool memorable villain. As a result focusing his entire build on visually appealing techniques with little mechanical effectiveness suits him perfectly.
10th Jun '17 2:07:59 PM ReaderAt2046
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* Tarquin claims that he is AboveGoodAndEvil, simply interested in following the narrative. But if that were true, then he could have just as easily chosen to be the protagonist of a story about the hero who overthrew the feuding warlords, brought peace to the war-torn continent, established a stable and prosperous civilization, lived to a ripe old age, died with the love and respect of those whose lives he bettered, and passed on to his eternal reward. That is just as valid a narrative as the one he chose to invoke, and would put him in an even better position. Tarquin is a villain because he ''chose'' to be, and for no other reason.
17th May '17 1:10:42 PM doomquokka
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* Why would Elan pick out a puppet as a Deity when he was trying to convince Roy he could be a Cleric, this troper thought for a while but then I realized it, Bards and Puppets have something in common, they entertain people. It would make logical sense why he would make up a deity relating to entertainment.

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* Why would Elan pick out a puppet as a Deity when he was trying to convince Roy he could be a Cleric, this troper thought for a while but then I realized it, Cleric? Bards and Puppets have something in common, they common: They entertain people. It would make logical sense why he would for him to make up a deity relating to entertainment.
30th Mar '17 2:12:48 PM BountyBeast
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* The fact that [[AbsurdPhobia dwarves are afraid of trees]] [[JustifiedTrope actually offers a pretty good explanation]] for why [[OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame so many dwarves]] [[AnAxeToGrind carry axes]] [[ElvesVsDwarves and hate elves]].
29th Mar '17 12:59:40 PM Bebop
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* Nale's overly-complicated multiclass setup is a joke that works on multiple levels. On the surface, it just goes along with his love for complexity. But his build means he's essentially ''a glorified bard'' (which is itself a reference to the complicated multiclassing one had to do to become a bard in ''AD&D'' first edition). Also, the reason he has to use that complicated setup is because he's LawfulEvil, and Bards are not allowed to be Lawful.

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* Nale's overly-complicated multiclass setup is a joke that works on multiple levels. On the surface, it just goes along with his love for complexity. But his build means he's essentially ''a glorified bard'' (which is itself a reference to the complicated multiclassing one had to do to become a bard in ''AD&D'' first 1st edition). Also, the reason he has to use that complicated setup is because he's LawfulEvil, and Bards are not allowed to be Lawful.
29th Mar '17 12:58:20 PM Bebop
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* Nale's overly-complicated multiclass setup is a joke that works on multiple levels. On the surface, it just goes along with his love for complexity. But his build means he's essentially ''a glorified bard'' (which is itself a reference to the complicated multiclassing one had to do to become a bard in 'AD&D' first edition). Also, the reason he has to use that complicated setup is because he's LawfulEvil, and Bards are not allowed to be Lawful.

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* Nale's overly-complicated multiclass setup is a joke that works on multiple levels. On the surface, it just goes along with his love for complexity. But his build means he's essentially ''a glorified bard'' (which is itself a reference to the complicated multiclassing one had to do to become a bard in 'AD&D' ''AD&D'' first edition). Also, the reason he has to use that complicated setup is because he's LawfulEvil, and Bards are not allowed to be Lawful.
29th Mar '17 12:57:44 PM Bebop
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* Nale's overly-complicated multiclass setup is a joke that works on two levels. On the surface, it just goes along with his love for complexity. But his build means he's essentially ''a glorified bard.'' Also, the reason he has to use that complicated setup is because he's LawfulEvil, and Bards are not allowed to be Lawful.

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* Nale's overly-complicated multiclass setup is a joke that works on two multiple levels. On the surface, it just goes along with his love for complexity. But his build means he's essentially ''a glorified bard.'' bard'' (which is itself a reference to the complicated multiclassing one had to do to become a bard in 'AD&D' first edition). Also, the reason he has to use that complicated setup is because he's LawfulEvil, and Bards are not allowed to be Lawful.
29th Mar '17 12:24:50 PM Bebop
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** On a similar note, his final SkywardScream ("THIS IS A HORRIBLE ENDING") cements just how out of touch he is with the actual story. It is a climax rather than an ending, nor from a purely literary point of view a horrible event in the plot, as he was given a poetic end for a GlorySeeker: Being utterly ignored after he completely failed to steer the plot back onto his version of events.
** And the final nail in this coffin is when Roy and Belkar come back on deck -- Roy asks what happened, and Elan is utterly dismissive of Tarquin, referring to it as, "Nothing Haley and V couldn't handle." In an incredibly subtle way, Elan is going out of his way to deny his father any narrative role at this point besides "minor speedbump".

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** On a similar note, his final SkywardScream ("THIS IS A HORRIBLE TERRIBLE ENDING") cements just how out of touch he is with the actual story. It is a climax rather than an ending, nor from a purely literary point of view a horrible event in the plot, as he was given a poetic end for a GlorySeeker: Being utterly ignored after he completely failed to steer the plot back onto his version of events.
** And the final nail in this coffin is when Roy and Belkar come back on deck -- Roy asks what happened, and Elan is utterly dismissive of Tarquin, referring to it as, "Nothing Haley and V couldn't handle." In an incredibly subtle way, Elan is going out of his way to deny his father any narrative role at this point besides "minor speedbump".speed bump".
This list shows the last 10 events of 300. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.TheOrderOfTheStick